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asphyxia

asphyxia

asphyxia Sentence Examples

  • They often avert death from asphyxia, or render the end less distressing.

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  • If the case is about to terminate fatally the spasms rapidly succeed each other and death usually occurs within two hours, either from asphyxia produced by spasm of the respiratory muscles or more rarely from exhaustion.

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  • If death from asphyxia appears imminent artificial respiration may be resorted to.

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  • If death from asphyxia appears imminent artificial respiration may be resorted to.

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  • The effects of the ingestion of large quantities may be so rapid that death may take place in a couple of hours, owing to collapse, consequent on perforation of the walls of the oesophagus or stomach, or from asphyxia due to swelling of the glottis consequent on some of the acid having entered the larynx.

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  • While prenatal care will not necessarily prevent newborn asphyxia, it can help ensure that both the mother and her baby are as healthy as possible at the time of birth.

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  • Asphyxia neonatorum is a neonatal emergency as it may lead to hypoxia (lowering of oxygen supply to the brain and tissues) and possible brain damage or death if not correctly managed.

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  • The pulse and respiration steadily fail, death occurring from asphyxia.

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  • The only post-mortem signs are those of asphyxia.

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  • Asphyxia >>

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  • The MLS BER has the potential to improve the diagnostic value of conventional BER in babies who suffered birth asphyxia.

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  • asphyxia caused by the regurgitation of the contents of the stomach in her lungs.

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  • These factors included exhaustion asphyxia, dehydration, and congestive heart failure.

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  • perinatal asphyxia means lack of oxygen around the time of birth.

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  • Alcohol or drug intoxication, delirium, obesity and respiratory problems (asthma among them) can increase the risk of positional asphyxia.

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  • Consensus is not yet apparent in the diagnosis of fetal asphyxia.

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  • However, he had died from respiratory failure due to accidental smothering and traumatic asphyxia.

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  • In particular, I noted the absence of the words 'positional asphyxia ' .

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  • asphyxia syndrome survive to go home, with appropriate critical care.

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  • This is never more true than in critical illness or birth asphyxia cases.

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  • As a consequence there was little time for adequate auscultation and the intrapartum asphyxia rate was high.

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  • barbiturate overdose, often combined with curare, to cause death, which results from not breathing, by asphyxia.

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  • A post mortem found that he died of asphyxia and recorded extensive bruising to his body and face.

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  • perinatal asphyxia means lack of oxygen around the time of birth.

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  • post mortem found that he died of asphyxia and recorded extensive bruising to his body and face.

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  • insect stings in the mouth or throat may cause swelling leading to asphyxia.

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  • The pulse and respiration steadily fail, death occurring from asphyxia.

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  • The only post-mortem signs are those of asphyxia.

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  • If the case is about to terminate fatally the spasms rapidly succeed each other and death usually occurs within two hours, either from asphyxia produced by spasm of the respiratory muscles or more rarely from exhaustion.

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  • They often avert death from asphyxia, or render the end less distressing.

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  • The effects of the ingestion of large quantities may be so rapid that death may take place in a couple of hours, owing to collapse, consequent on perforation of the walls of the oesophagus or stomach, or from asphyxia due to swelling of the glottis consequent on some of the acid having entered the larynx.

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  • Insect stings in the mouth or throat may cause swelling leading to asphyxia.

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  • In the twentieth century, it was accepted that most cases of CP were due to brain injuries received during a traumatic birth, a condition known as birth asphyxia.

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  • Birth asphyxia that is significant enough to result in CP is uncommon in developed countries.

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  • Fetal asphyxia (an impaired exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide) is recognized as an important cause of stillbirth and neonatal death.

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  • Asphyxia has also been implicated as a cause of cerebral palsy, although many cases of cerebral palsy have occurred without evidence of birth asphyxia.

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  • Asphyxia neonatorum is respiratory failure in the newborn, a condition caused by the inadequate intake of oxygen before, during, or just after birth.

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  • Asphyxia neonatorum, also called birth or newborn asphyxia, is defined as a failure to start regular respiration within a minute of birth.

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  • If an infant fails to establish sustained respiration after birth, the infant is diagnosed with asphyxia neonatorum.

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  • Normal infants have good muscle tone at birth and move their arms and legs actively, while asphyxia neonatorum infants are completely limp and do not move at all.

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  • If not correctly managed, asphyxia neonatorum will lead to hypoxia and possible brain damage or death.

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  • Worldwide, more than 1 million babies die annually from complications of birth asphyxia.

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  • The symptoms of asphyxia neonatorum are bluish or gray skin color (cyanosis), slow heartbeat (bradycardia), stiff or limp limbs (hypotonia), and a poor response to stimulation.

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  • Pregnant women who are at high risk of delivering newborns with asphyxia neonatorum should arrange for a close follow-up of their pregnancy with their obstetrician.

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  • The treatment for asphyxia neonatorum is resuscitation of the newborn.

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  • The more severe the fetal asphyxia, the longer it will take before the infant starts to breathe spontaneously.

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  • The prognosis for asphyxia neonatorum depends on how long the newborn is unable to breathe.

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  • With prolonged asphyxia, brain, heart, kidney, and lung damage can result and also death, if the asphyxiation lasts longer than 10 minutes.

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  • Anticipation is the key to preventing asphyxia neonatorum.

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  • It is important to identify fetuses that are likely to be at risk of asphyxia and to closely monitor such high-risk pregnancies.

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  • High-risk mothers should always give birth in hospitals with neonatal intensive care units where appropriate facilities are available to treat asphyxia neonatorum.

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  • Asphyxia neonatorum-Respiratory failure in the newborn.

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  • Women at risk for asphyxia neonatorum pregnancies should receive focused prenatal care from an obstetrician skilled at preventing and detecting problems such as anemia that may contribute to asphyxia neonatorum.

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  • Birth Asphyxia and the Brain: Basic Science and Clinical Implications.

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  • "Predicting the outcome of term neonates with intrapartum asphyxia."

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  • "Is it time to revisit a role for antithrombotic therapy in asphyxia neonatorum?"

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  • If an inadequate supply of oxygen from the placenta is detected during labor, the infant is at high risk for asphyxia, and an emergency delivery may be attempted either using forceps or by cesarean section.

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