How to use Aspirate in a sentence

aspirate
  • Her voice has an aspirate quality; there seems always to be too much breath for the amount of tone.

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  • The mediae have become aspirate tenues with a low intonation, which also marks the words having a simple initial consonant; while the former aspirates and the complex initials simplified in speech are uttered with a high tone, or, as the Tibetans say, " with a woman's voice," shrill and rapidly.

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  • He thinks that the guttural element in E was a spirant, and therefore different from X, which is an aspirate.

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  • On the west of the Aegean a new symbol was invented for the aspirate value, and this spread over the mainland and was carried by emigrants to Rhodes, Sicily and Italy.

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  • The symbol 9 or H was then employed for the long open e-sound, a use suggested by the name of the letter, which, by the loss of the aspirate, had passed from Heta to Eta.

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  • This aspirate, expressed by j, often has no etymological origin; for example, Jimdalo, a nickname applied to Andalusians, is simply the word Andaluz pronounced with the strong aspiration.

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  • Post-operative gastric emptying was assessed by measuring the oral intake and gastric aspirate.

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  • Bone marrow invasion was shown in two of 14 patients on MR images which were confirmed by bone marrow aspirate.

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  • A tiny sample of the marrow is then drawn (aspirated) into a syringe (a bone-marrow aspirate ).

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  • Surgery is required to aspirate abscesses; consult with an ENT surgeon.

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  • When an audible emission of breath attends its production the aspirate bh is formed.

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  • Patients who aspirate or have food and liquids reaching their lungs have been shown to improve when thin liquids are removed from their diet.

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  • Some children aspirate the stomach contents, which can cause pneumonia or even sudden death.

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  • The reason of this is apparently that the negative pressure of the pleural, and partly of the peritoneal, cavity tends to aspirate a liquid relatively thicker, so to speak, than that effused where no such extraneous mechanism is at work (James).

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