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astronomers

astronomers Sentence Examples

  • The astronomers forever comment on and observe them.

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  • The Arab astronomers measured a degree on the plains of Mesopotamia, thereby deducing a fair approximation to the size of the earth.

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  • Macpherson, Astronomers of To-Day (1905).

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  • Macpherson, Astronomers of To-Day (1905).

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  • The chief conclusions of astronomers concerning the .spherical figure and dimensions of the earth, its relation to the heavenly bodies, and the great circles of the globe - the equator, the ecliptic and the tropics - were considered as well established.

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  • Had the internal contacts alone been used, which many astronomers would have considered the proper course, the result would have been 8.776" In 1877 Sir David Gill organized an expedition to the island of Ascension to observe the parallax of Mars with the heliometer.

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  • Under the rule of the Abbasids, Bagdad became the centre of scientific thought; physicians and astronomers from India and Syria flocked to their court; Greek and Indian manuscripts were translated (a work commenced by the Caliph Mamun (813-833) and ably continued by his successors); and in about a century the Arabs were placed in possession of the vast stores of Greek and Indian learning.

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  • Thus he carried on the narrative of orderly development from the point at which it was left by Kant and Laplace - explaining by reference to the ascertained laws of physics and chemistry the configuration of the earth, its mountains and seas, its igneous and its stratified rocks, just as the astronomers had explained by those same laws the evolution of the sun and planets from diffused gaseous matter of high temperature.

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  • C. Janssen, a spectroscopic method for observing the solar prominences in daylight, and the names of both astronomers appear on a medal which was struck by the French government in 1872 to commemorate the discovery.

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  • Observatories were attached to the temples, and reports were regularly sent by the astronomers to the king.

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  • The ancient Egyptian year consisted of 365 days; but after the introduction of the Julian calendar, the astronomers of Alexandria adopted an intercalary year, and added six additional days instead of five to the end of the last month of every fourth year.

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  • It is necessary to remember that by astronomers and by some historians the era is assigned to the preceding day, July 15.

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  • Astronomers denote the year which preceded the first of our era by o, and the year previous to that by 1 B.C.; but chronologers, in conformity with common notions, call the year preceding the era 1 B.C., the previous year 2 B.C., and so on.

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  • Near by is the hill of Tarqui which the French astronomers chose for their meridian in 1742.

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  • In some isolated cases this has been done; but the general consensus of astronomers has been against it, the day as used in astronomy being only a measure of time, and having no relation to the period of daily repose.

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  • Think about notable astronomers of centuries past, who collected their own data through years of careful observation.

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  • Astronomer comes from the Latin word astra, which means stars; and astronomers are men who study the stars, and tell us about them.

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  • This knowledge, joined to what he had gathered by historical reading of equally unusual extent, he carefully digested and gave to the world in his Biographisch-literarisches Handworterbuch zur Geschichte der exacten Wissenschaften, containing notices of the lives and labours of mathematicians, astronomers, physicists, and chemists, of all peoples and all ages.

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  • Further, we know that in the 8th century B.C., there were observatories in most of the large cities in the valley of the Euphrates, and that professional astronomers regularly took observations of the heavens, copies of which were sent to the king of Assyria; and from a cuneiform inscription found in the palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh, the text of which is given by George Smith,5 we learn that at that time the epochs of eclipses of both sun and moon were predicted as possible - probably by means of the cycle of 223 lunations or Chaldaean Saros - and that observations were made accordingly.

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  • The most renowned poets were at the same time men of culture and science, critics, archaeologists, astronomers or physicians.

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  • He notes with exultation the 9th of July 1595, as the date of the pseudodiscovery, the publication of which in Prodromus Dissertationum Cosmographicarum seu Mysterium Cosmographicum (Tubingen, 1596) procured him much fame, and a friendly correspondence with the two most eminent astronomers of the time, Tycho Brahe and Galileo.

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  • more surprising as the Chinese astronomers are credited with having made use of the gnomon as early as 1000 B.C. for determining latitudes.

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  • trepidare, to tremble), a term meaning, in general, fear or trembling, but used technically in astronomy for an imagined slow oscillation of the ecliptic, having a period of 7000 years, introduced by the Arabian astronomers to explain a supposed variation in the precession of the equinoxes.

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  • Huggins's personal retrospect in the Nineteenth Century for June 1897; "Scientific Worthies," with photogravure portrait (Nature); Astronomers of To-Day, by Hector Macpherson, junr.

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  • On assuming the directorship of the Nautical Almanac he became very strongly impressed with the diversity existing in the values of the elements and constants of astronomy adopted by different astronomers, and the injurious effect which it exercised on the precision and symmetry of much astronomical work.

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  • A first meridian, separating a leeward from a windward region, passed through Ras Kumhari (Comorin) and was thus nearly identical with the first meridian of the Indian astronomers which passed through the sacred city of Ujjain (Ozere of Ptolemy) or the meridian of Azin of the Arabs.

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  • For nowhere could he have had a better means of consulting the works of historians, geographers and astronomers, such as Eratosthenes, Posidonius, Hipparchus and Apollodorus.

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  • In July 1628 Kepler accordingly arrived with his family at Sagan in Silesia, where he applied himself to the printing of his ephemerides up to the year 1636, and whence he issued, in 1629, a Notice to the Curious in Things Celestial, warning astronomers of approaching transits.

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  • Other astronomers use the two distance-measuring webs, placed at a convenient distance apart, for position wires.

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  • As the transit of Venus of 1874 approached, prepara tions were set on foot by the German Government in good time; a commission of the most celebrated astronomers was appointed, and it was resolved that the heliometer should be the instrument chiefly relied on.

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  • Other astronomers use the two distance-measuring webs, placed at a convenient distance apart, for position wires.

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  • There are a great many instruments besides those which the astronomers use.

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  • In Daniel, the term "Chaldaeans" is very commonly employed with the meaning "astrologers, astronomers," which sense also appears in the classical authors, notably in Herodotus, Strabo and Diodorus.

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  • No purely astronomical enterprise was ever carried out on so Transits of P large a scale or at so great an expenditure of money and labour as was devoted to the observations of these transits, and for several years before their occurrence the astronomers of every leading nation were busy in discussing methods of observation and working out the multifarious details necessary to their successful application.

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  • by two naturalists, Sir Joseph Banks and Dr Solander, a pupil of Linnaeus, as well as by two astronomers.

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  • The article Transit Circle describes one form of mounting in which the telescope is simply a refined substitute for the sights or pinules of the old astronomers.

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  • The variability of Algol ((3 Persei) was discovered in 1783 by John Goodricke (1764-1786), but, judging from its name, which signifies ' ` the demon," it seems possible that its peculiarity may have been known to the ancient astronomers.

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  • The line derives its name from Charles Mason (1730-1787) and Jeremiah Dixon, two English astronomers, whose survey of to a point about 244 m.

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  • Airy then at length published an account of the circumstances, and Adams's memoir was printed as an appendix to the Nautical Almanac. A keen controversy arose in France and England as to the merits of the two astronomers.

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  • As the indisputable facts became known, the world recognized that the two astronomers had independently solved the problem of Uranus, and ascribed to each equal glory.

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  • At first, Leverrier, Plana and other foreign astronomers controverted Adams's result; but its soundness was ultimately established, and its fundamental importance to this branch of celestial theory has only developed further with time.

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  • The Chung further relates the tragic fate of the official astronomers, Hsi and Ho, put to death for neglecting to perform the rites customary during an eclipse of the sun, identified by Professor S.

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  • This is a very close approximation to the truth, if the length of the unit employed has been correctly assigned.2 Among the astronomers of antiquity, two great men stand out with unchallenged pre-eminence.

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  • Ibn Junis (c. 950-1008), although the scene of his activity was in Egypt, falls into line with the astronomers of Bagdad.

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  • 19th century, both the use and the improvement of reflectors were left mainly in British hands; but the gift of the " Crossley " instrument in 1895, to the Lick observatory, and its splendid subsequent performances in nebular photography, brought similar tools of research into extensive use among American astronomers; and they are now, for many of the various purposes of astrophysics, strongly preferred to refractors.

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  • Only spurious star-parallaxes had claimed the attention of astronomers until F.

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  • A system was introduced by Riccioli in his Almagestum novum of designating the more conspicuous smaller features by the names of eminent astronomers and philosophers, while the great dark regions were designated as oceans, with quite fanciful names: Mare imbrium, Oceanus Procellarum, &c. More than a century elapsed from the time of Hevelius and Riccioli when J.

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  • Brown, whose work may be regarded not only as the last word on the subject, but as embodying a seemingly complete and satisfactory solution of a problem which has absorbed an important part of the energies of mathematical astronomers since the time of Hipparchus.

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  • Lalande said of him that, during a comparatively short life, he had made more observations and calculations than all the astronomers of his time put together.

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  • The sexagesimal system of division was originally used by the ancient Babylonian astronomers, was adopted by Ptolemy; and the sixtieth part of a degree, and its further subdivision into sixty parts, was called in Latin pars minutae prim'ae, and pars minutae secundae respectively, hence the English "minute" and "second."

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  • The theory of the ecliptic as representing the course of the sun through the year, divided among twelve constellations with a measurement of 30 to each division, is also of Babylonian origin, as has now been definitely proved; but it does not appear to have been perfected until after the fall of the Babylonian empire in 539 B.C. Similarly, the other accomplishments of Babylonian astronomers, such as their system or rather systems of moon calculations and the drawing up of planetary tablets, belong to this late period, so that the golden age of Babylonian astronomy belongs not to the remote past, as was until recently supposed, but to the Seleucid period, i.e.

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  • From certain expressions used in astrological texts that are earlier than the 7th century B.C. it would appear, indeed, that the beginnings at least of the calculation of sun and moon eclipses belong to the earlier period, but here, too, the chief work accomplished was after 400 B.e., and the defectiveness of early Babylonian astronomy may be gathered from the fact that as late as the 6th century B.C. an error of almost an entire month was made by the Babylonian astronomers in the attempt to determine through calculation the beginning of a certain year.

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  • The system was taken up almost bodily by the Arab astronomers, it was embodied in the Kabbalistic lore of Jews and Christians, and through these and other channels came to be the substance of the astrology of the middle ages, forming, as already pointed out, under the designation of "judicial astrology," a pseudo-science which was placed on a perfect footing of equality with "natural astrology" or the more genuine science of the study of the motions and phenomena of the heavenly bodies.

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  • Astronomers were only then beginning to study variable and periodic stars, and disturbances in that part of the heavens, which had till then, on the authority of Aristotle, been regarded as incorruptible, combined with the troubles of the times, must have given a new stimulus to belief in the signs in heaven.

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  • Like the history of the founder of the Achaemenian empire, that of Ardashir has from the beginning been overgrown with legends; like Cyrus he is the son of a shepherd, his future greatness is predicted by dreams and visions, and by the calculations of astronomers he becomes a servant at the court of King Artabanus and then flies to Persia and begins the rebellion; he fights with the great dragon, the enemy of god, &c. A Pahlavi text, which contains this legend, has been translated by Noldeke (Geschichte des Artachshir i Papakan, 1879).

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  • Besides Chandler, Albrecht of Berlin has investigated the motion of the pole P. The methods of the two astronomers are in some points different.

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  • Albategnius takes the highest rank among Arab astronomers.

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  • For the next few weeks to years astronomers continue to monitor the fading afterglow.

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  • amateur astronomers are aware how easily the LPS light can be filtered.

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  • Juno was the third asteroid to be discovered by astronomers early in the 19th century.

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  • The crab nebula is the remnant of a supernova that was observed by Chinese astronomers in 1054.

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  • Here you will find plenty of information for budding astronomers: A guide to the current month's.. .

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  • Where these images fall in the cluster allows astronomers to calculate the mass of the cluster in a different way.

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  • These unusual emissions enabled astronomers to pinpoint these two faint stars among the myriad of other faint stars in the cluster.

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  • A free public lecture by one of the worlds leading astronomers proved to be a huge success last night.

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  • To help astronomers locate the stars, the sky is divided up into 88 areas.

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  • Few UK amateur astronomers are aware how easily the LPS light can be filtered.

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  • We are interested in the views of all UK observational astronomers, whether they have used Gemini or not.

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  • For historical reasons, radio astronomers call the point spread function the beam.

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  • For this reason they are a technology of great interest to X-ray astronomers.

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  • People booked for a flight are given a pre-flight lecture by the two guest astronomers with Nigel being the regular contributor.

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  • By the 19th century astronomers had developed the technology to objectively measure a star's brightness.

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  • They use interactivity to enable the participation of novices in the scientific process just as expert astronomers do on a daily basis.

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  • The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

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  • infidel astronomers.

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  • dwarf irregulars play a key role in astronomers ' attempts to unravel the history of galaxies in the early universe.

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  • It may be necessary to add shielding to the light so that you avoid unnecessary light pollution which annoys astronomers and your neighbors alike!

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  • Mayan astronomers the key west at night waves.

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  • A people without century Mayan astronomers the key west at night waves.

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  • Up until then astronomers have been able only to observe and study astronomical objects from a distance without in any way disturbing them.

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  • observable by astronomers in the long-term even by the naked eye.

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  • Lower capital cost when building the observatory - no need for living accommodation, etc for astronomers.

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  • Seeing the two stars allowed astronomers to calculate the foreground star's distance from Earth, using a method called parallax.

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  • precision timekeeping was vital for astronomers mapping the stars.

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  • pulsars now known have been discovered by Jodrell Bank astronomers.

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  • Further evidence comes from astronomical observation - astronomers look into the past when they look into space and have been measuring and observing quasars.

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  • Some astronomers supported this point of view, and have sought evidence for physical associations between high-redshift quasars and low-redshift normal galaxies.

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  • radio astronomy Radio astronomers study radio waves coming from stars and galaxies.

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  • remnant of a supernova that was observed by Chinese astronomers in 1054.

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  • This is why astronomers are developping multi-field spectroscopy where integral field units replace the lenses or slits in a multi-object spectrograph.

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  • Present techniques share more in common with astronomers randomly trailing the sky for new supernovae.

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  • For example, in 2001, UK astronomers, using the Anglo-Australian telescope, discovered three planets orbiting another star.

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  • He shows how Greek astronomers developed the first true trigonometry.

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  • Astronomers detect light at sub-millimetre wavelengths in order to penetrate clouds of cosmic dust.

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  • This determines the reading of the position-circle corresponding to position-angle 90° or 270 °.2 When it is remembered that the measurements of the Struves, Dembowski, Secchi, the Bonds, Maclear and of most modern European astronomers have been made with Fraunhofer or Merz micrometers it is not too much to say that fig.

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  • The Arab astronomers measured a degree on the plains of Mesopotamia, thereby deducing a fair approximation to the size of the earth.

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  • by two naturalists, Sir Joseph Banks and Dr Solander, a pupil of Linnaeus, as well as by two astronomers.

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  • As the result, no less than 8000 lunar observations were rescued from oblivion, and were, 1846, placed at the disposal of astronomers in such a form that they could be used directly for comparison with the theory and for the improvement of the tables of the moon's motion.

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  • C. Janssen, a spectroscopic method for observing the solar prominences in daylight, and the names of both astronomers appear on a medal which was struck by the French government in 1872 to commemorate the discovery.

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  • This knowledge, joined to what he had gathered by historical reading of equally unusual extent, he carefully digested and gave to the world in his Biographisch-literarisches Handworterbuch zur Geschichte der exacten Wissenschaften, containing notices of the lives and labours of mathematicians, astronomers, physicists, and chemists, of all peoples and all ages.

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  • Most famous among these Arabian astronomers were Al Batani (d.

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  • A first meridian, separating a leeward from a windward region, passed through Ras Kumhari (Comorin) and was thus nearly identical with the first meridian of the Indian astronomers which passed through the sacred city of Ujjain (Ozere of Ptolemy) or the meridian of Azin of the Arabs.

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  • more surprising as the Chinese astronomers are credited with having made use of the gnomon as early as 1000 B.C. for determining latitudes.

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  • trepidare, to tremble), a term meaning, in general, fear or trembling, but used technically in astronomy for an imagined slow oscillation of the ecliptic, having a period of 7000 years, introduced by the Arabian astronomers to explain a supposed variation in the precession of the equinoxes.

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  • No purely astronomical enterprise was ever carried out on so Transits of P large a scale or at so great an expenditure of money and labour as was devoted to the observations of these transits, and for several years before their occurrence the astronomers of every leading nation were busy in discussing methods of observation and working out the multifarious details necessary to their successful application.

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  • Had the internal contacts alone been used, which many astronomers would have considered the proper course, the result would have been 8.776" In 1877 Sir David Gill organized an expedition to the island of Ascension to observe the parallax of Mars with the heliometer.

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  • Under the rule of the Abbasids, Bagdad became the centre of scientific thought; physicians and astronomers from India and Syria flocked to their court; Greek and Indian manuscripts were translated (a work commenced by the Caliph Mamun (813-833) and ably continued by his successors); and in about a century the Arabs were placed in possession of the vast stores of Greek and Indian learning.

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  • Thus he carried on the narrative of orderly development from the point at which it was left by Kant and Laplace - explaining by reference to the ascertained laws of physics and chemistry the configuration of the earth, its mountains and seas, its igneous and its stratified rocks, just as the astronomers had explained by those same laws the evolution of the sun and planets from diffused gaseous matter of high temperature.

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  • Observatories were attached to the temples, and reports were regularly sent by the astronomers to the king.

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  • Astronomers denote the year which preceded the first of our era by o, and the year previous to that by 1 B.C.; but chronologers, in conformity with common notions, call the year preceding the era 1 B.C., the previous year 2 B.C., and so on.

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  • The ancient Egyptian year consisted of 365 days; but after the introduction of the Julian calendar, the astronomers of Alexandria adopted an intercalary year, and added six additional days instead of five to the end of the last month of every fourth year.

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  • It is necessary to remember that by astronomers and by some historians the era is assigned to the preceding day, July 15.

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  • As the transit of Venus of 1874 approached, prepara tions were set on foot by the German Government in good time; a commission of the most celebrated astronomers was appointed, and it was resolved that the heliometer should be the instrument chiefly relied on.

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  • The most renowned poets were at the same time men of culture and science, critics, archaeologists, astronomers or physicians.

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  • Gradually, from Eratosthenes to Tycho, Hipparchus playing the most important part among ancient astronomers, the complex astrolabe was evolved, large specimens being among the chief observa tory instruments of the 15th, 16th and even 17th centuries; while small ones were in use among travellers and learned men, not only for astronomical, but for astrological and topographical purposes.

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  • 3, was adapted from that of astronomers by Martin Behaim, c. 1480.

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  • This circumstance appeared so anomalous that some astronomers doubted whether the surviving lines were really due to calcium; but Sir William and Lady Huggins (née Margaret Lindsay Murray, who, after their marriage in 1875, actively assisted her husband) successfully demonstrated in the laboratory that calcium vapour, if at a sufficiently low pressure, gives under the influence of the electric discharge precisely these lines and no others.

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  • Huggins's personal retrospect in the Nineteenth Century for June 1897; "Scientific Worthies," with photogravure portrait (Nature); Astronomers of To-Day, by Hector Macpherson, junr.

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  • An inscription found by Wrede at 'Obne is dated " in the year 120 of the Lion in Heaven, which we must leave the astronomers to explain.

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  • The idea of tracing the sun's path among the stars was, when it occurred to Chaldaean astronomers, an original and, relatively to their means, a recondite one.

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  • The whole system of junction stars was doubtless an imitation of the sieu; the choice of them by the Hindu astronomers of the 6th century A.D.

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  • In this belief he differed from his pupil, Roger Cotes, and from most of the great mathematical astronomers of the 18th century, who worked out in detail the task sketched by the genius of Newton.

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  • This work contains an elaborate account of the phenomena presented by the planet; but although favourably received by astronomers, it had no great sale.

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  • The best recognized function of German astronomers in that day was the construction of prophesying almanacs, greedily bought by a credulous public. Kepler thus found that the first duties required of him were of an astrological nature, and set himself with characteristic alacrity to master the rules of the art as laid down by Ptolemy and Cardan.

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  • He notes with exultation the 9th of July 1595, as the date of the pseudodiscovery, the publication of which in Prodromus Dissertationum Cosmographicarum seu Mysterium Cosmographicum (Tubingen, 1596) procured him much fame, and a friendly correspondence with the two most eminent astronomers of the time, Tycho Brahe and Galileo.

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  • In July 1628 Kepler accordingly arrived with his family at Sagan in Silesia, where he applied himself to the printing of his ephemerides up to the year 1636, and whence he issued, in 1629, a Notice to the Curious in Things Celestial, warning astronomers of approaching transits.

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  • The year of his birth is uncertain, but Kessler accepts as reliable the statement made by Biruni, that Mani was born in the year 527 of the astronomers of Babylon (A.D.

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  • For nowhere could he have had a better means of consulting the works of historians, geographers and astronomers, such as Eratosthenes, Posidonius, Hipparchus and Apollodorus.

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  • The chief conclusions of astronomers concerning the .spherical figure and dimensions of the earth, its relation to the heavenly bodies, and the great circles of the globe - the equator, the ecliptic and the tropics - were considered as well established.

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  • At the same time, he must have learnt much from other contemporaries at Athens, especially from astronomers such as Eudoxus and Callippus, and from orators such as Isocrates and Demosthenes.

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  • Astronomers, after the example of Ptolemy, regard the day as commencing with the sun's culmination, or noon, and find it most convenient for the purposes of computation to reckon through the whole twentyfour hours.

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  • But Astronomers, In Order To Preserve The Uniformity Of Computation, Make The Series Of Years Proceed Without Interruption, And Reckon The Year Preceding The First Of The Era O.

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  • In 1680 Jean Picard, in his Voyage d'Uranibourg, stated, as a result of ten years' observations, that Polaris, or the Pole Star, exhibited variations in its position amounting to 40" annually; some astronomers endeavoured to explain this by parallax, but these attempts were futile, for the motion was at variance with that which parallax would occasion.

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  • When James Bradley and Samuel Molyneux entered this sphere of astronomical research in 1725, there consequently prevailed much uncertainty as to whether stellar parallaxes had been observed or not; and it was with the intention of definitely answering this question that these astronomers erected a large telescope at the house of the latter at Kew.

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  • Their presence indicates the characteristic difference between the spark and the arc. The name is due to Sir Norman Lockyer, who has studied these lines and drawn the attention of astronomers to their importance in interpreting stellar spectra.

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  • They almost avenged man on the astronomers, who had shown that the world is not made for earth, and therefore not for man.

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  • Further, we know that in the 8th century B.C., there were observatories in most of the large cities in the valley of the Euphrates, and that professional astronomers regularly took observations of the heavens, copies of which were sent to the king of Assyria; and from a cuneiform inscription found in the palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh, the text of which is given by George Smith,5 we learn that at that time the epochs of eclipses of both sun and moon were predicted as possible - probably by means of the cycle of 223 lunations or Chaldaean Saros - and that observations were made accordingly.

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  • So little was the scientific conception of the solar system familiar to Epicurus that he could reproach the astronomers, because their account of an eclipse represented things otherwise than as they appear to the senses, and could declare that the sun and stars were just as large as they seemed to us.

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  • It is so called in memory of Idris Gawr, celebrated in the Triads as one of the three "Gwyn Serenyddion," or "Happy Astronomers," of Wales, who is traditionally supposed to have made his observations on this peak.

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  • nominally the beginning Df the rise of the Nile, was the beginning of the year, and as the ~ile commences to rise very regularly at about the date of the annual heliacal rising of the conspicuous dog-star Sothis (Sirius~ (which itself follows extremely closely the slow retrogression af the Julian year), the primitive astronomers found in the heliacal rising of Sothis as observed at Memphis (on July 9 Julian) a very correct and useful, starting-point for the seasonal year.

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  • Besides these there is a fever hospital, erected by Lord John George Beresford; a college, which Primate Robinson was anxious to raise to the rank of a university; a public library founded by him, an observatory, which has become famous from the efficiency of its astronomers; a number of churches and schools, and barracks.

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  • Ganymede was afterwards regarded as the genius of the fountains of the Nile, the life-giving and fertilizing river, and identified by astronomers with the Aquarius of the zodiac. Thus the divinity that distributed drink to the gods in heaven became the genius who presided over the due supply of water on earth.

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  • In some isolated cases this has been done; but the general consensus of astronomers has been against it, the day as used in astronomy being only a measure of time, and having no relation to the period of daily repose.

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  • probably no other astronomers have worked for so many hours on end for so many nights as they did, and they emphasize the easy position of the observer in using this form of instrument.

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  • The article Transit Circle describes one form of mounting in which the telescope is simply a refined substitute for the sights or pinules of the old astronomers.

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  • The variability of Algol ((3 Persei) was discovered in 1783 by John Goodricke (1764-1786), but, judging from its name, which signifies ' ` the demon," it seems possible that its peculiarity may have been known to the ancient astronomers.

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  • From comparisons between the observed places of Arcturus, Aldebaran and Sirius and the places assigned to them by Alexandrian astronomers, he was led to the opinion that all three are moving towards the south (Phil.

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    0
  • One of the problems, which has engaged a large share of the attention of astronomers in the last century, has been the determination of the direction of this " solar motion."

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  • But, whilst recognizing the existence of local drifts and systems, and admitting the possibility of relative motion between the nearer and more distant, or other classes of stars, it is;only recently that astronomers have seriously doubted the correctness of the hypothesis of random distribution of stellar motions as at least a rough representation of the truth.

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  • On assuming the directorship of the Nautical Almanac he became very strongly impressed with the diversity existing in the values of the elements and constants of astronomy adopted by different astronomers, and the injurious effect which it exercised on the precision and symmetry of much astronomical work.

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  • 800 and 1004, extracted from Caussin's translation of Ibn Junis, the eclipses and occultations of Bullialdus, Gassendi, and Hevelius, of the French astronomers at Paris and St Petersburg, and of Flamsteed at Greenwich, and deduced a secular acceleration of 8.8", agreeing well with the theoretical value.

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  • The advances in stellar photography made by Paul and Prosper Henry and others suggested to him the magnificent idea of obtaining, through the collaboration of astronomers in all parts of the world, an autographic picture of the entire sphere containing more than fifty million stars, which should faithfully record in future ages the state of the sky at the end of the i 9th century.

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  • AnwarI (died between ii89 and 1191; 585 and 587 A.H.), who in early life had pursued scientific studies in the madrasa of Ttt~, and who ranked among the foremost astronomers of his time, owes his renown as much to the inexhaustible store of poetical similes and epitheta ornantia which he showered upon Sinjar and other royal and princely personages, as to his cutting sarcasms, which he was careful to direct, not against individuals but against whole classes of society and the cruel wrong worked by an inexorable fatethus disregarding the example 01 Firdousi, whose attack upon Sultan Mahmd for having cheated him out of the reward for his epopee is the oldest and most finished specimen of personal satire.

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  • About the same time he was named by the emperor one of the astronomers of the Royal Observatory, which was accordingly his residence till his death, and it was in this capacity that he delivered his remarkably successful series of popular lectures on astronomy, which were continued from 1812 to 1845.

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  • From the astronomers the Stoics borrowed their picture of the universe - a plenum in the form of a series of layers or concentric rings, first the elements, then the planetary and stellar spheres, massed round the earth as centre - a picture which dominated the imagination of men from the days of Eudoxus down to those of Dante or even Copernicus.

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  • That the sun on midsummer day rises nearly, but not quite, in line with the "avenue" and over the Friar's Heel, has long been advanced as the chief argument in support of the theory that Stonehenge was a temple for sun-worship. On the supposition that this stone was raised to mark exactly the line of sunrise on midsummer's day when the structure was erected, it would naturally follow, owing to well-known astronomical causes, that in the course of time the direction of this line would slowly undergo a change, and that, at any subsequent date since, the amount of deviation would be commensurate with the lapse of time, thus supplying chronological data to astronomers for determining the age of the building.

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  • In Daniel, the term "Chaldaeans" is very commonly employed with the meaning "astrologers, astronomers," which sense also appears in the classical authors, notably in Herodotus, Strabo and Diodorus.

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  • Near by is the hill of Tarqui which the French astronomers chose for their meridian in 1742.

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  • The line derives its name from Charles Mason (1730-1787) and Jeremiah Dixon, two English astronomers, whose survey of to a point about 244 m.

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  • Airy then at length published an account of the circumstances, and Adams's memoir was printed as an appendix to the Nautical Almanac. A keen controversy arose in France and England as to the merits of the two astronomers.

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  • As the indisputable facts became known, the world recognized that the two astronomers had independently solved the problem of Uranus, and ascribed to each equal glory.

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  • At first, Leverrier, Plana and other foreign astronomers controverted Adams's result; but its soundness was ultimately established, and its fundamental importance to this branch of celestial theory has only developed further with time.

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  • The beautiful mosques and madrasas (theological colleges) are dilapidated; no astronomers study the sky from the tops of their minarets; and the scholars of the madrasas waste their time on the most deplorably puerile scholasticism.

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  • The Chung further relates the tragic fate of the official astronomers, Hsi and Ho, put to death for neglecting to perform the rites customary during an eclipse of the sun, identified by Professor S.

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  • This is a very close approximation to the truth, if the length of the unit employed has been correctly assigned.2 Among the astronomers of antiquity, two great men stand out with unchallenged pre-eminence.

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  • Ibn Junis (c. 950-1008), although the scene of his activity was in Egypt, falls into line with the astronomers of Bagdad.

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  • 19th century, both the use and the improvement of reflectors were left mainly in British hands; but the gift of the " Crossley " instrument in 1895, to the Lick observatory, and its splendid subsequent performances in nebular photography, brought similar tools of research into extensive use among American astronomers; and they are now, for many of the various purposes of astrophysics, strongly preferred to refractors.

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  • Only spurious star-parallaxes had claimed the attention of astronomers until F.

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  • A system was introduced by Riccioli in his Almagestum novum of designating the more conspicuous smaller features by the names of eminent astronomers and philosophers, while the great dark regions were designated as oceans, with quite fanciful names: Mare imbrium, Oceanus Procellarum, &c. More than a century elapsed from the time of Hevelius and Riccioli when J.

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  • Brown, whose work may be regarded not only as the last word on the subject, but as embodying a seemingly complete and satisfactory solution of a problem which has absorbed an important part of the energies of mathematical astronomers since the time of Hipparchus.

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  • Lalande said of him that, during a comparatively short life, he had made more observations and calculations than all the astronomers of his time put together.

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  • The sexagesimal system of division was originally used by the ancient Babylonian astronomers, was adopted by Ptolemy; and the sixtieth part of a degree, and its further subdivision into sixty parts, was called in Latin pars minutae prim'ae, and pars minutae secundae respectively, hence the English "minute" and "second."

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  • The theory of the ecliptic as representing the course of the sun through the year, divided among twelve constellations with a measurement of 30 to each division, is also of Babylonian origin, as has now been definitely proved; but it does not appear to have been perfected until after the fall of the Babylonian empire in 539 B.C. Similarly, the other accomplishments of Babylonian astronomers, such as their system or rather systems of moon calculations and the drawing up of planetary tablets, belong to this late period, so that the golden age of Babylonian astronomy belongs not to the remote past, as was until recently supposed, but to the Seleucid period, i.e.

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  • From certain expressions used in astrological texts that are earlier than the 7th century B.C. it would appear, indeed, that the beginnings at least of the calculation of sun and moon eclipses belong to the earlier period, but here, too, the chief work accomplished was after 400 B.e., and the defectiveness of early Babylonian astronomy may be gathered from the fact that as late as the 6th century B.C. an error of almost an entire month was made by the Babylonian astronomers in the attempt to determine through calculation the beginning of a certain year.

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  • The system was taken up almost bodily by the Arab astronomers, it was embodied in the Kabbalistic lore of Jews and Christians, and through these and other channels came to be the substance of the astrology of the middle ages, forming, as already pointed out, under the designation of "judicial astrology," a pseudo-science which was placed on a perfect footing of equality with "natural astrology" or the more genuine science of the study of the motions and phenomena of the heavenly bodies.

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  • Astronomers were only then beginning to study variable and periodic stars, and disturbances in that part of the heavens, which had till then, on the authority of Aristotle, been regarded as incorruptible, combined with the troubles of the times, must have given a new stimulus to belief in the signs in heaven.

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  • Like the history of the founder of the Achaemenian empire, that of Ardashir has from the beginning been overgrown with legends; like Cyrus he is the son of a shepherd, his future greatness is predicted by dreams and visions, and by the calculations of astronomers he becomes a servant at the court of King Artabanus and then flies to Persia and begins the rebellion; he fights with the great dragon, the enemy of god, &c. A Pahlavi text, which contains this legend, has been translated by Noldeke (Geschichte des Artachshir i Papakan, 1879).

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  • Besides Chandler, Albrecht of Berlin has investigated the motion of the pole P. The methods of the two astronomers are in some points different.

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  • Albategnius takes the highest rank among Arab astronomers.

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  • I have been reading in my book about astronomers.

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  • Over three quarters of the more than 1000 pulsars now known have been discovered by Jodrell Bank astronomers.

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  • Further evidence comes from astronomical observation - astronomers look into the past when they look into space and have been measuring and observing quasars.

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  • Some astronomers supported this point of view, and have sought evidence for physical associations between high-redshift quasars and low-redshift normal galaxies.

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  • Read Full Article Listening to the universe - radio astronomy Radio astronomers study radio waves coming from stars and galaxies.

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  • This is why astronomers are developping multi-field spectroscopy where integral field units replace the lenses or slits in a multi-object spectrograph.

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  • Present techniques share more in common with astronomers randomly trailing the sky for new supernovae.

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  • For example, in 2001, UK astronomers, using the Anglo-Australian telescope, discovered three planets orbiting another star.

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  • He shows how Greek astronomers developed the first true trigonometry.

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  • Astronomers detect light at sub-millimetre wavelengths in order to penetrate clouds of cosmic dust.

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  • Chinese astronomers learned that by observing and charting the stars and planets they could predict changes on earth, such as the seasons and tides.

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  • Astronomers advised farmers when the best times were for planting and harvesting their crops.

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  • The Chinese astronomers first created Ten Heavenly Stems (the celestial ch'i and providence) and Twelve Earthly Branches to give some kind of chronological order to the world and allow them to predict earth changes.

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  • The Mayans were mathematicians, great scholars, accomplished astronomers and astrologers.

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  • As for the question of where did the Chinese zodiac originate, you can trace these roots back to the ancient Chinese astronomers.

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  • Chinese astronomers learned how to chart and even predict seasonal changes in the heavens.

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  • The astronomers mastered the art of predicting climate and seasonal changes and were able to advise and prepare the farmers.

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  • The astronomers created a heavenly system that was supported by the Ten Heavenly Stems, which were known as the celestial chi and providence.

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  • These stems and branches were a road map for the astronomers who had learned through thousands of years of observation how all of these individual actions and reactions worked together.

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  • Many theorists believe that astronomers created the zodiac animals to help people who were unable to read and write understand the workings of the universe.

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  • The zodiac was first conceived by Babylonian astronomers when they split the sky up in to twelve parts.

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  • Astronomers are often moved to such depths as to get a comet tattoo to commemorate their love for a specific comet.

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  • 3, was adapted from that of astronomers by Martin Behaim, c. 1480.

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  • This circumstance appeared so anomalous that some astronomers doubted whether the surviving lines were really due to calcium; but Sir William and Lady Huggins (née Margaret Lindsay Murray, who, after their marriage in 1875, actively assisted her husband) successfully demonstrated in the laboratory that calcium vapour, if at a sufficiently low pressure, gives under the influence of the electric discharge precisely these lines and no others.

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  • An inscription found by Wrede at 'Obne is dated " in the year 120 of the Lion in Heaven, which we must leave the astronomers to explain.

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  • The idea of tracing the sun's path among the stars was, when it occurred to Chaldaean astronomers, an original and, relatively to their means, a recondite one.

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  • In this belief he differed from his pupil, Roger Cotes, and from most of the great mathematical astronomers of the 18th century, who worked out in detail the task sketched by the genius of Newton.

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  • This work contains an elaborate account of the phenomena presented by the planet; but although favourably received by astronomers, it had no great sale.

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  • At the same time, he must have learnt much from other contemporaries at Athens, especially from astronomers such as Eudoxus and Callippus, and from orators such as Isocrates and Demosthenes.

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  • Astronomers, after the example of Ptolemy, regard the day as commencing with the sun's culmination, or noon, and find it most convenient for the purposes of computation to reckon through the whole twentyfour hours.

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  • The Discovery Of The Period Of Thirty Three Years Is Ascribed To Omar Khayyam, One Of The Eight Astronomers Appointed Byjelal Ud Din Malik Shah, Sultan Of Khorasan, To Reform Or Construct A Calendar, About The Year 1079 Of Our Era.

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  • But Astronomers, In Order To Preserve The Uniformity Of Computation, Make The Series Of Years Proceed Without Interruption, And Reckon The Year Preceding The First Of The Era O.

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    1
  • In 1680 Jean Picard, in his Voyage d'Uranibourg, stated, as a result of ten years' observations, that Polaris, or the Pole Star, exhibited variations in its position amounting to 40" annually; some astronomers endeavoured to explain this by parallax, but these attempts were futile, for the motion was at variance with that which parallax would occasion.

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  • When James Bradley and Samuel Molyneux entered this sphere of astronomical research in 1725, there consequently prevailed much uncertainty as to whether stellar parallaxes had been observed or not; and it was with the intention of definitely answering this question that these astronomers erected a large telescope at the house of the latter at Kew.

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  • Their presence indicates the characteristic difference between the spark and the arc. The name is due to Sir Norman Lockyer, who has studied these lines and drawn the attention of astronomers to their importance in interpreting stellar spectra.

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  • They almost avenged man on the astronomers, who had shown that the world is not made for earth, and therefore not for man.

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  • So little was the scientific conception of the solar system familiar to Epicurus that he could reproach the astronomers, because their account of an eclipse represented things otherwise than as they appear to the senses, and could declare that the sun and stars were just as large as they seemed to us.

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  • It is so called in memory of Idris Gawr, celebrated in the Triads as one of the three "Gwyn Serenyddion," or "Happy Astronomers," of Wales, who is traditionally supposed to have made his observations on this peak.

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  • nominally the beginning Df the rise of the Nile, was the beginning of the year, and as the ~ile commences to rise very regularly at about the date of the annual heliacal rising of the conspicuous dog-star Sothis (Sirius~ (which itself follows extremely closely the slow retrogression af the Julian year), the primitive astronomers found in the heliacal rising of Sothis as observed at Memphis (on July 9 Julian) a very correct and useful, starting-point for the seasonal year.

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  • Besides these there is a fever hospital, erected by Lord John George Beresford; a college, which Primate Robinson was anxious to raise to the rank of a university; a public library founded by him, an observatory, which has become famous from the efficiency of its astronomers; a number of churches and schools, and barracks.

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  • Ganymede was afterwards regarded as the genius of the fountains of the Nile, the life-giving and fertilizing river, and identified by astronomers with the Aquarius of the zodiac. Thus the divinity that distributed drink to the gods in heaven became the genius who presided over the due supply of water on earth.

    0
    1
  • From comparisons between the observed places of Arcturus, Aldebaran and Sirius and the places assigned to them by Alexandrian astronomers, he was led to the opinion that all three are moving towards the south (Phil.

    0
    1
  • One of the problems, which has engaged a large share of the attention of astronomers in the last century, has been the determination of the direction of this " solar motion."

    0
    1
  • But, whilst recognizing the existence of local drifts and systems, and admitting the possibility of relative motion between the nearer and more distant, or other classes of stars, it is;only recently that astronomers have seriously doubted the correctness of the hypothesis of random distribution of stellar motions as at least a rough representation of the truth.

    0
    1
  • In view of the wide extent and importance of his labours, the variety of subjects of which he treats, ard the unity of purpose which guided him throughout, Simon Newcomb must be considered as one of the most distinguished astronomers of his time.

    0
    1
  • 800 and 1004, extracted from Caussin's translation of Ibn Junis, the eclipses and occultations of Bullialdus, Gassendi, and Hevelius, of the French astronomers at Paris and St Petersburg, and of Flamsteed at Greenwich, and deduced a secular acceleration of 8.8", agreeing well with the theoretical value.

    0
    1
  • The advances in stellar photography made by Paul and Prosper Henry and others suggested to him the magnificent idea of obtaining, through the collaboration of astronomers in all parts of the world, an autographic picture of the entire sphere containing more than fifty million stars, which should faithfully record in future ages the state of the sky at the end of the i 9th century.

    0
    1
  • About the same time he was named by the emperor one of the astronomers of the Royal Observatory, which was accordingly his residence till his death, and it was in this capacity that he delivered his remarkably successful series of popular lectures on astronomy, which were continued from 1812 to 1845.

    0
    1
  • From the astronomers the Stoics borrowed their picture of the universe - a plenum in the form of a series of layers or concentric rings, first the elements, then the planetary and stellar spheres, massed round the earth as centre - a picture which dominated the imagination of men from the days of Eudoxus down to those of Dante or even Copernicus.

    0
    1
  • That the sun on midsummer day rises nearly, but not quite, in line with the "avenue" and over the Friar's Heel, has long been advanced as the chief argument in support of the theory that Stonehenge was a temple for sun-worship. On the supposition that this stone was raised to mark exactly the line of sunrise on midsummer's day when the structure was erected, it would naturally follow, owing to well-known astronomical causes, that in the course of time the direction of this line would slowly undergo a change, and that, at any subsequent date since, the amount of deviation would be commensurate with the lapse of time, thus supplying chronological data to astronomers for determining the age of the building.

    0
    1
  • The Discovery Of The Period Of Thirty Three Years Is Ascribed To Omar Khayyam, One Of The Eight Astronomers Appointed Byjelal Ud Din Malik Shah, Sultan Of Khorasan, To Reform Or Construct A Calendar, About The Year 1079 Of Our Era.

    0
    1
  • In view of the wide extent and importance of his labours, the variety of subjects of which he treats, ard the unity of purpose which guided him throughout, Simon Newcomb must be considered as one of the most distinguished astronomers of his time.

    0
    1
  • Gradually, from Eratosthenes to Tycho, Hipparchus playing the most important part among ancient astronomers, the complex astrolabe was evolved, large specimens being among the chief observa tory instruments of the 15th, 16th and even 17th centuries; while small ones were in use among travellers and learned men, not only for astronomical, but for astrological and topographical purposes.

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    2
  • The whole system of junction stars was doubtless an imitation of the sieu; the choice of them by the Hindu astronomers of the 6th century A.D.

    0
    2
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