SentencesSentence examples

As Sentence Examples

  • She's as perfect as she can be.
  • Her face warmed as she thought of it.
  • As she left the kitchen, his voice followed her.
  • For a few minutes they held on to each other, kissing as if they hadn't seen each other in a week.
  • But the noise and clatter seemed as dreadful to them as Jim's heels, for all who were able swiftly turned and flew away to a great distance.
  • Crash after crash echoed far above their heads, as the earth came together where it had split, and stones and chunks of clay rattled around them on every side.
  • As they had no wings the strangers could not fly away, and if they jumped down from such a height they would surely be killed.
  • After reading my arguments, you may or may not believe the future I describe is inevitable, as I say it is.
  • He pulled away from her, propping up on an elbow as he studied her face.
  • I'm as hungry as the horse is, and I want my milk.
  • But I'm afraid you cannot rule the Emerald City, as you used to, because we now have a beautiful Princess whom everyone loves dearly.
  • So, as you are now too old to wander abroad and work in a circus, I offer you a home here as long as you live.
  • Andrew's gray eyes blazed as he stood up straight and proud before the haughty captain.
  • I came, I saw, I conquered, as the first baby in the family always does.
  • The fire snapped as it grew.
  • He pronounced every word plainly, as though he were talking to his schoolmates.
  • And as I look to the past and the present, I see two phenomena that especially drive my optimism.
  • Alex had been the one who helped her see them as true family, and yet he was having issues accepting his own father.
  • "You'll have to make a dash, Jim," said the Wizard, "and run as fast as you can go."
  • And why are children born to such men as you?
  • He was very tall--as tall as a man.
  • A long sigh escaped her lips as she slid back down under the covers.
  • His tone suggested impatience, but his expression gave no clue as to why.
  • Andrew was not held long as a prisoner.
  • It is a custom in the South to build a small house near the homestead as an annex to be used on occasion.
  • I had noticed that my mother and my friends did not use signs as I did when they wanted anything done, but talked with their mouths.
  • And not only was Napoleon not afraid to extend his line, but he welcomed every step forward as a triumph and did not seek battle as eagerly as in former campaigns, but very lazily.
  • In August he was at Smolensk and thought only of how to advance farther, though as we now see that advance was evidently ruinous to him.
  • At Smolensk the armies at last reunited, much as Bagration disliked it.
  • Of the war Princess Mary thought as women do think about wars.
  • The only thing that made Princess Mary anxious about him was that he slept very little and, instead of sleeping in his study as usual, changed his sleeping place every day.
  • As it was, the kids might pick up on her fear and emulate.
  • He rolled up the newspaper and hit her playfully on the backside as she walked away.
  • A few minutes later his deep voice drifted back down the hall as he discussed something with her.
  • "I suppose not," he finally said as he spooned mashed potatoes into his plate.
  • She frowned as she unbuttoned her blouse.
  • As it came to a stop the conductor called out in a loud voice.
  • Also, turning her head, she found that she could see the boy beside her, who had until now remained as still and silent as she herself.
  • He reached the edge of the tall roof, stepped one foot out into the air, and walked into space as calmly as if he were on firm ground.
  • But it took a good many years for them to grow as large and fine as they are now.
  • "If it had any bones, I ate them," replied the kitten, composedly, as it washed its face after the meal.
  • The girl's hair was soft and fluffy and her skin as smooth as satin.
  • As soon as he trotted out upon the surface of the river he found himself safe from pursuit, and Zeb was already running across the water toward Dorothy.
  • So the piglets will be perfectly safe, hereafter, as far as I am concerned.
  • "As dead as poss'ble would be pretty dead, wouldn't it?" asked Dorothy.
  • "As many times as is necessary," was the reply.
  • "Really," said the girl, anxiously, "I must get back as soon as poss'ble to my own folks."
  • As soon as it was read to the school, he rubbed it off the slate, and it was forgotten.
  • She boiled it, and boiled it, As long as she was able; Then Mrs. Finney took it, And put it on the table.
  • The shepherd did as he was bidden.
  • As soon as I see the light, I will mount my horse and ride out to give the alarm.
  • He became famous as one of the bravest and best of the generals who fought to make our country free.
  • As often as he touched the charcoal to the smooth board, the picture grew.
  • He did not even hear his mother's footsteps as she came into the room.
  • He did not hear her soft breathing as she stood over him and watched him finish the wonderful drawing.
  • One day as he was riding through the woods, some British soldiers saw him.
  • They knew that the master would be as good as his word.
  • He learned many languages and became known all over the world as "The Learned Blacksmith."
  • Now, Brother Felix says I can read almost as well as he.
  • There was to be music and dancing; and Cyrus was to invite as many guests as he chose.
  • Let the son marry the daughter, if both agree, and give them the treasure as a wedding portion.
  • The frightened fox scampered away as fast as it could; and Aristomenes followed, clinging to its tail.
  • The officer began to write, but just as he finished the first word, a bomb came through the roof of the house and struck the floor close by him.
  • There was a ship just ready to sail for Corinth, and the captain agreed to take him as a passenger.
  • And now they would have spared him; but he was true to his promise,-- as soon as the song was finished, he threw himself headlong into the sea.
  • He was dressed just as they had seen him when he jumped into the sea.
  • Three hours later, the ship came into port, as you have already learned.
  • The name of Arion is still remembered as that of a most wonderful musician.
  • He spoke of the birds as his little brothers of the air, and he could never bear to see them harmed.
  • One day as he was walking among the trees the birds saw him and flew down to greet him.
  • As the slaves stood before him he asked each one to tell what kind of work he could do.
  • Do as I say.
  • But I am sure that it is my duty to stand at my post as long as I live.
  • And as he spoke, the other lawmakers listened in silence till the darkness began to fade and the sky grew bright again.
  • As he was starting away, the friendly innkeeper said, "Which way will you travel, Mr. Randolph?"
  • As bad luck would have it, Mr. Randolph took the wrong road.
  • He was famous as a lawyer and statesman.
  • He tried to make signals to them; he called as loudly as he could; but he was neither seen nor heard, and the ships came no nearer.
  • As he grew up, his father wished him to learn a trade.
  • The ant was carrying a grain of wheat as large as itself.
  • As Tamerlane looked, he saw that there was a hole in the tree only a little way above, and that this was the home of the ant.
  • Just as he spoke, the ant lost its footing and fell to the ground.
  • "This is slow work, Robert," said the older of the boys as they were poling up the river to a new fishing place.
  • The rod was bent in the middle so that it could be turned as with a crank.
  • He is now remembered and honored as the inventor of the steamboat.
  • As the merchant was walking along, he came to a river that flowed gently between green and shady banks.
  • The officers did as they were bidden.
  • As soon as he entered the hall the caliph went to meet him.
  • As soon as he entered the hall the caliph went to meet him.
  • The gardener answered: A year ago, as I was spading in my garden, I saw something fall at the foot of a palm tree.
  • But, as I came to your palace this morning, I kept saying to myself, 'When our lord Al Mansour learns just how it was that I borrowed the gold, I have no doubt that in his kindness of heart he will forgive me the debt.'
  • The merchant did as he was told.
  • "There is nothing lacking," he said, "but the ten pieces he has told you about; and I will give him these as a reward."
  • "No," said Al Mansour, "it is for me to reward the man as he deserves."
  • The men heard it as it whistled through the trees and rattled the doors of the abbey.
  • "Who will sing us a song?" said the master woodman as he threw a fresh log upon the fire.
  • At last, just as the blacksmith was in the midst of a stirring song, he rose quietly and went out into the darkness.
  • Then Caedmon, with only the cows as his hearers, opened his mouth and began to sing.
  • So she called her clerk, who was a scholar, and bade him write the song, word for word, as it came from Caedmon's lips.
  • Why do his legs tremble under him as he walks, leaning upon a stick?
  • The coachman explained as well as he was able; and they rode onward.
  • And to this day, millions of people remember and honor the name of Gautama, as that of the great lover of men.
  • They did so, and as the flames lighted up the room, they saw their father enter with a child in his arms.
  • "What a beautiful child!" said the mother, as she hurried to do his bidding.
  • Well, as I was hurrying along, I heard a great splash, as though something had fallen into the pool by the fountain.
  • So I took him in my arms and ran home as fast as I could.
  • Mine makes the servants wait on me and do as I tell them.
  • As the little king went out, he turned at the door and called to Charlot.
  • As he came out of the forest he saw a little boy by the roadside, who seemed to be watching for some one.
  • All the men seemed amused when they saw the boy, and as they rode up, they greeted the king by taking off their hats.
  • Then one of the fishermen said, "Let us ask the governor about it and do as he shall bid us."
  • The people of his country had made him their king; but as soon as he had made good laws for them he gave up his crown.
  • He is my worst enemy, and yet, I admire him as the wisest man in the world.
  • As the nation grew, so did what came to be called the American Dream.
  • It seemed as if no one saw that coming because, frankly, no one could conceive of it happening.
  • This tendency to only be able to see new technology as an extension of the old is exactly the phenomena we have seen with the Internet.
  • She wants to do business as a limited liability company, so she creates an LLC online for $200.
  • Filmmakers such as James Cameron and George Lucas used to talk about putting off film projects to wait for the computer technology to catch up to their visions.
  • Though it isn't so much a time as a state of mind, historians plot the Renaissance as moving around Europe for a couple of centuries.
  • The arrival of these texts—as well as Byzantium's own architecture, science, and art—triggered a sensory and intellectual explosion, which became the cultural movement we now call the Renaissance.
  • As I write this, something like fifty million blogs and billions of blog posts are online.
  • We look at antique furniture today and say, "Man, they sure don't make stuff as good as they used to."
  • It would just take several hours as opposed to a few minutes.
  • In fact, the book could survive for centuries, as could new perfect copies of the book, and thus the ideas could be distributed.
  • Via books, ideas became mobile—or as we would say today, went viral—spreading to other villages and other countries and to multiple places around the world simultaneously.
  • Search engines such as Google exist to solve this problem.
  • I define wisdom as deriving a course of action from applying a value system to a situation.
  • Of course, Wikipedia is another textbook example where people toil for no payment, and anonymously as well.
  • But as I watch how we are building and using the Internet, the one-on-one encounters impress me most.
  • You probably have a device, such as a smart phone, that has an Internet connection and a GPS.
  • Or early climatologists who made their own daily observations of precipitation and barometric pressure, interpreting as well as collecting readings.
  • This unique phenomenon will pass as we learn to cope with vast amounts of data.
  • Up until now, we have thought of the Internet as a place to store information, and we have depended upon search engines to help us find it.
  • When you look at a product on one of its web pages, Amazon suggests other products you might like as well.
  • Well, obviously, Amazon is able to collect this data as they make sales.
  • For instance, they will learn subtleties such as suggesting beach gear if a person buys a cooler in July and tailgating gear if the same purchase is made in October.
  • The machine will figure this out as it collects more data and incorporates more variables, and then experiments on people to see which combinations of factors work the best.
  • As time passes, the suggestions will become astonishingly on-target—and no human will have programmed that.
  • I like this goal, and I would like to do it as well, but in bits, not bites.
  • No longer would we learn and forget, learn and forget, learn and forget, again and again, as a species.
  • Of course, the system only shapes decisions insofar as you take its guidance, which begs the question: Will people follow suggestions they may not fully understand?
  • What have the professors at that college ordered online that you have ordered as well?
  • As we move toward that future, it is a great tragedy that the experiences of all the people of the past are lost to us.
  • But as we do them yet again and capture them, we finally can begin to develop a planet-wide memory system.
  • When we consider the costs of all the wrong decisions ever made—a calculation I don't even know how to approach—we will think of it as a diminishing problem receding into the past.
  • And as with ignorance, we may already have much of the data we need to find solutions.
  • After the infectious diseases come the non-infectious ones such as cancer, Alzheimer's, and heart disease.
  • As we move out from that defined center, we come to disorders and disabilities—impairments of bodily systems that are brought about by injury, disease, or genetics.
  • It would include ending all non-infectious diseases as well.
  • So how about this instead: What if I can show you a future where everyone on the planet will live in good health as long as it is possible for their body to live?
  • A future without disease as we understand the term's meaning today.
  • It was recognized as the flu, although records describe conditions which were highly likely to have been polio.
  • In 1908, the poliovirus was identified as the cause.
  • In 1921, a dozen years before he would be sworn in as president, Franklin Roosevelt was diagnosed with polio.
  • At present, there are about one hundred new cases reported per month around the world, infecting about the same number of people as die from lightning strikes.
  • As I was writing these words, my ten-year-old son came in and asked, "What are you doing?"
  • In the eradication of smallpox, as in the near-elimination of polio, I find both fascinating lessons of history and enormous reason for hope.
  • And as population rises, education rises, health rises, and wealth rises, more and more people will be working on these problems.
  • Our battles with diseases go as far back into history as we can see.
  • Hippocrates was remarkable not only as a surgeon but also because he systematized medicine in his spare time.
  • He created many of the medical terms we use today, such as acute, chronic, endemic, epidemic, paroxysm, and relapse.
  • He formalized the structure of medical inquiry as an independent science.
  • Certainly some of the medical practices of the ancient world, such as bloodletting and the use of leeches, seem to us at least misguided and at worst, barbaric.
  • So these doctors were perhaps just as brilliant as those who have come since.
  • Half a century later, nitrous oxide came into use as an anesthetic.
  • Its makers had not conceived bupropion hydrochloride as a drug to help people quit smoking.
  • Imagine they also included their genetic mapping as well as every single thing they did in their daily lives.
  • This method will allow us to treat the entire world as a controlled experiment in retrospect.
  • Is it actually that blue-eyed redheads have the same number of accidents as non-redheads, but brown-eyed redheads are even more clumsy, accident prone, and traffic hazards?
  • Essentially, we will be able to run as many controlled experiments as we can imagine instantly and for no cost—and that will revolutionize medicine.
  • Are these ingredients in other foods as well?
  • Finally, this system will not just solve for human illness, but all kinds of other problems as well.
  • They accurately described the construction of DNA as a double helix and showed how its structure made replication both possible and reliable.
  • While we have deciphered the genome in that we have written it all down, we aren't at all sure which parts do what, as noted before.
  • Then, people could start reporting all their medical issues—headaches, halitosis, heart disease—and we will begin to see commonalities between genes and conditions we do not generally regard as genetic.
  • And as we have seen, understanding how we are made is certainly a huge advantage in our battle with disease.
  • As access becomes cheaper and better, and the whole world has mobile phones, more information can be delivered to people in remote parts of the world.
  • Cloud computing and software frameworks such as Hadoop give unimagined computing power to the scientist on the most modest budget.
  • The additional possibility of access to all humans' Digital Echoes, to be studied for a million unnoticed causal correlations, will hasten the demise of disease as well and will increase quality of life and longevity.
  • The first is that we all value things differently, such as in our jelly bean example.
  • That means that as you get more of them, you value each new one less.
  • It means I can trade you a good or service for an intermediate store of value known as money, and then trade that money to the person who actually has the goods I want.
  • They provide information such as reviews and user ratings.
  • Additionally, online stores powered by Yahoo and Google and Amazon exist where small vendors can set up storefronts and sell to the world, as a hobby or a livelihood.
  • The cost of interactive information exchange, such as asking questions about products you are contemplating purchasing, has fallen to nearly zero.
  • The other is division of labor, worth discussing in some detail as it is an almost miraculous process.
  • I have never so much as tasted a grub worm.
  • It requires the labor of thousands to make a pencil, and yet they are so inexpensive as to be almost free.
  • This increase in utility is the same as generating wealth.
  • Technology marches forward—perhaps not forever, but as close to forever as we can understand.
  • As my professors told me the first day I started studying economics in college (and never tired of repeating), scarcity is the central underlying assumption of all economic theory.
  • First, think of energy as the capacity to do work.
  • If you are a farmer and work alone, you can only plant as much land as you can personally plow. You can do just a couple of thousand calories of work a day, consuming only the energy produced by the food you ate.
  • It is as if each person has one hundred assistants working for him.
  • As my economics professors insisted, cost is determined by scarcity and demand.
  • Hurricanes release unimaginable amounts of power, as do earthquakes.
  • Everyone knows water evaporates, rises, then falls to the earth as rain—but no one can even guess how much energy could be captured from this if we only knew how.
  • Every day the earth heats and cools as night turns into day and back into night.
  • I doubted that, as Feynman was precise in his usage of words.
  • He had died by the time I read that passage in one of his books, so I couldn't write him, as is my normal practice when an author's words puzzle me.
  • And like our example with energy, technology and human innovation could make other things that are now scarce—or that we think of now as scarce—not so at all.
  • So hold these thoughts, as we will be returning to them.
  • First, many things in the physical world that we think of as scarce are not really scarce, just presently beyond our ability to capture.
  • Second, as technology advances, it will make things in the physical world fall in price.
  • As we envision a world where machines do more and more work that people used to do, our minds naturally turn to those who would be displaced by technological advance.
  • My purpose in this chapter will not be to persuade the reader of any political doctrine of trade; please apply your own political and social values as you see fit.
  • The idea of free trade has divided people for as long as trade has existed.
  • One person with a horse and a cotton gin could process as much as fifty people without the gin.
  • Even though this allowed cotton prices to plummet and demand for cotton to increase, some of those fifty people got laid off, no doubt shaking their fists at the infernal gin as they stormed off the property.
  • The cotton gin example is the same as if Chad were replaced by a gin.
  • The concept is known as "internalizing externalities."
  • When businesses and people are made to consider the overall effects of their choices as opposed to only their individual effects, efficient outcomes occur.
  • This is known as "internalizing externalities."
  • Calculating the actual, societal costs of fatty foods, alcohol, cars, pet ownership, mercury thermometers, air conditioning, solar panels, razor blades, jogging shoes, and ten thousand other things, and incorporating those costs in the prices as taxes would lead to a vastly more efficient allocation of resources.
  • And you could feel good about it; after all, you would be increasing efficiency, not merely acting as a leech to the system.
  • To some extent, we have this in the form of high taxes on cigarettes, which are seen to have negative externalities, and a home interest deduction on income taxes, as home ownership is viewed as having positive social good.
  • Machines—which still need you as an operator, as far as we can see—magnify your productivity.
  • And if your productivity fell, then your salary would fall as well.
  • And he will find he is capable of adding far more value than as a set of eyes watching a screen.
  • As I have pointed out, technology may in fact have limits, but we do not know what they are.
  • The word is broad in its meaning and I use it in its broadest sense, as a mechanical device built to independently perform a task.
  • As robotic technology advances, we are being forced to readjust our expectations of machines' capabilities.
  • We have fallen into the habit of anthropomorphizing computers and robots for a simple reason: The more we program them to do things that we presently do, the more we think of them as being like us.
  • Your natural expectation would be that they would talk, at least as well as Scooby does.
  • It is altogether possible that many people would want to have conversations with their dogs mainly because they regard their dogs as sentient.
  • But wait (as they say on late-night TV commercials), there's more!
  • And the principle at work in this technology could lead to a cure for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Plus, they will be able to convert heat to electricity as well, so anything that heats up will become an energy source.
  • As much as I would like to continue with speculations about molecular-sized machines, I have a larger thesis to prove.
  • As much as I would like to continue with speculations about molecular-sized machines, I have a larger thesis to prove.
  • People specialized, technology advanced, and as a result, men walked on the moon.
  • And they are so cheap as to nearly be free.
  • Finally, you might argue that fees paid as royalties to the owners of the intellectual property needed to build the Mercedes for $50 will not fall by a thousandfold.
  • Your house will not be "smart" insofar as it will not seem alive to you any more than your garage door opener or your web browser does.
  • As I observed a few pages ago in "Let Robots Be Robots," an intelligent system like this won't be creepy because we do not want it to be creepy.
  • I will probably absorb vitamins through my skin as my shirt detects I need them.
  • In the future, the price of some things won't go down as much, if at all.
  • Anything that requires the unamplified direct labor of a person won't either, such as a personal trainer, a babysitter, or a masseuse.
  • Try to think of the advances we have seen so far in history as the very tip of the iceberg, a hint of what is possible, not even being within sight of what is possible.
  • But I expect that technology and free enterprise will take us across a threshold where things formerly regarded as scarce will not be so any more.
  • This is because, as noted before, technology amplifies the productive effort of people.
  • Think about that: Poverty in the United States is defined as higher than the average income of the planet.
  • As currency is inflated, prices rise.
  • It happened in the United States as recently as the 1970s.
  • I referred to it as a dance, but it is a dance to economic death.
  • Families who owned great houses were able to keep them if they opened them to the public, acted as guides, and only lived in a small part of them.
  • They see themselves as defining law, not breaking it.
  • Expropriation often is accompanied by infringements of the third ingredient, individual liberty, as well.
  • Economically, that hasn't turned out as well as they had hoped.
  • Such radical redistribution attempts are dangerous games, for the rich are creators of economic opportunity, not just for themselves, but as employers, for society.
  • Cynics view this as the rich paying off the poor to keep them from revolting.
  • So far we have looked at poverty and how it is redefined as societies grow richer.
  • This might be the adoption of commercial standards as well as the creation and operation of a civil court system and laws.
  • They develop methods for the accurate measuring and recording of boundaries of land as well as the sale thereof.
  • As national income increases in a given country, the size of government as a portion of gross national product (GNP) rises and the range of services people expect the government to offer rises.
  • As national income increases in a given country, the size of government as a portion of gross national product (GNP) rises and the range of services people expect the government to offer rises.
  • Then, as a nation grows wealthier, tax rates could fall in terms of percentages because the nation is making so much more money.
  • The higher the average income of the people (as expressed through per capita GNP), the higher the tax rate.
  • Simply put, as income rises, we buy more things, including more government.
  • It seems that as national income rises, people choose to create larger governments that offer more entitlements and have more expansive powers.
  • In 58 BC, Clodius Pulcher ran on a "free grain for the poor" platform as he tried to become tribune.
  • It seems that we can afford to spend more on government as income rises.
  • We have to work at jobs to create wealth because as we live our lives, we consume wealth.
  • It was theirs to do with as they pleased and they chose to give it to you.
  • In other words, the average person will make more money, pay a higher percentage as taxes, but still bring home vastly more than before.
  • This income will not be regarded as welfare.
  • It will be regarded as interest payments on the accumulated riches of one thousand years of technical and material progress.
  • It will be regarded as a dividend of the work of the one hundred prior generations that got the world to this point.
  • As civilization and technology advance, people begin to create more than they consume.
  • We will know it is coming when formerly scarce items, such as commodities, fall in price.
  • As we start heading toward this world without want, there will be sizable disruptions in the normal fabric of life.
  • As we consider the lot of those left behind, it becomes clearer how the end of scarcity will have a profound impact on the world.
  • As I've said earlier, the most underutilized resource in the universe is human potential.
  • Well, wealth would expand dramatically, and the people who had those jobs before could get new and better jobs, such as managing the army of manure-toting robots.
  • As I've already said, I believe we will be experiencing so much prosperity in the not-too-distant future that no one will have to work.
  • It will be regarded as a human right—a dividend for being born a human being, your share of the inheritance that all the prior generations accumulated.
  • As children, we had all these things we liked to do that interested and excited us.
  • But as we grew up, reality set in that market forces did not allow those activities to pay enough to support us, so at some point we all figured out we had to "earn a living."
  • As we transition from one set of economic realities to another, there will be severe disruptions along the way.
  • As machines do ever more things that we used to do, we will have more choices for how we spend our time.
  • Or these jobs can be divorced from economic realities, as the struggling painter or actor decides simply to do what he loves and live off the minimum income afforded by this planet-wide prosperity.
  • As technology enters its explosive period of growth, with the Internet and associated technologies flourishing in a Moore's-Law-like manner, it will create immense amounts of wealth.
  • Poverty will be redefined upward until, for all intents and purposes, poverty as we know it today no longer will exist.
  • I reasoned that if I could show how poverty will end, then of course hunger would end as well—how many rich people do you hear about going hungry?
  • Hunger can be classified as three different types.
  • And he used his decades of dominance on the national scene, as well as his fantastic oratorical ability, to advance that belief and essentially invent the Democratic Party we know today.
  • The system was revised in the 1830s because it was viewed as discouraging work by interfering with the laws of supply and demand relating to labor.
  • In any case, as the song says, The times, they are a-changin'—and they are changing in a manner that governments probably can't keep up with.
  • As the saying goes, we laugh because it is true.
  • And finally, consider how nutrition affects other relative and subjective factors in our lives such as energy level and mood.
  • As we noted earlier, people no longer disagree simply about what values to apply to a set of facts—rather, they disagree as to the nature of the facts themselves.
  • As we noted earlier, people no longer disagree simply about what values to apply to a set of facts—rather, they disagree as to the nature of the facts themselves.
  • This makes a great deal of sense: If nutrition isn't governed by universal laws (as physics is) and instead affects different people differently, then the way you will know certain things is by learning through trial and error, through your own experience.
  • This will produce extremely specific nutritional information for just you, will add years to your life, and will increase its quality as well.
  • In the future, massive new amounts of information will begin to resolve the debate, instead of just adding noise to it as too often occurs today.
  • At the same time, the percent of income we individually have to spend on feeding ourselves plummeted as well.
  • And the American farmer produces key crops, such as wheat, very inexpensively.
  • Agriculture as an industry requires infrastructure.
  • There is some debate as to whether the poor should even try to feed themselves.
  • Still others argue for a system of government price supports, incentives, and subsidies, as is found in the United States and Europe.
  • As nice as it would be for the Japan strategy to work in the developing world, I don't think these countries can count on it.
  • As nice as it would be for the Japan strategy to work in the developing world, I don't think these countries can count on it.
  • The cost of their imported food doubles, and I guarantee you the foreign-owned factory won't double wages as a result.
  • But the industry as a whole has shot forward.)
  • The advances were not merely mechanical but chemical as well.
  • In the early 1800s, fertilizer companies sprang up using bone meal as the principle agent.
  • Government buildings were converted into silos to hold the abundance, as other countries in the region placed orders for massive amounts of these seeds.
  • All he could do was cross strains of wheat, much in the same fashion as Gregor Mendel did in the 1800s.
  • Operating at basically 5 percent efficiency, they are less than half as efficient as solar panels now on the market.
  • We stick a bunch of seeds in the ground and then treat a thousand acres of corn pretty much as a single unit.
  • I mentioned Gregor Mendel, known as the father of genetics.
  • Eventually, the pea was as large as its genetic potential allowed it to be.
  • As I write this, it is down to 2 percent.
  • This dairyman also makes some of the milk into cheese and we use a lot of that as well.
  • I write this to establish my bona fides as someone who truly cares about good food.
  • It would cost a million dollars and not even be as good as a Chevy.
  • Long term, we will be better off manufacturing our food as opposed to growing it.
  • What if a manufactured steak was as good as the best steak you have ever had?
  • Susie had kittens, and two of them had folded ears as well.
  • Plants are as well.
  • Finally, we get to the fourth order of GMO: being able to splice genes from one species into another species, a process known as transgenesis.
  • The law was a win for the environment.
  • As far as scientific advancements go, that would be right up there with the proverbial sliced bread.
  • As far as scientific advancements go, that would be right up there with the proverbial sliced bread.
  • By taking this "Absolutely no GMOs" stance they completely remove themselves from the debate and as such have no voice in the discussion about what direction to take GM: what are safe testing practices, what factors will we optimize for, and the whole host of questions that face us on this, the eve of a momentous leap forward.
  • As we have reasoned, when the Internet and related technologies help bring an end to poverty, the end of poverty will largely solve the problem of hunger.
  • As noted previously, in the future much of what you do will leave a Digital Echo, a record of its occurrence, down to the very minutia of your life.
  • Remember my earlier statement that a farmer treats a thousand acres of corn as a single entity because it is not cost effective to deal with each corn stalk separately?
  • We are really good on the reasoning part, but as far as our sensory inputs go, we are massively outclassed by cheap sensors.
  • As mentioned earlier, farmers suffer when they do not have reliable markets for their goods.
  • He can sell the certificate, use it as collateral, or hold it for the future.
  • It can sell produce abroad for better rates, give farmers predictability in pricing and flexibility on when to sell, and act as a storehouse against lean times in the future.
  • As Nobel laureate Amartya Sen has noted, democracies don't have famines.
  • The old adage is true: There really is no such thing as a free lunch.
  • There are those who would elevate the right to food as being a fundamental human right.
  • To think of the right to life as somehow different than a right to food is hard for me.
  • It was his view that "the attainment of human rights in the fullest sense cannot be achieved so long as hundreds of millions of poverty-stricken people lack the basic necessities for life."
  • As they died, they shouted, 'Communist Party, Chairman Mao, save us.'
  • As people were dying in large numbers around them, officials did not think to save them.
  • Yang also quotes Mao as saying in a 1959 meeting, When there is not enough to eat, people starve to death.
  • It would be tempting to characterize Roosevelt's remarks as socialistic.
  • In the United States, you could do it via the tax code, with government only acting as an income redistribution agent but not as a food distributor.
  • Food in the United States is so inexpensive as a percentage of national income that it literally is a throwaway item.
  • I do not think Americans would tolerate widespread, untreated hunger in this nation as long as it could afford otherwise.
  • As people grow wealthier (as the whole world will), they typically spend more money on food, though it is less as a percentage of overall income.
  • As people grow wealthier (as the whole world will), they typically spend more money on food, though it is less as a percentage of overall income.
  • As the world grows richer, people will care more about how their food is made, how the animals are treated, whether the laborer who picked the food is paid a living wage.
  • But over time, as incomes around the world rise, people will migrate more and more to products associated with social practices that match their own ideals.
  • As we understand our own genome better, we will know better how to eat in a way that is custom tailored for us.
  • As technology improves, all these processes and systems will improve and also fall in price.
  • The cost of food will fall to nearly zero as the number of farmers in the world falls to zero and food becomes as cheap as clean water.
  • The implication is that any time they nursed, they felt pain as well, to learn at an early age that there is no pleasure to be had in life without pain.
  • They were lined up as far as the eye could see on the Apian Way, the main road through Rome, as a warning to other slaves who might consider rebellion.
  • Yet in most parts of the world, emancipation came peacefully as the civilizing effects of culture transformed society.
  • In most parts of the world, women are no longer legally regarded as chattel.
  • As recently as 1900, most of the world was governed this way.
  • As recently as 1900, most of the world was governed this way.
  • We have ended pain as entertainment—or at least, involuntary participation in pain as entertainment.
  • We no longer have public executions as a form of entertainment.
  • In many parts of the world, we have even outlawed the use of animals fighting as entertainment, such as cockfighting and dogfighting.
  • People in power used to be able to order executions as capriciously as the queen did in Alice in Wonderland.
  • During World War II, when General Patton got sacked for slapping a soldier whom he regarded as cowardly, the Germans couldn't believe it: Their officers could have soldiers shot without trial!
  • And that advance continues, as the group of rights so acknowledged keeps expanding.
  • The United States is a republic, as even the Pledge of Allegiance says.
  • We use democracy as a method of selecting representatives.
  • As clichéd as it is to complain about rising rates of crime, the statistics tell a different story.
  • As clichéd as it is to complain about rising rates of crime, the statistics tell a different story.
  • More and more, those wishing to change the status quo adopt this as their primary tactic.
  • As Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle once observed, "Man seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebels against anything that does not deserve rebelling against."
  • We have created documents that enshrine our values as a method of articulating and preserving them.
  • Then war can become obsolete, as foreign to us as slavery and public hangings.
  • Maybe we need it as a release valve that lets off societal pressure ...
  • Early in his presidency, in a 1953 address that would become known as his "Cross of Iron" speech, he declared, "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.
  • As Eisenhower's presidency neared an end, he spoke of war again, but less in terms of economic costs.
  • Nearly two terms of fighting the Cold War led him to conclude, as he put it, War in our time has become an anachronism.
  • A war which became general, as any limited action might, would only result in the virtual destruction of mankind.
  • As Denzel Washington's character observed in the movie Crimson Tide, "In the nuclear world, the true enemy is war itself."
  • Just as technology magnifies our productive labor, it magnifies our destructive capacity as well.
  • I define war as armed conflict occurring between nation-states or, in the case of civil wars, between factions within nation-states.
  • Accountability must be at as low a level as possible, so that if government officials mess up, they answer to constituents in their locality.
  • Of course, politics being what it is, the Peace Dividend was spent a dozen times over by as many special interests who felt they were the most deserving of such an unexpected largess.
  • As long as these states were to share a currency, a military, provide for interstate trade, and have a single foreign policy, they could retain the economic advantages of being a large nation while maximizing individual liberty and self-determination.
  • As long as these states were to share a currency, a military, provide for interstate trade, and have a single foreign policy, they could retain the economic advantages of being a large nation while maximizing individual liberty and self-determination.
  • As American diplomat Ralph Johnson Bunche aptly observed, "There are no warlike people, just warlike leaders."
  • As we get better at killing, we don't seem less likely to.
  • As Frederick the Great observed almost two centuries earlier, "If my soldiers were to begin to think, not one of them would remain in the army."
  • Just as there is no single cause of war, there will be no single way that war will end.
  • As recently as the early twentieth century, relatively few careers existed in which young men of drive and ambition could distinguish themselves and leave a mark on the world.
  • As recently as the early twentieth century, relatively few careers existed in which young men of drive and ambition could distinguish themselves and leave a mark on the world.
  • This need for competition existed in the past the same as it does in the present.
  • Military heroes of the last several centuries, such as the aforementioned Lafayette and Hamilton and Travis, were not bloodthirsty.
  • Some have questioned whether Friedman's thesis is 100 percent true, mentioning NATO air strikes against Yugoslavia as a potential exception.
  • This has to be a serious deterrent to Japan (as an example).
  • In the past, war could increase your financial position, both as a nation (through spoils) and a soldier (through plunder).
  • As the poorest nations become wealthier, they too will grow less and less inclined toward war.
  • American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well.
  • Making swords actually paid better or at least as well as making plowshares.
  • This means that non-military manufacturing interests in the United States no longer profit as in the past from war.
  • What I am saying is that as more factors align toward peace, peace becomes ever more the better economic option.
  • It is a pacific system, operating to cordialize mankind, by rendering nations, as well as individuals, useful to each other.
  • As we just noted, when nations buy each other's goods, that promotes peace.
  • Centuries ago, North America saw a shortage of small coins, so large ones were cut into bits to circulate as small change.
  • Now, however, more and more wealth is tied up in intangibles such as intellectual property, patents, brands, media, and contracts.
  • Asymmetry is a mixed bag as far as the future goes.
  • As true as that was in Jefferson's time, our age has amplified all of it: both the miseries war can produce and the blessings peace can produce.
  • As true as that was in Jefferson's time, our age has amplified all of it: both the miseries war can produce and the blessings peace can produce.
  • For many of the same reasons as monarchies, dictatorships are inherently warlike.
  • They view individual liberty as a threat, new political ideas as subversion, and political opposition as treason.
  • Weakness in neighbors is regarded as an opportunity for conquest or, at least, coercion.
  • Germany viewed the Russian mobilization as an act of war and therefore declared war on Russia.
  • With Britain in the war, its colonies and dominions joined in as well.
  • Unless one can somehow imagine NATO countries going to war with each other, such as Belgium invading the United Kingdom, it is hard to see how "world wars" could escalate outside of NATO member countries.
  • This has come about as we have left a polarized world behind us and the importance of military alliances has fallen.
  • After World War I, as the Ottoman Empire collapsed, several new countries emerged.
  • Fifteen new nations formed as the Soviet Union dissolved; Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and Sudan into North Sudan and South Sudan.
  • Tensions mounted all through the 1830s as militias were raised on both sides in what later came to be known as the Aroostook War, even though there was never actually a war or casualties.
  • As the number of touch points with other countries rises, so must our shared understanding of acceptable conduct.
  • Non-violence as a successful political tactic.
  • The rise of public opinion as the most powerful political force in the world.
  • It was a huge shift in public opinion in which no group benefited financially; if anything, financial interests were aligned against this change, just as with tobacco.
  • As Alfred Einstein once observed, "Nothing will end war unless the people themselves refuse to go to war."
  • But maybe as a civilization, we have to talk out loud to figure out where we stand, to make progress.
  • After all, public opinion may just as easily be stirred up in favor of war as against it.
  • Third, the web acts as a feedback loop in that it allows all people to say what is on their minds.
  • I include Twitter in this list as a larger idea, not only as the literal Twitter.com.
  • Everyone will be on Facebook, as will be every business, every idea, every brand, and all the people who were once members but have since passed away.
  • Most Facebook users have people of other ethnicities and national origin as Facebook friends.
  • We tend to regard information that comes to us through our friend network as more authentic and reliable than information we receive from traditional media.
  • For instance, if you have a Facebook friend Abigail in Albania whom you only met once at a rock-paper-scissors competition years ago, you will generally regard Abigail's first-hand account as authoritative, even though you don't really know Abigail all that well.
  • I mention FactCheck and Snopes as two examples of the many enterprises on the Internet that subject every government utterance to scrutiny in something approximating real time.
  • Practically speaking, governments often act as if their first duty is to protect the government, not the people.
  • Free elections can be threatening as well, literally to their livelihoods.
  • Other nations are becoming more transparent as well.
  • Sure, it isn't as big a force as Democratic Peace Theory or Mutually Assured Poverty.
  • The article also describes a second project where a group of young entrepreneurs who look as if they could be in a garage band are fitting deceptively innocent-looking hardware into a prototype 'Internet in a suitcase.'
  • Would you regard this as good?
  • Then Latin became somewhat universal, from a Western viewpoint, as Rome's reach spread.
  • These nations will play a substantial role in shaping this new English, as they bring grammatical structure, idioms, and nuanced words from their native tongue.
  • As difficult as it might be to "let go," this is good for peace.
  • As difficult as it might be to "let go," this is good for peace.
  • As of the end of 2012, the Internet has more than two billion users.
  • As education rises, a thousand other things rise with it: income, health, political engagement, and an overall concern for world affairs.
  • However, at present—and for the future as far as we can see—growth in technology outpaces growth in wealth.
  • This is a force for peace, as more and more people have family members in more than one culture and share the interests of more than one nationality.
  • But the notion of "elites" is broadening, as is the number of non-Americans who study in the United States.
  • More than 70 percent of the British have passports, as do 50 percent of Canadians and 25 percent of Japanese.
  • The United States contributes much to this, including its movies, products such as iPhones, and websites such as Google, YouTube, Twitter, Amazon, and eBay.
  • British music is known and loved around the world, as is its comedy and royalty.
  • This is a force for peace—to the extent that as we share the same set of cultural references, we understand each other better.
  • I do not think the importance of YouTube lies in its role as a communication method nor as a fundamentally new means of distribution of media.
  • Now video is everywhere—on my phone, in my cab in New York, and in the elevator as I zoom to the fourteenth floor.
  • The range of subject matter on YouTube is as incomprehensibly large as the range in quality.
  • Instead of reading words on a page and trying to imagine a concept, we can see it, as the old expression goes, in Technicolor.
  • You view it as your duty to protest when people who do not hold to those values gain power.
  • They view the opposition by others to the actions of their country as treason, or at least, inexplicably self-destructive.
  • Sadly, patriotism is as well.
  • As civilization advances, we are becoming better people, and unquestionably more empathic.
  • The social reformer of the past is depicted as a dour spinster wielding an axe to break barrels of "Demon Rum."
  • We will live out the realization that, as Bertrand Russell said, "War does not determine who is right, only who is left."
  • War as the remedy will fall out of favor for the many reasons I outline above.
  • We value our humanity, and insofar as life in the future seems different from our life today, it somehow seems less human.
  • Anything different doesn't seem as human to us and we instinctively recoil from it.
  • All these things are the same today as they were in Shakespeare's time, and because of that, his stories are still very relevant to us.
  • Hold that thought, as we will return to it.
  • The implication was that Castor and Pollux, knowing of the imminent collapse of the roof, had come calling with the purpose of saving Simonides's life as their payment for the poem.
  • That's what interests me about this story (which may or may not be purely true): What Simonides did—recalling the names and locations of everyone at a large banquet—is described as entirely possible and an enviable, practical skill.
  • The libraries that existed, such as the one at Alexandria, contained reading rooms because when you read a book, you read it aloud.
  • So in the present and future, when a technology comes along that represents such a change—that saves details of our activities with which to advise us later, or has us speaking to machines as if they were creatures—it will simply be more of the same.
  • We embarked on these car projects with grandiose visions, many as unrealistic as they were ingenious.
  • As we approached the end of the flawless narrative, one of us would invariably ask sardonically (but never sarcastically), "What could possibly go wrong?"
  • Oddly, it still seemed reasonable even as we coasted through three red lights to get home.
  • Life, as they say, is good.
  • Civilization, like technology, also compounds over time, as do its benefits.
  • Scarcity, or what we term scarcity, is a technological problem as well. 4.
  • The wealth created by technological advance will grow as fast as technology grows.
  • As I review these points, none of them seem particularly like "stretches" to me.
  • As more nations become wealthier, they become more educated.
  • The ability of a few people to do a massive amount of damage rises as civilization becomes more complex and destructive power increases.
  • As troubling as this thought is, equally troubling would be the response of the country so attacked.
  • As troubling as this thought is, equally troubling would be the response of the country so attacked.
  • Prosperity requires civil liberties, prosperity thrives under lower taxes, and prosperity shrivels as wars disrupt the free flow of labor and capital.
  • As a government grows in size, even if the growth is in social programs, it inevitably grows in its intrusion on civil liberty.
  • As I see it, the grandchildren of those who would strap bombs on themselves today will not be rushing to imitate their elders.
  • As a historian, I know it has been the vanity of every age to think it represents a high point in history.
  • We live at a defining moment for humanity, as the compounding effects of technology and civilization reach an inflection point.
  • There was the usual amount of discussion as to a name for me.
  • I did not then know why Belle acted in this way; but I knew she was not doing as I wished.
  • This most naughty prank of mine convinced my parents that I must be taught as soon as possible.
  • I remember his caressing touch as he led me from tree to tree, from vine to vine, and his eager delight in whatever pleased me.
  • For a long time I regarded my little sister as an intruder.
  • We lived a long way from any school for the blind or the deaf, and it seemed unlikely that any one would come to such an out-of-the-way place as Tuscumbia to teach a child who was both deaf and blind.
  • Child as I was, I at once felt the tenderness and sympathy which endeared Dr. Bell to so many hearts, as his wonderful achievements enlist their admiration.
  • I felt approaching footsteps, I stretched out my hand as I supposed to my mother.
  • As the cool stream gushed over one hand she spelled into the other the word water, first slowly, then rapidly.
  • As my knowledge of things grew I felt more and more the delight of the world I was in.
  • It seemed as if the spirit of spring had passed through the summer-house.
  • Its delicate blossoms shrank from the slightest earthly touch; it seemed as if a tree of paradise had been transplanted to earth.
  • From the beginning of my education Miss Sullivan made it a practice to speak to me as she would speak to any hearing child; the only difference was that she spelled the sentences into my hand instead of speaking them.
  • This she did by repeating to me as far as possible, verbatim, what she heard, and by showing me how I could take part in the conversation.
  • As soon as I could spell a few words my teacher gave me slips of cardboard on which were printed words in raised letters.
  • As soon as I could spell a few words my teacher gave me slips of cardboard on which were printed words in raised letters.
  • Nothing delighted me so much as this game.
  • Whenever anything delighted or interested me she talked it over with me just as if she were a little girl herself.
  • What many children think of with dread, as a painful plodding through grammar, hard sums and harder definitions, is to-day one of my most precious memories.
  • Few know what joy it is to feel the roses pressing softly into the hand, or the beautiful motion of the lilies as they sway in the morning breeze.
  • The large, downy peaches would reach themselves into my hand, and as the joyous breezes flew about the trees the apples tumbled at my feet.
  • When I returned I felt a big cat brush past me as I opened the door.
  • As if it were yesterday I remember the preparations, the departure with my teacher and my mother, the journey, and finally the arrival in Boston.
  • When the train at last pulled into the station at Boston it was as if a beautiful fairy tale had come true.
  • I remember the surprise and the pain I felt as I noticed that they placed their hands over mine when I talked to them and that they read books with their fingers.
  • One day spent with the blind children made me feel thoroughly at home in my new environment, and I looked eagerly from one pleasant experience to another as the days flew swiftly by.
  • I could not quite convince myself that there was much world left, for I regarded Boston as the beginning and the end of creation.
  • I idealized them as the bravest and most generous men that ever sought a home in a strange land.
  • I thought they desired the freedom of their fellow men as well as their own.
  • At last, however, the sea, as if weary of its new toy, threw me back on the shore, and in another instant I was clasped in my teacher's arms.
  • The breakers would swoop back to gather themselves for a mightier leap, and I clung to the rock, tense, fascinated, as I felt the dash and roar of the rushing sea!
  • This feat pleased me highly, as his body was very heavy, and it took all my strength to drag him half a mile.
  • I was never still a moment; my life was as full of motion as those little insects that crowd a whole existence into one brief day.
  • "To-morrow to the chase!" was their good-night shout as the circle of merry friends broke up for the night.
  • The men slept in the hall outside our door, and I could feel the deep breathing of the dogs and the hunters as they lay on their improvised beds.
  • At dawn I was awakened by the smell of coffee, the rattling of guns, and the heavy footsteps of the men as they strode about, promising themselves the greatest luck of the season.
  • At last the men mounted, and, as they say in the old songs, away went the steeds with bridles ringing and whips cracking and hounds racing ahead, and away went the champion hunters "with hark and whoop and wild halloo!"
  • I called him Black Beauty, as I had just read the book, and he resembled his namesake in every way, from his glossy black coat to the white star on his forehead.
  • We always returned to the cottage with armfuls of laurel, goldenrod, ferns and gorgeous swamp-flowers such as grow only in the South.
  • It was very difficult to walk over, the ties were wide apart and so narrow that one felt as if one were walking on knives.
  • As the train rumbled by, the trestle shook and swayed until I thought we should be dashed to the chasm below.
  • Shrunk and cold, As if her veins were sapless and old, And she rose up decrepitly For a last dim look at earth and sea.
  • The rafters creaked and strained, and the branches of the trees surrounding the house rattled and beat against the windows, as the winds rioted up and down the country.
  • As the days wore on, the drifts gradually shrunk, but before they were wholly gone another storm came, so that I scarcely felt the earth under my feet once all winter.
  • As I talked, happy thoughts fluttered up out of my words that might perhaps have struggled in vain to escape my fingers.
  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
  • I place my hand on the hand of the speaker so lightly as not to impede its movements.
  • The position of the hand is as easy to feel as it is to see.
  • Constant practice makes the fingers very flexible, and some of my friends spell rapidly--about as fast as an expert writes on a typewriter.
  • My eyes fill with tears now as I think how my mother pressed me close to her, speechless and trembling with delight, taking in every syllable that I spoke, while little Mildred seized my free hand and kissed it and danced, and my father expressed his pride and affection in a big silence.
  • I thought then that I was "making up a story," as children say, and I eagerly sat down to write it before the ideas should slip from me.
  • Words and images came tripping to my finger ends, and as I thought out sentence after sentence, I wrote them on my braille slate.
  • I carried the little story to the post-office myself, feeling as if I were walking on air.
  • As I lay in my bed that night, I wept as I hope few children have wept.
  • As I lay in my bed that night, I wept as I hope few children have wept.
  • I represent my teacher as saying to me of the golden autumn leaves, "Yes, they are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer"--an idea direct from Miss Canby's story.
  • This habit of assimilating what pleased me and giving it out again as my own appears in much of my early correspondence and my first attempts at writing.
  • The young writer, as Stevenson has said, instinctively tries to copy whatever seems most admirable, and he shifts his admiration with astonishing versatility.
  • Mr. Higinbotham, President of the World's Fair, kindly gave me permission to touch the exhibits, and with an eagerness as insatiable as that with which Pizarro seized the treasures of Peru, I took in the glories of the Fair with my fingers.
  • Whenever it was possible, I touched the machinery while it was in motion, so as to get a clearer idea how the stones were weighed, cut, and polished.
  • I had a French grammar in raised print, and as I already knew some French, I often amused myself by composing in my head short exercises, using the new words as I came across them, and ignoring rules and other technicalities as much as possible.
  • I even tried, without aid, to master the French pronunciation, as I found all the letters and sounds described in the book.
  • I remember him as a man of rare, sweet nature and of wide experience.
  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.
  • I learned for the first time to know an author, to recognize his style as I recognize the clasp of a friend's hand.
  • I thought I might just as well describe my pet in order to know it--order, vertebrate; division, quadruped; class, mammalia; genus, felinus; species, cat; individual, Tabby.
  • It was very amusing but I did not like it nearly so well as "Wilhelm Tell."
  • I still regarded arithmetic as a system of pitfalls.
  • So long as we felt his loving presence and knew that he took a watchful interest in our work, fraught with so many difficulties, we could not be discouraged.
  • We read together, "As You Like It," Burke's "Speech on Conciliation with America," and Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson."
  • The papers were difficult, and I felt very anxious as I wrote out my answers on the typewriter.
  • Mr. Gilman spelled to me what I had written, and I made such changes as I thought necessary, and he inserted them.
  • In that case I correct only such mistakes as I can recall in the few minutes allowed, and make notes of these corrections at the end of my paper.
  • As I have said before, I had no aptitude for mathematics; the different points were not explained to me as fully as I wished.
  • As I have said before, I had no aptitude for mathematics; the different points were not explained to me as fully as I wished.
  • In the wonderland of Mind I should be as free as another.
  • The lectures are spelled into my hand as rapidly as possible, and much of the individuality of the lecturer is lost to me in the effort to keep in the race.
  • Last year, my second year at Radcliffe, I studied English composition, the Bible as English composition, the governments of America and Europe, the Odes of Horace, and Latin comedy.
  • The mind drops them as a branch drops its overripe fruit.
  • But when a great scholar like Professor Kittredge interprets what the master said, it is "as if new sight were given the blind."
  • You ransack your budget of historic facts much as you would hunt for a bit of silk in a rag-bag.
  • One of them is the precious science of patience, which teaches us that we should take our education as we would take a walk in the country, leisurely, our minds hospitably open to impressions of every sort.
  • As I have said, I did not study regularly during the early years of my education; nor did I read according to rule.
  • We had hurried through the dish-washing after luncheon, in order that we might have as long an afternoon as possible for the story.
  • As we hastened through the long grass toward the hammock, the grasshoppers swarmed about us and fastened themselves on our clothes, and I remember that my teacher insisted upon picking them all off before we sat down, which seemed to me an unnecessary waste of time.
  • Before we began the story Miss Sullivan explained to me the things that she knew I should not understand, and as we read on she explained the unfamiliar words.
  • They laid their treasures at my feet, and I accepted them as we accept the sunshine and the love of our friends.
  • Circumscribed as my life was in so many ways, I had to look between the covers of books for news of the world that lay outside my own.
  • I read it as much as possible without the help of notes or dictionary, and I always like to translate the episodes that please me especially.
  • Ruth is so loyal and gentle-hearted, we cannot help loving her, as she stands with the reapers amid the waving corn.
  • I could see, absolutely see, the dagger and Lady Macbeth's little white hand--the dreadful stain was as real to me as to the grief-stricken queen.
  • My delight in them is as varied as my moods.
  • The little songs and the sonnets have a meaning for me as fresh and wonderful as the dramas.
  • Though I believe it is no longer considered valid, yet I have kept it ever since as one of my treasures.
  • All things transitory But as symbols are sent.
  • In the summer of 1901 I visited Nova Scotia, and had opportunities such as I had not enjoyed before to make the acquaintance of the ocean.
  • As they passed us, the large craft and the gunboats in the harbour saluted and the seamen shouted applause for the master of the only little sail-boat that ventured out into the storm.
  • Thus it is that Even as the roots, shut in the darksome earth, Share in the tree-top's joyance, and conceive Of sunshine and wide air and winged things, By sympathy of nature, so do I gave evidence of things unseen.
  • As soon as my examinations were over, Miss Sullivan and I hastened to this green nook, where we have a little cottage on one of the three lakes for which Wrentham is famous.
  • As soon as my examinations were over, Miss Sullivan and I hastened to this green nook, where we have a little cottage on one of the three lakes for which Wrentham is famous.
  • The children who crowd these grimy alleys, half-clad and underfed, shrink away from your outstretched hand as if from a blow.
  • Then would their children grow stately as noble trees, and their thoughts sweet and pure as wayside flowers.
  • If there are children around, nothing pleases me so much as to frolic with them.
  • As my finger tips trace line and curve, they discover the thought and emotion which the artist has portrayed.
  • In imagination I can hear Homer singing, as with unsteady, hesitating steps he gropes his way from camp to camp--singing of life, of love, of war, of the splendid achievements of a noble race.
  • Be this as it may, I know that I can feel the heart-throbs of the ancient Greeks in their marble gods and goddesses.
  • I enjoy having a play described to me while it is being acted on the stage far more than reading it, because then it seems as if I were living in the midst of stirring events.
  • In the king's face, which he wore as a mask, there was a remoteness and inaccessibility of grief which I shall never forget.
  • I had often read the story, but I had never felt the charm of Rip's slow, quaint, kind ways as I did in the play.
  • Then they rose to fight the duel, and I followed the swift thrusts and parries of the swords and the waverings of poor Bob as his courage oozed out at his finger ends.
  • He asked me to indicate as far as I could the gestures and action that should go with the lines.
  • Sometimes, it is true, a sense of isolation enfolds me like a cold mist as I sit alone and wait at life's shut gate.
  • I have met people so empty of joy, that when I clasped their frosty finger tips, it seemed as if I were shaking hands with a northeast storm.
  • As a child I loved to sit on his knee and clasp his great hand with one of mine, while Miss Sullivan spelled into the other his beautiful words about God and the spiritual world.
  • Love your Heavenly Father with your whole heart and soul, love every child of God as much as ever you can, and remember that the possibilities of good are greater than the possibilities of evil; and you have the key to Heaven.
  • In spite of the lapse of years, they seem so close to me that I should not think it strange if at any moment they should clasp my hand and speak words of endearment as they used to before they went away.
  • After that I saw Dr. Holmes many times and learned to love the man as well as the poet.
  • I also recited "Laus Deo," and as I spoke the concluding verses, he placed in my hands a statue of a slave from whose crouching figure the fetters were falling, even as they fell from Peter's limbs when the angel led him forth out of prison.
  • He is never quite so happy as when he has a little deaf child in his arms.
  • One does not need to read "A Boy I Knew" to understand him--the most generous, sweet-natured boy I ever knew, a good friend in all sorts of weather, who traces the footprints of love in the life of dogs as well as in that of his fellowmen.
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.
  • They were all gentle and sympathetic and I felt the charm of their manner as much as I had felt the brilliancy of their essays and poems.
  • I could not keep pace with all these literary folk as they glanced from subject to subject and entered into deep dispute, or made conversation sparkle with epigrams and happy witticisms.
  • Helen Keller's letters are important, not only as a supplementary story of her life, but as a demonstration of her growth in thought and expression--the growth which in itself has made her distinguished.
  • Even when she did not fully understand words or ideas, she liked to set them down as though she did.
  • His wings are as long as my arm, and his bill is as long as my foot.
  • She has eight puppies, and she thinks there never were such fine puppies as hers.
  • I think mother will be glad to make the dress for you, and when you wear it you will look as pretty as a rose.
  • I think puppies can feel very home-sick, as well as little girls.
  • The flowers were wilted, but the kind thought which came with them was as sweet and as fresh as newly pulled violets.
  • They do not make honey for us, like the bees, but many of them are as beautiful as the flowers they light upon, and they always delight the hearts of little children.
  • Now I am as happy as the little birds, because I can speak and perhaps I shall sing too.
  • All the love that is in our hearts comes from him, as all the light which is in the flowers comes from the sun.
  • And He is happier than any of us because He is greater than any of us, and also because He not merely SEES your happiness as we do, but He also MADE it.
  • He gives it to you as the sun gives light and color to the rose.
  • All this is what you are to think of and to understand more and more as you grow older.
  • I am very much delighted to hear of your new acquisition--that you "talk with your mouth" as well as with your fingers.
  • The tongue is so serviceable a member (taking all sorts of shapes, just as is wanted),--the teeth, the lips, the roof of the mouth, all ready to help, and so heap up the sound of the voice into the solid bits which we call consonants, and make room for the curiously shaped breathings which we call vowels!
  • It almost makes me think the world would get along as well without seeing and hearing as with them.
  • Perhaps people would be better in a great many ways, for they could not fight as they do now.
  • Then think how much kindness you are sure of as long as you live.
  • The grass was as green as though it was springtime, and the golden ears of corn gathered together in heaps in the great fields looked very pretty.
  • I thank thee for all thy good wishes, and wish thee as many.
  • His parents are too poor to pay to have the little fellow sent to school; so, instead of giving me a dog, the gentlemen are going to help make Tommy's life as bright and joyous as mine.
  • I wonder if the May-days in England are as beautiful as they are here.
  • Please think of me always as your loving little sister, HELEN KELLER.
  • It is very beautiful to think that you can tell so many people of the heavenly Father's tender love for all His children even when they are not gentle and noble as He wishes them to be.
  • I hope too, that Bishop Brooks' whole life will be as rich in happiness as the month of May is full of blossoms and singing birds.
  • Perhaps the Old Sea God as he lay asleep upon the shore, heard the soft music of growing things--the stir of life in the earth's bosom, and his stormy heart was angry, because he knew that his and Winter's reign was almost at an end.
  • My dear Carrie--You are to look upon it as a most positive proof of my love that I write to you to-day.
  • I do not write on a Braille tablet, as you suppose, but on a grooved board like the piece which I enclose.
  • I hope you will write to me as often as you can.
  • Especially important are such details as her feeling the rush of the water by putting her hand on the window.
  • It seemed as if it were some living thing rushing on to some terrible fate.
  • I was only doing as the Canadians do, while I was in their country, and besides I honor England's good queen.
  • His beautiful word-pictures made us feel as if we were sitting in the shadow of San Marco, dreaming, or sailing upon the moonlit canal....
  • I hope when I visit Venice, as I surely shall some day, that Mr. Munsell will go with me.
  • You see, none of my friends describe things to me so vividly and so beautifully as he does....
  • Please favour her with every facility to examine the exhibits in the several Departments, and extend to her such other courtesies as may be possible.
  • Several hundred books, including many fine ones, were sent to me in a short time, as well as money and encouragement.
  • Our friends were greatly surprised to see us, as they had not expected us before the last of this month.
  • Mr. Wade is just as dear and good as ever!
  • The play seemed so real, we almost forgot where we were, and believed we were watching the genuine scenes as they were acted so long ago.
  • As I sit by the window writing to you, it is so lovely to have the soft, cool breezes fan my cheek and to feel that the hard work of last year is over!
  • Teacher and Mrs. Hopkins both say you must come as soon as you can!
  • Perhaps our guardian angel gathers them up as we drop them, and will give them back to us in the beautiful sometime when we have grown wiser, and learned how to use them rightly.
  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.
  • Sometimes it really seems as if the task which we have set ourselves were more than we can accomplish; but at other times I enjoy my work more than I can say.
  • I wish it were not such a bother to move, especially as we have to do it so often!...
  • But, as you know, my heart is usually brimful of happiness.
  • Would a college at Havana not be the noblest and most enduring monument that could be raised to the brave men of the "Maine," as well as a source of infinite good to all concerned?
  • On the other hand, it would be a pledge to the world that we intend to stand by our declaration of war, and give Cuba to the Cubans, as soon as we have fitted them to assume the duties and responsibilities of a self-governing people....
  • She looked as if she had just risen from the foam of the sea, and her loveliness was like a strain of heavenly music.
  • But somehow, I should prefer to see the originals in the place where Genius meant them to remain, not only as a hymn of praise to the gods, but also as a monument of the glory of Greece.
  • I already have the seventh and eighth books of the "Aeneid" and one book of the "Iliad," all of which is most fortunate, as I have come almost to the end of my embossed text-books.
  • As to the two-handed alphabet, I think it is much easier for those who have sight than the manual alphabet; for most of the letters look like the large capitals in books; but I think when it comes to teaching a deaf-blind person to spell, the manual alphabet is much more convenient, and less conspicuous....
  • I feel as if I ought to give up the idea of going to college altogether: for not all the knowledge in the world could make me happy, if obtained at such a cost.
  • I cannot help feeling as if I knew its gifted author.
  • Consequently, I did not do so well as I should have done, if Teacher had been allowed to read the Algebra and Geometry to me.
  • The facts about the braille examinations are as follows:
  • The Proctor also was a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way; and, as they were both unfamiliar with my speech, they could not readily understand what I said to them.
  • In the German class Miss Sullivan interpreted to me as well as she could what the teacher said.
  • We could hear the yells of the boys and the cheers of the lookers-on as plainly in our room as if we had been on the field.
  • I stood in the middle of the church, where the vibrations from the great organ were strongest, and I felt the mighty waves of sound beat against me, as the great billows beat against a little ship at sea.
  • I am afraid I find fault with the poem as much as I enjoy it.
  • Is it possible for the College to accommodate itself to these unprecedented conditions, so as to enable me to pursue my studies at Radcliffe?
  • My friends think it very strange that they should hesitate so long, especially when I have not asked them to simplify my work in the least, but only to modify it so as to meet the existing circumstances.
  • Still I could not shut my eyes to the force and weight of their arguments, and I saw plainly that I must abandon--'s scheme as impracticable.
  • Tell me truly, do you think me as bad as that?
  • There's no great hurry, and I want to get as much as possible out of my studies.
  • I have always accepted other peoples experiences and observations as a matter of course.
  • I only spoke a few words, as I did not know I was expected to speak until a few minutes before I was called upon.
  • Even Greek can be embossed in it, as you know.
  • The way in which Miss Keller wrote her story shows, as nothing else can show, the difficulties she had to overcome.
  • As a matter of fact, most of the advice she has received and heeded has led to excisions rather than to additions.
  • When she is talking with an intimate friend, however, her hand goes quickly to her friend's face to see, as she says, "the twist of the mouth."
  • "Yes," she replied, "but I like to play also, and I feel sometimes as if I were a music box with all the play shut up inside me."
  • Her life has been a series of attempts to do whatever other people do, and to do it as well.
  • If any one whom she is touching laughs at a joke, she laughs, too, just as if she had heard it.
  • She cannot sing and she cannot play the piano, although, as some early experiments show, she could learn mechanically to beat out a tune on the keys.
  • The vibration of the air as the organ notes swelled made her sway in answer.
  • She reaches out and touches the leaves, and the world of growing things is hers, as truly as it is ours, to enjoy while she holds the leaves in her fingers and smells the blossoms, and to remember when the walk is done.
  • True, her view of life is highly coloured and full of poetic exaggeration; the universe, as she sees it, is no doubt a little better than it really is.
  • This sense is not, however, so finely developed as in some other blind people.
  • Anything shallower than a half-inch bas-relief is a blank to her, so far as it expresses an idea of beauty.
  • Miss Keller puts her fingers lightly over the hand of one who is talking to her and gets the words as rapidly as they can be spelled.
  • As she explains, she is not conscious of the single letters or of separate words.
  • Most educated blind people know several, but it would save trouble if, as Miss Keller suggests, English braille were universally adopted.
  • Miss Keller does not as a rule read very fast, but she reads deliberately, not so much because she feels the words less quickly than we see then, as because it is one of her habits of mind to do things thoroughly and well.
  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.
  • As her intellect grew she became less dependent on this sense.
  • The question of a special "sixth sense," such as people have ascribed. to Miss Keller, is a delicate one.
  • All that she is, all that she has done, can be explained directly, except such things in every human being as never can be explained.
  • She had no conception of God before she heard the word "God," as her comments very clearly show.
  • Her sense of time is excellent, but whether it would have developed as a special faculty cannot be known, for she has had a watch since she was seven years old.
  • Yesterday I read to her the story of 'Macbeth,' as told by Charles and Mary Lamb.
  • As head of the Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston, he heard of Laura Bridgman and had her brought to the Institution on October 4, 1837.
  • Science and faith together led him to try to make his way into the soul which he believed was born in Laura Bridgman as in every other human being.
  • As an investigator he kept always the scientist's attitude.
  • As soon as a thing was done, a definite goal passed, the teacher did not always look back and describe the way she had come.
  • As soon as a thing was done, a definite goal passed, the teacher did not always look back and describe the way she had come.
  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.
  • Why, one might just as well say that a two-year-old child converses fluently when he says 'apple give,' or 'baby walk go.'
  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.
  • Some of the details she had forgotten, as she grew more and more to generalize.
  • Mr. Anagnos wrote in the report of the Perkins Institution, dated November 27, 1888: At my urgent request, Helen, accompanied by her mother and her teacher, came to the North in the last week of May, and spent several months with us as our guests....
  • As we approached the house I saw a child standing in the doorway, and Captain Keller said, There she is.
  • She is large, strong, and ruddy, and as unrestrained in her movements as a young colt.
  • Then I showed her the doll and spelled the word again, holding the doll toward her as I held the cake.
  • I very soon made up my mind that I could do nothing with Helen in the midst of the family, who have always allowed her to do exactly as she pleased.
  • Every thwarted desire was the signal for a passionate outburst, and as she grew older and stronger, these tempests became more violent.
  • As I began to teach her, I was beset by many difficulties.
  • To get her to do the simplest thing, such as combing her hair or washing her hands or buttoning her boots, it was necessary to use force, and, of course, a distressing scene followed.
  • As I wrote you, I meant to go slowly at first.
  • She accepted everything I did for her as a matter of course, and refused to be caressed, and there was no way of appealing to her affection or sympathy or childish love of approbation.
  • I hurried the preparations for our departure as much as possible, and here we are.
  • But fortunately for us both, I am a little stronger, and quite as obstinate when I set out.
  • I finally succeeded in getting her on the bed and covered her up, and she lay curled up as near the edge of the bed as possible.
  • She kept going to the door, as if she expected some one, and every now and then she would touch her cheek, which is her sign for her mother, and shake her head sadly.
  • I don't think she has any special tenderness for them--I have never seen her caress them; but she dresses and undresses them many times during the day and handles them exactly as she has seen her mother and the nurse handle her baby sister.
  • As I have said before, she is wonderfully bright and active and as quick as lightning in her movements.
  • As I have said before, she is wonderfully bright and active and as quick as lightning in her movements.
  • Helen evidently knew where she was as soon as she touched the boxwood hedges, and made many signs which I did not understand.
  • She is sitting by me as I write, her face serene and happy, crocheting a long red chain of Scotch wool.
  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"
  • I think "no" and "yes," conveyed by a shake or a nod of my head, have become facts as apparent to her as hot and cold or as the difference between pain and pleasure.
  • They have promised to let me have a free hand and help me as much as possible.
  • She had put the napkin under her chin, instead of pinning it at the back, as was her custom.
  • We began the lesson as usual.
  • After spelling half the words, she stopped suddenly, as if a thought had flashed into her mind, and felt for the napkin.
  • This morning she planted her doll and showed me that she expected her to grow as tall as I. You must see that she is very bright, but you have no idea how cunning she is.
  • Last week she made her doll an apron, and it was done as well as any child of her age could do it.
  • She dropped the mug and stood as one transfixed.
  • These observations have given me a clue to the method to be followed in teaching Helen language.I SHALL TALK INTO HER HAND AS WE TALK INTO THE BABY'S EARS.
  • She learns because she can't help it, just as the bird learns to fly.
  • Helen is learning adjectives and adverbs as easily as she learned nouns.
  • If she wanted to indicate something large, she spread the fingers of both hands as wide as she could, and brought them together, as if to clasp a big ball.
  • Indeed, I feel as if I had never seen anything until now, Helen finds so much to ask about along the way.
  • I need a teacher quite as much as Helen.
  • WE MAKE A SORT OF GAME OF IT and try to see who can find the words most quickly, Helen with her fingers, or I with my eyes, and she learns as many new words as I can explain with the help of those she knows.
  • Helen is almost as eager to read as she is to talk.
  • I am glad Mr. Anagnos thinks so highly of me as a teacher.
  • It's queer how ready people always are with advice in any real or imaginary emergency, and no matter how many times experience has shown them to be wrong, they continue to set forth their opinions, as if they had received them from the Almighty!
  • I am teaching Helen the square-hand letters as a sort of diversion.
  • We all feel refreshed, as if we'd had a shower-bath.
  • Helen's as lively as a cricket.
  • My little pupil continues to manifest the same eagerness to learn as at first.
  • During our walks she keeps up a continual spelling, and delights to accompany it with actions such as skipping, hopping, jumping, running, walking fast, walking slow, and the like.
  • Helen's pencil-writing is excellent, as you will see from the enclosed letter, which she wrote for her own amusement.
  • "when?" especially "why?" all day long, and as her intelligence grows her inquiries become more insistent.
  • Of course she asks many questions that are not as intelligent as these.
  • I read the letter at the supper-table, and Mrs. Keller exclaimed: "My, Miss Annie, Helen writes almost as well as that now!"
  • It was amusing to see her hold it before her eyes and spell the sentences out on her fingers, just as I had done.
  • Then she got up and stood very still, as if listening with her feet for Mildred's "thump, thump."
  • It seems as if a child who could see and hear until her nineteenth month must retain some of her first impressions, though ever so faintly.
  • "What colour is think?" was one of the restful questions she asked, as we swung to and fro in the hammock.
  • Quick as a flash she said, "My think is white, Viney's think is black."
  • She wrote it out of her own head, as the children say.
  • In her reports Miss Sullivan speaks of "lessons" as if they came in regular order.
  • I then said to her with the finger alphabet, "wind fast," or "wind slow," holding her hands and showing her how to do as I wished.
  • She moved her finger from one printed character to another as I formed each letter on my fingers.
  • As she had now learned to express her ideas on paper, I next taught her the braille system.
  • She can add and subtract with great rapidity up to the sum of one hundred; and she knows the multiplication tables as far as the FIVES.
  • When walking or riding she often gives the names of the people we meet almost as soon as we recognize them.
  • They were as gentle as kittens; but I told her they would get wild and fierce as they grew older.
  • Helen is as eager to have stories told her as any hearing child I ever knew.
  • TOO MUCH EXPLANATION DIRECTS THE CHILD'S ATTENTION TO WORDS AND SENTENCES, SO THAT HE FAILS TO GET THE THOUGHT AS A WHOLE.
  • Helen is invited to all the children's entertainments, and I take her to as many as I can.
  • I want her to know children and to be with them as much as possible.
  • My fingers and head ached; but Helen was as fresh and full of spirit as when we left home.
  • They relieved me as much as possible.
  • I never was so glad to get out of a place as I was to leave that church!
  • Her motions are often more expressive than any words, and she is as graceful as a nymph.
  • I wonder if the days seem as interminable to you as they do to me.
  • Why, it is as easy to teach the name of an idea, if it is clearly formulated in the child's mind, as to teach the name of an object.
  • If you had called these sensations respectively BLACK and WHITE, he would have adopted them as readily; but he would mean by BLACK and WHITE the same things that he means by SWEET and SOUR.
  • Indeed, her whole body is so finely organized that she seems to use it as a medium for bringing herself into closer relations with her fellow creatures.
  • She would turn her head, smile, and act as though she had heard what was said.
  • This time her countenance changed whenever she was spoken to, but there was not such a decided lighting up of the features as when I had held her hand.
  • When her attention was drawn to a marble slab inscribed with the name FLORENCE in relief, she dropped upon the ground as though looking for something, then turned to me with a face full of trouble, and asked, "Were is poor little Florence?"
  • As she continued to ask these distressing questions, we left the cemetery.
  • She will handle the baby as tenderly as the most careful nurse could desire.
  • She bends over her book with a look of intense interest, and as the forefinger of her left hand runs along the line, she spells out the words with the other hand; but often her motions are so rapid as to be unintelligible even to those accustomed to reading the swift and varied movements of her fingers.
  • They like juicy fruit to eat as well as people, and they are hungry.
  • I got the milk to show her that she had used the correct word; but I did not let her drink it until she had, with my assistance, made a complete sentence, as "Give Helen some milk to drink."
  • This is especially true of her earlier lessons, when her knowledge of language was so slight as to make explanation impossible.
  • She continues to manifest the same eagerness to learn as at first.
  • The cow loves to eat grass as well as girl does bread and butter and milk.
  • I tried to describe to her the appearance of a camel; but, as we were not allowed to touch the animal, I feared that she did not get a correct idea of its shape.
  • I watched her for some time as she moved about, trying to take long strides in order to carry out the idea I had given her of a camel's gait.
  • From Miss Sullivan's part of this report I give her most important comments and such biographical matter as does not appear elsewhere in the present volume.
  • Of course, you cannot help it, and I love you just as well as if you were the most beautiful creature in the world.
  • There was a hopeless look in the dull eye that I could not help noticing, and then, as I was thinking where I had seen that horse before, she looked full at me and said, 'Black Beauty, is that you?'
  • As the design was somewhat complicated, the slightest jar made the structure fall.
  • I regard my pupil as a free and active being, whose own spontaneous impulses must be my surest guide.
  • I have always talked to Helen exactly as I would talk to a seeing and hearing child, and I have insisted that other people should do the same.
  • She always reads such books as seeing and hearing children of her age read and enjoy.
  • She ran her fingers along the lines, finding the words she knew and guessing at the meaning of others, in a way that would convince the most conservative of educators that a little deaf child, if given the opportunity, will learn to read as easily and naturally as ordinary children.
  • One day as we left the library I noticed that she appeared more serious than usual, and I asked the cause.
  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.
  • In the case of Helen, as in that of Laura Bridgman, disappointment was inevitable.
  • As we were passing a large globe a short time after she had written the questions, she stopped before it and asked, "Who made the REAL world?"
  • I told her that God was everywhere, and that she must not think of Him as a person, but as the life, the mind, the soul of everything.
  • I then asked her, "Can you think of your soul as separate from your body?"
  • Why cannot we know as much about heaven as we do about foreign countries?
  • "But," said Helen, quickly, "I think God could make some more worlds as well as He made this one."
  • The fact that sin exists, and that great misery results from it, dawned gradually upon her mind as she understood more and more clearly the lives and experiences of those around her.
  • It may be true, as some maintain, that language cannot express to us much beyond what we have lived and experienced; but I have always observed that children manifest the greatest delight in the lofty, poetic language which we are too ready to think beyond their comprehension.
  • Indeed, only such explanations should be given as are really essential.
  • Helen has the vitality of feeling, the freshness and eagerness of interest, and the spiritual insight of the artistic temperament, and naturally she has a more active and intense joy in life, simply as life, and in nature, books, and people than less gifted mortals.
  • There has been much discussion of such of Miss Sullivan's statements and explanations as have been published before.
  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.
  • We do not take in a sentence word by word, but as a whole.
  • By watching them, she learned to treat her pupil as nearly as possible like an ordinary child.
  • Books supplemented, perhaps equaled in importance the manual alphabet, as a means of teaching language.
  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.
  • Another friend, who is as familiar with French as with English, finds her French much more intelligible than her English.
  • I made no effort to teach her to speak, because I regarded her inability to watch the lips of others as an insurmountable obstacle.
  • I knew that Laura Bridgman had shown the same intuitive desire to produce sounds, and had even learned to pronounce a few simple words, which she took great delight in using, and I did not doubt that Helen could accomplish as much as this.
  • She continued to exercise her vocal organs mechanically, as ordinary children do.
  • She kept one hand on the singer's mouth, while the other rested on the piano, and she stood in this position as long as any one would sing to her, and afterward she would make a continuous sound which she called singing.
  • In reading the lips she is not so quick or so accurate as some reports declare.
  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.
  • I also discuss the political situation with my dear father, and we decide the most perplexing questions quite as satisfactorily to ourselves as if I could see and hear.
  • We shall speak, yes, and sing, too, as God intended we should speak and sing.
  • In this, as in all other things, Miss Sullivan has been the wise teacher.
  • Her service as a teacher of English is not to be measured by her own skill in composition.
  • She excels other deaf people because she was taught as if she were normal.
  • On the other hand, the peculiar value to her of language, which ordinary people take for granted as a necessary part of them like their right hand, made her think about language and love it.
  • As we went in she repeated these words, 'Out of the cloud-folds of his garments Winter shakes the snow.'
  • As I had never heard it, I inquired of several of my friends if they recalled the words; no one seemed to remember it.
  • In mentioning a visit to Lexington, Mass., she writes: As we rode along we could see the forest monarchs bend their proud forms to listen to the little children of the woodlands whispering their secrets.
  • As we had never seen or heard of any such story as this before, we inquired of her where she read it; she replied, "I did not read it; it is my story for Mr. Anagnos's birthday."
  • As we had never seen or heard of any such story as this before, we inquired of her where she read it; she replied, "I did not read it; it is my story for Mr. Anagnos's birthday."
  • As I had never read this story, or even heard of the book, I inquired of Helen if she knew anything about the matter, and found she did not.
  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.
  • This became a difficult task, as her publishers in Philadelphia had retired from business many years ago; however, it was eventually discovered that her residence is at Wilmington, Delaware, and copies of the second edition of the book, 1889, were obtained from her.
  • She thinks it is wonderful that two people should write stories so much alike; but she still considers her own as original.
  • As he came in sight of the rose-bushes that grew near the side of the house, he suddenly clapped his hands, and with a little shout of joy stopped to look at them; they were all covered with lovely rosebuds.
  • Some were red, some white, and others pale pink, and they were just peeping out of the green leaves, as rosy-faced children peep out from their warm beds in wintertime before they are quite willing to get up.
  • After awhile he went nearer, and looking closely at the buds, found that they were folded up, leaf over leaf, as eyelids are folded over sleeping eyes, so that Birdie thought they must be asleep.
  • The fresh morning air blew gently in my face, as if to welcome me, and be my merry playmate, and the sun looked at me with a warm and tender smile.
  • "The Frost Fairies" and "The Frost Kings" are given in full, as the differences are as important as the resemblances:
  • Every year Santa Claus takes a journey over the world in a sleigh drawn by a strong and rapid steed called "Rudolph."
  • But his most wonderful work is the painting of the trees, which look, after his task is done, as if they were covered with the brightest layers of gold and rubies; and are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer.
  • The fairies promised obedience and soon started on their journey, dragging the great glass jars and vases along, as well as they could, and now and then grumbling a little at having such hard work to do, for they were idle fairies, and liked play better than work.
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the king, and he had started out to look for his tardy servants, and just as they were all hidden, he came along slowly, looking on all sides for the fairies.
  • You must know that King Frost, like all other kings, has great treasures of gold and precious stones; but as he is a generous old monarch, he endeavours to make a right use of his riches.
  • So he called together the merry little fairies of his household and, showing them the jars and vases containing his treasures, he bade them carry them to the palace of Santa Claus as quickly as they could.
  • The fairies promised obedience, and were off in a twinkling, dragging the heavy jars and vases along after them as well as they could, now and then grumbling a little at having such a hard task, for they were idle fairies and loved to play better than to work.
  • "The leaves are as lovely as the flowers!" cried they, in their delight.
  • Now Helen, in her letter of February, 1890 (quoted above), alludes to this story of Miss Canby's as a dream "WHICH I HAD A LONG TIME AGO WHEN I WAS A VERY LITTLE CHILD."
  • Her father, Captain Keller, wrote to me as follows on the subject:
  • Her testimony is as follows:
  • Helen told me that for a long time she had thought of Jack Frost as a king, because of the many treasures which he possessed.
  • Of the sources of his vocabulary he is, for the most part, as unaware as he is of the moment when he ate the food which makes a bit of his thumbnail.
  • Surely the writer must become as a little child to see things like that.
  • From the early sketch I take a few passages which seem to me, without making very much allowance for difference in time, almost as good as anything she has written since:
  • But early one morning the fever left me as mysteriously and unexpectedly as it had come, and I fell into a quiet sleep.
  • As soon as my strength returned, I began to take an interest in what the people around me were doing.
  • As soon as my strength returned, I began to take an interest in what the people around me were doing.
  • I would cling to my mother's dress as she went about her household duties, and my little hands felt every object and observed every motion, and in this way I learned a great many things.
  • I was continually spelling and acting out the words as I spelled them.
  • As soon as breakfast was over we hurried off to the shore.
  • As soon as breakfast was over we hurried off to the shore.
  • The beautiful, warm air was peculiarly fragrant, and I noticed it got cooler and fresher as we went on.
  • There is no affectation about them, and as they come straight from your heart, so they go straight to mine.
  • In the years when she was growing out of childhood, her style lost its early simplicity and became stiff and, as she says, "periwigged."
  • The style of the Bible is everywhere in Miss Keller's work, just as it is in the style of most great English writers.
  • In her style, as in what she writes about, we must concede to the artist what we deny to the autobiographer.
  • It seems worth while, however, to quote from some of her chance bits of writing, which are neither so informal as her letters nor so carefully composed as her story of her life.
  • They are regarded generally as far more appropriate in books and in public discourses than in the parlor or at the table.
  • For the first time since my entrance into Radcliffe I had the opportunity to make friends with all my classmates...
  • Tantalus, too, great as he was above all mortals, went down to the kingdom of the dead, never to return.
  • I shall never forget how the fury of battle throbbed in my veins--it seemed as if the tumultuous beating of my heart would stop my breath.
  • From the top of the hill where I stood I saw my army surging over a sunlit plain like angry breakers, and as they moved, I saw the green of fields, like the cool hollows between billows.
  • I plunged into the oncoming billows, as a strong swimmer dives into breakers, and struck, alas, 'tis true, the bedpost!
  • I was very fond of bananas, and one night I dreamed that I found a long string of them in the dining-room, near the cupboard, all peeled and deliciously ripe, and all I had to do was to stand under the string and eat as long as I could eat.
  • There are some who complain most energetically and inconsolably of any, because they are, as they say, doing their duty.
  • "What!" exclaimed the Indian as he went out the gate, "do you mean to starve us?"
  • The life which men praise and regard as successful is but one kind.
  • I determined to go into business at once, and not wait to acquire the usual capital, using such slender means as I had already got.
  • You will export such articles as the country affords, purely native products, much ice and pine timber and a little granite, always in native bottoms.
  • It is a labor to task the faculties of a man--such problems of profit and loss, of interest, of tare and tret, and gauging of all kinds in it, as demand a universal knowledge.
  • As this business was to be entered into without the usual capital, it may not be easy to conjecture where those means, that will still be indispensable to every such undertaking, were to be obtained.
  • I sometimes try my acquaintances by such tests as this--Who could wear a patch, or two extra seams only, over the knee?
  • Most behave as if they believed that their prospects for life would be ruined if they should do it.
  • We don garment after garment, as if we grew like exogenous plants by addition without.
  • Of what use this measuring of me if she does not measure my character, but only the breadth of my shoulders, as it were a peg to bang the coat on?
  • We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII, or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
  • When the soldier is hit by a cannonball, rags are as becoming as purple.
  • The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched.
  • It plays house, as well as horse, having an instinct for it.
  • You could sit up as late as you pleased, and, whenever you got up, go abroad without any landlord or house-lord dogging you for rent.
  • Many a man is harassed to death to pay the rent of a larger and more luxurious box who would not have frozen to death in such a box as this.
  • A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.
  • The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former....
  • The Indians had advanced so far as to regulate the effect of the wind by a mat suspended over the hole in the roof and moved by a string.
  • In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.
  • The rest pay an annual tax for this outside garment of all, become indispensable summer and winter, which would buy a village of Indian wigwams, but now helps to keep them poor as long as they live.
  • As I live, saith the Lord God, ye shall not have occasion any more to use this proverb in Israel.
  • Behold all souls are mine; as the soul of the father, so also the soul of the son is mine: the soul that sinneth, it shall die.
  • With consummate skill he has set his trap with a hair spring to catch comfort and independence, and then, as he turned away, got his own leg into it.
  • The mason who finishes the cornice of the palace returns at night perchance to a hut not so good as a wigwam.
  • Or I could refer you to Ireland, which is marked as one of the white or enlightened spots on the map.
  • Yet I have no doubt that that people's rulers are as wise as the average of civilized rulers.
  • Why should not our furniture be as simple as the Arab's or the Indian's?
  • When I think of the benefactors of the race, whom we have apotheosized as messengers from heaven, bearers of divine gifts to man, I do not see in my mind any retinue at their heels, any carload of fashionable furniture.
  • Or what if I were to allow--would it not be a singular allowance?--that our furniture should be more complex than the Arab's, in proportion as we are morally and intellectually his superiors!
  • He dwelt, as it were, in a tent in this world, and was either threading the valleys, or crossing the plains, or climbing the mountain-tops.
  • We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven.
  • We have adopted Christianity merely as an improved method of agri-culture.
  • In such a neighborhood as this, boards and shingles, lime and bricks, are cheaper and more easily obtained than suitable caves, or whole logs, or bark in sufficient quantities, or even well-tempered clay or flat stones.
  • With a little more wit we might use these materials so as to become richer than the richest now are, and make our civilization a blessing.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • They were pleasant spring days, in which the winter of man's discontent was thawing as well as the earth, and the life that had lain torpid began to stretch itself.
  • On the 1st of April it rained and melted the ice, and in the early part of the day, which was very foggy, I heard a stray goose groping about over the pond and cackling as if lost, or like the spirit of the fog.
  • It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap.
  • One large bundle held their all--bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens--all but the cat; she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.
  • One early thrush gave me a note or two as I drove along the woodland path.
  • Under the most splendid house in the city is still to be found the cellar where they store their roots as of old, and long after the superstructure has disappeared posterity remark its dent in the earth.
  • Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?
  • It is not the tailor alone who is the ninth part of a man; it is as much the preacher, and the merchant, and the farmer.
  • What reasonable man ever supposed that ornaments were something outward and in the skin merely--that the tortoise got his spotted shell, or the shell-fish its mother-o'-pearl tints, by such a contract as the inhabitants of Broadway their Trinity Church?
  • But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.
  • What if an equal ado were made about the ornaments of style in literature, and the architects of our bibles spent as much time about their cornices as the architects of our churches do?
  • Toss up a copper for it as well.
  • Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.
  • Methinks this would exercise their minds as much as mathematics.
  • They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or New York.
  • As if the main object were to talk fast and not to talk sensibly.
  • And so, if the railroad reached round the world, I think that I should keep ahead of you; and as for seeing the country and getting experience of that kind, I should have to cut your acquaintance altogether.
  • Such is the universal law, which no man can ever outwit, and with regard to the railroad even we may say it is as broad as it is long.
  • I desire to speak impartially on this point, and as one not interested in the success or failure of the present economical and social arrangements.
  • One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon.
  • As for the religion and love of art of the builders, it is much the same all the world over, whether the building be an Egyptian temple or the United States Bank.
  • To meet the objections of some inveterate cavillers, I may as well state, that if I dined out occasionally, as I always had done, and I trust shall have opportunities to do again, it was frequently to the detriment of my domestic arrangements.
  • In cold weather it was no little amusement to bake several small loaves of this in succession, tending and turning them as carefully as an Egyptian his hatching eggs.
  • They were a real cereal fruit which I ripened, and they had to my senses a fragrance like that of other noble fruits, which I kept in as long as possible by wrapping them in cloths.
  • Finally, as for salt, that grossest of groceries, to obtain this might be a fit occasion for a visit to the seashore, or, if I did without it altogether, I should probably drink the less water.
  • As for a habitat, if I were not permitted still to squat, I might purchase one acre at the same price for which the land I cultivated was sold--namely, eight dollars and eight cents.
  • But as it was, I considered that I enhanced the value of the land by squatting on it.
  • There is a plenty of such chairs as I like best in the village garrets to be had for taking them away.
  • Each load looks as if it contained the contents of a dozen shanties; and if one shanty is poor, this is a dozen times as poor.
  • It is the same as if all these traps were buckled to a man's belt, and he could not move over the rough country where our lines are cast without dragging them--dragging his trap.
  • I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn; great trunk, little trunk, bandbox, and bundle.
  • The whole of my winters, as well as most of my summers, I had free and clear for study.
  • As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure.
  • I also dreamed that I might gather the wild herbs, or carry evergreens to such villagers as loved to be reminded of the woods, even to the city, by hay-cart loads.
  • One young man of my acquaintance, who has inherited some acres, told me that he thought he should live as I did, if he had the means.
  • It is by a mathematical point only that we are wise, as the sailor or the fugitive slave keeps the polestar in his eye; but that is sufficient guidance for all our life.
  • Undoubtedly, in this case, what is true for one is truer still for a thousand, as a large house is not proportionally more expensive than a small one, since one roof may cover, one cellar underlie, and one wall separate several apartments.
  • To co-operate in the highest as well as the lowest sense, means to get our living together.
  • I heard it proposed lately that two young men should travel together over the world, the one without money, earning his means as he went, before the mast and behind the plow, the other carrying a bill of exchange in his pocket.
  • However, when I have thought to indulge myself in this respect, and lay their Heaven under an obligation by maintaining certain poor persons in all respects as comfortably as I maintain myself, and have even ventured so far as to make them the offer, they have one and all unhesitatingly preferred to remain poor.
  • You must have a genius for charity as well as for anything else.
  • As for Doing-good, that is one of the professions which are full.
  • Men say, practically, Begin where you are and such as you are, without aiming mainly to become of more worth, and with kindness aforethought go about doing good.
  • There is no odor so bad as that which arises from goodness tainted.
  • I can find you a Newfoundland dog that will do as much.
  • Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  • Often the poor man is not so cold and hungry as he is dirty and ragged and gross.
  • A robust poor man, one sunny day here in Concord, praised a fellow-townsman to me, because, as he said, he was kind to the poor; meaning himself.
  • I do not value chiefly a man's uprightness and benevolence, which are, as it were, his stem and leaves.
  • The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own castoff griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy.
  • If, then, we would indeed restore mankind by truly Indian, botanic, magnetic, or natural means, let us first be as simple and well as Nature ourselves, dispel the clouds which hang over our own brows, and take up a little life into our pores.
  • At a certain season of our life we are accustomed to consider every spot as the possible site of a house.
  • This experience entitled me to be regarded as a sort of real-estate broker by my friends.
  • But it turned out as I have said.
  • But I would say to my fellows, once for all, As long as possible live free and uncommitted.
  • But I would say to my fellows, once for all, As long as possible live free and uncommitted.
  • I think I shall not buy greedily, but go round and round it as long as I live, and be buried in it first, that it may please me the more at last.
  • It was suggestive somewhat as a picture in outlines.
  • It was not so much within doors as behind a door where I sat, even in the rainiest weather.
  • The very dew seemed to hang upon the trees later into the day than usual, as on the sides of mountains.
  • This is as important as that it keeps butter cool.
  • I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame.
  • I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb-nail.
  • And when they run over a man that is walking in his sleep, a supernumerary sleeper in the wrong position, and wake him up, they suddenly stop the cars, and make a hue and cry about it, as if this were an exception.
  • As for work, we haven't any of any consequence.
  • Hardly a man takes a half-hour's nap after dinner, but when he wakes he holds up his head and asks, "What's the news?" as if the rest of mankind had stood his sentinels.
  • After a night's sleep the news is as indispensable as the breakfast.
  • To a philosopher all news, as it is called, is gossip, and they who edit and read it are old women over their tea.
  • If men would steadily observe realities only, and not allow themselves to be deluded, life, to compare it with such things as we know, would be like a fairy tale and the Arabian Nights' Entertainments.
  • Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito's wing that falls on the rails.
  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.
  • The oldest Egyptian or Hindoo philosopher raised a corner of the veil from the statue of the divinity; and still the trembling robe remains raised, and I gaze upon as fresh a glory as he did, since it was I in him that was then so bold, and it is he in me that now reviews the vision.
  • They seem as solitary, and the letter in which they are printed as rare and curious, as ever.
  • They are the only oracles which are not decayed, and there are such answers to the most modern inquiry in them as Delphi and Dodona never gave.
  • We might as well omit to study Nature because she is old.
  • It requires a training such as the athletes underwent, the steady intention almost of the whole life to this object.
  • Books must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written.
  • However much we may admire the orator's occasional bursts of eloquence, the noblest written words are commonly as far behind or above the fleeting spoken language as the firmament with its stars is behind the clouds.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • This is about as much as the college-bred generally do or aspire to do, and they take an English paper for the purpose.
  • As if Plato were my townsman and I never saw him--my next neighbor and I never heard him speak or attended to the wisdom of his words.
  • We should be as good as the worthies of antiquity, but partly by first knowing how good they were.
  • It is not all books that are as dull as their readers.
  • We need to be provoked--goaded like oxen, as we are, into a trot.
  • It can spend money enough on such things as farmers and traders value, but it is thought Utopian to propose spending money for things which more intelligent men know to be of far more worth.
  • The day advanced as if to light some work of mine; it was morning, and lo, now it is evening, and nothing memorable is accomplished.
  • As the sparrow had its trill, sitting on the hickory before my door, so had I my chuckle or suppressed warble which he might hear out of my nest.
  • They seemed glad to get out themselves, and as if unwilling to be brought in.
  • It looked as if this was the way these forms came to be transferred to our furniture, to tables, chairs, and bedsteads--because they once stood in their midst.
  • As they come under one horizon, they shout their warning to get off the track to the other, heard sometimes through the circles of two towns.
  • If all were as it seems, and men made the elements their servants for noble ends!
  • If the enterprise were as innocent as it is early!
  • If the enterprise were as heroic and commanding as it is protracted and unwearied!
  • Who can write so graphically the history of the storms they have weathered as these rents have done?
  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.
  • The air is filled with the bleating of calves and sheep, and the hustling of oxen, as if a pastoral valley were going by.
  • A carload of drovers, too, in the midst, on a level with their droves now, their vocation gone, but still clinging to their useless sticks as their badge of office.
  • Sometimes, on Sundays, I heard the bells, the Lincoln, Acton, Bedford, or Concord bell, when the wind was favorable, a faint, sweet, and, as it were, natural melody, worth importing into the wilderness.
  • At a sufficient distance over the woods this sound acquires a certain vibratory hum, as if the pine needles in the horizon were the strings of a harp which it swept.
  • They would begin to sing almost with as much precision as a clock, within five minutes of a particular time, referred to the setting of the sun, every evening.
  • Sometimes one would circle round and round me in the woods a few feet distant as if tethered by a string, when probably I was near its eggs.
  • They sang at intervals throughout the night, and were again as musical as ever just before and about dawn.
  • As I walk along the stony shore of the pond in my shirt-sleeves, though it is cool as well as cloudy and windy, and I see nothing special to attract me, all the elements are unusually congenial to me.
  • As I walk along the stony shore of the pond in my shirt-sleeves, though it is cool as well as cloudy and windy, and I see nothing special to attract me, all the elements are unusually congenial to me.
  • These small waves raised by the evening wind are as remote from storm as the smooth reflecting surface.
  • I could always tell if visitors had called in my absence, either by the bended twigs or grass, or the print of their shoes, and generally of what sex or age or quality they were by some slight trace left, as a flower dropped, or a bunch of grass plucked and thrown away, even as far off as the railroad, half a mile distant, or by the lingering odor of a cigar or pipe.
  • But for the most part it is as solitary where I live as on the prairies.
  • It is as much Asia or Africa as New England.
  • I have, as it were, my own sun and moon and stars, and a little world all to myself.
  • If it should continue so long as to cause the seeds to rot in the ground and destroy the potatoes in the low lands, it would still be good for the grass on the uplands, and, being good for the grass, it would be good for me.
  • In one heavy thunder-shower the lightning struck a large pitch pine across the pond, making a very conspicuous and perfectly regular spiral groove from top to bottom, an inch or more deep, and four or five inches wide, as you would groove a walking-stick.
  • Confucius says truly, "Virtue does not remain as an abandoned orphan; it must of necessity have neighbors."
  • It was a kind of fiction, a work of the imagination only, so far as he was concerned.
  • The really diligent student in one of the crowded hives of Cambridge College is as solitary as a dervish in the desert.
  • It would be better if there were but one inhabitant to a square mile, as where I live.
  • In my house we were so near that we could not begin to hear--we could not speak low enough to be heard; as when you throw two stones into calm water so near that they break each other's undulations.
  • As the conversation began to assume a loftier and grander tone, we gradually shoved our chairs farther apart till they touched the wall in opposite corners, and then commonly there was not room enough.
  • At one o'clock the next day Massasoit "brought two fishes that he had shot," about thrice as big as a bream.
  • As for lodging, it is true they were but poorly entertained, though what they found an inconvenience was no doubt intended for an honor; but as far as eating was concerned, I do not see how the Indians could have done better.
  • As for lodging, it is true they were but poorly entertained, though what they found an inconvenience was no doubt intended for an honor; but as far as eating was concerned, I do not see how the Indians could have done better.
  • As for men, they will hardly fail one anywhere.
  • I had withdrawn so far within the great ocean of solitude, into which the rivers of society empty, that for the most part, so far as my needs were concerned, only the finest sediment was deposited around me.
  • He came along early, crossing my bean-field, though without anxiety or haste to get to his work, such as Yankees exhibit.
  • He would say, as he went by in the morning, How thick the pigeons are!
  • Sometimes I saw him at his work in the woods, felling trees, and he would greet me with a laugh of inexpressible satisfaction, and a salutation in Canadian French, though he spoke English as well.
  • In the winter he had a fire by which at noon he warmed his coffee in a kettle; and as he sat on a log to eat his dinner the chickadees would sometimes come round and alight on his arm and peck at the potato in his fingers; and he said that he "liked to have the little fellers about him."
  • But the intellectual and what is called spiritual man in him were slumbering as in an infant.
  • He had got to find him out as you did.
  • If you told him that such a one was coming, he did as if he thought that anything so grand would expect nothing of himself, but take all the responsibility on itself, and let him be forgotten still.
  • He could defend many institutions better than any philosopher, because, in describing them as they concerned him, he gave the true reason for their prevalence, and speculation had not suggested to him any other.
  • "Good Lord"--said he, "a man that has to work as I do, if he does not forget the ideas he has had, he will do well.
  • Many a traveller came out of his way to see me and the inside of my house, and, as an excuse for calling, asked for a glass of water.
  • The Lord had made him so, yet he supposed the Lord cared as much for him as for another.
  • It seemed that from such a basis of truth and frankness as the poor weak-headed pauper had laid, our intercourse might go forward to something better than the intercourse of sages.
  • One man proposed a book in which visitors should write their names, as at the White Mountains; but, alas!
  • When I was four years old, as I well remember, I was brought from Boston to this my native town, through these very woods and this field, to the pond.
  • Fellow-travellers as they rattled by compared it aloud with the fields which they had passed, so that I came to know how I stood in the agricultural world.
  • Mine was, as it were, the connecting link between wild and cultivated fields; as some states are civilized, and others half-civilized, and others savage or barbarous, so my field was, though not in a bad sense, a half-cultivated field.
  • Near at hand, upon the topmost spray of a birch, sings the brown thrasher--or red mavis, as some love to call him--all the morning, glad of your society, that would find out another farmer's field if yours were not here.
  • But this was not corn, and so it was safe from such enemies as he.
  • As I drew a still fresher soil about the rows with my hoe, I disturbed the ashes of unchronicled nations who in primeval years lived under these heavens, and their small implements of war and hunting were brought to the light of this modern day.
  • Or sometimes I watched a pair of hen-hawks circling high in the sky, alternately soaring and descending, approaching, and leaving one another, as if they were the embodiment of my own thoughts.
  • I felt proud to know that the liberties of Massachusetts and of our fatherland were in such safe keeping; and as I turned to my hoeing again I was filled with an inexpressible confidence, and pursued my labor cheerfully with a calm trust in the future.
  • When there were several bands of musicians, it sounded as if all the village was a vast bellows and all the buildings expanded and collapsed alternately with a din.
  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.
  • That's Roman wormwood--that's pigweed--that's sorrel--that's piper-grass--have at him, chop him up, turn his roots upward to the sun, don't let him have a fibre in the shade, if you do he'll turn himself t' other side up and be as green as a leek in two days.
  • But above all harvest as early as possible, if you would escape frosts and have a fair and salable crop; you may save much loss by this means.
  • Commonly men will only be brave as their fathers were brave, or timid.
  • He knows Nature but as a robber.
  • This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green.
  • As I walked in the woods to see the birds and squirrels, so I walked in the village to see the men and boys; instead of the wind among the pines I heard the carts rattle.
  • The village appeared to me a great news room; and on one side, to support it, as once at Redding & Company's on State Street, they kept nuts and raisins, or salt and meal and other groceries.
  • I hardly ever failed, when I rambled through the village, to see a row of such worthies, either sitting on a ladder sunning themselves, with their bodies inclined forward and their eyes glancing along the line this way and that, from time to time, with a voluptuous expression, or else leaning against a barn with their hands in their pockets, like caryatides, as if to prop it up.
  • I observed that the vitals of the village were the grocery, the bar-room, the post-office, and the bank; and, as a necessary part of the machinery, they kept a bell, a big gun, and a fire-engine, at convenient places; and the houses were so arranged as to make the most of mankind, in lanes and fronting one another, so that every traveller had to run the gauntlet, and every man, woman, and child might get a lick at him.
  • Signs were hung out on all sides to allure him; some to catch him by the appetite, as the tavern and victualling cellar; some by the fancy, as the dry goods store and the jeweller's; and others by the hair or the feet or the skirts, as the barber, the shoemaker, or the tailor.
  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."
  • I had many a genial thought by the cabin fire "as I sailed."
  • I have heard of many going astray even in the village streets, when the darkness was so thick that you could cut it with a knife, as the saying is.
  • It is a surprising and memorable, as well as valuable experience, to be lost in the woods any time.
  • I am convinced, that if all men were to live as simply as I then did, thieving and robbery would be unknown.
  • Thus I caught two fishes as it were with one hook.
  • I have seen our river, when, the landscape being covered with snow, both water and ice were almost as green as grass.
  • It is a vitreous greenish blue, as I remember it, like those patches of the winter sky seen through cloud vistas in the west before sundown.
  • Yet a single glass of its water held up to the light is as colorless as an equal quantity of air.
  • It is well known that a large plate of glass will have a green tint, owing, as the makers say, to its "body," but a small piece of the same will be colorless.
  • Successive nations perchance have drank at, admired, and fathomed it, and passed away, and still its water is green and pellucid as ever.
  • This is particularly distinct to one standing on the middle of the pond in winter, just after a light snow has fallen, appearing as a clear undulating white line, unobscured by weeds and twigs, and very obvious a quarter of a mile off in many places where in summer it is hardly distinguishable close at hand.
  • The snow reprints it, as it were, in clear white type alto-relievo.
  • The pond rises and falls, but whether regularly or not, and within what period, nobody knows, though, as usual, many pretend to know.
  • For four months in the year its water is as cold as it is pure at all times; and I think that it is then as good as any, if not the best, in the town.
  • Moreover, in summer, Walden never becomes so warm as most water which is exposed to the sun, on account of its depth.
  • It was as good when a week old as the day it was dipped, and had no taste of the pump.
  • They are similar to those found in rivers; but as there are no suckers nor lampreys here, I know not by what fish they could be made.
  • The forest has never so good a setting, nor is so distinctly beautiful, as when seen from the middle of a small lake amid hills which rise from the water's edge; for the water in which it is reflected not only makes the best foreground in such a case, but, with its winding shore, the most natural and agreeable boundary to it.
  • There is no rawness nor imperfection in its edge there, as where the axe has cleared a part, or a cultivated field abuts on it.
  • The water laves the shore as it did a thousand years ago.
  • Indeed, they sometimes dive below this line, as it were by mistake, and are undeceived.
  • Again the works of man shine as in the spring.
  • Ay, every leaf and twig and stone and cobweb sparkles now at mid-afternoon as when covered with dew in a spring morning.
  • In such a day, in September or October, Walden is a perfect forest mirror, set round with stones as precious to my eye as if fewer or rarer.
  • Nothing so fair, so pure, and at the same time so large, as a lake, perchance, lies on the surface of the earth.
  • It is a mirror which no stone can crack, whose quicksilver will never wear off, whose gilding Nature continually repairs; no storms, no dust, can dim its surface ever fresh;--a mirror in which all impurity presented to it sinks, swept and dusted by the sun's hazy brush--this the light dust-cloth--which retains no breath that is breathed on it, but sends its own to float as clouds high above its surface, and be reflected in its bosom still.
  • Though I passed over it as gently as possible, the slight undulations produced by my boat extended almost as far as I could see, and gave a ribbed appearance to the reflections.
  • In such transparent and seemingly bottomless water, reflecting the clouds, I seemed to be floating through the air as in a balloon, and their swimming impressed me as a kind of flight or hovering, as if they were a compact flock of birds passing just beneath my level on the right or left, their fins, like sails, set all around them.
  • When I approached carelessly and alarmed them, they made a sudden splash and rippling with their tails, as if one had struck the water with a brushy bough, and instantly took refuge in the depths.
  • The hills which form its shores are so steep, and the woods on them were then so high, that, as you looked down from the west end, it had the appearance of an amphitheatre for some land of sylvan spectacle.
  • Moreover, the waves, I suspect, do not so much construct as wear down a material which has already acquired consistency.
  • Farmers are respectable and interesting to me in proportion as they are poor--poor farmers.
  • As if you were to raise your potatoes in the churchyard!
  • Let our lakes receive as true names at least as the Icarian Sea, where "still the shore" a "brave attempt resounds."
  • In these as in other respects, however, it is a lesser twin of Walden.
  • As near as he could remember, it stood twelve or fifteen rods from the shore, where the water was thirty or forty feet deep.
  • As near as he could remember, it stood twelve or fifteen rods from the shore, where the water was thirty or forty feet deep.
  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
  • Once it chanced that I stood in the very abutment of a rainbow's arch, which filled the lower stratum of the atmosphere, tinging the grass and leaves around, and dazzling me as if I looked through colored crystal.
  • But the only true America is that country where you are at liberty to pursue such a mode of life as may enable you to do without these, and where the state does not endeavor to compel you to sustain the slavery and war and other superfluous expenses which directly or indirectly result from the use of such things.
  • For I purposely talked to him as if he were a philosopher, or desired to be one.
  • I like sometimes to take rank hold on life and spend my day more as the animals do.
  • There is a period in the history of the individual, as of the race, when the hunters are the "best men," as the Algonquins called them.
  • A little bread or a few potatoes would have done as well, with less trouble and filth.
  • Most men would feel shame if caught preparing with their own hands precisely such a dinner, whether of animal or vegetable food, as is every day prepared for them by others.
  • The true harvest of my daily life is somewhat as intangible and indescribable as the tints of morning or evening.
  • Perhaps these questions are entertained only in youth, as most believe of poetry.
  • A puritan may go to his brown-bread crust with as gross an appetite as ever an alderman to his turtle.
  • Many an irksome noise, go a long way off, is heard as music, a proud, sweet satire on the meanness of our lives.
  • We are conscious of an animal in us, which awakens in proportion as our higher nature slumbers.
  • If I knew so wise a man as could teach me purity I would go to seek him forthwith.
  • Sometimes I had a companion in my fishing, who came through the village to my house from the other side of the town, and the catching of the dinner was as much a social exercise as the eating of it.
  • I have not heard so much as a locust over the sweet-fern these three hours.
  • I thought, as I have my living to get, and have not eaten to-day, that I might go a-fishing.
  • I think that I may warrant you one worm to every three sods you turn up, if you look well in among the roots of the grass, as if you were weeding.
  • Or, if you choose to go farther, it will not be unwise, for I have found the increase of fair bait to be very nearly as the squares of the distances.
  • I was as near being resolved into the essence of things as ever I was in my life.
  • Why has man just these species of animals for his neighbors; as if nothing but a mouse could have filled this crevice?
  • At length, as I leaned with my elbow on the bench one day, it ran up my clothes, and along my sleeve, and round and round the paper which held my dinner, while I kept the latter close, and dodged and played at bopeep with it; and when at last I held still a piece of cheese between my thumb and finger, it came and nibbled it, sitting in my hand, and afterward cleaned its face and paws, like a fly, and walked away.
  • In the fall the loon (Colymbus glacialis) came, as usual, to moult and bathe in the pond, making the woods ring with his wild laughter before I had risen.
  • Yet he appeared to know his course as surely under water as on the surface, and swam much faster there.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • But after an hour he seemed as fresh as ever, dived as willingly, and swam yet farther than at first.
  • These nuts, as far as they went, were a good substitute for bread.
  • The wasps came by thousands to my lodge in October, as to winter quarters, and settled on my windows within and on the walls overhead, sometimes deterring visitors from entering.
  • Each morning, when they were numbed with cold, I swept some of them out, but I did not trouble myself much to get rid of them; I even felt complimented by their regarding my house as a desirable shelter.
  • I lingered most about the fireplace, as the most vital part of the house.
  • I now first began to inhabit my house, I may say, when I began to use it for warmth as well as shelter.
  • There is as much secrecy about the cooking as if he had a design to poison you.
  • As if only the savage dwelt near enough to Nature and Truth to borrow a trope from them.
  • But these within the ice are not so numerous nor obvious as those beneath.
  • One day when I came to the same place forty-eight hours afterward, I found that those large bubbles were still perfect, though an inch more of ice had formed, as I could see distinctly by the seam in the edge of a cake.
  • Though completely waterlogged and almost as heavy as lead, they not only burned long, but made a very hot fire; nay, I thought that they burned better for the soaking, as if the pitch, being confined by the water, burned longer, as in a lamp.
  • It is as precious to us as it was to our Saxon and Norman ancestors.
  • As my driver prophesied when I was plowing, they warmed me twice--once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat.
  • As for the axe, I was advised to get the village blacksmith to "jump" it; but I jumped him, and, putting a hickory helve from the woods into it, made it do.
  • Stumps thirty or forty years old, at least, will still be sound at the core, though the sapwood has all become vegetable mould, as appears by the scales of the thick bark forming a ring level with the earth four or five inches distant from the heart.
  • It was as if I had left a cheerful housekeeper behind.
  • Some of my friends spoke as if I was coming to the woods on purpose to freeze myself.
  • The next winter I used a small cooking-stove for economy, since I did not own the forest; but it did not keep fire so well as the open fireplace.
  • The stove not only took up room and scented the house, but it concealed the fire, and I felt as if I had lost a companion.
  • One old frequenter of these woods remembers, that as he passed her house one noon he heard her muttering to herself over her gurgling pot--"Ye are all bones, bones!"
  • Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord--where he is styled "Sippio Brister"--Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called--"a man of color," as if he were discolored.
  • And then fresh sparks went up above the wood, as if the roof fell in, and we all shouted "Concord to the rescue!"
  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.
  • He gazed into the cellar from all sides and points of view by turns, always lying down to it, as if there was some treasure, which he remembered, concealed between the stones, where there was absolutely nothing but a heap of bricks and ashes.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • He died in the road at the foot of Brister's Hill shortly after I came to the woods, so that I have not remembered him as a neighbor.
  • Before his house was pulled down, when his comrades avoided it as "an unlucky castle," I visited it.
  • There lay his old clothes curled up by use, as if they were himself, upon his raised plank bed.
  • One black chicken which the administrator could not catch, black as night and as silent, not even croaking, awaiting Reynard, still went to roost in the next apartment.
  • But all I can learn of their conclusions amounts to just this, that "Cato and Brister pulled wool"; which is about as edifying as the history of more famous schools of philosophy.
  • Little did the dusky children think that the puny slip with its two eyes only, which they stuck in the ground in the shadow of the house and daily watered, would root itself so, and outlive them, and house itself in the rear that shaded it, and grown man's garden and orchard, and tell their story faintly to the lone wanderer a half-century after they had grown up and died--blossoming as fair, and smelling as sweet, as in that first spring.
  • When the farmers could not get to the woods and swamps with their teams, and were obliged to cut down the shade trees before their houses, and, when the crust was harder, cut off the trees in the swamps, ten feet from the ground, as it appeared the next spring.
  • I too felt a slumberous influence after watching him half an hour, as he sat thus with his eyes half open, like a cat, winged brother of the cat.
  • One of the last of the philosophers--Connecticut gave him to the world--he peddled first her wares, afterwards, as he declares, his brains.
  • His words and attitude always suppose a better state of things than other men are acquainted with, and he will be the last man to be disappointed as the ages revolve.
  • There too, as everywhere, I sometimes expected the Visitor who never comes.
  • The Vishnu Purana says, "The house-holder is to remain at eventide in his courtyard as long as it takes to milk a cow, or longer if he pleases, to await the arrival of a guest."
  • One night in the beginning of winter, before the pond froze over, about nine o'clock, I was startled by the loud honking of a goose, and, stepping to the door, heard the sound of their wings like a tempest in the woods as they flew low over my house.
  • I also heard the whooping of the ice in the pond, my great bed-fellow in that part of Concord, as if it were restless in its bed and would fain turn over, were troubled with flatulency and had dreams; or I was waked by the cracking of the ground by the frost, as if some one had driven a team against my door, and in the morning would find a crack in the earth a quarter of a mile long and a third of an inch wide.
  • Usually the red squirrel (Sciurus Hudsonius) waked me in the dawn, coursing over the roof and up and down the sides of the house, as if sent out of the woods for this purpose.
  • They were manifestly thieves, and I had not much respect for them; but the squirrels, though at first shy, went to work as if they were taking what was their own.
  • Late in the afternoon, as he was resting in the thick woods south of Walden, he heard the voice of the hounds far over toward Fair Haven still pursuing the fox; and on they came, their hounding cry which made all the woods ring sounding nearer and nearer, now from Well Meadow, now from the Baker Farm.
  • At length the old hound burst into view with muzzle to the ground, and snapping the air as if possessed, and ran directly to the rock; but, spying the dead fox, she suddenly ceased her hounding as if struck dumb with amazement, and walked round and round him in silence; and one by one her pups arrived, and, like their mother, were sobered into silence by the mystery.
  • At midnight, when there was a moon, I sometimes met with hounds in my path prowling about the woods, which would skulk out of my way, as if afraid, and stand silent amid the bushes till I had passed.
  • It looked as if Nature no longer contained the breed of nobler bloods, but stood on her last toes.
  • It is hardly as if you had seen a wild creature when a rabbit or a partridge bursts away, only a natural one, as much to be expected as rustling leaves.
  • Heaven is under our feet is well as over our heads.
  • These alders loomed through the mist at regular intervals as you walked half way round the pond.
  • As I was desirous to recover the long lost bottom of Walden Pond, I surveyed it carefully, before the ice broke up, early in '46, with compass and chain and sounding line.
  • But the deepest ponds are not so deep in proportion to their area as most suppose, and, if drained, would not leave very remarkable valleys.
  • William Gilpin, who is so admirable in all that relates to landscapes, and usually so correct, standing at the head of Loch Fyne, in Scotland, which he describes as "a bay of salt water, sixty or seventy fathoms deep, four miles in breadth," and about fifty miles long, surrounded by mountains, observes, "If we could have seen it immediately after the diluvian crash, or whatever convulsion of nature occasioned it, before the waters gushed in, what a horrid chasm must it have appeared!
  • So high as heaved the tumid hills, so low Down sunk a hollow bottom broad and deep, Capacious bed of waters.
  • But if, using the shortest diameter of Loch Fyne, we apply these proportions to Walden, which, as we have seen, appears already in a vertical section only like a shallow plate, it will appear four times as shallow.
  • But it is easiest, as they who work on the highways know, to find the hollows by the puddles after a shower.
  • As I sounded through the ice I could determine the shape of the bottom with greater accuracy than is possible in surveying harbors which do not freeze over, and I was surprised at its general regularity.
  • Is not this the rule also for the height of mountains, regarded as the opposite of valleys?
  • In proportion as the mouth of the cove was wider compared with its length, the water over the bar was deeper compared with that in the basin.
  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.
  • The particular laws are as our points of view, as, to the traveller, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form.
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • Deep ruts and "cradle-holes" were worn in the ice, as on terra firma, by the passage of the sleds over the same track, and the horses invariably ate their oats out of cakes of ice hollowed out like buckets.
  • They told me that they had some in the ice-houses at Fresh Pond five years old which was as good as ever.
  • Perhaps I shall hear a solitary loon laugh as he dives and plumes himself, or shall see a lonely fisher in his boat, like a floating leaf, beholding his form reflected in the waves, where lately a hundred men securely labored.
  • I meet his servant come to draw water for his master, and our buckets as it were grate together in the same well.
  • This pond has no stream passing through it to melt or wear away the ice.
  • Ice has its grain as well as wood, and when a cake begins to rot or "comb," that is, assume the appearance of honeycomb, whatever may be its position, the air cells are at right angles with what was the water surface.
  • Also, as I have said, the bubbles themselves within the ice operate as burning-glasses to melt the ice beneath.
  • One pleasant morning after a cold night, February 24th, 1850, having gone to Flint's Pond to spend the day, I noticed with surprise, that when I struck the ice with the head of my axe, it resounded like a gong for many rods around, or as if I had struck on a tight drum-head.
  • It took a short siesta at noon, and boomed once more toward night, as the sun was withdrawing his influence.
  • The largest pond is as sensitive to atmospheric changes as the globule of mercury in its tube.
  • The ice in the pond at length begins to be honeycombed, and I can set my heel in it as I walk.
  • When the warmer days come, they who dwell near the river hear the ice crack at night with a startling whoop as loud as artillery, as if its icy fetters were rent from end to end, and within a few days see it rapidly going out.
  • As it flows it takes the forms of sappy leaves or vines, making heaps of pulpy sprays a foot or more in depth, and resembling, as you look down on them, the laciniated, lobed, and imbricated thalluses of some lichens; or you are reminded of coral, of leopard's paws or birds' feet, of brains or lungs or bowels, and excrements of all kinds.
  • As it flows it takes the forms of sappy leaves or vines, making heaps of pulpy sprays a foot or more in depth, and resembling, as you look down on them, the laciniated, lobed, and imbricated thalluses of some lichens; or you are reminded of coral, of leopard's paws or birds' feet, of brains or lungs or bowels, and excrements of all kinds.
  • The whole cut impressed me as if it were a cave with its stalactites laid open to the light.
  • I feel as if I were nearer to the vitals of the globe, for this sandy overflow is something such a foliaceous mass as the vitals of the animal body.
  • Even ice begins with delicate crystal leaves, as if it had flowed into moulds which the fronds of waterplants have impressed on the watery mirror.
  • It is wonderful how rapidly yet perfectly the sand organizes itself as it flows, using the best material its mass affords to form the sharp edges of its channel.
  • The ear may be regarded, fancifully, as a lichen, Umbilicaria, on the side of the head, with its lobe or drop.
  • It precedes the green and flowery spring, as mythology precedes regular poetry.
  • The faint silvery warblings were heard over the partially bare and moist fields from the bluebird, the song sparrow, and the red-wing, as if the last flakes of winter tinkled as they fell!
  • It grows as steadily as the rill oozes out of the ground.
  • It is glorious to behold this ribbon of water sparkling in the sun, the bare face of the pond full of glee and youth, as if it spoke the joy of the fishes within it, and of the sands on its shore.
  • But this spring it broke up more steadily, as I have said.
  • I heard a robin in the distance, the first I had heard for many a thousand years, methought, whose note I shall not forget for many a thousand more--the same sweet and powerful song as of yore.
  • The pitch pines and shrub oaks about my house, which had so long drooped, suddenly resumed their several characters, looked brighter, greener, and more erect and alive, as if effectually cleansed and restored by the rain.
  • As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation.
  • As every season seems best to us in its turn, so the coming in of spring is like the creation of Cosmos out of Chaos and the realization of the Golden Age.
  • As soon as the breath of evening does not suffice longer to preserve them, then the nature of man does not differ much from that of the brute.
  • As soon as the breath of evening does not suffice longer to preserve them, then the nature of man does not differ much from that of the brute.
  • Early in May, the oaks, hickories, maples, and other trees, just putting out amidst the pine woods around the pond, imparted a brightness like sunshine to the landscape, especially in cloudy days, as if the sun were breaking through mists and shining faintly on the hillsides here and there.
  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.
  • And so the seasons went rolling on into summer, as one rambles into higher and higher grass.
  • He declared that "a soldier who fights in the ranks does not require half so much courage as a footpad"--"that honor and religion have never stood in the way of a well-considered and a firm resolve."
  • This was manly, as the world goes; and yet it was idle, if not desperate.
  • I left the woods for as good a reason as I went there.
  • As if that were important, and there were not enough to understand you without them.
  • As if Nature could support but one order of understandings, could not sustain birds as well as quadrupeds, flying as well as creeping things, and hush and whoa, which Bright can understand, were the best English.
  • As if Nature could support but one order of understandings, could not sustain birds as well as quadrupeds, flying as well as creeping things, and hush and whoa, which Bright can understand, were the best English.
  • As if there were safety in stupidity alone.
  • Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense?
  • "They pretend," as I hear, "that the verses of Kabir have four different senses; illusion, spirit, intellect, and the exoteric doctrine of the Vedas"; but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation.
  • Southern customers objected to its blue color, which is the evidence of its purity, as if it were muddy, and preferred the Cambridge ice, which is white, but tastes of weeds.
  • It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak.
  • Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • No face which we can give to a matter will stead us so well at last as the truth.
  • It is not so bad as you are.
  • Love your life, poor as it is.
  • I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.
  • If I were confined to a corner of a garret all my days, like a spider, the world would be just as large to me while I had my thoughts about me.
  • The interest and the conversation are about costume and manners chiefly; but a goose is a goose still, dress it as you will.
  • Every nail driven should be as another rivet in the machine of the universe, you carrying on the work.
  • "Yes, we have done great deeds, and sung divine songs, which shall never die"--that is, as long as we can remember them.
  • Most have not delved six feet beneath the surface, nor leaped as many above it.
  • There are such words as joy and sorrow, but they are only the burden of a psalm, sung with a nasal twang, while we believe in the ordinary and mean.
  • Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.
  • But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.
  • It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
  • They have the same sort of worth only as horses and dogs.
  • Others, as most legislators, politicians, lawyers, ministers, and office-holders, serve the state chiefly with their heads; and, as they rarely make any moral distinctions, they are as likely to serve the devil, without intending it, as God.
  • A very few, as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men, serve the state with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and they are commonly treated as enemies by it.
  • I cannot for an instant recognize that political organization as my government which is the slave's government also.
  • This people must cease to hold slaves, and to make war on Mexico, though it cost them their existence as a people.
  • It is not so important that many should be as good as you, as that there be some absolute goodness somewhere; for that will leaven the whole lump.
  • At most, they give only a cheap vote, and a feeble countenance and Godspeed, to the right, as it goes by them.
  • I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail.
  • Oh for a man who is a man, and, as my neighbor says, has a bone in his back which you cannot pass your hand through!
  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
  • After the first blush of sin comes its indifference; and from immoral it becomes, as it were, unmoral, and not quite unnecessary to that life which we have made.
  • Men generally, under such a government as this, think that they ought to wait until they have persuaded the majority to alter them.
  • As for adopting the ways which the State has provided for remedying the evil, I know not of such ways.
  • If a thousand men were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.
  • The opportunities of living are diminished in proportion as what are called the "means" are increased.
  • I should feel as if I were worth less in that case.
  • I did not see why the lyceum should not present its tax-bill, and have the State to back its demand, as well as the Church.
  • I felt as if I alone of all my townsmen had paid my tax.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • It must help itself; do as I do.
  • As near as I could discover, he had probably gone to bed in a barn when drunk, and smoked his pipe there; and so a barn was burnt.
  • As near as I could discover, he had probably gone to bed in a barn when drunk, and smoked his pipe there; and so a barn was burnt.
  • I pumped my fellow-prisoner as dry as I could, for fear I should never see him again; but at length he showed me which was my bed, and left me to blow out the lamp.
  • It was like travelling into a far country, such as I had never expected to behold, to lie there for one night.
  • My neighbors did not thus salute me, but first looked at me, and then at one another, as if I had returned from a long journey.
  • In fact, I quietly declare war with the State, after my fashion, though I will still make what use and get what advantage of her I can, as is usual in such cases.
  • But I think, again, This is no reason why I should do as they do, or permit others to suffer much greater pain of a different kind.
  • I do not wish to split hairs, to make fine distinctions, or set myself up as better than my neighbors.
  • "I have never made an effort," he says, "and never propose to make an effort; I have never countenanced an effort, and never mean to countenance an effort, to disturb the arrangement as originally made, by which the various States came into the Union."
  • Even the Chinese philosopher was wise enough to regard the individual as the basis of the empire.
  • Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government?
  • It shall be on your family's behalf that I'll start my apprenticeship as old maid.
  • As is always the case with a thoroughly attractive woman, her defect--the shortness of her upper lip and her half-open mouth--seemed to be her own special and peculiar form of beauty.
  • The little princess went round the table with quick, short, swaying steps, her workbag on her arm, and gaily spreading out her dress sat down on a sofa near the silver samovar, as if all she was doing was a pleasure to herself and to all around her.
  • Pierre murmured something unintelligible, and continued to look round as if in search of something.
  • On his way to the aunt he bowed to the little princess with a pleased smile, as to an intimate acquaintance.
  • "You think so?" rejoined Anna Pavlovna in order to say something and get away to attend to her duties as hostess.
  • And having got rid of this young man who did not know how to behave, she resumed her duties as hostess and continued to listen and watch, ready to help at any point where the conversation might happen to flag.
  • Here the conversation seemed interesting and he stood waiting for an opportunity to express his own views, as young people are fond of doing.
  • Anna Pavlovna was obviously serving him up as a treat to her guests.
  • He was dressed in a dark-green dress coat, knee breeches of the color of cuisse de nymphe effrayee, as he called it, shoes, and silk stockings.
  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.
  • It is only necessary for one powerful nation like Russia--barbaric as she is said to be--to place herself disinterestedly at the head of an alliance having for its object the maintenance of the balance of power of Europe, and it would save the world!
  • May I? he added in a low voice so as not to disturb the vicomte who was continuing his story.
  • Pierre gazed at her with rapturous, almost frightened, eyes as she passed him.
  • Nothing is so necessary for a young man as the society of clever women.
  • "Papa, we shall be late," said Princess Helene, turning her beautiful head and looking over her classically molded shoulder as she stood waiting by the door.
  • You don't know how Kutuzov is pestered since his appointment as Commander in Chief.
  • He told me himself that all the Moscow ladies have conspired to give him all their sons as adjutants.
  • "Papa," said his beautiful daughter in the same tone as before, "we shall be late."
  • But as soon as the prince had gone her face resumed its former cold, artificial expression.
  • It is as if the whole world had gone crazy.
  • He explained this to her with as much gravity as if she had asked him to do it.
  • The vicomte who was meeting him for the first time saw clearly that this young Jacobin was not so terrible as his words suggested.
  • Besides, in the actions of a statesman one has to distinguish between his acts as a private person, as a general, and as an emperor.
  • And Prince Hippolyte began to tell his story in such Russian as a Frenchman would speak after spending about a year in Russia.
  • Stout, about the average height, broad, with huge red hands; he did not know, as the saying is, how to enter a drawing room and still less how to leave one; that is, how to say something particularly agreeable before going away.
  • The princess as usual spoke smilingly and listened with a laugh.
  • "Princesse, au revoir," cried he, stumbling with his tongue as well as with his feet.
  • Prince Hippolyte laughed spasmodically as he stood in the porch waiting for the vicomte whom he had promised to take home.
  • She will be quite ill now, said Prince Andrew, as he entered the study, rubbing his small white hands.
  • Prince Andrew shook himself as if waking up, and his face assumed the look it had had in Anna Pavlovna's drawing room.
  • She had changed her gown for a house dress as fresh and elegant as the other.
  • "How is it," she began, as usual in French, settling down briskly and fussily in the easy chair, "how is it Annette never got married?
  • She paused as if she felt it indecorous to speak of her pregnancy before Pierre, though the gist of the matter lay in that.
  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.
  • "Good night, Lise," said he, rising and courteously kissing her hand as he would have done to a stranger.
  • When you meet them in society it seems as if there were something in them, but there's nothing, nothing, nothing!
  • And if Pierre was often struck by Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical meditation (to which he himself was particularly addicted), he regarded even this not as a defect but as a sign of strength.
  • Even in the best, most friendly and simplest relations of life, praise and commendation are essential, just as grease is necessary to wheels that they may run smoothly.
  • I am fond of you, especially as you are the one live man among our whole set.
  • Suddenly Dolokhov made a backward movement with his spine, and his arm trembled nervously; this was sufficient to cause his whole body to slip as he sat on the sloping ledge.
  • As he began slipping down, his head and arm wavered still more with the strain.
  • One hand moved as if to clutch the window sill, but refrained from touching it.
  • Ask her in," she said to the footman in a sad voice, as if saying: "Very well, finish me off."
  • "What is that?" asked the countess as if she did not know what the visitor alluded to, though she had already heard about the cause of Count Bezukhov's distress some fifteen times.
  • He's also my Bory's godfather, she added, as if she attached no importance at all to the fact.
  • And as he waved his arms to impersonate the policeman, his portly form again shook with a deep ringing laugh, the laugh of one who always eats well and, in particular, drinks well.
  • As he spoke he kept glancing with the flirtatiousness of a handsome youth at Sonya and the young lady visitor.
  • "How plainly all these young people wear their hearts on their sleeves!" said Anna Mikhaylovna, pointing to Nicholas as he went out.
  • When Natasha ran out of the drawing room she only went as far as the conservatory.
  • Natasha checked her first impulse to run out to her, and remained in her hiding place, watching--as under an invisible cap--to see what went on in the world.
  • "If you had told me sooner, Mamma, I would have gone," she replied as she rose to go to her own room.
  • But as she passed the sitting room she noticed two couples sitting, one pair at each window.
  • Go and flirt with Berg as much as you please, she finished quickly.
  • You see yours is already an officer in the Guards, while my Nicholas is going as a cadet.
  • "He is just the same as ever," replied Anna Mikhaylovna, "overflowing with amiability.
  • He says Count Orlov never gave such a dinner as ours will be!
  • Remember that, my dear, and be nice to him, as you so well know how to be.
  • "We may as well go back," said the son in French.
  • "My dear!" exclaimed his mother imploringly, again laying her hand on his arm as if that touch might soothe or rouse him.
  • Evidently the prince understood her, and also understood, as he had done at Anna Pavlovna's, that it would be difficult to get rid of Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • "Still the same; but what can you expect, this noise..." said the princess, looking at Anna Mikhaylovna as at a stranger.
  • He had now been for some days in Moscow and was staying as usual at his father's house.
  • Pierre was received as if he were a corpse or a leper.
  • She drew her wool down through the canvas and, scarcely able to refrain from laughing, stooped as if trying to make out the pattern.
  • Can I see him? asked Pierre, awkwardly as usual, but unabashed.
  • He sent for Pierre and said to him: My dear fellow, if you are going to behave here as you did in Petersburg, you will end very badly; that is all I have to say to you.
  • Mr. Pitt, as a traitor to the nation and to the rights of man, is sentenced to...
  • Pierre shook his head and arms as if attacked by mosquitoes or bees.
  • Pierre smiled in his good-natured way as if afraid for his companion's sake that the latter might say something he would afterwards regret.
  • Everybody is wondering to whom the count will leave his fortune, though he may perhaps outlive us all, as I sincerely hope he will...
  • I am sorry for him as a man, but what can one do?
  • As often happens in early youth, especially to one who leads a lonely life, he felt an unaccountable tenderness for this young man and made up his mind that they would be friends.
  • The count came waddling in to see his wife with a rather guilty look as usual.
  • But mind, don't bring me such tattered and dirty notes as last time, but nice clean ones for the countess.
  • This was an old bachelor, Shinshin, a cousin of the countess', a man with "a sharp tongue" as they said in Moscow society.
  • This was Lieutenant Berg, an officer in the Semenov regiment with whom Boris was to travel to join the army, and about whom Natasha had teased her elder sister Vera, speaking of Berg as her "intended."
  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.
  • Tall and stout, holding high her fifty-year-old head with its gray curls, she stood surveying the guests, and leisurely arranged her wide sleeves as if rolling them up.
  • (Marya Dmitrievna always called Natasha a Cossack) and she stroked the child's arm as she came up fearless and gay to kiss her hand.
  • The countess in turn, without omitting her duties as hostess, threw significant glances from behind the pineapples at her husband whose face and bald head seemed by their redness to contrast more than usual with his gray hair.
  • At the ladies' end an even chatter of voices was heard all the time, at the men's end the voices sounded louder and louder, especially that of the colonel of hussars who, growing more and more flushed, ate and drank so much that the count held him up as a pattern to the other guests.
  • "Hungarian"... or "Rhine wine" as the case might be.
  • Natasha, who sat opposite, was looking at Boris as girls of thirteen look at the boy they are in love with and have just kissed for the first time.
  • Natasha, who was treated as though she were grown up, was evidently very proud of this but at the same time felt shy.
  • "Sonya," she suddenly exclaimed, as if she had guessed the true reason of her friend's sorrow, "I'm sure Vera has said something to you since dinner?
  • The little kitten brightened, its eyes shone, and it seemed ready to lift its tail, jump down on its soft paws, and begin playing with the ball of worsted as a kitten should.
  • At nighttime in the moon's fair glow How sweet, as fancies wander free, To feel that in this world there's one Who still is thinking but of thee!
  • Just look at her! exclaimed the countess as she crossed the ballroom, pointing to Natasha.
  • As soon as the provocatively gay strains of Daniel Cooper (somewhat resembling those of a merry peasant dance) began to sound, all the doorways of the ballroom were suddenly filled by the domestic serfs--the men on one side and the women on the other--who with beaming faces had come to see their master making merry.
  • As soon as the provocatively gay strains of Daniel Cooper (somewhat resembling those of a merry peasant dance) began to sound, all the doorways of the ballroom were suddenly filled by the domestic serfs--the men on one side and the women on the other--who with beaming faces had come to see their master making merry.
  • A regular eagle he is! loudly remarked the nurse, as she stood in one of the doorways.
  • Natasha kept pulling everyone by sleeve or dress, urging them to "look at Papa!" though as it was they never took their eyes off the couple.
  • Everyone stood up respectfully when the Military Governor, having stayed about half an hour alone with the dying man, passed out, slightly acknowledging their bows and trying to escape as quickly as possible from the glances fixed on him by the doctors, clergy, and relatives of the family.
  • The weather is beautiful, Princess; and besides, in Moscow one feels as if one were in the country.
  • Everyone again looked toward the door, which creaked as the second princess went in with the drink she had prepared according to Lorrain's instructions.
  • She rose and smoothed her hair, which was as usual so extremely smooth that it seemed to be made of one piece with her head and covered with varnish.
  • "Well, my dear?" said Prince Vasili, taking her hand and bending it downwards as was his habit.
  • This might have been taken as an expression of sorrow and devotion, or of weariness and hope of resting before long.
  • Prince Vasili understood it as an expression of weariness.
  • I love you all, like children of my own, as you know.
  • The princess smiled as people do who think they know more about the subject under discussion than those they are talking with.
  • If not, then as soon as all is over," and Prince Vasili sighed to intimate what he meant by the words all is over, "and the count's papers are opened, the will and letter will be delivered to the Emperor, and the petition will certainly be granted.
  • Pierre will get everything as the legitimate son.
  • "And our share?" asked the princess smiling ironically, as if anything might happen, only not that.
  • But, my poor Catiche, it is as clear as daylight!
  • "My dear Princess Catherine Semenovna," began Prince Vasili impatiently, "I came here not to wrangle with you, but to talk about your interests as with a kinswoman, a good, kind, true relation.
  • I value your friendship and wish you to have as good an opinion of me.
  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.
  • "Yes," replied a footman in a bold loud voice, as if anything were now permissible; "the door to the left, ma'am."
  • "Ah, my friend!" she said, touching his arm as she had done her son's when speaking to him that afternoon, "believe me I suffer no less than you do, but be a man!"
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, addressing a maid who was hurrying past with a decanter on a tray as "my dear" and "my sweet," asked about the princess' health and then led Pierre along a stone passage.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna evinced no surprise, she only smiled faintly and sighed, as if to say that this was no more than she had expected.
  • The same people were still sitting here in almost the same positions as before, whispering to one another.
  • All became silent and turned to look at the pale tear-worn Anna Mikhaylovna as she entered, and at the big stout figure of Pierre who, hanging his head, meekly followed her.
  • She felt that as she brought with her the person the dying man wished to see, her own admission was assured.
  • As soon as Anna Mikhaylovna had disappeared he noticed that the eyes of all in the room turned to him with something more than curiosity and sympathy.
  • As soon as Anna Mikhaylovna had disappeared he noticed that the eyes of all in the room turned to him with something more than curiosity and sympathy.
  • A deference such as he had never before received was shown him.
  • He went up to him, took his hand (a thing he never used to do), and drew it downwards as if wishing to ascertain whether it was firmly fixed on.
  • The dying man lay as lifeless and immovable as before.
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • Here! exclaimed different voices; and the heavy breathing of the bearers and the shuffling of their feet grew more hurried, as if the weight they were carrying were too much for them.
  • It was the same as Pierre remembered it three months before, when the count had sent him to Petersburg.
  • Either this look meant nothing but that as long as one has eyes they must look somewhere, or it meant too much.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna made a hurried sign with her eyes, glancing at the sick man's hand and moving her lips as if to send it a kiss.
  • Pierre, carefully stretching his neck so as not to touch the quilt, followed her suggestion and pressed his lips to the large boned, fleshy hand.
  • As soon as they saw Pierre and his companion they became silent, and Pierre thought he saw the princess hide something as she whispered:
  • As soon as they saw Pierre and his companion they became silent, and Pierre thought he saw the princess hide something as she whispered:
  • "Permit me, Princess, to know what is necessary and what is not necessary," said the younger of the two speakers, evidently in the same state of excitement as when she had slammed the door of her room.
  • Come, my dear Anna Mikhaylovna, let Catiche do as she pleases.
  • She tried to pass Anna Mikhaylovna, but the latter sprang so as to bar her path.
  • Pierre noticed that he was pale and that his jaw quivered and shook as if in an ague.
  • Try to weep, nothing gives such relief as tears.
  • She said the count had died as she would herself wish to die, that his end was not only touching but edifying.
  • It uplifts the soul to see such men as the old count and his worthy son, said she.
  • Of the behavior of the eldest princess and Prince Vasili she spoke disapprovingly, but in whispers and as a great secret.
  • As regularity is a prime condition facilitating activity, regularity in his household was carried to the highest point of exactitude.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • On the morning of the day that the young couple were to arrive, Princess Mary entered the antechamber as usual at the time appointed for the morning greeting.
  • The princess was as untidy as her father was tidy.
  • Why are we not together as we were last summer, in your big study, on the blue sofa, the confidential sofa?
  • As with everyone, her face assumed a forced unnatural expression as soon as she looked in a glass.
  • As with everyone, her face assumed a forced unnatural expression as soon as she looked in a glass.
  • God grant that the Corsican monster who is destroying the peace of Europe may be overthrown by the angel whom it has pleased the Almighty, in His goodness, to give us as sovereign!
  • As for the past two years people have amused themselves by finding husbands for me (most of whom I don't even know), the matchmaking chronicles of Moscow now speak of me as the future Countess Bezukhova.
  • As for the past two years people have amused themselves by finding husbands for me (most of whom I don't even know), the matchmaking chronicles of Moscow now speak of me as the future Countess Bezukhova.
  • I embrace you as I love you.
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • I cannot agree with you about Pierre, whom I knew as a child.
  • As to his inheritance and the part played by Prince Vasili, it is very sad for both.
  • In regard to this project of marriage for me, I will tell you, dear sweet friend, that I look on marriage as a divine institution to which we must conform.
  • However painful it may be to me, should the Almighty lay the duties of wife and mother upon me I shall try to perform them as faithfully as I can, without disquieting myself by examining my feelings toward him whom He may give me for husband.
  • Between twelve and two o'clock, as the day was mapped out, the prince rested and the princess played the clavichord.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • The little princess had grown stouter during this time, but her eyes and her short, downy, smiling lip lifted when she began to speak just as merrily and prettily as ever.
  • Prince Andrew stopped and made a grimace, as if expecting something unpleasant.
  • Prince Andrew shrugged his shoulders and frowned, as lovers of music do when they hear a false note.
  • The two women let go of one another, and then, as if afraid of being too late, seized each other's hands, kissing them and pulling them away, and again began kissing each other on the face, and then to Prince Andrew's surprise both began to cry and kissed again.
  • Prince Andrew and his sister, hand in hand, kissed one another, and he told her she was still the same crybaby as ever.
  • "The hours are the same, and the lathe, and also the mathematics and my geometry lessons," said Princess Mary gleefully, as if her lessons in geometry were among the greatest delights of her life.
  • Wants to vanquish Buonaparte? said the old man, shaking his powdered head as much as the tail, which Tikhon was holding fast to plait, would allow.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • The old prince did not evince the least interest during this explanation, but as if he were not listening to it continued to dress while walking about, and three times unexpectedly interrupted.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • Prince Andrew, looking again at that genealogical tree, shook his head, laughing as a man laughs who looks at a portrait so characteristic of the original as to be amusing.
  • The prince walked in quickly and jauntily as was his wont, as if intentionally contrasting the briskness of his manners with the strict formality of his house.
  • She felt, as courtiers do when the Tsar enters, the sensation of fear and respect which the old man inspired in all around him.
  • "You must walk, walk as much as possible, as much as possible," he said.
  • As she became animated the prince looked at her more and more sternly, and suddenly, as if he had studied her sufficiently and had formed a definite idea of her, he turned away and addressed Michael Ivanovich.
  • As she became animated the prince looked at her more and more sternly, and suddenly, as if he had studied her sufficiently and had formed a definite idea of her, he turned away and addressed Michael Ivanovich.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • You may laugh as much as you like, but all the same Bonaparte is a great general!
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • The old prince, not altering his routine, retired as usual after dinner.
  • You have changed so, Andrusha, she added, as if to explain such a question.
  • She smiled as she uttered his pet name, "Andrusha."
  • Prince Andrew smiled as he looked at his sister, as we smile at those we think we thoroughly understand.
  • As Sterne says: 'We don't love people so much for the good they have done us, as for the good we have done them.'
  • As Sterne says: 'We don't love people so much for the good they have done us, as for the good we have done them.'
  • But even if one might, what feeling except veneration could such a man as my father evoke?
  • I only wish you were all as happy as I am.
  • I don't understand how a man of his immense intellect can fail to see what is as clear as day, and can go so far astray.
  • "Even if it were a great deal of trouble..." answered Prince Andrew, as if guessing what it was about.
  • Think as you please, but do this for my sake!
  • As I was saying to you, Andrew, be kind and generous as you always used to be.
  • As I was saying to you, Andrew, be kind and generous as you always used to be.
  • Red patches appeared on Princess Mary's face and she was silent as if she felt guilty.
  • As he said this he rose, went to his sister, and, stooping, kissed her forehead.
  • She was speaking as usual in French, and as if after long self-restraint she wished to make up for lost time.
  • No, but imagine the old Countess Zubova, with false curls and her mouth full of false teeth, as if she were trying to cheat old age....
  • I am ashamed as it is to leave her on your hands...
  • The old prince stopped writing and, as if not understanding, fixed his stern eyes on his son.
  • Give this letter to Michael Ilarionovich. * I have written that he should make use of you in proper places and not keep you long as an adjutant: a bad position!
  • "I also wanted to ask you," continued Prince Andrew, "if I'm killed and if I have a son, do not let him be taken away from you--as I said yesterday... let him grow up with you....
  • And this "Well!" sounded coldly ironic, as if he were saying,: "Now go through your performance."
  • The general looked the captain up and down as he came up panting, slackening his pace as he approached.
  • Whom have you got there dressed up as a Hungarian? said the commander with an austere gibe.
  • "I request you to have the goodness to change your coat," he said as he turned away.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian general were talking in low voices and Kutuzov smiled slightly as treading heavily he stepped down from the carriage just as if those two thousand men breathlessly gazing at him and the regimental commander did not exist.
  • The word of command rang out, and again the regiment quivered, as with a jingling sound it presented arms.
  • "As far as the service goes he is quite punctilious, your excellency; but his character..." said Timokhin.
  • "As far as the service goes he is quite punctilious, your excellency; but his character..." said Timokhin.
  • And that other one with him, the Austrian, looked as if he were smeared with chalk--as white as flour!
  • I suppose they polish him up as they do the guns.
  • Having jerked out these last words as soldiers do and waved his arms as if flinging something to the ground, the drummer--a lean, handsome soldier of forty--looked sternly at the singers and screwed up his eyes.
  • "Oh, my bower new...!" chimed in twenty voices, and the castanet player, in spite of the burden of his equipment, rushed out to the front and, walking backwards before the company, jerked his shoulders and flourished his castanets as if threatening someone.
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • Zherkov had met Dolokhov abroad as a private and had not seen fit to recognize him.
  • I am as you see.
  • "I'm glad," answered Dolokhov briefly and clearly, as the song demanded.
  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.
  • On Kutuzov's staff, among his fellow officers and in the army generally, Prince Andrew had, as he had had in Petersburg society, two quite opposite reputations.
  • The unknown general looked disdainfully down at Kozlovski, who was rather short, as if surprised that anyone should not know him.
  • He took out a notebook, hurriedly scribbled something in pencil, tore out the leaf, gave it to Kozlovski, stepped quickly to the window, and threw himself into a chair, gazing at those in the room as if asking, "Why do they look at me?"
  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.
  • The general with the bandaged head bent forward as though running away from some danger, and, making long, quick strides with his thin legs, went up to Kutuzov.
  • Kutuzov's face as he stood in the open doorway remained perfectly immobile for a few moments.
  • The generals were passing by, looking as if they wished to avoid embarrassing attentions.
  • Quarante mille hommes massacres et l'armee de nos allies detruite, et vous trouvez la le mot pour rire, * he said, as if strengthening his views by this French sentence.
  • The squadron in which Nicholas Rostov served as a cadet was quartered in the German village of Salzeneck.
  • The best quarters in the village were assigned to cavalry-captain Denisov, the squadron commander, known throughout the whole cavalry division as Vaska Denisov.
  • On October 11, the day when all was astir at headquarters over the news of Mack's defeat, the camp life of the officers of this squadron was proceeding as usual.
  • As soon as you left, it began and went on.
  • As soon as you left, it began and went on.
  • He lets one win the singles and collahs it as soon as one doubles it; gives the singles and snatches the doubles!
  • Rostov shrugged his shoulders as much as to say: "Nor do I, but what's one to do?" and, having given his order, he returned to Telyanin.
  • "Well there certainly are disgusting people," thought Rostov as he entered.
  • We are childwen of the dust... but one falls in love and one is a God, one is pua' as on the first day of cweation...
  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.
  • "Yes," said Rostov as if it cost him a great deal to utter the word; and he sat down at the nearest table.
  • As soon as Rostov heard them, an enormous load of doubt fell from him.
  • As soon as Rostov heard them, an enormous load of doubt fell from him.
  • He may keep me on duty every day, or may place me under arrest, but no one can make me apologize, because if he, as commander of this regiment, thinks it beneath his dignity to give me satisfaction, then...
  • "That's better, Count," said the staff captain, beginning to address Rostov by his title, as if in recognition of his confession.
  • "Well, it's as you like," said the staff captain.
  • You look as if you'd just come out of a hot bath.
  • The wide expanse that opened out before the heights on which the Russian batteries stood guarding the bridge was at times veiled by a diaphanous curtain of slanting rain, and then, suddenly spread out in the sunlight, far-distant objects could be clearly seen glittering as though freshly varnished.
  • Everyone got up and began watching the movements of our troops below, as plainly visible as if but a stone's throw away, and the movements of the approaching enemy farther off.
  • "It's as if a dam had burst," said the Cossack hopelessly.
  • I did, 'pon my word, I got that frightened! said he, as if bragging of having been frightened.
  • I have seen as much before now, mate!
  • "Where are you going?" asked an infantry officer who was eating an apple, also half smiling as he looked at the handsome girl.
  • As often happens, the horses of a convoy wagon became restive at the end of the bridge, and the whole crowd had to wait.
  • See, here's an officer jammed in too-- different voices were saying in the crowd, as the men looked at one another, and all pressed toward the exit from the bridge.
  • "The squadwon can't pass," shouted Vaska Denisov, showing his white teeth fiercely and spurring his black thoroughbred Arab, which twitched its ears as the bayonets touched it, and snorted, spurting white foam from his bit, tramping the planks of the bridge with his hoofs, and apparently ready to jump over the railings had his rider let him.
  • Then the clang of hoofs, as of several horses galloping, resounded on the planks of the bridge, and the squadron, officers in front and men four abreast, spread across the bridge and began to emerge on his side of it.
  • The last of the infantry hurriedly crossed the bridge, squeezing together as they approached it as if passing through a funnel.
  • The quartermaster frowned, looking at the soldiers as if threatening to punish them.
  • He was glancing at everyone with a clear, bright expression, as if asking them to notice how calmly he sat under fire.
  • The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
  • With his shaggy head thrown back like birds when they drink, pressing his spurs mercilessly into the sides of his good horse, Bedouin, and sitting as though falling backwards in the saddle, he galloped to the other flank of the squadron and shouted in a hoarse voice to the men to look to their pistols.
  • His face with its long mustache was serious as always, only his eyes were brighter than usual.
  • "Attack indeed!" said the colonel in a bored voice, puckering up his face as if driving off a troublesome fly.
  • Then he imagined how, after the attack, Bogdanich would come up to him as he lay wounded and would magnanimously extend the hand of reconciliation.
  • The high-shouldered figure of Zherkov, familiar to the Pavlograds as he had but recently left their regiment, rode up to the colonel.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • "How's this, Colonel?" he shouted as he approached.
  • "I will the bridge fire," he said in a solemn tone as if to announce that in spite of all the unpleasantness he had to endure he would still do the right thing.
  • "There, it's just as I thought," said Rostov to himself.
  • His hand trembled as he gave his horse into an orderly's charge, and he felt the blood rush to his heart with a thud.
  • "True enough," answered Nesvitski; "two smart fellows could have done the job just as well."
  • Oh! groaned Nesvitski as if in fierce pain, seizing the officer of the suite by the arm.
  • He stood looking about him, when suddenly he heard a rattle on the bridge as if nuts were being spilt, and the hussar nearest to him fell against the rails with a groan.
  • Nicholas Rostov turned away and, as if searching for something, gazed into the distance, at the waters of the Danube, at the sky, and at the sun.
  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.
  • As soon as he closed his eyes his ears seemed filled with the rattle of the wheels and the sensation of victory.
  • As soon as he closed his eyes his ears seemed filled with the rattle of the wheels and the sensation of victory.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • Prince Andrew's joyous feeling was considerably weakened as he approached the door of the minister's room.
  • I could not have a more welcome visitor, said Bilibin as he came out to meet Prince Andrew.
  • And I am sitting here ill, as you see.
  • Bilibin was a man of thirty-five, a bachelor, and of the same circle as Prince Andrew.
  • Bilibin liked conversation as he liked work, only when it could be made elegantly witty.
  • These sayings were prepared in the inner laboratory of his mind in a portable form as if intentionally, so that insignificant society people might carry them from drawing room to drawing room.
  • His thin, worn, sallow face was covered with deep wrinkles, which always looked as clean and well washed as the tips of one's fingers after a Russian bath.
  • "They received me and my news as one receives a dog in a game of skittles," said he in conclusion.
  • Because not everything happens as one expects or with the smoothness of a parade.
  • We had expected, as I told you, to get at their rear by seven in the morning but had not reached it by five in the afternoon.
  • Bring us nice news of a victory by the Archduke Karl or Ferdinand (one archduke's as good as another, as you know) and even if it is only over a fire brigade of Bonaparte's, that will be another story and we'll fire off some cannon!
  • You abandon Vienna, give up its defense--as much as to say: 'Heaven is with us, but heaven help you and your capital!'
  • You see that your victory is not a matter for great rejoicing and that you can't be received as a savior.
  • "Really I don't care about that, I don't care at all," said Prince Andrew, beginning to understand that his news of the battle before Krems was really of small importance in view of such events as the fall of Austria's capital.
  • "If we live we shall see," replied Bilibin, his face again becoming smooth as a sign that the conversation was at an end.
  • These gentlemen received Prince Andrew as one of themselves, an honor they did not extend to many.
  • "The Berlin cabinet cannot express a feeling of alliance," began Hippolyte gazing round with importance at the others, "without expressing... as in its last note... you understand...
  • I want to entertain him as far as I can, with all the pleasures of life here.
  • "When speaking to the Emperor, try as far as you can to praise the way that provisions are supplied and the routes indicated," said Bilibin, accompanying him to the hall.
  • "I should like to speak well of them, but as far as I know the facts, I can't," replied Bolkonski, smiling.
  • Well, talk as much as you can, anyway.
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.
  • Before the conversation began Prince Andrew was struck by the fact that the Emperor seemed confused and blushed as if not knowing what to say.
  • Then followed other questions just as simple: Was Kutuzov well?
  • The French entered Vienna as I told you.
  • "It's not treachery nor rascality nor stupidity: it is just as at Ulm... it is..."--he seemed to be trying to find the right expression.
  • But as you are a philosopher, be a consistent one, look at the other side of the question and you will see that your duty, on the contrary, is to take care of yourself.
  • I am speaking sincerely as a friend!
  • Very sinister reports of the position of the army reached him as he went along, and the appearance of the troops in their disorderly flight confirmed these rumors.
  • Do as you like.
  • "This is a mob of scoundrels and not an army," he was thinking as he went up to the window of the first house, when a familiar voice called him by name.
  • Nesvitski, moving his moist lips as he chewed something, and flourishing his arm, called him to enter.
  • You must be ill to shiver like that, he added, noticing that Prince Andrew winced as at an electric shock.
  • Just as he was going to open it the sounds ceased, the door opened, and Kutuzov with his eagle nose and puffy face appeared in the doorway.
  • Prince Andrew stood right in front of Kutuzov but the expression of the commander in chief's one sound eye showed him to be so preoccupied with thoughts and anxieties as to be oblivious of his presence.
  • "If a tenth part of his detachment returns I shall thank God," he added as if speaking to himself.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • Bagration was to make this march without resting, and to halt facing Vienna with Znaim to his rear, and if he succeeded in forestalling the French he was to delay them as long as possible.
  • Marching thirty miles that stormy night across roadless hills, with his hungry, ill-shod soldiers, and losing a third of his men as stragglers by the way, Bagration came out on the Vienna-Znaim road at Hollabrunn a few hours ahead of the French who were approaching Hollabrunn from Vienna.
  • "However, there will hardly be an engagement today," said Bagration as if to reassure Prince Andrew.
  • "If he is one of the ordinary little staff dandies sent to earn a medal he can get his reward just as well in the rearguard, but if he wishes to stay with me, let him... he'll be of use here if he's a brave officer," thought Bagration.
  • Prince Andrew, without replying, asked the prince's permission to ride round the position to see the disposition of the forces, so as to know his bearings should he be sent to execute an order.
  • One would think that as an artillery officer you would set a good example, yet here you are without your boots!
  • Prince Andrew smiled involuntarily as he looked at the artillery officer Tushin, who silent and smiling, shifting from one stockinged foot to the other, glanced inquiringly with his large, intelligent, kindly eyes from Prince Andrew to the staff officer.
  • All their faces were as serene as if all this were happening at home awaiting peaceful encampment, and not within sight of the enemy before an action in which at least half of them would be left on the field.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • "We'll make you dance as we did under Suvorov...," * said Dolokhov.
  • The Emperor will teach your Suvara as he has taught the others...
  • Ouh! ouh! came peals of such healthy and good-humored laughter from the soldiers that it infected the French involuntarily, so much so that the only thing left to do seemed to be to unload the muskets, explode the ammunition, and all return home as quickly as possible.
  • But the guns remained loaded, the loopholes in blockhouses and entrenchments looked out just as menacingly, and the unlimbered cannon confronted one another as before.
  • "No, friend," said a pleasant and, as it seemed to Prince Andrew, a familiar voice, "what I say is that if it were possible to know what is beyond death, none of us would be afraid of it.
  • Prince Andrew asked himself as he looked.
  • Prince Bagration screwed up his eyes, looked round, and, seeing the cause of the confusion, turned away with indifference, as if to say, "Is it worth while noticing trifles?"
  • As he approached, a ringing shot issued from it deafening him and his suite, and in the smoke that suddenly surrounded the gun they could see the gunners who had seized it straining to roll it quickly back to its former position.
  • Prince Bagration bowed his head as a sign that this was exactly what he had desired and expected.
  • The commander of the regiment turned to Prince Bagration, entreating him to go back as it was too dangerous to remain where they were.
  • He spoke as if those bullets could not kill him, and his half-closed eyes gave still more persuasiveness to his words.
  • The staff officer joined in the colonel's appeals, but Bagration did not reply; he only gave an order to cease firing and re-form, so as to give room for the two approaching battalions.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • At that moment he was clearly thinking of nothing but how dashing a fellow he would appear as he passed the commander.
  • It was as if all the powers of his soul were concentrated on passing the commander in the best possible manner, and feeling that he was doing it well he was happy.
  • A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves!"
  • Another, without looking round, as though fearing to relax, shouted with his mouth wide open and passed on.
  • The command of the left flank belonged by seniority to the commander of the regiment Kutuzov had reviewed at Braunau and in which Dolokhov was serving as a private.
  • The command to form up rang out and the sabers whizzed as they were drawn from their scabbards.
  • "Faster!" came the word of command, and Rostov felt Rook's flanks drooping as he broke into a gallop.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • The wrist felt as if it were not his.
  • The French had fallen behind, and just as he looked round the first man changed his run to a walk and, turning, shouted something loudly to a comrade farther back.
  • But at the same time, his left arm felt as heavy as if a seventy-pound weight were tied to it.
  • The general had a fit of coughing as a result of shouting and of the powder smoke and stopped in despair.
  • As if urging each other on, the soldiers cried at each shot: Fine!
  • The French columns that had advanced beyond the village went back; but as though in revenge for this failure, the enemy placed ten guns to the right of the village and began firing them at Tushin's battery.
  • Only when a man was killed or wounded did he frown and turn away from the sight, shouting angrily at the men who, as is always the case, hesitated about lifting the injured or dead.
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer--all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • He imagined himself as an enormously tall, powerful man who was throwing cannon balls at the French with both hands.
  • "Now then, Matvevna, dear old lady, don't let me down!" he was saying as he moved from the gun, when a strange, unfamiliar voice called above his head: "Captain Tushin!
  • Blood was gushing from its leg as from a spring.
  • They were both so busy as to seem not to notice one another.
  • Interrupting one another, they all gave, and transmitted, orders as to how to proceed, reprimanding and reproaching him.
  • "It was the officer, your honor, stained it," answered the artilleryman, wiping away the blood with his coat sleeve, as if apologizing for the state of his gun.
  • They all rushed out of the village again, but Tushin's guns could not move, and the artillerymen, Tushin, and the cadet exchanged silent glances as they awaited their fate.
  • And again and again in the complete darkness Tushin's guns moved forward, surrounded by the humming infantry as by a frame.
  • In the darkness, it seemed as though a gloomy unseen river was flowing always in one direction, humming with whispers and talk and the sound of hoofs and wheels.
  • It was no longer, as before, a dark, unseen river flowing through the gloom, but a dark sea swelling and gradually subsiding after a storm.
  • The general had so wished to do this and was so sorry he had not managed to do it that it seemed to him as if it had really happened.
  • As he stepped past the generals in the crowded hut, feeling embarrassed as he always was by the sight of his superiors, he did not notice the staff of the banner and stumbled over it.
  • As he stepped past the generals in the crowded hut, feeling embarrassed as he always was by the sight of his superiors, he did not notice the staff of the banner and stumbled over it.
  • "How was it a gun was abandoned?" asked Bagration, frowning, not so much at the captain as at those who were laughing, among whom Zherkov laughed loudest.
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
  • That affair was the same thing as this soldier with the harsh voice, and it was that affair and this soldier that were so agonizingly, incessantly pulling and pressing his arm and always dragging it in one direction.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • In Petersburg, as in Moscow, Pierre found the same atmosphere of gentleness and affection.
  • Formerly in Anna Pavlovna's presence, Pierre had always felt that what he was saying was out of place, tactless and unsuitable, that remarks which seemed to him clever while they formed in his mind became foolish as soon as he uttered them, while on the contrary Hippolyte's stupidest remarks came out clever and apt.
  • When he read that sentence, Pierre felt for the first time that some link which other people recognized had grown up between himself and Helene, and that thought both alarmed him, as if some obligation were being imposed on him which he could not fulfill, and pleased him as an entertaining supposition.
  • The beauty went to the aunt, but Anna Pavlovna detained Pierre, looking as if she had to give some final necessary instructions.
  • Pierre, in reply, sincerely agreed with her as to Helene's perfection of manner.
  • She looked at her niece, as if inquiring what she was to do with these people.
  • She was, as always at evening parties, wearing a dress such as was then fashionable, cut very low at front and back.
  • He was conscious of the warmth of her body, the scent of perfume, and the creaking of her corset as she moved.
  • It seemed to him that everyone knew what had happened to him as he knew it himself.
  • She paused, as women always do, expecting something after they have mentioned their age.
  • But she was just as terribly close to him.
  • He had merely understood that the woman he had known as a child, of whom when her beauty was mentioned he had said absent-mindedly: "Yes, she's good looking," he had understood that this woman might belong to him.
  • And he again saw her not as the daughter of Prince Vasili, but visualized her whole body only veiled by its gray dress.
  • Why did this thought never occur to me before? and again he told himself that it was impossible, that there would be something unnatural, and as it seemed to him dishonorable, in this marriage.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • And though Prince Vasili, when he stayed in (as he said) for Pierre's sake, hardly exchanged a couple of words with him, Pierre felt unable to disappoint him.
  • On Helene's name day, a small party of just their own people--as his wife said--met for supper at Prince Vasili's.
  • But much as all the rest laughed, talked, and joked, much as they enjoyed their Rhine wine, saute, and ices, and however they avoided looking at the young couple, and heedless and unobservant as they seemed of them, one could feel by the occasional glances they gave that the story about Sergey Kuzmich, the laughter, and the food were all a pretense, and that the whole attention of that company was directed to-- Pierre and Helene.
  • The old princess sighed sadly as she offered some wine to the old lady next to her and glanced angrily at her daughter, and her sigh seemed to say: "Yes, there's nothing left for you and me but to sip sweet wine, my dear, now that the time has come for these young ones to be thus boldly, provocatively happy."
  • It seemed as if the very light of the candles was focused on those two happy faces alone.
  • He felt it awkward to attract everyone's attention and to be considered a lucky man and, with his plain face, to be looked on as a sort of Paris possessed of a Helen.
  • And here he was sitting by her side as her betrothed, seeing, hearing, feeling her nearness, her breathing, her movements, her beauty.
  • Some, as if unwilling to distract her from an important occupation, came up to her for a moment and made haste to go away, refusing to let her see them off.
  • The diplomatist preserved a mournful silence as he left the drawing room.
  • But, as he had to say something, he began by asking her whether she was satisfied with the party.
  • Prince Vasili gave him a look of stern inquiry, as though what Pierre had just said was so strange that one could not take it in.
  • "The step must be taken but I cannot, I cannot!" thought Pierre, and he again began speaking about indifferent matters, about Sergey Kuzmich, asking what the point of the story was as he had not heard it properly.
  • Pierre and Helene still sat talking just as before.
  • Pierre held the hand of his betrothed in silence, looking at her beautiful bosom as it rose and fell.
  • She thought: "If I seem not to notice he will think that I do not sympathize with him; if I seem sad and out of spirits myself, he will say (as he has done before) that I'm in the dumps."
  • Afraid of the 'minister' as that idiot Alpatych called him this morning?
  • "Yes, I feel a kind of oppression," she said in reply to the prince's question as to how she felt.
  • He regarded his whole life as a continual round of amusement which someone for some reason had to provide for him.
  • Prince Vasili's two valets were busy dressing him, and he looked round with much animation and cheerfully nodded to his son as the latter entered, as if to say: "Yes, that's how I want you to look."
  • Dressed as she used to be in Petersburg society, it was still more noticeable how much plainer she had become.
  • Are you going to remain as you are, dear princess? she began.
  • She flushed, her beautiful eyes grew dim, red blotches came on her face, and it took on the unattractive martyrlike expression it so often wore, as she submitted herself to Mademoiselle Bourienne and Lise.
  • And as Princess Mary gave no answer, she left the room.
  • She did not comply with Lise's request, she not only left her hair as it was, but did not even look in her glass.
  • She fancied a child, her own--such as she had seen the day before in the arms of her nurse's daughter--at her own breast, the husband standing by and gazing tenderly at her and the child.
  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.
  • It was as if he said to them: I know you, I know you, but why should I bother about you?
  • The princess felt this, and as if wishing to show him that she did not even dare expect to interest him, she turned to his father.
  • It's not as at Annette's * receptions where you always ran away; you remember cette chere Annette!
  • "And didn't Hippolyte tell you?" asked Prince Vasili, turning to his son and seizing the little princess' arm as if she would have run away and he had just managed to catch her, "didn't he tell you how he himself was pining for the dear princess, and how she showed him the door?
  • Life without Princess Mary, little as he seemed to value her, was unthinkable to him.
  • "You must do as you please," said Prince Bolkonski, bowing to his daughter-in-law, "but she need not make a fool of herself, she's plain enough as it is."
  • As soon as they were alone together, Prince Vasili announced his hopes and wishes to the old prince.
  • As soon as they were alone together, Prince Vasili announced his hopes and wishes to the old prince.
  • "Let her marry, it's all the same to me!" he screamed in the same piercing tone as when parting from his son.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.
  • She did not know how she found the courage, but she looked straight into his handsome face as it came near to her shortsighted eyes.
  • They all separated, but, except Anatole who fell asleep as soon as he got into bed, all kept awake a long time that night.
  • The old prince felt as though he had been insulted through his daughter.
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.
  • Last night a proposition was made me on your account and, as you know my principles, I refer it to you.
  • Prince Vasili finds you to his taste as a daughter-in-law and makes a proposal to you on his pupil's behalf.
  • Yes or no, yes or no, yes or no! he still shouted when the princess, as if lost in a fog, had already staggered out of the study.
  • Decide, my dear, good, gentle Marie, whom I have always loved as a daughter!
  • After dinner, she rushed head long after Anna Mikhaylovna and, dashing at her, flung herself on her neck as soon as she overtook her in the sitting room.
  • It's not that I don't remember--I know what he is like, but not as I remember Nikolenka.
  • She felt that Sonya was speaking the truth, that there was such love as Sonya was speaking of.
  • Now that he was already an officer and a wounded hero, would it be right to remind him of herself and, as it might seem, of the obligations to her he had taken on himself?
  • As twenty years before, it seemed impossible that the little creature who lived somewhere under her heart would ever cry, suck her breast, and begin to speak, so now she could not believe that that little creature could be this strong, brave man, this model son and officer that, judging by this letter, he now was.
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • The Guards had made their whole march as if on a pleasure trip, parading their cleanliness and discipline.
  • Boris, in the accurate way characteristic of him, was building a little pyramid of chessmen with his delicate white fingers while awaiting Berg's move, and watched his opponent's face, evidently thinking about the game as he always thought only of whatever he was engaged on.
  • "As you see," he said.
  • As for us, Count, we get along on our pay.
  • Do go somewhere, anywhere... to the devil!" he exclaimed, and immediately seizing him by the shoulder and looking amiably into his face, evidently wishing to soften the rudeness of his words, he added, "Don't be hurt, my dear fellow; you know I speak from my heart as to an old acquaintance."
  • "Oh dear, what a beast I am!" muttered Rostov, as he read the letter.
  • Well, as you see.
  • Because when once a man starts on military service, he should try to make as successful a career of it as possible.
  • Without boasting, you know, I may say that I know the Army Orders by heart and know the Regulations as well as I do the Lord's Prayer.
  • Well, he stormed at me, as the saying is, stormed and stormed and stormed!
  • It was not a matter of life but rather of death, as the saying is.
  • This pleased Rostov and he began talking about it, and as he went on became more and more animated.
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • In the middle of his story, just as he was saying: "You cannot imagine what a strange frenzy one experiences during an attack," Prince Andrew, whom Boris was expecting, entered the room.
  • Berg took the opportunity to ask, with great politeness, whether, as was rumored, the allowance of forage money to captains of companies would be doubled.
  • "As to your business," Prince Andrew continued, addressing Boris, "we will talk of it later" (and he looked round at Rostov).
  • It looked as if by that slight motion the army itself was expressing its joy at the approach of the Emperors.
  • It seemed as though not the trumpeters were playing, but as if the army itself, rejoicing at the Emperors' approach, had naturally burst into music.
  • Till the Tsar reached it, each regiment in its silence and immobility seemed like a lifeless body, but as soon as he came up it became alive, its thunder joining the roar of the whole line along which he had already passed.
  • The Tsar stopped a few minutes in front of the hussars as if undecided.
  • Rostov himself, his legs well back and his stomach drawn in and feeling himself one with his horse, rode past the Emperor with a frowning but blissful face "like a vewy devil," as Denisov expressed it.
  • They all had but one wish: to advance as soon as possible against the enemy under the Emperor's command.
  • "Very well, then, be so good as to wait," said Prince Andrew to the general, in Russian, speaking with the French intonation he affected when he wished to speak contemptuously, and noticing Boris, Prince Andrew, paying no more heed to the general who ran after him imploring him to hear something more, nodded and turned to him with a cheerful smile.
  • Boris smiled, as if he understood what Prince Andrew was alluding to as something generally known.
  • I only wanted to ask because I fear the Guards won't be in action, he added as if in apology.
  • He would say a lot of pleasant things, ask you to dinner" ("That would not be bad as regards the unwritten code," thought Boris), "but nothing more would come of it.
  • God grant that the one that will result from it will be as victorious!
  • If not as 'Consul' and of course not as 'Emperor,' it seemed to me it should be to 'General Bonaparte.'
  • He suggested addressing him as 'Usurper and Enemy of Mankind.'
  • But I have come to you, Prince, as a petitioner on behalf of this young man.
  • Boris was excited by the thought of being so close to the higher powers as he felt himself to be at that moment.
  • This short man nodded to Dolgorukov as to an intimate friend and stared at Prince Andrew with cool intensity, walking straight toward him and evidently expecting him to bow or to step out of his way.
  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • He was happy as a lover when the longed-for moment of meeting arrives.
  • He felt it not only from the sound of the hoofs of the approaching cavalcade, but because as he drew near everything grew brighter, more joyful, more significant, and more festive around him.
  • And as if in accord with Rostov's feeling, there was a deathly stillness amid which was heard the Emperor's voice.
  • Rostov saw how the Emperor's rather round shoulders shuddered as if a cold shiver had run down them, how his left foot began convulsively tapping the horse's side with the spur, and how the well-trained horse looked round unconcerned and did not stir.
  • Rostov saw tears filling the Emperor's eyes and heard him, as he was riding away, say to Czartoryski: What a terrible thing war is: what a terrible thing!
  • "Not 'our Sovereign, the Emperor,' as they say at official dinners," said he, "but the health of our Sovereign, that good, enchanting, and great man!
  • "If we fought before," he said, "not letting the French pass, as at Schon Grabern, what shall we not do now when he is at the front?
  • "As there's no one to fall in love with on campaign, he's fallen in love with the Tsar," he said.
  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
  • Just as in a clock, the result of the complicated motion of innumerable wheels and pulleys is merely a slow and regular movement of the hands which show the time, so the result of all the complicated human activities of 160,000 Russians and French--all their passions, desires, remorse, humiliations, sufferings, outbursts of pride, fear, and enthusiasm--was only the loss of the battle of Austerlitz, the so-called battle of the three Emperors--that is to say, a slow movement of the hand on the dial of human history.
  • But they heard him at the council of war and will hear him when he talks sense, but to temporize and wait for something now when Bonaparte fears nothing so much as a general battle is impossible.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
  • They began as follows:
  • But the Austrian general, continuing to read, frowned angrily and jerked his elbows, as if to say: "You can tell me your views later, but now be so good as to look at the map and listen."
  • Langeron lifted his eyes with an expression of perplexity, turned round to Miloradovich as if seeking an explanation, but meeting the latter's impressive but meaningless gaze drooped his eyes sadly and again took to twirling his snuffbox.
  • "A geography lesson!" he muttered as if to himself, but loud enough to be heard.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • He listened to what Langeron said, as if remarking, "So you are still at that silly business!" quickly closed his eye again, and let his head sink still lower.
  • Langeron, trying as virulently as possible to sting Weyrother's vanity as author of the military plan, argued that Bonaparte might easily attack instead of being attacked, and so render the whole of this plan perfectly worthless.
  • He moved as if to rise.
  • To the left he saw a sloping descent lit up, and facing it a black knoll that seemed as steep as a wall.
  • "What does that prove?" he was saying as Rostov rode up.
  • Napoleon's proclamation was as follows:
  • Austrian column guides were moving in and out among the Russian troops and served as heralds of the advance.
  • As soon as an Austrian officer showed himself near a commanding officer's quarters, the regiment began to move: the soldiers ran from the fires, thrust their pipes into their boots, their bags into the carts, got their muskets ready, and formed rank.
  • As soon as an Austrian officer showed himself near a commanding officer's quarters, the regiment began to move: the soldiers ran from the fires, thrust their pipes into their boots, their bags into the carts, got their muskets ready, and formed rank.
  • A soldier on the march is hemmed in and borne along by his regiment as much as a sailor is by his ship.
  • However far he has walked, whatever strange, unknown, and dangerous places he reaches, just as a sailor is always surrounded by the same decks, masts, and rigging of his ship, so the soldier always has around him the same comrades, the same ranks, the same sergeant major Ivan Mitrich, the same company dog Jack, and the same commanders.
  • Whether all the enemy forces were, as we supposed, six miles away, or whether they were near by in that sea of mist, no one knew till after eight o'clock.
  • Part of the Russian force had already descended into the valley toward the ponds and lakes and part were leaving these Pratzen Heights which he intended to attack and regarded as the key to the position.
  • When the sun had entirely emerged from the fog, and fields and mist were aglow with dazzling light--as if he had only awaited this to begin the action--he drew the glove from his shapely white hand, made a sign with it to the marshals, and ordered the action to begin.
  • He was in a state of suppressed excitement and irritation, though controlledly calm as a man is at the approach of a long-awaited moment.
  • The locality and the position of our troops were known to him as far as they could be known to anyone in our army.
  • Kindly do as you are ordered.
  • "My dear fellow," Nesvitski whispered to Prince Andrew, "the old man is as surly as a dog."
  • Seeing him, Kutuzov's malevolent and caustic expression softened, as if admitting that what was being done was not his adjutant's fault, and still not answering the Austrian adjutant, he addressed Bolkonski.
  • "All right, all right!" he said to Prince Andrew, and turned to a general who, watch in hand, was saying it was time they started as all the left-flank columns had already descended.
  • He was slightly flushed after galloping two miles, and reining in his horse he sighed restfully and looked round at the faces of his suite, young and animated as his own.
  • The Emperor, frowning slightly, bent his ear forward as if he had not quite heard.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • And at this as if at a command, everyone began to run.
  • "Stop those wretches!" gasped Kutuzov to the regimental commander, pointing to the flying soldiers; but at that instant, as if to punish him for those words, bullets flew hissing across the regiment and across Kutuzov's suite like a flock of little birds.
  • "Forward, lads!" he shouted in a voice piercing as a child's.
  • "What are they about?" thought Prince Andrew as he gazed at them.
  • Why doesn't the red-haired gunner run away as he is unarmed?
  • It seemed to him as though one of the soldiers near him hit him on the head with the full swing of a bludgeon.
  • "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
  • Bagration knew that as the distance between the two flanks was more than six miles, even if the messenger were not killed (which he very likely would be), and found the commander-in-chief (which would be very difficult), he would not be able to get back before evening.
  • Rostov, fearing to be crushed or swept into the attack on the French, galloped along the front as hard as his horse could go, but still was not in time to avoid them.
  • At that moment, as the Horse Guards, having passed him, disappeared in the smoke, Rostov hesitated whether to gallop after them or to go where he was sent.
  • Count! shouted Berg who ran up from the other side as eager as Boris.
  • Having passed the Guards and traversed an empty space, Rostov, to avoid again getting in front of the first line as he had done when the Horse Guards charged, followed the line of reserves, going far round the place where the hottest musket fire and cannonade were heard.
  • Rostov kept asking as he came up to Russian and Austrian soldiers running in confused crowds across his path.
  • It's all up now! he was told in Russian, German, and Czech by the crowd of fugitives who understood what was happening as little as he did.
  • I saw him just as I see you....
  • There he sat in the carriage as pale as anything.
  • It is as if I were glad of a chance to take advantage of his being alone and despondent!
  • "That's a fine death!" said Napoleon as he gazed at Bolkonski.
  • He heard the speaker addressed as Sire.
  • But he heard the words as he might have heard the buzzing of a fly.
  • The Emperor without waiting for an answer turned away and said to one of the officers as he went: Have these gentlemen attended to and taken to my bivouac; let my doctor, Larrey, examine their wounds.
  • Denisov was going home to Voronezh and Rostov persuaded him to travel with him as far as Moscow and to stay with him there.
  • The house stood cold and silent, as if quite regardless of who had come to it.
  • The well-known old door handle, which always angered the countess when it was not properly cleaned, turned as loosely as ever.
  • Are you the same as we?
  • "As may happen," said Rostov.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • It makes it as if you were marrying her because you must, and that wouldn't do at all.
  • Curving her arms, Natasha held out her skirts as dancers do, ran back a few steps, turned, cut a caper, brought her little feet sharply together, and made some steps on the very tips of her toes.
  • And Natasha rose and went out of the room on tiptoe, like a ballet dancer, but smiling as only happy girls of fifteen can smile.
  • He kissed her hand and addressed her not as thou but as you--Sonya.
  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.
  • On his return to Moscow from the army, Nicholas Rostov was welcomed by his home circle as the best of sons, a hero, and their darling Nikolenka; by his relations as a charming, attractive, and polite young man; by his acquaintances as a handsome lieutenant of hussars, a good dancer, and one of the best matches in the city.
  • I shall have my own orchestra, but shouldn't we get the gypsy singers as well?
  • And such a lofty angelic soul as young Bezukhov!
  • But after a while, just as a jury comes out of its room, the bigwigs who guided the club's opinion reappeared, and everybody began speaking clearly and definitely.
  • What also conduced to Bagration's being selected as Moscow's hero was the fact that he had no connections in the city and was a stranger there.
  • Berg was mentioned, by those who did not know him, as having, when wounded in the right hand, taken his sword in the left, and gone forward.
  • Nesvitski was there as an old member of the club.
  • Here, as elsewhere, he was surrounded by an atmosphere of subservience to his wealth, and being in the habit of lording it over these people, he treated them with absent-minded contempt.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • Bekleshev and Theodore Uvarov, who had arrived with him, paused at the doorway to allow him, as the guest of honor, to enter first.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • The committeemen met him at the first door and, expressing their delight at seeing such a highly honored guest, took possession of him as it were, without waiting for his reply, surrounded him, and led him to the drawing room.
  • It was at first impossible to enter the drawing-room door for the crowd of members and guests jostling one another and trying to get a good look at Bagration over each other's shoulders, as if he were some rare animal.
  • Bagration, on seeing the salver, glanced around in dismay, as though seeking help.
  • A dreaded foe be thou, kindhearted as a man, A Rhipheus at home, a Caesar in the field!
  • Three hundred persons took their seats in the dining room, according to their rank and importance: the more important nearer to the honored guest, as naturally as water flows deepest where the land lies lowest.
  • As soon as the singing was over, another and another toast was proposed and Count Ilya Rostov became more and more moved, more glass was smashed, and the shouting grew louder.
  • As soon as the singing was over, another and another toast was proposed and Count Ilya Rostov became more and more moved, more glass was smashed, and the shouting grew louder.
  • As usual, he ate and drank much, and eagerly.
  • He remembered the expression Dolokhov's face assumed in his moments of cruelty, as when tying the policeman to the bear and dropping them into the water, or when he challenged a man to a duel without any reason, or shot a post-boy's horse with a pistol.
  • Rostov looked inimically at Pierre, first because Pierre appeared to his hussar eyes as a rich civilian, the husband of a beauty, and in a word--an old woman; and secondly because Pierre in his preoccupation and absent-mindedness had not recognized Rostov and had not responded to his greeting.
  • The footman, who was distributing leaflets with Kutuzov's cantata, laid one before Pierre as one of the principal guests.
  • "Well then, till tomorrow at Sokolniki," said Dolokhov, as he took leave of Rostov in the club porch.
  • But go with the firm intention of killing your man as quickly and surely as possible, and then all will be right, as our bear huntsman at Kostroma used to tell me.
  • He looked about distractedly and screwed up his eyes as if dazzled by the sun.
  • Denisov first went to the barrier and announced: As the adve'sawies have wefused a weconciliation, please pwoceed.
  • They had the right to fire when they liked as they approached the barrier.
  • The smoke, rendered denser by the mist, prevented him from seeing anything for an instant, but there was no second report as he had expected.
  • He sucked and swallowed the cold snow, his lips quivered but his eyes, still smiling, glittered with effort and exasperation as he mustered his remaining strength.
  • The night after the duel he did not go to his bedroom but, as he often did, remained in his father's room, that huge room in which Count Bezukhov had died.
  • "Louis XVI was executed because they said he was dishonorable and a criminal," came into Pierre's head, "and from their point of view they were right, as were those too who canonized him and died a martyr's death for his sake.
  • But if you are alive--live: tomorrow you'll die as I might have died an hour ago.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • Helene laughed, "that Dolokhov was my lover," she said in French with her coarse plainness of speech, uttering the word amant as casually as any other word, "and you believed it!
  • The gazettes from which the old prince first heard of the defeat at Austerlitz stated, as usual very briefly and vaguely, that after brilliant engagements the Russians had had to retreat and had made their withdrawal in perfect order.
  • "Your son," wrote Kutuzov, "fell before my eyes, a standard in his hand and at the head of a regiment--he fell as a hero, worthy of his father and his fatherland.
  • When Princess Mary went to him at the usual hour he was working at his lathe and, as usual, did not look round at her.
  • Kutuzov writes... and he screamed as piercingly as if he wished to drive the princess away by that scream...
  • It was as if joy--a supreme joy apart from the joys and sorrows of this world--overflowed the great grief within her.
  • She saw him tender and amused as he was when he put on the little icon.
  • Unobservant as was the little princess, these tears, the cause of which she did not understand, agitated her.
  • She said nothing but looked about uneasily as if in search of something.
  • She prayed for her brother as living and was always awaiting news of his return.
  • Dearest, I'm afraid this morning's fruschtique *--as Foka the cook calls it--has disagreed with me.
  • Oh! she heard as she left the room.
  • Suddenly her door opened softly and her old nurse, Praskovya Savishna, who hardly ever came to that room as the old prince had forbidden it, appeared on the threshold with a shawl round her head.
  • Everyone in the house was dominated by the same feeling that Princess Mary experienced as she sat in her room.
  • After a while he re-entered it as if to snuff the candles, and, seeing the prince was lying on the sofa, looked at him, noticed his perturbed face, shook his head, and going up to him silently kissed him on the shoulder and left the room without snuffing the candles or saying why he had entered.
  • As she was crossing the anteroom she saw through the window a carriage with lanterns, standing at the entrance.
  • He was standing close to the door and as soon as it opened his rough old arms closed like a vise round his son's neck, and without a word he began to sob like a child.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • I think there were not many such gallant sons of the fatherland out there as he.
  • Why, if he was so jealous, as I see things he should have shown it sooner, but he lets it go on for months.
  • I have an adored, a priceless mother, and two or three friends--you among them--and as for the rest I only care about them in so far as they are harmful or useful.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • It was a grand farewell dinner, as he and Denisov were leaving to join their regiment after Epiphany.
  • As soon as he entered he noticed and felt the tension of the amorous air in the house, and also noticed a curious embarrassment among some of those present.
  • As soon as he entered he noticed and felt the tension of the amorous air in the house, and also noticed a curious embarrassment among some of those present.
  • "Perhaps," coldly and angrily replied Dolokhov, glancing at Sonya, and, scowling, he gave Nicholas just such a look as he had given Pierre at the club dinner.
  • Little as Nicholas had occupied himself with Sonya of late, something seemed to give way within him at this news.
  • Much as Mamma pressed her, she refused, and I know she won't change once she has said...
  • I love you as a brother and always shall, and I want nothing more.
  • So said the mothers as they watched their young people executing their newly learned steps, and so said the youths and maidens themselves as they danced till they were ready to drop, and so said the grown-up young men and women who came to these balls with an air of condescension and found them most enjoyable.
  • There was the fact that only those came who wished to dance and amuse themselves as girls of thirteen and fourteen do who are wearing long dresses for the first time.
  • Iogel had taken a ballroom in Bezukhov's house, and the ball, as everyone said, was a great success.
  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.
  • She fixed her eyes on him in amazement, smiling as if she did not recognize him.
  • Dolokhov's clear, cold glance met Rostov as soon as he entered the door, as though he had long expected him.
  • Dolokhov now asked as if guessing Rostov's thought.
  • At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
  • "Still, don't ruin yourself!" said Dolokhov with a side glance at Rostov as he continued to deal.
  • Instead of sixteen hundred rubles he had a long column of figures scored against him, which he had reckoned up to ten thousand, but that now, as he vaguely supposed, must have risen to fifteen thousand.
  • I had a splendid card all ready, as if it were the fun of the game which interested him most.
  • Dolokhov cut him short, as if to remind him that it was not for him to jest.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • "Oh, nothing," said he, as if weary of being continually asked the same question.
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • It was long since Rostov had felt such enjoyment from music as he did that day.
  • And suddenly, in the most casual tone, which made him feel ashamed of himself, he said, as if merely asking his father to let him have the carriage to drive to town:
  • Nonsense! cried the count, suddenly reddening with an apoplectic flush over neck and nape as old people do.
  • "It can't be helped It happens to everyone!" said the son, with a bold, free, and easy tone, while in his soul he regarded himself as a worthless scoundrel whose whole life could not atone for his crime.
  • I shall speak to him myself, said the countess, indignant that they should have dared to treat this little Natasha as grown up.
  • No, but you are so nice... but it won't do...not that... but as a friend, I shall always love you.
  • "Vasili Dmitrich, I thank you for the honor," she said, with an embarrassed voice, though it sounded severe to Denisov--"but my daughter is so young, and I thought that, as my son's friend, you would have addressed yourself first to me.
  • It was as if she wanted to show him that his losses were an achievement that made her love him all the more, but Nicholas now considered himself unworthy of her.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • But the officer thrashed him because he had to get on as quickly as possible.
  • As if that money could add a hair's breadth to happiness or peace of mind.
  • My wife--as she once was--did not struggle, and perhaps she was right.
  • The stranger sat without stirring, either resting or, as it seemed to Pierre, sunk in profound and calm meditation.
  • He seemed to emphasize the last word, as if to say--Yes, misfortune!
  • I should like to help you as far as lies in my power.
  • "Just as I may suppose you to be deluded," said Pierre, with a faint smile.
  • And thou art more foolish and unreasonable than a little child, who, playing with the parts of a skillfully made watch, dares to say that, as he does not understand its use, he does not believe in the master who made it.
  • Then change it, purify thyself; and as thou art purified, thou wilt gain wisdom.
  • After these words, the Mason, as if tired by his long discourse, again leaned his arms on the back of the sofa and closed his eyes.
  • The Mason cleared his throat huskily, as old men do, and called his servant.
  • The traveler was Joseph Alexeevich Bazdeev, as Pierre saw from the postmaster's book.
  • One thing he continually realized as he read that book: the joy, hitherto unknown to him, of believing in the possibility of attaining perfection, and in the possibility of active brotherly love among men, which Joseph Alexeevich had revealed to him.
  • "One more question, Count," he said, "which I beg you to answer in all sincerity--not as a future Mason but as an honest man: have you renounced your former convictions--do you believe in God?"
  • To Pierre's inquiries as to what he must do and how he should answer, Willarski only replied that brothers more worthy than he would test him and that Pierre had only to tell the truth.
  • Willarski, stepping toward him, said something to him in French in an undertone and then went up to a small wardrobe in which Pierre noticed garments such as he had never seen before.
  • Once or twice he shrugged his shoulders and raised his hand to the kerchief, as if wishing to take it off, but let it drop again.
  • "In the seventh place, try, by the frequent thought of death," the Rhetor said, "to bring yourself to regard it not as a dreaded foe, but as a friend that frees the soul grown weary in the labors of virtue from this distressful life, and leads it to its place of recompense and peace."
  • A bass voice (Pierre was still blindfolded) questioned him as to who he was, when and where he was born, and so on.
  • During these wanderings, Pierre noticed that he was spoken of now as the "Seeker," now as the "Sufferer," and now as the "Postulant," to the accompaniment of various knockings with mallets and swords.
  • As he was being led up to some object he noticed a hesitation and uncertainty among his conductors.
  • The candles were then extinguished and some spirit lighted, as Pierre knew by the smell, and he was told that he would now see the lesser light.
  • The bandage was taken off his eyes and, by the faint light of the burning spirit, Pierre, as in a dream, saw several men standing before him, wearing aprons like the Rhetor's and holding swords in their hands pointed at his breast.
  • As to the first pair of gloves, a man's, he said that Pierre could not know their meaning but must keep them.
  • Pierre would have liked to subscribe all he had, but fearing that it might look like pride subscribed the same amount as the others.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • You are under a delusion, said Prince Vasili, as he entered.
  • I know all about it, and I can tell you positively that Helene is as innocent before you as Christ was before the Jews.
  • And why didn't you simply come straight to me as to a friend?
  • You behaved as becomes a man who values his honor, perhaps too hastily, but we won't go into that.
  • I said so even at the time when everybody was in raptures about him, when he had just returned from abroad, and when, if you remember, he posed as a sort of Marat at one of my soirees.
  • The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.
  • As soon as he had finished she turned to him with her usual smile.
  • As soon as he had finished she turned to him with her usual smile.
  • Anna Pavlovna waited for him to go on, but as he seemed quite decided to say no more she began to tell of how at Potsdam the impious Bonaparte had stolen the sword of Frederick the Great.
  • "It is the sword of Frederick the Great which I..." she began, but Hippolyte interrupted her with the words: "Le Roi de Prusse..." and again, as soon as all turned toward him, excused himself and said no more.
  • Hippolyte laughed as if ashamed of laughing.
  • Boris smiled circumspectly, so that it might be taken as ironical or appreciative according to the way the joke was received.
  • It seemed as if from some words Boris had spoken that evening about the Prussian army, Helene had suddenly found it necessary to see him.
  • There were other guests and the countess talked little to him, and only as he kissed her hand on taking leave said unexpectedly and in a whisper, with a strangely unsmiling face: Come to dinner tomorrow... in the evening.
  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).
  • The baby Prince Nicholas lived with his wet nurse and nurse Savishna in the late princess' rooms and Princess Mary spent most of the day in the nursery, taking a mother's place to her little nephew as best she could.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, too, seemed passionately fond of the boy, and Princess Mary often deprived herself to give her friend the pleasure of dandling the little angel--as she called her nephew--and playing with him.
  • After the Austerlitz campaign Prince Andrew had firmly resolved not to continue his military service, and when the war recommenced and everybody had to serve, he took a post under his father in the recruitment so as to avoid active service.
  • Prince Andrew remained at Bald Hills as usual during his father's absence.
  • As you please... really...
  • I think so... but as you please, said Princess Mary, evidently intimidated and confused that her opinion had prevailed.
  • "Since the day of our brilliant success at Austerlitz," wrote Bilibin, "as you know, my dear prince, I never leave headquarters.
  • I have certainly acquired a taste for war, and it is just as well for me; what I have seen during these last three months is incredible.
  • 'The enemy of the human race,' as you know, attacks the Prussians.
  • There are thousands such as I in Russia.
  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.
  • We civilians, as you know, have a very bad way of deciding whether a battle was won or lost.
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • Our aim is no longer, as it should be, to avoid or attack the enemy, but solely to avoid General Buxhowden who by right of seniority should be our chief.
  • General Buxhowden was all but attacked and captured by a superior enemy force as a result of one of these maneuvers that enabled us to escape him.
  • But as it turns out, just at that moment a third enemy rises before us--namely the Orthodox Russian soldiers, loudly demanding bread, meat, biscuits, fodder, and whatnot!
  • He shut his eyes, rubbed his forehead as if to rid himself of all interest in what he had read, and listened to what was passing in the nursery.
  • Just as he went in he saw that the nurse was hiding something from him with a scared look and that Princess Mary was no longer by the cot.
  • As often happens after long sleeplessness and long anxiety, he was seized by an unreasoning panic--it occurred to him that the child was dead.
  • Prince Andrew was as glad to find the boy like that, as if he had already lost him.
  • He bent over him and, as his sister had taught him, tried with his lips whether the child was still feverish.
  • Each made the other a warning gesture and stood still in the dim light beneath the curtain as if not wishing to leave that seclusion where they three were shut off from all the world.
  • Continuing to represent the liberation of the serfs as impracticable, he arranged for the erection of large buildings--schools, hospitals, and asylums--on all the estates before the master arrived.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • Some domestic serfs Pierre met, in reply to inquiries as to where the prince lived, pointed out a small newly built lodge close to the pond.
  • As is usually the case with people meeting after a prolonged separation, it was long before their conversation could settle on anything.
  • It was as if Prince Andrew would have liked to sympathize with what Pierre was saying, but could not.
  • "My plans?" he said, as if astonished at the word.
  • Pierre blushed, as he always did when it was mentioned, and said hurriedly: I will tell you some time how it all happened.
  • To live only so as not to do evil and not to have to repent is not enough.
  • "But that's just the same as myself--they are not others," explained Prince Andrew.
  • The others, one's neighbors, le prochain, as you and Princess Mary call it, are the chief source of all error and evil.
  • The one and the other may serve as a pastime.
  • They rose from the table and sat down in the entrance porch which served as a veranda.
  • But as I see it, physical labor is as essential to him, as much a condition of his existence, as mental activity is to you or me.
  • I go to bed after two in the morning, thoughts come and I can't sleep but toss about till dawn, because I think and can't help thinking, just as he can't help plowing and mowing; if he didn't, he would go to the drink shop or fall ill.
  • Just as I could not stand his terrible physical labor but should die of it in a week, so he could not stand my physical idleness, but would grow fat and die.
  • He will drag about as a cripple, a burden to everybody, for another ten years.
  • Others are being born and there are plenty of them as it is.
  • His glance became more animated as his conclusions became more hopeless.
  • That is not cleanly," said Prince Andrew; "on the contrary one must try to make one's life as pleasant as possible.
  • I'm alive, that is not my fault, so I must live out my life as best I can without hurting others.
  • Life as it is leaves one no peace.
  • Well, as I was saying," he continued, recovering his composure, "now there's this recruiting.
  • "Yes, but it is not as you imagine," Prince Andrew continued.
  • In Siberia they lead the same animal life, and the stripes on their bodies heal, and they are happy as before.
  • But it is a good thing for proprietors who perish morally, bring remorse upon themselves, stifle this remorse and grow callous, as a result of being able to inflict punishments justly and unjustly.
  • So that's what I'm sorry for--human dignity, peace of mind, purity, and not the serfs' backs and foreheads, which, beat and shave as you may, always remain the same backs and foreheads.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • And he began to explain Freemasonry as he understood it to Prince Andrew.
  • Nor could I, and it cannot be seen if one looks on our life here as the end of everything.
  • Prince Andrew felt as if the sound of the waves kept up a refrain to Pierre's words, whispering:
  • It vanished as soon as he returned to the customary conditions of his life, but he knew that this feeling which he did not know how to develop existed within him.
  • As they approached the house, Prince Andrew with a smile drew Pierre's attention to a commotion going on at the back porch.
  • "Andrew, why didn't you warn me?" said the princess, with mild reproach, as she stood before her pilgrims like a hen before her chickens.
  • There was a general who did not believe, and said, 'The monks cheat,' and as soon as he'd said it he went blind.
  • "I have known you a long time, you see, and am as fond of you as of a brother," she said.
  • "Who's that?" asked the old prince, noticing Pierre as he got out of the carriage.
  • That charm was not expressed so much in his relations with him as with all his family and with the household.
  • When Pierre had gone and the members of the household met together, they began to express their opinions of him as people always do after a new acquaintance has left, but as seldom happens, no one said anything but what was good of him.
  • On approaching it, Rostov felt as he had done when approaching his home in Moscow.
  • The regiment was also a home, and as unalterably dear and precious as his parents' house.
  • As no transports could arrive, the men dispersed about the abandoned and deserted villages, searching for potatoes, but found few even of these.
  • It was very bitter, but they wandered about the fields seeking it and dug it out with their sabers and ate it, though they were ordered not to do so, as it was a noxious plant.
  • Despite this destitution, the soldiers and officers went on living just as usual.
  • As usual, in their spare time, they lit bonfires, steamed themselves before them naked; smoked, picked out and baked sprouting rotten potatoes, told and listened to stories of Potemkin's and Suvorov's campaigns, or to legends of Alesha the Sly, or the priest's laborer Mikolka.
  • The officers, as usual, lived in twos and threes in the roofless, half- ruined houses.
  • The younger ones occupied themselves as before, some playing cards (there was plenty of money, though there was no food), some with more innocent games, such as quoits and skittles.
  • Rostov lived, as before, with Denisov, and since their furlough they had become more friendly than ever.
  • Denisov evidently tried to expose Rostov to danger as seldom as possible, and after an action greeted his safe return with evident joy.
  • Rostov took the joke as an insult, flared up, and said such unpleasant things to the officer that it was all Denisov could do to prevent a duel.
  • Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the room without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling.
  • In April the troops were enlivened by news of the Emperor's arrival, but Rostov had no chance of being present at the review he held at Bartenstein, as the Pavlograds were at the outposts far beyond that place.
  • The trench itself was the room, in which the lucky ones, such as the squadron commander, had a board, lying on piles at the end opposite the entrance, to serve as a table.
  • He could hear that Lavrushka--that sly, bold orderly of Denisov's--was talking, as well as the quartermaster.
  • The weather had cleared up, and near the next hut two officers and a cadet were playing svayka, laughing as they threw their missiles which buried themselves in the soft mud.
  • If not, as the demand was booked against an infantry regiment, there will be a row and the affair may end badly.
  • The case, as represented by the offended parties, was that, after seizing the transports, Major Denisov, being drunk, went to the chief quartermaster and without any provocation called him a thief, threatened to strike him, and on being led out had rushed into the office and given two officials a thrashing, and dislocated the arm of one of them.
  • Denisov, as was his wont, rode out in front of the outposts, parading his courage.
  • "There was one like that," said the doctor, as if pleased.
  • Close to the corner, on an overcoat, sat an old, unshaven, gray-bearded soldier as thin as a skeleton, with a stern sallow face and eyes intently fixed on Rostov.
  • How are you, how are you? he called out, still in the same voice as in the regiment, but Rostov noticed sadly that under this habitual ease and animation some new, sinister, hidden feeling showed itself in the expression of Denisov's face and the intonations of his voice.
  • His face had the same swollen pallor as the faces of the other hospital patients, but it was not this that struck Rostov.
  • On Rostov's inquiry as to how the matter stood, he at once produced from under his pillow a paper he had received from the commission and the rough draft of his answer to it.
  • His hospital companions, who had gathered round Rostov--a fresh arrival from the world outside--gradually began to disperse as soon as Denisov began reading his answer.
  • Only recently, talking with one of Platov's Cossack officers, Rostov had argued that if Napoleon were taken prisoner he would be treated not as a sovereign, but as a criminal.
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.
  • His eyes, looking serenely and steadily at Rostov, seemed to be veiled by something, as if screened by blue spectacles of conventionality.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • Boris, with one leg crossed over the other and stroking his left hand with the slender fingers of his right, listened to Rostov as a general listens to the report of a subordinate, now looking aside and now gazing straight into Rostov's eyes with the same veiled look.
  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.
  • As the Tsar rode up to one flank of the battalions, which presented arms, another group of horsemen galloped up to the opposite flank, and at the head of them Rostov recognized Napoleon.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • It struck him as a surprise that Alexander treated Bonaparte as an equal and that the latter was quite at ease with the Tsar, as if such relations with an Emperor were an everyday matter to him.
  • His face twitched, as often happens to soldiers called before the ranks.
  • Napoleon slightly turned his head, and put his plump little hand out behind him as if to take something.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • Napoleon merely laid the cross on Lazarev's breast and, dropping his hand, turned toward Alexander as though sure that the cross would adhere there.
  • If the Emperor pleases to recognize Bonaparte as Emperor and to conclude an alliance with him, it means that that is the right thing to do.
  • That way we shall be saying there is no God--nothing! shouted Nicholas, banging the table--very little to the point as it seemed to his listeners, but quite relevantly to the course of his own thoughts.
  • The other half he spent in "Bogucharovo Cloister," as his father called Prince Andrew's estate.
  • "Oh, the spring, I suppose," he thought as he turned round.
  • Probably ten times the age of the birches that formed the forest, it was ten times as thick and twice as tall as they.
  • Look at those cramped dead firs, ever the same, and at me too, sticking out my broken and barked fingers just where they have grown, whether from my back or my sides: as they have grown so I stand, and I do not believe in your hopes and your lies.
  • As he passed through the forest Prince Andrew turned several times to look at that oak, as if expecting something from it.
  • As he passed through the forest Prince Andrew turned several times to look at that oak, as if expecting something from it.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • In 1809 Count Ilya Rostov was living at Otradnoe just as he had done in former years, that is, entertaining almost the whole province with hunts, theatricals, dinners, and music.
  • He was glad to see Prince Andrew, as he was to see any new visitor, and insisted on his staying the night.
  • I feel like sitting down on my heels, putting my arms round my knees like this, straining tight, as tight as possible, and flying away!
  • As if it were on purpose, thought he.
  • He could not now understand how he could ever even have doubted the necessity of taking an active share in life, just as a month before he had not understood how the idea of leaving the quiet country could ever enter his head.
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • Soon after his arrival Prince Andrew, as a gentleman of the chamber, presented himself at court and at a levee.
  • During his service, chiefly as an adjutant, Prince Andrew had seen the anterooms of many important men, and the different types of such rooms were well known to him.
  • Kochubey shook his head smilingly, as if surprised at Bolkonski's simplicity.
  • "It was a small estate that brought in no profit," replied Prince Andrew, trying to extenuate his action so as not to irritate the old man uselessly.
  • Just the same as now--I ask you, Count--who will be heads of the departments when everybody has to pass examinations?
  • Yes, that's a difficulty, as education is not at all general, but...
  • Speranski did not shift his eyes from one face to another as people involuntarily do on entering a large company and was in no hurry to speak.
  • As happens to some people, especially to men who judge those near to them severely, he always on meeting anyone new-- especially anyone whom, like Speranski, he knew by reputation--expected to discover in him the perfection of human qualities.
  • I had heard of you, as everyone has, he said after a pause.
  • Closing his eyes, he bowed a la francaise, without taking leave, and trying to attract as little attention as possible, he left the room.
  • The mechanism of life, the arrangement of the day so as to be in time everywhere, absorbed the greater part of his vital energy.
  • As he had done on their first meeting at Kochubey's, Speranski produced a strong impression on Prince Andrew on the Wednesday, when he received him tête-à-tête at his own house and talked to him long and confidentially.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • Everything was right and everything was as it should be: only one thing disconcerted Prince Andrew.
  • This was Speranski's cold, mirrorlike look, which did not allow one to penetrate to his soul, and his delicate white hands, which Prince Andrew involuntarily watched as one does watch the hands of those who possess power.
  • His life meanwhile continued as before, with the same infatuations and dissipations.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • As soon as we have a certain number of worthy men in every state, each of them again training two others and all being closely united, everything will be possible for our order, which has already in secret accomplished much for the welfare of mankind.
  • As soon as we have a certain number of worthy men in every state, each of them again training two others and all being closely united, everything will be possible for our order, which has already in secret accomplished much for the welfare of mankind.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • I told him everything as best I could, and told him what I had proposed to our Petersburg lodge, of the bad reception I had encountered, and of my rupture with the Brothers.
  • Talking of my family affairs he said to me, the chief duty of a true Mason, as I have told you, lies in perfecting himself.
  • At that time, as always happens, the highest society that met at court and at the grand balls was divided into several circles, each with its own particular tone.
  • In this group Helene, as soon as she had settled in Petersburg with her husband, took a very prominent place.
  • To be received in the Countess Bezukhova's salon was regarded as a diploma of intellect.
  • * (2) "Of a charming woman, as witty as she is lovely."
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • He entered his wife's drawing room as one enters a theater, was acquainted with everybody, equally pleased to see everyone, and equally indifferent to them all.
  • Helene spoke of him as "mon page" and treated him like a child.
  • Her smile for him was the same as for everybody, but sometimes that smile made Pierre uncomfortable.
  • After dinner I fell asleep and as I was drowsing off I clearly heard a voice saying in my left ear, "Thy day!"
  • It seemed as if I chattered incessantly with other people and suddenly remembered that this could not please him, and I wished to come close to him and embrace him.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • Only excuse me, my dear fellow, I'll give you twenty thousand and a note of hand for eighty thousand as well.
  • Before Sonya and her mother, if Boris happened to be mentioned, she spoke quite freely of that episode as of some childish, long-forgotten matter that was not worth mentioning.
  • It seemed to her mother and Sonya that Natasha was in love with Boris as of old.
  • Natasha jumped on it, sank into the feather bed, rolled over to the wall, and began snuggling up the bedclothes as she settled down, raising her knees to her chin, kicking out and laughing almost inaudibly, now covering herself up head and all, and now peeping at her mother.
  • As she said this the countess looked round at her daughter.
  • Sonya stood ready dressed in the middle of the room and, pressing the head of a pin till it hurt her dainty finger, was fixing on a last ribbon that squeaked as the pin went through it.
  • Don't come in, Papa! she cried to her father as he opened the door--speaking from under the filmy skirt which still covered her whole face.
  • Charming! cried Natasha, as she stood in the middle of the room smoothing out the folds of the gauze.
  • "Say what you like," exclaimed Sonya, in a despairing voice as she looked at Natasha, "say what you like, it's still too long."
  • "What a beauty--a very queen!" said the nurse as she came to the door.
  • In spite of her age and plainness she had gone through the same process as the Rostovs, but with less flurry – for to her it was a matter of routine.
  • She had washed behind her ears just as carefully, and when she entered her drawing room in her yellow dress, wearing her badge as maid of honor, her old lady's maid was as full of rapturous admiration as the Rostovs' servants had been.
  • She looked at her and gave her alone a special smile in addition to her usual smile as hostess.
  • Looks as if he were a king!
  • Pierre, swaying his stout body, advanced, making way through the crowd and nodding to right and left as casually and good-naturedly as if he were passing through a crowd at a fair.
  • I'd give it to him if he treated me as he does those ladies.
  • He walked in rapidly, bowing to right and left as if anxious to get the first moments of the reception over.
  • They do not even seem to see me, or if they do they look as if they were saying, 'Ah, she's not the one I'm after, so it's not worth looking at her!'
  • She and the countess and Sonya were standing by themselves as in the depths of a forest amid that crowd of strangers, with no one interested in them and not wanted by anyone.
  • The handsome Anatole was smilingly talking to a partner on his arm and looked at Natasha as one looks at a wall.
  • This family gathering seemed humiliating to Natasha--as if there were nowhere else for the family to talk but here at the ball.
  • Prince Andrew, as one closely connected with Speranski and participating in the work of the legislative commission, could give reliable information about that sitting, concerning which various rumors were current.
  • "If she goes to her cousin first and then to another lady, she will be my wife," said Prince Andrew to himself quite to his own surprise, as he watched her.
  • Such as she are rare here, he thought, as Natasha, readjusting a rose that was slipping on her bodice, settled herself beside him.
  • "I have never enjoyed myself so much before!" she said, and Prince Andrew noticed how her thin arms rose quickly as if to embrace her father and instantly dropped again.
  • Especially such a capital fellow as Bezukhov!
  • He kept criticizing his own work, as he often did, and was glad when he heard someone coming.
  • He was going to dine that evening at Speranski's, "with only a few friends," as the host had said when inviting him.
  • While still in the anteroom Prince Andrew heard loud voices and a ringing staccato laugh--a laugh such as one hears on the stage.
  • Stolypin gave a deep bass guffaw as he munched a piece of bread and cheese.
  • When he reached home Prince Andrew began thinking of his life in Petersburg during those last four months as if it were something new.
  • She and all the Rostov family welcomed him as an old friend, simply and cordially.
  • The old count's hospitality and good nature, which struck one especially in Petersburg as a pleasant surprise, were such that Prince Andrew could not refuse to stay to dinner.
  • He looked at Natasha as she sang, and something new and joyful stirred in his soul.
  • As soon as Natasha had finished she went up to him and asked how he liked her voice.
  • As soon as Natasha had finished she went up to him and asked how he liked her voice.
  • He smiled, looking at her, and said he liked her singing as he liked everything she did.
  • Having lit his candle he sat up in bed, then got up, then lay down again not at all troubled by his sleeplessness: his soul was as fresh and joyful as if he had stepped out of a stuffy room into God's own fresh air.
  • One morning Colonel Berg, whom Pierre knew as he knew everybody in Moscow and Petersburg, came to see him.
  • Only Countess Helene, considering the society of such people as the Bergs beneath her, could be cruel enough to refuse such an invitation.
  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.
  • The old people sat with the old, the young with the young, and the hostess at the tea table, on which stood exactly the same kind of cakes in a silver cake basket as the Panins had at their party.
  • Everything was just as it was everywhere else.
  • Pierre, as one of the principal guests, had to sit down to boston with Count Rostov, the general, and the colonel.
  • With so intellectual a guest as she considered Prince Andrew to be, she felt that she had to employ her diplomatic tact.
  • "Well?" asked Pierre, seeing his friend's strange animation with surprise, and noticing the glance he turned on Natasha as he rose.
  • Pierre saw how Prince Andrew asked her something and how she flushed as she replied.
  • The countess looked with sad and sternly serious eyes at Prince Andrew when he talked to Natasha and timidly started some artificial conversation about trifles as soon as he looked her way.
  • It was as if she feared this strange, unexpected happiness of meeting again the very man she had then chosen (she was firmly convinced she had done so) and of finding him, as it seemed, not indifferent to her.
  • "If only they would let me end my days as I want to," thought the old man, "then they might do as they please."
  • In the first place the marriage was not a brilliant one as regards birth, wealth, or rank.
  • She listened joyfully (as though she had not expected it) to the charm of the notes reverberating, filling the whole empty ballroom, and slowly dying away; and all at once she felt cheerful.
  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.
  • "There, that's me!" the expression of her face seemed to say as she caught sight of herself.
  • "How charming that Natasha is!" she said again, speaking as some third, collective, male person.
  • As soon as he saw Natasha his face brightened.
  • As soon as he saw Natasha his face brightened.
  • She held out her hand to him, and with a mixed feeling of estrangement and tenderness pressed her lips to his forehead as he stooped to kiss her hand.
  • She wished to love him as a son, but felt that to her he was a stranger and a terrifying man.
  • Natasha was sitting on the bed, pale and dry eyed, and was gazing at the icons and whispering something as she rapidly crossed herself.
  • Natasha murmured as if in vexation.
  • The present feeling, though not so bright and poetic as the former, was stronger and more serious.
  • "Hard as this year which delays my happiness will be," continued Prince Andrew, "it will give you time to be sure of yourself.
  • From that day Prince Andrew began to frequent the Rostovs' as Natasha's affianced lover.
  • He came every day to the Rostovs', but did not behave to Natasha as an affianced lover: he did not use the familiar thou, but said you to her, and kissed only her hand.
  • It was as if they had not known each other till now.
  • Natasha shared this as she did all his feelings, which she constantly divined.
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
  • Flushed and agitated she went about the house all that day, dry-eyed, occupied with most trivial matters as if not understanding what awaited her.
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.
  • Your loss is so terrible that I can only explain it to myself as a special providence of God who, loving you, wishes to try you and your excellent mother.
  • Religion alone can explain to us what without its help man cannot comprehend: why, for what cause, kind and noble beings able to find happiness in life--not merely harming no one but necessary to the happiness of others--are called away to God, while cruel, useless, harmful persons, or such as are a burden to themselves and to others, are left living.
  • As it is, not only has she left us, and particularly Prince Andrew, with the purest regrets and memories, but probably she will there receive a place I dare not hope for myself.
  • This irritability is, as you know, chiefly directed to political questions.
  • He, as I wrote you before, has changed very much of late.
  • He has again become as I used to know him when a child: kind, affectionate, with that heart of gold to which I know no equal.
  • You write that in Petersburg he is spoken of as one of the most active, cultivated, and capable of the young men.
  • Secondly because, as far as I know, that girl is not the kind of girl who could please Prince Andrew.
  • He wrote that he had never loved as he did now and that only now did he understand and know what life was.
  • "Besides," he wrote, "the matter was not then so definitely settled as it is now.
  • If the doctors did not keep me here at the spas I should be back in Russia, but as it is I have to postpone my return for three months.
  • When Theodosia had gone to sleep Princess Mary thought about this for a long time, and at last made up her mind that, strange as it might seem, she must go on a pilgrimage.
  • Thoughts of home grew stronger the nearer he approached it--far stronger, as though this feeling of his was subject to the law by which the force of attraction is in inverse proportion to the square of the distance.
  • What was new in them was a certain uneasiness and occasional discord, which there used not to be, and which, as Nicholas soon found out, was due to the bad state of their affairs.
  • As for Natasha, for a long while Nicholas wondered and laughed whenever he looked at her.
  • Not at all as before.
  • Her brother often wondered as he looked at her.
  • She was even- tempered and calm and quite as cheerful as of old.
  • To throw off this burden as quickly as possible, on the third day after his arrival he went, angry and scowling and without answering questions as to where he was going, to Mitenka's lodge and demanded an account of everything.
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • She went several times to his door on tiptoe and listened, as he lighted one pipe after another.
  • On the fifteenth, when young Rostov, in his dressing gown, looked out of the window, he saw it was an unsurpassable morning for hunting: it was as if the sky were melting and sinking to the earth without any wind.
  • "What orders, your excellency?" said the huntsman in his deep bass, deep as a proto-deacon's and hoarse with hallooing--and two flashing black eyes gazed from under his brows at his master, who was silent.
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • But just as Daniel was about to go Natasha came in with rapid steps, not having done up her hair or finished dressing and with her old nurse's big shawl wrapped round her.
  • "Yes, we are going," replied Nicholas reluctantly, for today, as he intended to hunt seriously, he did not want to take Natasha and Petya.
  • He cast down his eyes and hurried out as if it were none of his business, careful as he went not to inflict any accidental injury on the young lady.
  • As soon as they had passed the fence they all spread out evenly and quietly, without noise or talk, along the road and field leading to the Otradnoe covert.
  • As soon as they had passed the fence they all spread out evenly and quietly, without noise or talk, along the road and field leading to the Otradnoe covert.
  • The horses stepped over the field as over a thick carpet, now and then splashing into puddles as they crossed a road.
  • "That's as may happen," answered Rostov.
  • His eyes were rather moist and glittered more than usual, and as he sat in his saddle, wrapped up in his fur coat, he looked like a child taken out for an outing.
  • She's as good as many a man!
  • Yes, one would have to search far to find another as smart.
  • Then, unexpectedly, as often happens, the sound of the hunt suddenly approached, as if the hounds in full cry and Daniel ulyulyuing were just in front of them.
  • What sportsmen! and as if scorning to say more to the frightened and shamefaced count, he lashed the heaving flanks of his sweating chestnut gelding with all the anger the count had aroused and flew off after the hounds.
  • He made thousands of different conjectures as to where and from what side the beast would come and how he would set upon it.
  • "No, it can't be!" thought Rostov, taking a deep breath, as a man does at the coming of something long hoped for.
  • Nicholas asked himself as the wolf approached him coming from the copse.
  • Nearer and nearer... now she was ahead of it; but the wolf turned its head to face her, and instead of putting on speed as she usually did Milka suddenly raised her tail and stiffened her forelegs.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • Daniel galloped up silently, holding a naked dagger in his left hand and thrashing the laboring sides of his chestnut horse with his whip as if it were a flail.
  • Daniel rose a little, took a step, and with his whole weight, as if lying down to rest, fell on the wolf, seizing her by the ears.
  • The old count went home, and Natasha and Petya promised to return very soon, but as it was still early the hunt went farther.
  • Nicholas, though he had never seen Ilagin, with his usual absence of moderation in judgment, hated him cordially from reports of his arbitrariness and violence, and regarded him as his bitterest foe.
  • For myself, I can tell you, Count, I enjoy riding in company such as this... what could be better?
  • (he again raised his cap to Natasha) "but as for counting skins and what one takes, I don't care about that."
  • "And suppose they outdo my Milka at once!" he thought as he rode with "Uncle" and Ilagin toward the hare.
  • "A full-grown one?" asked Ilagin as he approached the whip who had sighted the hare--and not without agitation he looked round and whistled to Erza.
  • Again the beautiful Erza reached him, but when close to the hare's scut paused as if measuring the distance, so as not to make a mistake this time but seize his hind leg.
  • There, it has beaten them all, the thousand-ruble as well as the one-ruble borzois.
  • That's it, come on! said he, panting and looking wrathfully around as if he were abusing someone, as if they were all his enemies and had insulted him, and only now had he at last succeeded in justifying himself.
  • "Uncle" himself twisted up the hare, threw it neatly and smartly across his horse's back as if by that gesture he meant to rebuke everybody, and, with an air of not wishing to speak to anyone, mounted his bay and rode off.
  • Well, I am like any other dog as long as it's not a question of coursing.
  • A score of women serfs, old and young, as well as children, popped out from the back entrance to have a look at the hunters who were arriving.
  • She's ridden all day like a man, and is as fresh as ever!
  • "Take this, little Lady-Countess!" she kept saying, as she offered Natasha first one thing and then another.
  • After a casual pause, such as often occurs when receiving friends for the first time in one's own house, "Uncle," answering a thought that was in his visitors' minds, said:
  • "Uncle's" face was very significant and even handsome as he said this.
  • The door at the end of the passage led to the huntsmen's room, as they called the room for the hunt servants.
  • Really very good! said Nicholas with some unintentional superciliousness, as if ashamed to confess that the sounds pleased him very much.
  • Just as "Uncle's" pickled mushrooms, honey, and cherry brandy had seemed to her the best in the world, so also that song, at that moment, seemed to her the acme of musical delight.
  • "More, please, more!" cried Natasha at the door as soon as the balalayka ceased.
  • The tune, played with precision and in exact time, began to thrill in the hearts of Nicholas and Natasha, arousing in them the same kind of sober mirth as radiated from Anisya Fedorovna's whole being.
  • Go on, Uncle, go on! shouted Natasha as soon as he had finished.
  • "Nicholas, Nicholas!" she said, turning to her brother, as if asking him: "What is it moves me so?"
  • "Go on, Uncle dear," Natasha wailed in an imploring tone as if her life depended on it.
  • Now a fine young fellow must be found as husband for you.
  • But as soon as she had said it a new train of thoughts and feelings arose in her.
  • It is as if he thought my Bolkonski would not approve of or understand our gaiety.
  • As 'twas growing dark last night Fell the snow so soft and light...
  • As a result of this the unconsidered tune, like the song of a bird, was extraordinarily good.
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • "Good-bye, dear niece," his voice called out of the darkness--not the voice Natasha had known previously, but the one that had sung As 'twas growing dark last night.
  • "I know, I expect you thought of him," said Nicholas, smiling as Natasha knew by the sound of his voice.
  • These were all their own people who had settled down in the house almost as members of the family, or persons who were, it seemed, obliged to live in the count's house.
  • Such were Dimmler the musician and his wife, Vogel the dancing master and his family, Belova, an old maiden lady, an inmate of the house, and many others such as Petya's tutors, the girls' former governess, and other people who simply found it preferable and more advantageous to live in the count's house than at home.
  • They had not as many visitors as before, but the old habits of life without which the count and countess could not conceive of existence remained unchanged.
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • They broke off and rose as she entered.
  • No one in the house sent people about or gave them as much trouble as Natasha did.
  • She seemed to be trying whether any of them would get angry or sulky with her; but the serfs fulfilled no one's orders so readily as they did hers.
  • "What can I do, where can I go?" thought she, as she went slowly along the passage.
  • The servants stood round the table--but Prince Andrew was not there and life was going on as before.
  • But Natasha stayed by her mother and glanced round as if looking for something.
  • Of course I do, I remember his teeth as if I had just seen them.
  • It's as if it were a dream!
  • Sonya, as always, did not quite keep pace with them, though they shared the same reminiscences.
  • Standing as usual in the middle of the hall and choosing the place where the resonance was best, Natasha began to sing her mother's favorite song.
  • She had said she did not want to sing, but it was long since she had sung, and long before she again sang, as she did that evening.
  • Sonya, as she listened, thought of the immense difference there was between herself and her friend, and how impossible it was for her to be anything like as bewitching as her cousin.
  • The mummers (some of the house serfs) dressed up as bears, Turks, innkeepers, and ladies--frightening and funny--bringing in with them the cold from outside and a feeling of gaiety, crowded, at first timidly, into the anteroom, then hiding behind one another they pushed into the ballroom where, shyly at first and then more and more merrily and heartily, they started singing, dancing, and playing Christmas games.
  • Nicholas, who, as the roads were in splendid condition, wanted to take them all for a drive in his troyka, proposed to take with them about a dozen of the serf mummers and drive to "Uncle's."
  • Two of the troykas were the usual household sleighs, the third was the old count's with a trotter from the Orlov stud as shaft horse, the fourth was Nicholas' own with a short shaggy black shaft horse.
  • The old count's troyka, with Dimmler and his party, started forward, squeaking on its runners as though freezing to the snow, its deep-toned bell clanging.
  • While they drove past the garden the shadows of the bare trees often fell across the road and hid the brilliant moonlight, but as soon as they were past the fence, the snowy plain bathed in moonlight and motionless spread out before them glittering like diamonds and dappled with bluish shadows.
  • The shaft horse swayed from side to side, moving his ears as if asking: "Isn't it time to begin now?"
  • "And who is this?" she asked her governess, peering into the face of her own daughter dressed up as a Kazan-Tartar.
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • Whether they were playing the ring and string game or the ruble game or talking as now, Nicholas did not leave Sonya's side, and gazed at her with quite new eyes.
  • The log walls of the barn and its snow-covered roof, that looked as if hewn out of some precious stone, sparkled in the moonlight.
  • But ready as she was to take the smallest speck for the image of a man or of a coffin, she saw nothing.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • Be quiet, be quiet, be quiet, I tell you!... she almost screamed, so as to drown his voice.
  • Firmly resolved, after putting his affairs in order in the regiment, to retire from the army and return and marry Sonya, Nicholas, serious, sorrowful, and at variance with his parents, but, as it seemed to him, passionately in love, left at the beginning of January to rejoin his regiment.
  • In Moscow he felt at peace, at home, warm and dirty as in an old dressing gown.
  • As soon as he sank into his place on the sofa after two bottles of Margaux he was surrounded, and talking, disputing, and joking began.
  • As soon as he sank into his place on the sofa after two bottles of Margaux he was surrounded, and talking, disputing, and joking began.
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.
  • "Helene, who has never cared for anything but her own body and is one of the stupidest women in the world," thought Pierre, "is regarded by people as the acme of intelligence and refinement, and they pay homage to her.
  • I have tried, and have always found that they too in the depths of their souls understand it as I do, and only try not to see it.
  • Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought.
  • "Nothing is trivial, and nothing is important, it's all the same--only to save oneself from it as best one can," thought Pierre.
  • "And if you allow yourself," he screamed in a fury, addressing Princess Mary for the first time, "to forget yourself again before her as you dared to do yesterday, I will show you who is master in this house.
  • He was enormously tall, handsome, amiable as Frenchmen are, and was, as all Moscow said, an extraordinarily clever doctor.
  • He was received in the best houses not merely as a doctor, but as an equal.
  • Metivier, who came in the morning with his felicitations, considered it proper in his quality of doctor de forcer la consigne, * as he told Princess Mary, and went in to see the prince.
  • The prince's house did not belong to what is known as fashionable society, but his little circle--though not much talked about in town-- was one it was more flattering to be received in than any other.
  • Prince Bolkonski listened as a presiding judge receives a report, only now and then, silently or by a brief word, showing that he took heed of what was being reported to him.
  • The tone of the conversation was such as indicated that no one approved of what was being done in the political world.
  • "Bonaparte treats Europe as a pirate does a captured vessel," said Count Rostopchin, repeating a phrase he had uttered several times before.
  • He shifts the Dukes about as I might move my serfs from Bald Hills to Bogucharovo or my Ryazan estates.
  • Prince Bolkonski glanced at the young man as if about to say something in reply, but changed his mind, evidently considering him too young.
  • "Does it matter, Count, how the Note is worded," he asked, "so long as its substance is forcible?"
  • Princess Mary as she sat listening to the old men's talk and faultfinding, understood nothing of what she heard; she only wondered whether the guests had all observed her father's hostile attitude toward her.
  • Princess Mary told Pierre of her plan to become intimate with her future sister-in-law as soon as the Rostovs arrived and to try to accustom the old prince to her.
  • She was by now decidedly plain, but thought herself not merely as good-looking as before but even far more attractive.
  • Meeting at large gatherings Julie and Boris looked on one another as the only souls who understood one another in a world of indifferent people.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who often visited the Karagins, while playing cards with the mother made careful inquiries as to Julie's dowry (she was to have two estates in Penza and the Nizhegorod forests).
  • "I can always arrange so as not to see her often," thought Boris.
  • She held herself as erect, told everyone her opinion as candidly, loudly, and bluntly as ever, and her whole bearing seemed a reproach to others for any weakness, passion, or temptation--the possibility of which she did not admit.
  • She had not yet gone to bed when the Rostovs arrived and the pulley of the hall door squeaked from the cold as it let in the Rostovs and their servants.
  • As for them"--and she pointed to the girls--"tomorrow I'll take them first to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God, and then we'll drive to the Super-Rogue's.
  • They'll be safe with me, as safe as in Chancery!
  • She had decided to receive them, but feared lest the prince might at any moment indulge in some freak, as he seemed much upset by the Rostovs' visit.
  • "There, my dear princess, I've brought you my songstress," said the count, bowing and looking round uneasily as if afraid the old prince might appear.
  • "What have I said and what have I done?" thought she, as soon as she was out of the room.
  • But if you only knew how offensive it was... as if I...
  • I would not be silly and afraid of things, I would simply embrace him, cling to him, and make him look at me with those searching inquiring eyes with which he has so often looked at me, and then I would make him laugh as he used to laugh.
  • Natasha's looks, as everyone told her, had improved in the country, and that evening thanks to her agitation she was particularly pretty.
  • They swear by him, they offer him to you as they would a dish of choice sterlet.
  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.
  • "And do you know, Countess," he said, suddenly addressing her as an old, familiar acquaintance, "we are getting up a costume tournament; you ought to take part in it!
  • Natasha kept turning to Helene and to her father, as if asking what it all meant, but Helene was engaged in conversation with a general and did not answer her look, and her father's eyes said nothing but what they always said: Having a good time?
  • Anatole smiled as though to encourage her.
  • Do come, dear countess, and give me this flower as a pledge!
  • She did not know what to say and turned away as if she had not heard his remark.
  • But as soon as she had turned away she felt that he was there, behind, so close behind her.
  • She smiled just as he was doing, gazing straight into his eyes.
  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.
  • As they were leaving the theater Anatole came up to them, called their carriage, and helped them in.
  • As he was putting Natasha in he pressed her arm above the elbow.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • There was a special reason for this, as he had got married two years before--a fact known only to his most intimate friends.
  • Anatole had very soon abandoned his wife and, for a payment which he agreed to send to his father-in-law, had arranged to be free to pass himself off as a bachelor.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • He was convinced that, as a duck is so made that it must live in water, so God had made him such that he must spend thirty thousand rubles a year and always occupy a prominent position in society.
  • Dolokhov, who needed Anatole Kuragin's name, position, and connections as a bait to draw rich young men into his gambling set, made use of him and amused himself at his expense without letting the other feel it.
  • Anatole had no notion and was incapable of considering what might come of such love-making, as he never had any notion of the outcome of any of his actions.
  • She could no longer think of him by herself calmly and continuously as she had done before.
  • As soon as she began to think of him, the recollection of the old prince, of Princess Mary, of the theater, and of Kuragin mingled with her thoughts.
  • As soon as she began to think of him, the recollection of the old prince, of Princess Mary, of the theater, and of Kuragin mingled with her thoughts.
  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna's broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
  • She looked at Natasha's dresses and praised them, as well as a new dress of her own made of "metallic gauze," which she had received from Paris, and advised Natasha to have one like it.
  • As she was leaving the Rostovs she called her protegee aside.
  • The count decided not to sit down to cards or let his girls out of his sight and to get away as soon as Mademoiselle George's performance was over.
  • "Come, come, Natasha!" said the count, as he turned back for his daughter.
  • Anatole asked Natasha for a valse and as they danced he pressed her waist and hand and told her she was bewitching and that he loved her.
  • Natasha kept looking uneasily at everybody with wide-open eyes, as if wishing to intercept every glance directed toward her, and tried to appear the same as usual.
  • Yesterday, as you know, I went to see Prince Bolkonski.
  • Whatever her father's feelings might be, she begged Natasha to believe that she could not help loving her as the one chosen by her brother, for whose happiness she was ready to sacrifice everything.
  • All that has happened, and now all is changed, she thought as she sat with the letter she had begun before her.
  • She vividly pictured herself as Prince Andrew's wife, and the scenes of happiness with him she had so often repeated in her imagination, and at the same time, aglow with excitement, recalled every detail of yesterday's interview with Anatole.
  • "Why could that not be as well?" she sometimes asked herself in complete bewilderment.
  • With trembling hands Natasha held that passionate love letter which Dolokhov had composed for Anatole, and as she read it she found in it an echo of all that she herself imagined she was feeling.
  • As she read she glanced at the sleeping Natasha, trying to find in her face an explanation of what she was reading, but did not find it.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with wide-open eyes as if she could not grasp the question.
  • It's not the same as before.
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • Oh, Sonya, if you knew him as I do!
  • Hard as it was for Sonya, she watched her friend and did not let her out of her sight.
  • The day before the count was to return, Sonya noticed that Natasha sat by the drawing-room window all the morning as if expecting something and that she made a sign to an officer who drove past, whom Sonya took to be Anatole.
  • She cried as she said good-by to Uncle, Sonya remembered.
  • "Well, anyway," thought Sonya as she stood in the dark passage, "now or never I must prove that I remember the family's goodness to me and that I love Nicholas.
  • More than once he had driven them through the town with gypsies and "ladykins" as he called the cocottes.
  • "As your messenger ordered, your special beasts," replied Balaga.
  • As if I'd grudge my gentlemen anything!
  • As fast as ever the horses can gallop, so fast we'll go!
  • As fast as ever the horses can gallop, so fast we'll go!
  • Hard as it may be, I'll tell them all to hold their tongues and will hide it from the count.
  • Why carry you off as if you were some gypsy singing girl?...
  • "Well, let her sleep," said Marya Dmitrievna as she went out of the room supposing Natasha to be asleep.
  • Next day Count Rostov returned from his estate near Moscow in time for lunch as he had promised.
  • In reply to the count's anxious inquiries as to why she was so dejected and whether anything had happened to her betrothed, she assured him that nothing had happened and asked him not to worry.
  • And what can they want with me? thought he as he dressed to go to Marya Dmitrievna's.
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • Pierre--only now realizing the danger to the old count, Nicholas, and Prince Andrew-- promised to do as she wished.
  • Behave as if you know nothing either, she said.
  • Sonya told Pierre this as she led him along the corridor to Natasha's room.
  • As for Pierre, he evidently did not exist for her.
  • Natasha looked from one to the other as a hunted and wounded animal looks at the approaching dogs and sportsmen.
  • In the club all was going on as usual.
  • He paced through the ballroom, waited till everyone had come, and as Anatole had not turned up did not stay for dinner but drove home.
  • Anatole, for whom Pierre was looking, dined that day with Dolokhov, consulting him as to how to remedy this unfortunate affair.
  • "First, the letters," said he, as if repeating a lesson to himself.
  • After all, you must understand that besides your pleasure there is such a thing as other people's happiness and peace, and that you are ruining a whole life for the sake of amusing yourself!
  • Don't you understand that it is as mean as beating an old man or a child?...
  • "I don't know about that, eh?" said Anatole, growing more confident as Pierre mastered his wrath.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • If you want me to do as you wish, eh?
  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.
  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.
  • Prince Andrew, as if trying to remember whether he had something more to say, or waiting to see if Pierre would say anything, looked fixedly at him.
  • Natasha was standing in the middle of the drawing room, emaciated, with a pale set face, but not at all shamefaced as Pierre expected to find her.
  • He thought she would give him her hand as usual; but she, stepping up to him, stopped, breathing heavily, her arms hanging lifelessly just in the pose she used to stand in when she went to the middle of the ballroom to sing, but with quite a different expression of face.
  • Pierre sniffed as he looked at her, but did not speak.
  • Millions of men perpetrated against one another such innumerable crimes, frauds, treacheries, thefts, forgeries, issues of false money, burglaries, incendiarisms, and murders as in whole centuries are not recorded in the annals of all the law courts of the world, but which those who committed them did not at the time regard as being crimes.
  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).
  • Millions of men, renouncing their human feelings and reason, had to go from west to east to slay their fellows, just as some centuries previously hordes of men had come from the east to the west, slaying their fellows.
  • The actions of Napoleon and Alexander, on whose words the event seemed to hang, were as little voluntary as the actions of any soldier who was drawn into the campaign by lot or by conscription.
  • We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand).
  • History, that is, the unconscious, general, hive life of mankind, uses every moment of the life of kings as a tool for its own purposes.
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • I've seen him twice, as I see you now.
  • The lady who was thought to be most pleasing to the Emperor was invited to act as hostess.
  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.
  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.
  • He took Balashev by the arm and crossed the room with him, unconsciously clearing a path seven yards wide as the people on both sides made way for him.
  • Arakcheev looked at the Emperor from under his brow and, sniffing with his red nose, stepped forward from the crowd as if expecting the Emperor to address him.
  • Boris, fluttering as if he had not had time to withdraw, respectfully pressed close to the doorpost with bowed head.
  • I will not make peace as long as a single armed enemy remains in my country!
  • Yesterday I learned that, despite the loyalty with which I have kept my engagements with Your Majesty, your troops have crossed the Russian frontier, and I have this moment received from Petersburg a note, in which Count Lauriston informs me, as a reason for this aggression, that Your Majesty has considered yourself to be in a state of war with me from the time Prince Kuragin asked for his passports.
  • The reasons on which the Duc de Bassano based his refusal to deliver them to him would never have led me to suppose that that could serve as a pretext for aggression.
  • In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
  • As soon as the King began to speak loud and fast his royal dignity instantly forsook him, and without noticing it he passed into his natural tone of good-natured familiarity.
  • As soon as the King began to speak loud and fast his royal dignity instantly forsook him, and without noticing it he passed into his natural tone of good-natured familiarity.
  • "Well, General, it all looks like war," as if regretting a circumstance of which he was unable to judge.
  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
  • Murat's face beamed with stupid satisfaction as he listened to "Monsieur de Bal-macheve."
  • But royaute oblige! * and he felt it incumbent on him, as a king and an ally, to confer on state affairs with Alexander's envoy.
  • But instead of that, at the next village the sentinels of Davout's infantry corps detained him as the pickets of the vanguard had done, and an adjutant of the corps commander, who was fetched, conducted him into the village to Marshal Davout.
  • "Your Emperor's orders are obeyed in your army, but here," said Davout, "you must do as you're told."
  • "You will be treated as is fitting," said he and, putting the packet in his pocket, left the shed.
  • Balashev remembered these words, "So long as a single armed foe remains on Russian soil," but some complex feeling restrained him.
  • Such demands as to retreat beyond the Vistula and Oder may be made to a Prince of Baden, but not to me!
  • Yes, I know you have made peace with the Turks without obtaining Moldavia and Wallachia; I would have given your sovereign those provinces as I gave him Finland.
  • He looked compassionately at Balashev, and as soon as the latter tried to make some rejoinder hastily interrupted him.
  • A sovereign should not be with the army unless he is a general! said Napoleon, evidently uttering these words as a direct challenge to the Emperor.
  • I know the number of your battalions as exactly as I know my own.
  • Balashev began to feel uncomfortable: as envoy he feared to demean his dignity and felt the necessity of replying; but, as a man, he shrank before the transport of groundless wrath that had evidently seized Napoleon.
  • Napoleon nodded condescendingly, as if to say, I know it's your duty to say that, but you don't believe it yourself.
  • When Balashev had ended, Napoleon again took out his snuffbox, sniffed at it, and stamped his foot twice on the floor as a signal.
  • In the course of conversation he mentioned Moscow and questioned Balashev about the Russian capital, not merely as an interested traveler asks about a new city he intends to visit, but as if convinced that Balashev, as a Russian, must be flattered by his curiosity.
  • Balashev, who was on the alert all through the dinner, replied that just as "all roads lead to Rome," so all roads lead to Moscow: there were many roads, and "among them the road through Poltava, which Charles XII chose."
  • After his interview with Pierre in Moscow, Prince Andrew went to Petersburg, on business as he told his family, but really to meet Anatole Kuragin whom he felt it necessary to encounter.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • As a general on duty on Kutuzov's staff, he applied himself to business with zeal and perseverance and surprised Kutuzov by his willingness and accuracy in work.
  • He entered through the gates with their stone pillars and drove up the avenue leading to the house as if he were entering an enchanted, sleeping castle.
  • He had grown, become rosier, had curly dark hair, and, when merry and laughing, quite unconsciously lifted the upper lip of his pretty little mouth just as the little princess used to do.
  • But though externally all remained as of old, the inner relations of all these people had changed since Prince Andrew had seen them last.
  • "Ah, he has passed judgment... passed judgement!" said the old man in a low voice and, as it seemed to Prince Andrew, with some embarrassment, but then he suddenly jumped up and cried: "Be off, be off!
  • As soon as she began to speak of that, her lips trembled and her tears began to fall.
  • As soon as she began to speak of that, her lips trembled and her tears began to fall.
  • "Then it must be so!" thought Prince Andrew as he drove out of the avenue from the house at Bald Hills.
  • I want to meet that man whom I despise, so as to give him a chance to kill and laugh at me!
  • As there was not a single town or large village in the vicinity of the camp, the immense number of generals and courtiers accompanying the army were living in the best houses of the villages on both sides of the river, over a radius of six miles.
  • The Emperor was with the first army, but not as commander-in-chief.
  • In attendance on him was the head of the imperial staff, Quartermaster General Prince Volkonski, as well as generals, imperial aides-de-camp, diplomatic officials, and a large number of foreigners, but not the army staff.
  • Arakcheev was a faithful custodian to enforce order and acted as the sovereign's bodyguard.
  • Bennigsen was a landlord in the Vilna province who appeared to be doing the honors of the district, but was in reality a good general, useful as an adviser and ready at hand to replace Barclay.
  • The second party was directly opposed to the first; one extreme, as always happens, was met by representatives of the other.
  • At that time a famous joke of Ermolov's was being circulated, that as a great favor he had petitioned the Emperor to make him a German.
  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.
  • The only reasonable thing left to do is to conclude peace as soon as possible, before we are turned out of Petersburg.
  • The fifth party consisted of those who were adherents of Barclay de Tolly, not so much as a man but as minister of war and commander-in- chief.
  • Give him real power, for war cannot be conducted successfully without unity of command, and he will show what he can do, as he did in Finland.
  • The eighth and largest group, which in its enormous numbers was to the others as ninety-nine to one, consisted of men who desired neither peace nor war, neither an advance nor a defensive camp at the Drissa or anywhere else, neither Barclay nor the Emperor, neither Pfuel nor Bennigsen, but only the one most essential thing--as much advantage and pleasure for themselves as possible.
  • That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country--the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow--was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
  • It was not a council of war, but, as it were, a council to elucidate certain questions for the Emperor personally.
  • He entered the room, looking restlessly and angrily around, as if afraid of everything in that large apartment.
  • One could see that he wished to pass through the rooms as quickly as possible, finish with the bows and greetings, and sit down to business in front of a map, where he would feel at home.
  • A Frenchman is self-assured because he regards himself personally, both in mind and body, as irresistibly attractive to men and women.
  • Prince Andrew's eyes were still following Pfuel out of the room when Count Bennigsen entered hurriedly, and nodding to Bolkonski, but not pausing, went into the study, giving instructions to his adjutant as he went.
  • Without heeding the end of the Italian's remarks, and as though not hearing them, the Emperor, recognizing Bolkonski, addressed him graciously.
  • Prince Peter Mikhaylovich Volkonski occupied the position, as it were, of chief of the Emperor's staff.
  • It was one of the millions of proposals, one as good as another, that could be made as long as it was quite unknown what character the war would take.
  • In answer to Toll, Paulucci suggested an advance and an attack, which, he urged, could alone extricate us from the present uncertainty and from the trap (as he called the Drissa camp) in which we were situated.
  • Pfuel only snorted contemptuously and turned away, to show that he would never demean himself by replying to such nonsense as he was now hearing.
  • Of all these men Prince Andrew sympathized most with Pfuel, angry, determined, and absurdly self-confident as he was.
  • So thought Prince Andrew as he listened to the talking, and he roused himself only when Paulucci called him and everyone was leaving.
  • It was, in fact, only the commencement of the campaign that prevented Rostov from returning home as he had promised and marrying Sonya.
  • And since it had to be so, Nicholas Rostov, as was natural to him, felt contented with the life he led in the regiment and was able to find pleasure in that life.
  • If the thought that things looked bad chanced to enter anyone's head, he tried to be as cheerful as befits a good soldier and not to think of the general trend of affairs, but only of the task nearest to hand.
  • Rostov, smoking his pipe and turning his head about as the water trickled down his neck, listened inattentively, with an occasional glance at Ilyin, who was pressing close to him.
  • Ilyin tried to imitate Rostov in everything and adored him as a girl might have done.
  • Since the campaigns of Austerlitz and of 1807 Rostov knew by experience that men always lie when describing military exploits, as he himself had done when recounting them; besides that, he had experience enough to know that nothing happens in war at all as we can imagine or relate it.
  • And so he did not like Zdrzhinski's tale, nor did he like Zdrzhinski himself who, with his mustaches extending over his cheeks, bent low over the face of his hearer, as was his habit, and crowded Rostov in the narrow shanty.
  • Mary Hendrikhovna obliged them with the loan of a petticoat to be used as a curtain, and behind that screen Rostov and Ilyin, helped by Lavrushka who had brought their kits, changed their wet things for dry ones.
  • He is sleeping well as it is, after a sleepless night.
  • She, seeing herself surrounded by such brilliant and polite young men, beamed with satisfaction, try as she might to hide it, and perturbed as she evidently was each time her husband moved in his sleep behind her.
  • "But you take it without sugar?" she said, smiling all the time, as if everything she said and everything the others said was very amusing and had a double meaning.
  • As it is, she is Queen, and her word is law!
  • Without greeting the officers, he scratched himself and asked to be allowed to pass as they were blocking the way.
  • As soon as he had left the room all the officers burst into loud laughter and Mary Hendrikhovna blushed till her eyes filled with tears and thereby became still more attractive to them.
  • As soon as he had left the room all the officers burst into loud laughter and Mary Hendrikhovna blushed till her eyes filled with tears and thereby became still more attractive to them.
  • Seeing his gloomy face as he frowned at his wife, the officers grew still merrier, and some of them could not refrain from laughter, for which they hurriedly sought plausible pretexts.
  • As they left the tavern in the twilight of the dawn, Rostov and Ilyin both glanced under the wet and glistening leather hood of the doctor's cart, from under the apron of which his feet were sticking out, and in the middle of which his wife's nightcap was visible and her sleepy breathing audible.
  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.
  • As soon as the sun appeared in a clear strip of sky beneath the clouds, the wind fell, as if it dared not spoil the beauty of the summer morning after the storm; drops still continued to fall, but vertically now, and all was still.
  • As soon as the sun appeared in a clear strip of sky beneath the clouds, the wind fell, as if it dared not spoil the beauty of the summer morning after the storm; drops still continued to fall, but vertically now, and all was still.
  • And with that light, and as if in reply to it, came the sound of guns ahead of them.
  • At these sounds, long unheard, Rostov's spirits rose, as at the strains of the merriest music.
  • Again all was silent and then again it sounded as if someone were walking on detonators and exploding them.
  • As soon as the uhlans descended the hill, the hussars were ordered up the hill to support the battery.
  • As soon as the uhlans descended the hill, the hussars were ordered up the hill to support the battery.
  • As they took the places vacated by the uhlans, bullets came from the front, whining and whistling, but fell spent without taking effect.
  • Rostov gazed at what was happening before him as at a hunt.
  • He acted as he did when hunting, without reflecting or considering.
  • Hardly had they reached the bottom of the hill before their pace instinctively changed to a gallop, which grew faster and faster as they drew nearer to our uhlans and the French dragoons who galloped after them.
  • The officer fell, not so much from the blow--which had but slightly cut his arm above the elbow--as from the shock to his horse and from fright.
  • His eyes, screwed up with fear as if he every moment expected another blow, gazed up at Rostov with shrinking terror.
  • In front, the French infantry were firing as they ran.
  • "But what on earth is worrying me?" he asked himself as he rode back from the general.
  • Rostov still had the same indefinite feeling, as of shame.
  • But while Nicholas was considering these questions and still could reach no clear solution of what puzzled him so, the wheel of fortune in the service, as often happens, turned in his favor.
  • She could not eat or sleep, grew visibly thinner, coughed, and, as the doctors made them feel, was in danger.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.
  • But, above all, that thought was kept out of their minds by the fact that they saw they were really useful, as in fact they were to the whole Rostov family.
  • It comforted her to reflect that she was not better as she had formerly imagined, but worse, much worse, than anybody else in the world.
  • She noticed this and attributed it to his general kindness and shyness, which she imagined must be the same toward everyone as it was to her.
  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
  • "Be quite easy," he continued playfully, as he adroitly took the gold coin in his palm.
  • The countess, with a cheerful expression on her face, looked down at her nails and spat a little for luck as she returned to the drawing room.
  • That Sunday, the Rostovs went to Mass at the Razumovskis' private chapel as usual.
  • All the Moscow notabilities, all the Rostovs' acquaintances, were at the Razumovskis' chapel, for, as if expecting something to happen, many wealthy families who usually left town for their country estates had not gone away that summer.
  • As Natasha, at her mother's side, passed through the crowd behind a liveried footman who cleared the way for them, she heard a young man speaking about her in too loud a whisper.
  • With a sinking heart, wretched as she always was now when she found herself in a crowd, Natasha in her lilac silk dress trimmed with black lace walked- -as women can walk--with the more repose and stateliness the greater the pain and shame in her soul.
  • She knew for certain that she was pretty, but this no longer gave her satisfaction as it used to.
  • She included among her enemies the creditors and all who had business dealings with her father, and always at the thought of enemies and those who hated her she remembered Anatole who had done her so much harm--and though he did not hate her she gladly prayed for him as for an enemy.
  • Only at prayer did she feel able to think clearly and calmly of Prince Andrew and Anatole, as men for whom her feelings were as nothing compared with her awe and devotion to God.
  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.
  • Bless his counsels, his undertakings, and his work; strengthen his kingdom by Thine almighty hand, and give him victory over his enemy, even as Thou gavest Moses the victory over Amalek, Gideon over Midian, and David over Goliath.
  • Pierre still went into society, drank as much and led the same idle and dissipated life, because besides the hours he spent at the Rostovs' there were other hours he had to spend somehow, and the habits and acquaintances he had made in Moscow formed a current that bore him along irresistibly.
  • The French alphabet, written out with the same numerical values as the Hebrew, in which the first nine letters denote units and the others tens, will have the following significance:
  • A few intimate friends were dining with the Rostovs that day, as usual on Sundays.
  • Pierre came early so as to find them alone.
  • "I want to try to sing again," she said, adding as if by way of excuse, "it is, at least, something to do."
  • Well, Papa, I tell you definitely, and Mamma too, it's as you please, but I say definitely that you must let me enter the army, because I can't... that's all....
  • As he approached the Kremlin he even began to avoid being crushed and resolutely stuck out his elbows in a menacing way.
  • As soon as Petya found himself in the square he clearly heard the sound of bells and the joyous voices of the crowd that filled the whole Kremlin.
  • As soon as Petya found himself in the square he clearly heard the sound of bells and the joyous voices of the crowd that filled the whole Kremlin.
  • Poor dear, he's as white as a sheet!--various voices were heard saying.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • He sat on his elevation--the pedestal of the cannon--still agitated as before by the thought of the Emperor and by his love for him.
  • Petya pushed her hand away with his knee, seized a biscuit, and as if fearing to be too late, again shouted "Hurrah!" with a voice already hoarse.
  • Happy as Petya was, he felt sad at having to go home knowing that all the enjoyment of that day was over.
  • On all these faces, as on the faces of the crowd Petya had seen in the Square, there was a striking contradiction: the general expectation of a solemn event, and at the same time the everyday interests in a boston card party, Peter the cook, Zinaida Dmitrievna's health, and so on.
  • The retired naval man was speaking very boldly, as was evident from the expression on the faces of the listeners and from the fact that some people Pierre knew as the meekest and quietest of men walked away disapprovingly or expressed disagreement with him.
  • Adraksin was in uniform, and whether as a result of the uniform or from some other cause Pierre saw before him quite a different man.
  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.
  • Their chairs made a scraping noise as the gentlemen who had conferred rose with apparent relief, and began walking up and down, arm in arm, to stretch their legs and converse in couples.
  • As became known later, he had scarcely begun to address the merchants before tears gushed from his eyes and he concluded in a trembling voice.
  • Barclay de Tolly tried to command the army in the best way, because he wished to fulfill his duty and earn fame as a great commander.
  • He wrote to Arakcheev, the Emperor's confidant: It must be as my sovereign pleases, but I cannot work with the Minister (meaning Barclay).
  • This general, hating Barclay, rode to visit a friend of his own, a corps commander, and, having spent the day with him, returned to Barclay and condemned, as unsuitable from every point of view, the battleground he had not seen.
  • We pass the time as we can, but in war as in war!
  • She could not have read the letter as she did not even know it had arrived.
  • But as soon as he had left the room the old prince, looking uneasily round, threw down his napkin and went himself.
  • I?... said the prince as if unpleasantly awakened, and not taking his eyes from the plan of the building.
  • She gave it to him and, unpleasant as it was to her to do so, ventured to ask him what her father was doing.
  • When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, the old prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, was sitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper in his outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was reading his manuscript-- his "Remarks" as he termed it--which was to be transmitted to the Emperor after his death.
  • Varnish, sealing wax, as in Michael Ivanovich's list.
  • Frowning with vexation at the effort necessary to divest himself of his coat and trousers, the prince undressed, sat down heavily on the bed, and appeared to be meditating as he looked contemptuously at his withered yellow legs.
  • But hardly had he done so before he felt the bed rocking backwards and forwards beneath him as if it were breathing heavily and jolting.
  • He opened his eyes as they were closing.
  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.
  • Dessalles wrote this letter to the Governor for Princess Mary, she signed it, and it was given to Alpatych with instructions to hand it to the Governor and to come back as quickly as possible if there was danger.
  • Having received all his orders Alpatych, wearing a white beaver hat--a present from the prince--and carrying a stick as the prince did, went out accompanied by his family.
  • Women, women! said Alpatych, puffing and speaking rapidly just as the prince did, and he climbed into the trap.
  • As he went along he looked with pleasure at the year's splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the prince's orders.
  • As he went along he looked with pleasure at the year's splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the prince's orders.
  • As he approached Smolensk he heard the sounds of distant firing, but these did not impress him.
  • Many people were hurrying through the streets and there were many soldiers, but cabs were still driving about, tradesmen stood at their shops, and service was being held in the churches as usual.
  • 'One man though undone is but one,' as the proverb says, but with thirteen in your family and all the property...
  • "To see the Governor by his excellency's order," answered Alpatych, lifting his head and proudly thrusting his hand into the bosom of his coat as he always did when he mentioned the prince....
  • Still, as the prince is unwell my advice is that they should go to Moscow.
  • Loaded carts stood at the house next to Ferapontov's and women were wailing and lamenting as they said good-by.
  • The cook began running hither and thither in the passage like a frightened hen, just as Alpatych entered.
  • At these words Alpatych nodded as if in approval, and not wishing to hear more went to the door of the room opposite the innkeeper's, where he had left his purchases.
  • The noise of wheels, hoofs, and bells was heard from the gateway as a little trap passed out.
  • With lively curiosity everyone tried to get a glimpse of the projectiles as they flew over their heads.
  • As Alpatych was driving out of the gate he saw some ten soldiers in Ferapontov's open shop, talking loudly and filling their bags and knapsacks with flour and sunflower seeds.
  • "Well then," continued Prince Andrew to Alpatych, "report to them as I have told you"; and not replying a word to Berg who was now mute beside him, he touched his horse and rode down the side street.
  • As soon as day dawned the march began.
  • As soon as day dawned the march began.
  • Some of this dust was kneaded by the feet and wheels, while the rest rose and hung like a cloud over the troops, settling in eyes, ears, hair, and nostrils, and worst of all in the lungs of the men and beasts as they moved along that road.
  • As soon as he came across a former acquaintance or anyone from the staff, he bristled up immediately and grew spiteful, ironical, and contemptuous.
  • As soon as he came across a former acquaintance or anyone from the staff, he bristled up immediately and grew spiteful, ironical, and contemptuous.
  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
  • As he crossed the dam Prince Andrew smelled the ooze and freshness of the pond.
  • One fair-haired young soldier of the third company, whom Prince Andrew knew and who had a strap round the calf of one leg, crossed himself, stepped back to get a good run, and plunged into the water; another, a dark noncommissioned officer who was always shaggy, stood up to his waist in the water joyfully wriggling his muscular figure and snorted with satisfaction as he poured the water over his head with hands blackened to the wrists.
  • On the seventh of August Prince Bagration wrote as follows from his quarters at Mikhaylovna on the Smolensk road:
  • I swear to you on my honor that Napoleon was in such a fix as never before and might have lost half his army but could not have taken Smolensk.
  • Our troops fought, and are fighting, as never before.
  • It is disgraceful, a stain on our army, and as for him, he ought, it seems to me, not to live.
  • If it has come to this--we must fight as long as Russia can and as long as there are men able to stand...
  • In Helene's circle the war in general was regarded as a series of formal demonstrations which would very soon end in peace, and the view prevailed expressed by Bilibin--who now in Petersburg was quite at home in Helene's house, which every clever man was obliged to visit--that not by gunpowder but by those who invented it would matters be settled.
  • Anna Pavlovna's circle on the contrary was enraptured by this enthusiasm and spoke of it as Plutarch speaks of the deeds of the ancients.
  • One of the visitors, usually spoken of as "a man of great merit," having described how he had that day seen Kutuzov, the newly chosen chief of the Petersburg militia, presiding over the enrollment of recruits at the Treasury, cautiously ventured to suggest that Kutuzov would be the man to satisfy all requirements.
  • I told them his election as chief of the militia would not please the Emperor.
  • As soon as he said this both Prince Vasili and Anna Pavlovna turned away from him and glanced sadly at one another with a sigh at his naivete.
  • As soon as he said this both Prince Vasili and Anna Pavlovna turned away from him and glanced sadly at one another with a sigh at his naivete.
  • He is as right as other historians who look for the explanation of historic events in the will of one man; he is as right as the Russian historians who maintain that Napoleon was drawn to Moscow by the skill of the Russian commanders.
  • In this question he saw subtle cunning, as men of his type see cunning in everything, so he frowned and did not answer immediately.
  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
  • Princess Mary was not in Moscow and out of danger as Prince Andrew supposed.
  • After the return of Alpatych from Smolensk the old prince suddenly seemed to awake as from a dream.
  • The fact that he did not, as she had feared, order her to be carried away by force but only told her not to let him see her cheered Princess Mary.
  • Strange as it was to her to acknowledge this feeling in herself, yet there it was.
  • Thrust them aside as she would, questions continually recurred to her as to how she would order her life now, after that.
  • She spent the night of the fourteenth as usual, without undressing, in the room next to the one where the prince lay.
  • He made a mumbling sound in confirmation of this, took her hand, and began pressing it to different parts of his breast as if trying to find the right place for it.
  • Unconsciously imitating her father, she now tried to express herself as he did, as much as possible by signs, and her tongue too seemed to move with difficulty.
  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.
  • "Call Andrew!" he said suddenly, and a childish, timid expression of doubt showed itself on his face as he spoke.
  • She could understand nothing, think of nothing and feel nothing, except passionate love for her father, love such as she thought she had never felt till that moment.
  • She ran out sobbing into the garden and as far as the pond, along the avenues of young lime trees Prince Andrew had planted.
  • She rose and saw Dunyasha her maid, who was evidently looking for her, and who stopped suddenly as if in alarm on seeing her mistress.
  • He was still lying on the bed as before, but the stern expression of his quiet face made Princess Mary stop short on the threshold.
  • Heaven only knows who arranged all this and when, but it all got done as if of its own accord.
  • Just as horses shy and snort and gather about a dead horse, so the inmates of the house and strangers crowded into the drawing room round the coffin--the Marshal, the village Elder, peasant women--and all with fixed and frightened eyes, crossing themselves, bowed and kissed the old prince's cold and stiffened hand.
  • As birds migrate to somewhere beyond the sea, so these men with their wives and children streamed to the southeast, to parts where none of them had ever been.
  • Many of them were punished, some sent to Siberia, many died of cold and hunger on the road, many returned of their own accord, and the movement died down of itself just as it had sprung up, without apparent reason.
  • But such undercurrents still existed among the people and gathered new forces ready to manifest themselves just as strangely, unexpectedly, and at the same time simply, naturally, and forcibly.
  • As proof of this the peasant had brought from Visloukhovo a hundred rubles in notes (he did not know that they were false) paid to him in advance for hay.
  • On the fifteenth, the day of the old prince's death, the Marshal had insisted on Princess Mary's leaving at once, as it was becoming dangerous.
  • Dron was one of those physically and mentally vigorous peasants who grow big beards as soon as they are of age and go on unchanged till they are sixty or seventy, without a gray hair or the loss of a tooth, as straight and strong at sixty as at thirty.
  • Just as Dron was a model village Elder, so Alpatych had not managed the prince's estates for twenty years in vain.
  • This idea horrified her, made her shudder, blush, and feel such a rush of anger and pride as she had never experienced before.
  • The old valet Tikhon, with sunken, emaciated face that bore the stamp of inconsolable grief, replied: "Yes, Princess" to all Princess Mary's questions and hardly refrained from sobbing as he looked at her.
  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.
  • Is it true, as they tell me, that I can't even go away?
  • As it is, some go three days without eating.
  • She had heard vaguely that there was such a thing as "landlord's corn" which was sometimes given to the peasants.
  • They say they don't agree to leave Bogucharovo as you ordered.
  • But as if this angered him, he bent his head quite low and muttered:
  • I remember how he began speaking to him about Lise as if she were alive--he had forgotten she was dead--and Tikhon reminded him that she was no more, and he shouted, 'Fool!'
  • For the last three days Bogucharovo had lain between the two hostile armies, so that it was as easy for the Russian rearguard to get to it as for the French vanguard; Rostov, as a careful squadron commander, wished to take such provisions as remained at Bogucharovo before the French could get them.
  • He pointed to the two peasants who kept as close to him as horseflies to a horse.
  • Rostov dismounted, gave his horse to the orderly, and followed Alpatych to the house, questioning him as to the state of affairs.
  • God has sent you! exclaimed deeply moved voices as Rostov passed through the anteroom.
  • This meeting immediately struck Rostov as a romantic event.
  • What gentleness and nobility there are in her features and expression! thought he as he looked at her and listened to her timid story.
  • She turned away, and then, as if fearing he might take her words as meant to move him to pity, looked at him with an apprehensive glance of inquiry.
  • Go when you please, and I give you my word of honor that no one shall dare to cause you annoyance if only you will allow me to act as your escort.
  • And bowing respectfully, as if to a lady of royal blood, he moved toward the door.
  • And as if afraid of wasting his store of anger, he left Alpatych and went rapidly forward.
  • As soon as Rostov, followed by Ilyin, Lavrushka, and Alpatych, came up to the crowd, Karp, thrusting his fingers into his belt and smiling a little, walked to the front.
  • As soon as Rostov, followed by Ilyin, Lavrushka, and Alpatych, came up to the crowd, Karp, thrusting his fingers into his belt and smiling a little, walked to the front.
  • It's as the old men have decided--there's too many of you giving orders.
  • Bind him, Lavrushka! shouted Rostov, as if that order, too, could not possibly meet with any opposition.
  • And in fact two more peasants began binding Dron, who took off his own belt and handed it to them, as if to aid them.
  • Any police officer would have done as much!
  • His kind, honest eyes, with the tears rising in them when she herself had begun to cry as she spoke of her loss, did not leave her memory.
  • It was at those moments that Dunyasha noticed her smiling as she looked out of the carriage window.
  • He stopped in the village at the priest's house in front of which stood the commander-in-chief's carriage, and he sat down on the bench at the gate awaiting his Serene Highness, as everyone now called Kutuzov.
  • As it was, devil only knows what was happening.
  • I'm Lieutenant Colonel Denisov, better known as 'Vaska,' said Denisov, pressing Prince Andrew's hand and looking into his face with a particularly kindly attention.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • Denisov rose and began gesticulating as he explained his plan to Bolkonski.
  • "Whew... whew... whew!" he whistled just audibly as he rode into the yard.
  • As often occurs with old men, it was only after some seconds that the impression produced by Prince Andrew's face linked itself up with Kutuzov's remembrance of his personality.
  • Kutuzov swayed his head, as much as to say: "How is one man to deal with it all?" and again listened to Denisov.
  • "I give my word of honor as a Wussian officer," said Denisov, "that I can bweak Napoleon's line of communication!"
  • He was listening to the general's report-- which consisted chiefly of a criticism of the position at Tsarevo- Zaymishche--as he had listened to Denisov, and seven years previously had listened to the discussion at the Austerlitz council of war.
  • "Well, that's all!" said Kutuzov as he signed the last of the documents, and rising heavily and smoothing out the folds in his fat white neck he moved toward the door with a more cheerful expression.
  • He had in his hand a French book which he closed as Prince Andrew entered, marking the place with a knife.
  • The regiments would not be what they are if the would-be advisers served there as you do.
  • Tout vient a point a celui qui sait attendre. * And there were as many advisers there as here..." he went on, returning to the subject of "advisers" which evidently occupied him.
  • "I'll tell you what to do," he continued, as Prince Andrew still did not reply: "I will tell you what to do, and what I do.
  • The more he realized the absence of all personal motive in that old man--in whom there seemed to remain only the habit of passions, and in place of an intellect (grouping events and drawing conclusions) only the capacity calmly to contemplate the course of events--the more reassured he was that everything would be as it should.
  • "You don't spare anyone," said Julie Drubetskaya as she collected and pressed together a bunch of raveled lint with her thin, beringed fingers.
  • You know, Count, such knights as you are only found in Madame de Souza's novels.
  • The second broadsheet stated that our headquarters were at Vyazma, that Count Wittgenstein had defeated the French, but that as many of the inhabitants of Moscow wished to be armed, weapons were ready for them at the arsenal: sabers, pistols, and muskets which could be had at a low price.
  • The Emperor had written to Count Rostopchin as follows:
  • As soon as Leppich is ready, get together a crew of reliable and intelligent men for his car and send a courier to General Kutuzov to let him know.
  • As soon as Leppich is ready, get together a crew of reliable and intelligent men for his car and send a courier to General Kutuzov to let him know.
  • On his way home from Vorontsovo, as he was passing the Bolotnoe Place Pierre, seeing a large crowd round the Lobnoe Place, stopped and got out of his trap.
  • In the crowd people began talking loudly, to stifle their feelings of pity as it seemed to Pierre.
  • Pierre choked, his face puckered, and he turned hastily away, went back to his trap muttering something to himself as he went, and took his seat.
  • As they drove along he shuddered and exclaimed several times so audibly that the coachman asked him:
  • "To the Governor's, as you ordered," answered the coachman.
  • He was told that there in Perkhushkovo the earth trembled from the firing, but nobody could answer his questions as to who had won.
  • Pierre pushed forward as fast as he could, and the farther he left Moscow behind and the deeper he plunged into that sea of troops the more was he overcome by restless agitation and a new and joyful feeling he had not experienced before.
  • Before the battle of Borodino our strength in proportion to the French was about as five to six, but after that battle it was little more than one to two: previously we had a hundred thousand against a hundred and twenty thousand; afterwards little more than fifty thousand against a hundred thousand.
  • If it is said that he expected to end the campaign by occupying Moscow as he had ended a previous campaign by occupying Vienna, there is much evidence to the contrary.
  • All the historians describe the affair as follows:
  • So the histories say, and it is all quite wrong, as anyone who cares to look into the matter can easily convince himself.
  • To anyone who looks at the field of Borodino without thinking of how the battle was actually fought, this position, protected by the river Kolocha, presents itself as obvious for an army whose object was to prevent an enemy from advancing along the Smolensk road to Moscow.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • By crossing to the other side of the Kolocha to the left of the highroad, Napoleon shifted the whole forthcoming battle from right to left (looking from the Russian side) and transferred it to the plain between Utitsa, Semenovsk, and Borodino--a plain no more advantageous as a position than any other plain in Russia--and there the whole battle of the twenty-sixth of August took place.
  • So it happened that throughout the whole battle the Russians opposed the entire French army launched against our left flank with but half as many men.
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • The wounded, bandaged with rags, with pale cheeks, compressed lips, and knitted brows, held on to the sides of the carts as they were jolted against one another.
  • The cavalry regiment, as it descended the hill with its singers, surrounded Pierre's carriage and blocked the road.
  • We have ten thousand carts, but we need other things as well--we must manage as best we can!
  • On seeing these peasants, who were evidently still amused by the novelty of their position as soldiers, Pierre once more thought of the wounded men at Mozhaysk and understood what the soldier had meant when he said: "They want the whole nation to fall on them."
  • The officer appeared abashed, as though he understood that one might think of how many men would be missing tomorrow but ought not to speak of it.
  • "Oh, those damned fellows!" muttered the officer who followed him, holding his nose as he ran past the men at work.
  • At last he rose, kissed the icon as a child does with naively pouting lips, and again bowed till he touched the ground with his hand.
  • Kutuzov repeated, his laughing eye narrowing more and more as he looked at Pierre.
  • Just then Boris, with his courtierlike adroitness, stepped up to Pierre's side near Kutuzov and in a most natural manner, without raising his voice, said to Pierre, as though continuing an interrupted conversation:
  • And as often happens with old people, Kutuzov began looking about absent-mindedly as if forgetting all he wanted to say or do.
  • From Gorki, Bennigsen descended the highroad to the bridge which, when they had looked at it from the hill, the officer had pointed out as being the center of our position and where rows of fragrant new-mown hay lay by the riverside.
  • Then they rode downhill and uphill, across a ryefield trodden and beaten down as if by hail, following a track freshly made by the artillery over the furrows of the plowed land, and reached some fleches * which were still being dug.
  • Here, at the extreme left flank, Bennigsen talked a great deal and with much heat, and, as it seemed to Pierre, gave orders of great military importance.
  • Narrow and burdensome and useless to anyone as his life now seemed to him, Prince Andrew on the eve of battle felt agitated and irritable as he had done seven years before at Austerlitz.
  • But Napoleon came and swept him aside, unconscious of his existence, as he might brush a chip from his path, and his Bald Hills and his whole life fell to pieces.
  • As he said this his eyes and face expressed more than coldness--they expressed hostility, which Pierre noticed at once.
  • "Why, so as not to lay waste the country we were abandoning to the enemy," said Prince Andrew with venomous irony.
  • At Smolensk too he judged correctly that the French might outflank us, as they had larger forces.
  • He is unsuitable now, just because he plans out everything very thoroughly and accurately as every German has to.
  • While Russia was well, a foreigner could serve her and be a splendid minister; but as soon as she is in danger she needs one of her own kin.
  • They slander him as a traitor, and the only result will be that afterwards, ashamed of their false accusations, they will make him out a hero or a genius instead of a traitor, and that will be still more unjust.
  • "But that's impossible," said Prince Andrew as if it were a matter settled long ago.
  • And we said so because we had nothing to fight for there, we wanted to get away from the battlefield as soon as we could.
  • He understood that latent heat (as they say in physics) of patriotism which was present in all these men he had seen, and this explained to him why they all prepared for death calmly, and as it were lightheartedly.
  • As it is we have played at war--that's what's vile!
  • He who has come to this as I have through the same sufferings...
  • He paced up and down a few times in silence, but his eyes glittered feverishly and his lips quivered as he began speaking.
  • If there was none of this magnanimity in war, we should go to war only when it was worth while going to certain death, as now.
  • As it is now, war is the favorite pastime of the idle and frivolous.
  • Prince Andrew smiled now the same happy smile as then when he had looked into her eyes.
  • Prince Andrew jumped up as if someone had burned him, and again began pacing up and down in front of the shed.
  • Napoleon made ironic remarks during Fabvier's account, as if he had not expected that matters could go otherwise in his absence.
  • "Sire, all Paris regrets your absence," replied de Beausset as was proper.
  • Though it was not clear what the artist meant to express by depicting the so-called King of Rome spiking the earth with a stick, the allegory apparently seemed to Napoleon, as it had done to all who had seen it in Paris, quite clear and very pleasing.
  • Behave as you did at Austerlitz, Friedland, Vitebsk, and Smolensk.
  • The cannonade on the left flank will begin as soon as the guns of the right wing are heard.
  • But this was not and could not be done, for during the whole battle Napoleon was so far away that, as appeared later, he could not know the course of the battle and not one of his orders during the fight could be executed.
  • There was nothing left for them to do but cry "Vive l'Empereur!" and go to fight, in order to get food and rest as conquerors in Moscow.
  • His pseudo- orders during the battle were also no worse than formerly, but much the same as usual.
  • Napoleon walked about in front of his tent, looked at the fires and listened to these sounds, and as he was passing a tall guardsman in a shaggy cap, who was standing sentinel before his tent and had drawn himself up like a black pillar at sight of the Emperor, Napoleon stopped in front of him.
  • And all this moved, or seemed to move, as the smoke and mist spread out over the whole space.
  • It seemed as if those smoke clouds sometimes ran and sometimes stood still while woods, fields, and glittering bayonets ran past them.
  • They were all looking at the field of battle as he was, and, as it seemed to him, with the same feelings.
  • The adjutant looked at Pierre as if puzzled what to do with him now.
  • In contrast with the dread felt by the infantrymen placed in support, here in the battery where a small number of men busy at their work were separated from the rest by a trench, everyone experienced a common and as it were family feeling of animation.
  • The soldiers looked askance at him with surprise and even alarm as they went past him.
  • The soldiers shook their heads disapprovingly as they looked at Pierre.
  • "A live one!" shouted a man as a whistling shell approached.
  • "Are you bowing to a friend, eh?" remarked another, chaffing a peasant who ducked low as a cannon ball flew over.
  • They gave little jumps as they walked, as though they were on springs.
  • The sergeant ran up to the officer and in a frightened whisper informed him (as a butler at dinner informs his master that there is no more of some wine asked for) that there were no more charges.
  • Beside himself with terror Pierre jumped up and ran back to the battery, as to the only refuge from the horrors that surrounded him.
  • He saw the senior officer lying on the earth wall with his back turned as if he were examining something down below and that one of the soldiers he had noticed before was struggling forward shouting "Brothers!" and trying to free himself from some men who were holding him by the arm.
  • Pierre again went up onto the knoll where he had spent over an hour, and of that family circle which had received him as a member he did not find a single one.
  • The sun had risen brightly and its slanting rays struck straight into Napoleon's face as, shading his eyes with his hand, he looked at the fleches.
  • The smoke spread out before them, and at times it looked as if the smoke were moving, at times as if the troops moved.
  • In this way two cavalry regiments galloped through the Semenovsk hollow and as soon as they reached the top of the incline turned round and galloped full speed back again.
  • But contrary to what had always happened in their former battles, instead of the news they expected of the enemy's flight, these orderly masses returned thence as disorganized and terrified mobs.
  • "Reinforcements?" said Napoleon in a tone of stern surprise, looking at the adjutant--a handsome lad with long black curls arranged like Murat's own--as though he did not understand his words.
  • Friant's division disappeared as the others had done into the smoke of the battlefield.
  • From all sides adjutants continued to arrive at a gallop and as if by agreement all said the same thing.
  • Despite news of the capture of the fleches, Napoleon saw that this was not the same, not at all the same, as what had happened in his former battles.
  • Kutuzov's general expression was one of concentrated quiet attention, and his face wore a strained look as if he found it difficult to master the fatigue of his old and feeble body.
  • When Scherbinin came galloping from the left flank with news that the French had captured the fleches and the village of Semenovsk, Kutuzov, guessing by the sounds of the battle and by Scherbinin's looks that the news was bad, rose as if to stretch his legs and, taking Scherbinin's arm, led him aside.
  • Several times his head dropped low as if it were falling and he dozed off.
  • He treated his Serene Highness with a somewhat affected nonchalance intended to show that, as a highly trained military man, he left it to Russians to make an idol of this useless old man, but that he knew whom he was dealing with.
  • Kutuzov ceased chewing and fixed an astonished gaze on Wolzogen, as if not understanding what was said to him.
  • Be so good as to ride to General Barclay and inform him of my firm intention to attack the enemy tomorrow, said Kutuzov sternly.
  • The tales passing from mouth to mouth at different ends of the army did not even resemble what Kutuzov had said, but the sense of his words spread everywhere because what he said was not the outcome of cunning calculations, but of a feeling that lay in the commander-in-chief's soul as in that of every Russian.
  • At times, as if to allow them a respite, a quarter of an hour passed during which the cannon balls and shells all flew overhead, but sometimes several men were torn from the regiment in a minute and the slain were continually being dragged away and the wounded carried off.
  • It was as if the minds of these morally exhausted men found relief in everyday, commonplace occurrences.
  • All the powers of his soul, as of every soldier there, were unconsciously bent on avoiding the contemplation of the horrors of their situation.
  • At one and the same moment came the sound of an explosion, a whistle of splinters as from a breaking window frame, a suffocating smell of powder, and Prince Andrew started to one side, raising his arm, and fell on his chest.
  • Disregarding the officers' orders, the soldiers stood leaning against their stretchers and gazing intently, as if trying to comprehend the difficult problem of what was taking place before them.
  • One of the doctors came out of the tent in a bloodstained apron, holding a cigar between the thumb and little finger of one of his small bloodstained hands, so as not to smear it.
  • All he saw about him merged into a general impression of naked, bleeding human bodies that seemed to fill the whole of the low tent, as a few weeks previously, on that hot August day, such bodies had filled the dirty pond beside the Smolensk road.
  • Yes, it was the same flesh, the same chair a canon, the sight of which had even then filled him with horror, as by a presentiment.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew opened his eyes, the doctor bent over, kissed him silently on the lips, and hurried away.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew opened his eyes, the doctor bent over, kissed him silently on the lips, and hurried away.
  • With painful dejection he awaited the end of this action, in which he regarded himself as a participant and which he was unable to arrest.
  • And he fell back into that artificial realm of imaginary greatness, and again--as a horse walking a treadmill thinks it is doing something for itself--he submissively fulfilled the cruel, sad, gloomy, and inhuman role predestined for him.
  • He could not disavow his actions, belauded as they were by half the world, and so he had to repudiate truth, goodness, and all humanity.
  • In that reunion of great sovereigns we should have discussed our interests like one family, and have rendered account to the peoples as clerk to master.
  • Clouds gathered and drops of rain began to fall on the dead and wounded, on the frightened, exhausted, and hesitating men, as if to say: Enough, men!
  • The cannon balls flew just as swiftly and cruelly from both sides, crushing human bodies, and that terrible work which was not done by the will of a man but at the will of Him who governs men and worlds continued.
  • It was not Napoleon alone who had experienced that nightmare feeling of the mighty arm being stricken powerless, but all the generals and soldiers of his army whether they had taken part in the battle or not, after all their experience of previous battles--when after one tenth of such efforts the enemy had fled--experienced a similar feeling of terror before an enemy who, after losing HALF his men, stood as threateningly at the end as at the beginning of the battle.
  • It is merely necessary to select some larger or smaller unit as the subject of observation--as criticism has every right to do, seeing that whatever unit history observes must always be arbitrarily selected.
  • But the mind of man not only refuses to believe this explanation, but plainly says that this method of explanation is fallacious, because in it a weaker phenomenon is taken as the cause of a stronger.
  • I see only a coincidence of occurrences such as happens with all the phenomena of life, and I see that however much and however carefully I observe the hands of the watch, and the valves and wheels of the engine, and the oak, I shall not discover the cause of the bells ringing, the engine moving, or of the winds of spring.
  • He gave orders to prepare for a fresh conflict to finish the enemy and did this not to deceive anyone, but because he knew that the enemy was beaten, as everyone who had taken part in the battle knew it.
  • For people accustomed to think that plans of campaign and battles are made by generals--as any one of us sitting over a map in his study may imagine how he would have arranged things in this or that battle--the questions present themselves: Why did Kutuzov during the retreat not do this or that?
  • "Give me your hand," said he and, turning it over so as to feel the pulse, added: "You are not well, my dear fellow.
  • After hearing what was being said by one or other of these groups he generally turned away with an air of disappointment, as though they were not speaking of anything he wished to hear.
  • "Granddad" himself, as Malasha in her own mind called Kutuzov, sat apart in a dark corner behind the oven.
  • Beside him sat Uvarov, who with rapid gesticulations was giving him some information, speaking in low tones as they all did.
  • Raevski, twitching forward the black hair on his temples as was his habit, glanced now at Kutuzov and now at the door with a look of impatience.
  • Is it better to give up Moscow without a battle, or by accepting battle to risk losing the army as well as Moscow?
  • It seemed to her that it was only a personal struggle between "Granddad" and "Long-coat" as she termed Bennigsen.
  • During one of these pauses Kutuzov heaved a deep sigh as if preparing to speak.
  • At that very time, in circumstances even more important than retreating without a battle, namely the evacuation and burning of Moscow, Rostopchin, who is usually represented as being the instigator of that event, acted in an altogether different manner from Kutuzov.
  • And as soon as the enemy drew near the wealthy classes went away abandoning their property, while the poorer remained and burned and destroyed what was left.
  • They went away because for Russians there could be no question as to whether things would go well or ill under French rule in Moscow.
  • They knew that it was for the army to fight, and that if it could not succeed it would not do to take young ladies and house serfs to the Three Hills quarter of Moscow to fight Napoleon, and that they must go away, sorry as they were to abandon their property to destruction.
  • The enchanting, middle-aged Frenchman laid his hands on her head and, as she herself afterward described it, she felt something like a fresh breeze wafted into her soul.
  • And as it always happens in contests of cunning that a stupid person gets the better of cleverer ones, Helene--having realized that the main object of all these words and all this trouble was, after converting her to Catholicism, to obtain money from her for Jesuit institutions (as to which she received indications)-before parting with her money insisted that the various operations necessary to free her from her husband should be performed.
  • Though people were afraid of Marya Dmitrievna she was regarded in Petersburg as a buffoon, and so of what she had said they only noticed, and repeated in a whisper, the one coarse word she had used, supposing the whole sting of her remark to lie in that word.
  • Tell me, as you would a sister, what I ought to do.
  • As a true friend, I have thought and thought again about your affair.
  • Bilibin shrugged his shoulders, as much as to say that not even he could help in that difficulty.
  • She consulted a Russian priest as to the possibility of divorce and remarriage during a husband's lifetime, and the priest told her that it was impossible, and to her delight showed her a text in the Gospel which (as it seemed to him) plainly forbids remarriage while the husband is alive.
  • Armed with these arguments, which appeared to her unanswerable, she drove to her daughter's early one morning so as to find her alone.
  • "Comtesse, a tout peche misericorde," * said a fair-haired young man with a long face and nose, as he entered the room.
  • "I, I..." said Pierre, feeling it necessary to minimize his social position as much as possible so as to be nearer to the soldiers and better understood by them.
  • Pierre sat down by the fire and began eating the mash, as they called the food in the cauldron, and he thought it more delicious than any food he had ever tasted.
  • As he sat bending greedily over it, helping himself to large spoonfuls and chewing one after another, his face was lit up by the fire and the soldiers looked at him in silence.
  • "To be a soldier, just a soldier!" thought Pierre as he fell asleep, "to enter communal life completely, to be imbued by what makes them what they are.
  • I could have run away from my father, as I wanted to.
  • For a moment as he was rearranging his cloak Pierre opened his eyes and saw the same penthouse roofs, posts, and yard, but now they were all bluish, lit up, and glittering with frost or dew.
  • Though this news was being concealed from the inhabitants, the officials--the heads of the various government departments--knew that Moscow would soon be in the enemy's hands, just as Count Rostopchin himself knew it, and to escape personal responsibility they had all come to the governor to ask how they were to deal with their various departments.
  • As Pierre was entering the reception room a courier from the army came out of Rostopchin's private room.
  • If they're sent out and brought back again later on it will do no harm, but as things are now one can't answer for anything.
  • "Ah, how do you do, great warrior?" said Rostopchin as soon as the short man had left the room.
  • "Vereshchagin is a renegade and a traitor who will be punished as he deserves," said he with the vindictive heat with which people speak when recalling an insult.
  • I beg you to leave the town and break off all communication with such men as Klyucharev.
  • Be off as soon as you can, that's all I have to tell you.
  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.
  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.
  • The voices and footsteps of the many servants and of the peasants who had come with the carts resounded as they shouted to one another in the yard and in the house.
  • Natasha quietly repeated her question, and her face and whole manner were so serious, though she was still holding the ends of her handkerchief, that the major ceased smiling and after some reflection-- as if considering in how far the thing was possible--replied in the affirmative.
  • She and Mavra Kuzminichna tried to get as many of the wounded as possible into their yard.
  • "Oh, what sleep-?" said the countess, waking up just as she was dropping into a doze.
  • The countess looked with timid horror at her son's eager, excited face as he said this.
  • Thanks to Natasha's directions the work now went on expeditiously, unnecessary things were left, and the most valuable packed as compactly as possible.
  • But hard as they all worked till quite late that night, they could not get everything packed.
  • The church bells everywhere were ringing for service, just as usual on Sundays.
  • The price of weapons, of gold, of carts and horses, kept rising, but the value of paper money and city articles kept falling, so that by midday there were instances of carters removing valuable goods, such as cloth, and receiving in payment a half of what they carted, while peasant horses were fetching five hundred rubles each, and furniture, mirrors, and bronzes were being given away for nothing.
  • As to the serfs the only indication was that three out of their huge retinue disappeared during the night, but nothing was stolen; and as to the value of their possessions, the thirty peasant carts that had come in from their estates and which many people envied proved to be extremely valuable and they were offered enormous sums of money for them.
  • As to the serfs the only indication was that three out of their huge retinue disappeared during the night, but nothing was stolen; and as to the value of their possessions, the thirty peasant carts that had come in from their estates and which many people envied proved to be extremely valuable and they were offered enormous sums of money for them.
  • Pity these wounded men as one might, it was evident that if they were given one cart there would be no reason to refuse another, or all the carts and one's own carriages as well.
  • On waking up that morning Count Ilya Rostov left his bedroom softly, so as not to wake the countess who had fallen asleep only toward morning, and came out to the porch in his lilac silk dressing gown.
  • As soon as the countess wakes we'll be off, God willing!
  • As soon as the countess wakes we'll be off, God willing!
  • Count, be so good as to allow me... for God's sake, to get into some corner of one of your carts!
  • "Well, never mind, some of the things can be unloaded," he added in a soft, confidential voice, as though afraid of being overheard.
  • The count spoke timidly, as he always did when talking of money matters.
  • The countess was accustomed to this tone as a precursor of news of something detrimental to the children's interests, such as the building of a new gallery or conservatory, the inauguration of a private theater or an orchestra.
  • Do as you please!
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • Natasha watched him with an intent gaze that confused him, as if she were trying to find in his face the answer to some question.
  • "Altogether such heroism as was displayed by the Russian warriors cannot be imagined or adequately praised!" said Berg, glancing round at Natasha, and as if anxious to conciliate her, replying to her intent look with a smile.
  • At that moment Berg drew out his handkerchief as if to blow his nose and, seeing the knot in it, pondered, shaking his head sadly and significantly.
  • Natasha left the room with her father and, as if finding it difficult to reach some decision, first followed him and then ran downstairs.
  • Oh, do as you like!
  • It no longer seemed strange to them but on the contrary it seemed the only thing that could be done, just as a quarter of an hour before it had not seemed strange to anyone that the wounded should be left behind and the goods carted away but that had seemed the only thing to do.
  • The whole household, as if to atone for not having done it sooner, set eagerly to work at the new task of placing the wounded in the carts.
  • Natasha was in a state of rapturous excitement such as she had not known for a long time.
  • The phaeton was full of people and there was a doubt as to where Count Peter could sit.
  • She was putting away the things that had to be left behind and making a list of them as the countess wished, and she tried to get as much taken away with them as possible.
  • The caleche in which Prince Andrew was being taken attracted Sonya's attention as it passed the front porch.
  • They knew their Natasha, and alarm as to what would happen if she heard this news stifled all sympathy for the man they both liked.
  • What's the matter? asked Natasha, as with animated face she ran into the room.
  • Efim, the old coachman, who was the only one the countess trusted to drive her, sat perched up high on the box and did not so much as glance round at what was going on behind him.
  • The footman sprang onto the box of the moving coach which jolted as it passed out of the yard onto the uneven roadway; the other vehicles jolted in their turn, and the procession of carriages moved up the street.
  • In the carriages, the caleche, and the phaeton, all crossed themselves as they passed the church opposite the house.
  • Rarely had Natasha experienced so joyful a feeling as now, sitting in the carriage beside the countess and gazing at the slowly receding walls of forsaken, agitated Moscow.
  • In Kudrino, from the Nikitski, Presnya, and Podnovinsk Streets came several other trains of vehicles similar to the Rostovs', and as they passed along the Sadovaya Street the carriages and carts formed two rows abreast.
  • Pierre took her outstretched hand and kissed it awkwardly as he walked along beside her while the coach still moved on.
  • His major-domo came in a second time to say that the Frenchman who had brought the letter from the countess was very anxious to see him if only for a minute, and that someone from Bazdeev's widow had called to ask Pierre to take charge of her husband's books, as she herself was leaving for the country.
  • But as soon as the man had left the room Pierre took up his hat which was lying on the table and went out of his study by the other door.
  • He went along the whole length of this passage to the stairs and, frowning and rubbing his forehead with both hands, went down as far as the first landing.
  • But there were some carriages waiting, and as soon as Pierre stepped out of the gate the coachmen and the yard porter noticed him and raised their caps to him.
  • Be so good as to step in.
  • Makar Alexeevich, the brother of my late master--may the kingdom of heaven be his--has remained here, but he is in a weak state as you know, said the old servant.
  • As it was sealed up so it has remained, but Sophia Danilovna gave orders that if anyone should come from you they were to have the books.
  • Makar Alexeevich came twice that evening shuffling along in his galoshes as far as the door and stopped and looked ingratiatingly at Pierre.
  • But as soon as Pierre turned toward him he wrapped his dressing gown around him with a shamefaced and angry look and hurried away.
  • However, I know their presence will inspire me, and I shall speak to them as I always do: clearly, impressively, and majestically.
  • That speech was full of dignity and greatness as Napoleon understood it.
  • The bees circle round a queenless hive in the hot beams of the midday sun as gaily as around the living hives; from a distance it smells of honey like the others, and bees fly in and out in the same way.
  • In a third place a crowd of bees, crushing one another, attack some victim and fight and smother it, and the victim, enfeebled or killed, drops from above slowly and lightly as a feather, among the heap of corpses.
  • Only a few of them still move, rise, and feebly fly to settle on the enemy's hand, lacking the spirit to die stinging him; the rest are dead and fall as lightly as fish scales.
  • But the roll of the drums did not make the looting soldiers run in the direction of the drum as formerly, but made them, on the contrary, run farther away.
  • Be so good as to protect us!
  • From one open shop came the sound of blows and vituperation, and just as the officer came up to it a man in a gray coat with a shaven head was flung out violently.
  • Someone stopped at the gate, and the latch rattled as someone tried to open it.
  • The young officer standing in the gateway, as if hesitating whether to enter or not, clicked his tongue.
  • "Oh well... it can't be helped!" said he in a tone of vexation and placed his hand on the gate as if to leave.
  • And as soon as the officer let go of the gate handle she turned and, hurrying away on her old legs, went through the back yard to the servants' quarters.
  • Swaying his head and smiling as if amused at himself, the officer ran almost at a trot through the deserted streets toward the Yauza bridge to overtake his regiment.
  • The sleeve of his coat kept slipping down and he always carefully rolled it up again with his left hand, as if it were most important that the sinewy white arm he was flourishing should be bare.
  • The tall lad, standing in the porch, turned his bleared eyes from the publican to the smith and back again as if considering whom he ought to fight now.
  • As if this action had some mysterious and menacing significance, the workmen surrounding the publican paused in indecision.
  • "Your honor..." replied the shopman in the frieze coat, "your honor, in accord with the proclamation of his highest excellency the count, they desire to serve, not sparing their lives, and it is not any kind of riot, but as his highest excellence said..."
  • This letter requested the count to send police officers to guide the troops through the town, as the army was retreating to the Ryazan road beyond Moscow.
  • Not only did it seem to him (as to all administrators) that he controlled the external actions of Moscow's inhabitants, but he also thought he controlled their mental attitude by means of his broadsheets and posters, written in a coarse tone which the people despise in their own class and do not understand from those in authority.
  • The superintendent of police, whom the crowd had stopped, went in to see him at the same time as an adjutant who informed the count that the horses were harnessed.
  • As often happens with passionate people, he was mastered by anger but was still seeking an object on which to vent it.
  • "Here is that mob, the dregs of the people," he thought as he gazed at the crowd: "this rabble they have roused by their folly!
  • "Ah!" exclaimed Rostopchin, as if struck by an unexpected recollection.
  • And the count stepped as briskly back into the room and slammed the door behind him.
  • He'll show you what law is! the mob were saying as if reproving one another for their lack of confidence.
  • Rostopchin, coming out there with quick angry steps, looked hastily around as if seeking someone.
  • And as he spoke he saw a young man coming round the corner of the house between two dragoons.
  • At the count's first words he raised it slowly and looked up at him as if wishing to say something or at least to meet his eye.
  • As if inflamed by the sight, he raised his arm and addressed the people, almost shouting:
  • Deal with him as you think fit!
  • Hearing not so much the words as the angry tone of Rostopchin's voice, the crowd moaned and heaved forward, but again paused.
  • "Ah!" cried Vereshchagin in meek surprise, looking round with a frightened glance as if not understanding why this was done to him.
  • He would make that foxy old courtier feel that the responsibility for all the calamities that would follow the abandonment of the city and the ruin of Russia (as Rostopchin regarded it) would fall upon his doting old head.
  • Count Rostopchin suddenly grew pale as he had done when the crowd closed in on Vereshchagin.
  • The caleche flew over the ground as fast as the horses could draw it, but for a long time Count Rostopchin still heard the insane despairing screams growing fainter in the distance, while his eyes saw nothing but the astonished, frightened, bloodstained face of "the traitor" in the fur-lined coat.
  • Recent as that mental picture was, Rostopchin already felt that it had cut deep into his heart and drawn blood.
  • Kutuzov looked at Rostopchin as if, not grasping what was said to him, he was trying to read something peculiar written at that moment on the face of the man addressing him.
  • About the middle of the Arbat Street, near the Church of the Miraculous Icon of St. Nicholas, Murat halted to await news from the advanced detachment as to the condition in which they had found the citadel, le Kremlin.
  • No masters of the houses being found anywhere, the French were not billeted on the inhabitants as is usual in towns but lived in it as in a camp.
  • As soon as the men of the various regiments began to disperse among the wealthy and deserted houses, the army was lost forever and there came into being something nondescript, neither citizens nor soldiers but what are known as marauders.
  • As soon as the men of the various regiments began to disperse among the wealthy and deserted houses, the army was lost forever and there came into being something nondescript, neither citizens nor soldiers but what are known as marauders.
  • As a hungry herd of cattle keeps well together when crossing a barren field, but gets out of hand and at once disperses uncontrollably as soon as it reaches rich pastures, so did the army disperse all over the wealthy city.
  • As a hungry herd of cattle keeps well together when crossing a barren field, but gets out of hand and at once disperses uncontrollably as soon as it reaches rich pastures, so did the army disperse all over the wealthy city.
  • The absorption of the French by Moscow, radiating starwise as it did, only reached the quarter where Pierre was staying by the evening of the second of September.
  • The other was that vague and quite Russian feeling of contempt for everything conventional, artificial, and human--for everything the majority of men regard as the greatest good in the world.
  • Pierre's physical condition, as is always the case, corresponded to his mental state.
  • Makar Alexeevich was standing with parted lips, swaying, as if about to fall asleep, as he leaned against the wall.
  • Well, and what are we to do with this man? he added, addressing himself to Pierre as to a brother.
  • Will you now be so good as to tell me with whom I have the honor of conversing so pleasantly, instead of being in the ambulance with that maniac's bullet in my body?
  • But as the captain had the wine they had taken while passing through Moscow, he left the kvass to Morel and applied himself to the bottle of Bordeaux.
  • Here is one I got at Wagram" (he touched his side) "and a second at Smolensk"--he showed a scar on his cheek--"and this leg which as you see does not want to march, I got that on the seventh at the great battle of la Moskowa.
  • I was at it three times--sure as I sit here.
  • I saw them close up their ranks six times in succession and march as if on parade.
  • The captain was so naively and good-humoredly gay, so real, and so pleased with himself that Pierre almost winked back as he looked merrily at him.
  • When he returned to the room Pierre was sitting in the same place as before, with his head in his hands.
  • Painful as that was it was not that which tormented Pierre at the moment.
  • His eyes shone and his mustache twitched as if he were smiling to himself at some amusing thought.
  • The captain gazed intently at him as he had done when he learned that "shelter" was Unterkunft in German, and his face suddenly brightened.
  • Who would have said that I should be a soldier and a captain of dragoons in the service of Bonaparte, as we used to call him?
  • Having repeated these words the captain wiped his eyes and gave himself a shake, as if driving away the weakness which assailed him at this touching recollection.
  • The next morning they woke late and were again delayed so often that they only got as far as Great Mytishchi.
  • He had spent the first night in the same yard as the Rostovs.
  • Old Daniel Terentich, the count's valet (as he was called), came up to the group and shouted at Mishka.
  • Doesn't it look as if that glow were in Moscow? remarked one of the footmen.
  • But Natasha looked at her as if not understanding what was said to her and again fixed her eyes on the corner of the stove.
  • Sonya had cried and begged to be forgiven and now, as if trying to atone for her fault, paid unceasing attention to her cousin.
  • And as if in order not to offend Sonya and to get rid of her, she turned her face to the window, looked out in such a way that it was evident that she could not see anything, and again settled down in her former attitude.
  • The countess went up to her daughter and touched her head with the back of her hand as she was wont to do when Natasha was ill, then touched her forehead with her lips as if to feel whether she was feverish, and finally kissed her.
  • She knew Prince Andrew was in the same yard as themselves and in a part of the hut across the passage; but this dreadful incessant moaning made her sob.
  • As if to celebrate a victory over everybody, a cricket chirped in a crack in the wall.
  • Horribly unlike a man as that body looked, she must see him.
  • She passed the valet, the snuff fell from the candle wick, and she saw Prince Andrew clearly with his arms outside the quilt, and such as she had always seen him.
  • He was the same as ever, but the feverish color of his face, his glittering eyes rapturously turned toward her, and especially his neck, delicate as a child's, revealed by the turn-down collar of his shirt, gave him a peculiarly innocent, childlike look, such as she had never seen on him before.
  • He drank it eagerly, looking with feverish eyes at the door in front of him as if trying to understand and remember something.
  • Prince Andrew again pondered as if trying to remember something.
  • Prince Andrew answered all his questions reluctantly but reasonably, and then said he wanted a bolster placed under him as he was uncomfortable and in great pain.
  • "Yes, a new happiness was revealed to me of which man cannot be deprived," he thought as he lay in the semidarkness of the quiet hut, gazing fixedly before him with feverish wide open eyes.
  • And of them all, I loved and hated none as I did her.
  • And he vividly pictured to himself Natasha, not as he had done in the past with nothing but her charms which gave him delight, but for the first time picturing to himself her soul.
  • "I love you more, better than before," said Prince Andrew, lifting her face with his hand so as to look into her eyes.
  • The buildings in Carriage Row, across the river, in the Bazaar and the Povarskoy, as well as the barges on the Moskva River and the timber yards by the Dorogomilov Bridge, were all ablaze.
  • In another side street a sentinel standing beside a green caisson shouted at him, but only when the shout was threateningly repeated and he heard the click of the man's musket as he raised it did Pierre understand that he had to pass on the other side of the street.
  • As Pierre approached that street the smoke became denser and denser--he even felt the heat of the fire.
  • As he was going along a foot path across a wide- open space adjoining the Povarskoy on one side and the gardens of Prince Gruzinski's house on the other, Pierre suddenly heard the desperate weeping of a woman close to him.
  • He stopped as if awakening from a dream and lifted his head.
  • As soon as she saw Pierre, the woman almost threw herself at his feet.
  • As soon as she saw Pierre, the woman almost threw herself at his feet.
  • We ran out just as we were....
  • Pierre felt as if he had come back to life after a heavy swoon.
  • As Pierre passed through the fence gate, he was enveloped by hot air and involuntarily stopped.
  • Pierre was seized by a sense of horror and repulsion such as he had experienced when touching some nasty little animal.
  • It was now, however, impossible to get back the way he had come; the maid, Aniska, was no longer there, and Pierre with a feeling of pity and disgust pressed the wet, painfully sobbing child to himself as tenderly as he could and ran with her through the garden seeking another way out.
  • The beautiful Armenian still sat motionless and in the same attitude, with her long lashes drooping as if she did not see or feel what the soldier was doing to her.
  • Pierre was as if intoxicated.
  • In Petersburg at that time a complicated struggle was being carried on with greater heat than ever in the highest circles, between the parties of Rumyantsev, the French, Marya Fedorovna, the Tsarevich, and others, drowned as usual by the buzzing of the court drones.
  • There were the same receptions and balls, the same French theater, the same court interests and service interests and intrigues as usual.
  • The Empress Elisabeth, however, when asked what instructions she would be pleased to give--with her characteristic Russian patriotism had replied that she could give no directions about state institutions for that was the affair of the sovereign, but as far as she personally was concerned she would be the last to quit Petersburg.
  • It was regarded as a model of ecclesiastical, patriotic eloquence.
  • This reading, as was always the case at Anna Pavlovna's soirees, had a political significance.
  • We belong to different camps, but that does not prevent my esteeming her as she deserves.
  • During his diplomatic career he had more than once noticed that such utterances were received as very witty, and at every opportunity he uttered in that way the first words that entered his head.
  • Prince Vasili sternly declaimed, looking round at his audience as if to inquire whether anyone had anything to say to the contrary.
  • Bilibin attentively examined his nails, and many of those present appeared intimidated, as if asking in what they were to blame.
  • Animated by that address Anna Pavlovna's guests talked for a long time of the state of the fatherland and offered various conjectures as to the result of the battle to be fought in a few days.
  • "Fancy the Emperor's position!" said they, and instead of extolling Kutuzov as they had done the day before, they condemned him as the cause of the Emperor's anxiety.
  • Moreover, toward evening, as if everything conspired to make Petersburg society anxious and uneasy, a terrible piece of news was added.
  • As long as this news remained unofficial it was possible to doubt it, but the next day the following communication was received from Count Rostopchin:
  • As long as this news remained unofficial it was possible to doubt it, but the next day the following communication was received from Count Rostopchin:
  • This messenger was Michaud, a Frenchman who did not know Russian, but who was quoique etranger, russe de coeur et d'ame, * as he said of himself.
  • He suddenly frowned, as if blaming himself for his weakness, and raising his head addressed Michaud in a firm voice:
  • "Sire, will you allow me to speak frankly as befits a loyal soldier?" he asked to gain time.
  • When he heard these words and saw the expression of firm resolution in the Emperor's eyes, Michaud--quoique etranger, russe de coeur et d'ame-- at that solemn moment felt himself enraptured by all that he had heard (as he used afterwards to say), and gave expression to his own feelings and those of the Russian people whose representative he considered himself to be, in the following words:
  • When--free from soldiers, wagons, and the filthy traces of a camp--he saw villages with peasants and peasant women, gentlemen's country houses, fields where cattle were grazing, posthouses with stationmasters asleep in them, he rejoiced as though seeing all this for the first time.
  • Everything seemed to him pleasant and easy during that first part of his stay in Voronezh and, as usually happens when a man is in a pleasant state of mind, everything went well and easily.
  • In very few words Nicholas bought seventeen picked stallions for six thousand rubles--to serve, as he said, as samples of his remounts.
  • Among the men was an Italian prisoner, an officer of the French army; and Nicholas felt that the presence of that prisoner enhanced his own importance as a Russian hero.
  • The Italian was, as it were, a war trophy.
  • As soon as Nicholas entered in his hussar uniform, diffusing around him a fragrance of perfume and wine, and had uttered the words "better late than never" and heard them repeated several times by others, people clustered around him; all eyes turned on him, and he felt at once that he had entered into his proper position in the province--that of a universal favorite: a very pleasant position, and intoxicatingly so after his long privations.
  • As soon as Nicholas entered in his hussar uniform, diffusing around him a fragrance of perfume and wine, and had uttered the words "better late than never" and heard them repeated several times by others, people clustered around him; all eyes turned on him, and he felt at once that he had entered into his proper position in the province--that of a universal favorite: a very pleasant position, and intoxicatingly so after his long privations.
  • Among these was the governor's wife herself, who welcomed Rostov as a near relative and called him "Nicholas."
  • With the naive conviction of young men in a merry mood that other men's wives were created for them, Rostov did not leave the lady's side and treated her husband in a friendly and conspiratorial style, as if, without speaking of it, they knew how capitally Nicholas and the lady would get on together.
  • "Ah, Nikita Ivanych!" cried Nicholas, rising politely, and as if wishing Nikita Ivanych to share his joke, he began to tell him of his intention to elope with a blonde lady.
  • Nicholas promised to come and blushed again as he bowed.
  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.
  • "Not at all," replied Nicholas as if offended at the idea.
  • "Yes, yes," the governor's wife said as if talking to herself.
  • And as long as my sister Natasha was engaged to her brother it was of course out of the question for me to think of marrying her.
  • More than anything she feared lest the confusion she felt might overwhelm her and betray her as soon as she saw him.
  • When Rostov entered the room, the princess dropped her eyes for an instant, as if to give the visitor time to greet her aunt, and then just as Nicholas turned to her she raised her head and met his look with shining eyes.
  • Rostov saw all this as clearly as if he had known her whole life.
  • She did not talk about her brother, diverting the conversation as soon as her aunt mentioned Andrew.
  • Nicholas noticed this, as he noticed every shade of Princess Mary's character with an observation unusual to him, and everything confirmed his conviction that she was a quite unusual and extraordinary being.
  • Nicholas blushed and was confused when people spoke to him about the princess (as she did when he was mentioned) and even when he thought of her, but in her presence he felt quite at ease, and said not at all what he had prepared, but what, quite appropriately, occurred to him at the moment.
  • When a pause occurred during his short visit, Nicholas, as is usual when there are children, turned to Prince Andrew's little son, caressing him and asking whether he would like to be an hussar.
  • Nicholas also noticed that look and, as if understanding it, flushed with pleasure and began to kiss the boy with good natured playfulness.
  • After meeting Princess Mary, though the course of his life went on externally as before, all his former amusements lost their charm for him and he often thought about her.
  • But he never thought about her as he had thought of all the young ladies without exception whom he had met in society, nor as he had for a long time, and at one time rapturously, thought about Sonya.
  • He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on--and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.
  • Nicholas immediately recognized Princess Mary not so much by the profile he saw under her bonnet as by the feeling of solicitude, timidity, and pity that immediately overcame him.
  • As had occurred before when she was present, Nicholas went up to her without waiting to be prompted by the governor's wife and not asking himself whether or not it was right and proper to address her here in church, and told her he had heard of her trouble and sympathized with his whole soul.
  • As soon as she heard his voice a vivid glow kindled in her face, lighting up both her sorrow and her joy.
  • As soon as she heard his voice a vivid glow kindled in her face, lighting up both her sorrow and her joy.
  • "Oh, that would be so dread..." she began and, prevented by agitation from finishing, she bent her head with a movement as graceful as everything she did in his presence and, looking up at him gratefully, went out, following her aunt.
  • His having encountered her in such exceptional circumstances, and his mother having at one time mentioned her to him as a good match, had drawn his particular attention to her.
  • In men Rostov could not bear to see the expression of a higher spiritual life (that was why he did not like Prince Andrew) and he referred to it contemptuously as philosophy and dreaminess, but in Princess Mary that very sorrow which revealed the depth of a whole spiritual world foreign to him was an irresistible attraction.
  • Besides, I don't love her--not as I should.
  • Yes, prayer can move mountains, but one must have faith and not pray as Natasha and I used to as children, that the snow might turn into sugar-- and then run out into the yard to see whether it had done so.
  • Softened by memories of Princess Mary he began to pray as he had not done for a long time.
  • This unexpected and, as it seemed to Nicholas, quite voluntary letter from Sonya freed him from the knot that fettered him and from which there had seemed no escape.
  • Neither he nor she said a word about what "Natasha nursing him" might mean, but thanks to this letter Nicholas suddenly became almost as intimate with the princess as if they were relations.
  • Sonya's letter written from Troitsa, which had come as an answer to Nicholas' prayer, was prompted by this: the thought of getting Nicholas married to an heiress occupied the old countess' mind more and more.
  • She knew that being thrown together again under such terrible circumstances they would again fall in love with one another, and that Nicholas would then not be able to marry Princess Mary as they would be within the prohibited degrees of affinity.
  • In the next room sat the count and countess respectfully conversing with the prior, who was calling on them as old acquaintances and benefactors of the monastery.
  • Sonya was there too, tormented by curiosity as to what Prince Andrew and Natasha were talking about.
  • As soon as the prior withdrew, Natasha took her friend by the hand and went with her into the unoccupied room.
  • As soon as the prior withdrew, Natasha took her friend by the hand and went with her into the unoccupied room.
  • Sonya, dovey, everything is as it used to be.
  • She had in fact seen nothing then but had mentioned the first thing that came into her head, but what she had invented then seemed to her now as real as any other recollection.
  • "Sonya!" said the countess, raising her eyes from her letter as her niece passed, "Sonya, won't you write to Nicholas?"
  • In their attitude toward him could still be felt both uncertainty as to who he might be – perhaps a very important person – and hostility as a result of their recent personal conflict with him.
  • If they noticed anything remarkable about Pierre, it was only his unabashed, meditative concentration and thoughtfulness, and the way he spoke French, which struck them as surprisingly good.
  • In spite of this he was placed that day with the other arrested suspects, as the separate room he had occupied was required by an officer.
  • As soon as Pierre began to say anything that did not fit in with that aim, the channel was removed and the water could flow to waste.
  • As soon as Pierre began to say anything that did not fit in with that aim, the channel was removed and the water could flow to waste.
  • And so, as they had the power and wish to inculpate him, this expedient of an inquiry and trial seemed unnecessary.
  • This officer, probably someone on the staff, was holding a paper in his hand, and called over all the Russians there, naming Pierre as "the man who does not give his name."
  • No flames were seen, but columns of smoke rose on all sides, and all Moscow as far as Pierre could see was one vast charred ruin.
  • Looking at his cold face, as he sat like a stern schoolmaster who was prepared to wait awhile for an answer, Pierre felt that every instant of delay might cost him his life; but he did not know what to say.
  • But where they were to take him Pierre did not know: back to the coach house or to the place of execution his companions had pointed out to him as they crossed the Virgin's Field.
  • His faculties were quite numbed, he was stupefied, and noticing nothing around him went on moving his legs as the others did till they all stopped and he stopped too.
  • There was a stir in the ranks of the soldiers and it was evident that they were all hurrying--not as men hurry to do something they understand, but as people hurry to finish a necessary but unpleasant and incomprehensible task.
  • The convicts stopped when they reached the post and, while sacks were being brought, looked dumbly around as a wounded beast looks at an approaching huntsman.
  • Pierre, breathing heavily, looked around as if asking what it meant.
  • They are all suffering as I am.
  • When they got him to the post he grew quiet, as if he suddenly understood something.
  • Probably a word of command was given and was followed by the reports of eight muskets; but try as he would Pierre could not afterwards remember having heard the slightest sound of the shots.
  • The lower jaw of an old Frenchman with a thick mustache trembled as he untied the ropes.
  • They all plainly and certainly knew that they were criminals who must hide the traces of their guilt as quickly as possible.
  • The twenty-four sharpshooters with discharged muskets, standing in the center of the circle, ran back to their places as the companies passed by.
  • He had experienced this before, but never so strongly as now.
  • But as soon as he closed them he saw before him the dreadful face of the factory lad-- especially dreadful because of its simplicity--and the faces of the murderers, even more dreadful because of their disquiet.
  • No, I went to look at the fire, and they arrested me there, and tried me as an incendiary.
  • Pierre asked as he munched the last of the potato.
  • "I say things happen not as we plan but as God judges," he replied, thinking that he was repeating what he had said before, and immediately continued:
  • "A wife for counsel, a mother-in-law for welcome, but there's none as dear as one's own mother!" said he.
  • We had a little girl, but God took her before I went as a soldier.
  • When Pierre saw his neighbor next morning at dawn the first impression of him, as of something round, was fully confirmed: Platon's whole figure--in a French overcoat girdled with a cord, a soldier's cap, and bast shoes--was round.
  • But his brilliantly white, strong teeth which showed in two unbroken semicircles when he laughed--as he often did--were all sound and good, there was not a gray hair in his beard or on his head, and his whole body gave an impression of suppleness and especially of firmness and endurance.
  • Every night before lying down, he said: "Lord, lay me down as a stone and raise me up as a loaf!" and every morning on getting up, he said: "I lay down and curled up, I get up and shake myself."
  • And indeed he only had to lie down, to fall asleep like a stone, and he only had to shake himself, to be ready without a moment's delay for some work, just as children are ready to play directly they awake.
  • When he related anything it was generally some old and evidently precious memory of his "Christian" life, as he called his peasant existence.
  • He liked to talk and he talked well, adorning his speech with terms of endearment and with folk sayings which Pierre thought he invented himself, but the chief charm of his talk lay in the fact that the commonest events--sometimes just such as Pierre had witnessed without taking notice of them--assumed in Karataev's a character of solemn fitness.
  • Karataev had no attachments, friendships, or love, as Pierre understood them, but loved and lived affectionately with everything life brought him in contact with, particularly with man--not any particular man, but those with whom he happened to be.
  • Sometimes Pierre, struck by the meaning of his words, would ask him to repeat them, but Platon could never recall what he had said a moment before, just as he never could repeat to Pierre the words of his favorite song: native and birch tree and my heart is sick occurred in it, but when spoken and not sung, no meaning could be got out of it.
  • But his life, as he regarded it, had no meaning as a separate thing.
  • It had meaning only as part of a whole of which he was always conscious.
  • His words and actions flowed from him as evenly, inevitably, and spontaneously as fragrance exhales from a flower.
  • That feeling was so strong at the moment of leaving Voronezh that those who saw her off, as they looked at her careworn, despairing face, felt sure she would fall ill on the journey.
  • As always happens when traveling, Princess Mary thought only of the journey itself, forgetting its object.
  • The carriage steps clattered as they were let down.
  • "The doctor says that he is not in danger," said the countess, but as she spoke she raised her eyes with a sigh, and her gesture conveyed a contradiction of her words.
  • While talking to Princess Mary he continually looked round as if asking everyone whether he was doing the right thing.
  • In spite of her one desire to see her brother as soon as possible, and her vexation that at the moment when all she wanted was to see him they should be trying to entertain her and pretending to admire her nephew, the princess noticed all that was going on around her and felt the necessity of submitting, for a time, to this new order of things which she had entered.
  • As soon as Natasha, sitting at the head of Prince Andrew's bed, heard of Princess Mary's arrival, she softly left his room and hastened to her with those swift steps that had sounded buoyant to Princess Mary.
  • As soon as Natasha, sitting at the head of Prince Andrew's bed, heard of Princess Mary's arrival, she softly left his room and hastened to her with those swift steps that had sounded buoyant to Princess Mary.
  • Hard as she had tried to prepare herself, and now tried to remain tranquil, she knew that she would be unable to look at him without tears.
  • She was sure he would speak soft, tender words to her such as her father had uttered before his death, and that she would not be able to bear it and would burst into sobs in his presence.
  • His eyes gazed at them as they entered.
  • In the deep gaze that seemed to look not outwards but inwards there was an almost hostile expression as he slowly regarded his sister and Natasha.
  • He kissed his sister, holding her hand in his as was their wont.
  • Had he screamed in agony, that scream would not have struck such horror into Princess Mary's heart as the tone of his voice.
  • Princess Mary heard his words but they had no meaning for her, except as a proof of how far away he now was from everything living.
  • It was the unexpected realization of the fact that he still valued life as presented to him in the form of his love for Natasha, and a last, though ultimately vanquished, attack of terror before the unknown.
  • As usual after dinner he was slightly feverish, and his thoughts were preternaturally clear.
  • She had learned to knit stockings since Prince Andrew had casually mentioned that no one nursed the sick so well as old nurses who knit stockings, and that there is something soothing in the knitting of stockings.
  • "Can it or can it not be?" he now thought as he looked at her and listened to the light click of the steel needles.
  • The discovery of these laws is only possible when we have quite abandoned the attempt to find the cause in the will of some one man, just as the discovery of the laws of the motion of the planets was possible only when men abandoned the conception of the fixity of the earth.
  • They ascribe the glory of that achievement of genius to different men and dispute as to whom the honor is due.
  • If the Russian army at Krasnaya Pakhra had given battle as Bennigsen and Barclay advised?
  • Just as it is impossible to say when it was decided to abandon Moscow, so it is impossible to say precisely when, or by whom, it was decided to move to Tarutino.
  • Only when the army had got there, as the result of innumerable and varying forces, did people begin to assure themselves that they had desired this movement and long ago foreseen its result.
  • Kutuzov's merit lay, not in any strategic maneuver of genius, as it is called, but in the fact that he alone understood the significance of what had happened.
  • During the month that the French troops were pillaging in Moscow and the Russian troops were quietly encamped at Tarutino, a change had taken place in the relative strength of the two armies--both in spirit and in number--as a result of which the superiority had passed to the Russian side.
  • Though the condition and numbers of the French army were unknown to the Russians, as soon as that change occurred the need of attacking at once showed itself by countless signs.
  • And at once, as a clock begins to strike and chime as soon as the minute hand has completed a full circle, this change was shown by an increased activity, whirring, and chiming in the higher spheres.
  • So fresh instructions were sent for the solution of difficulties that might be encountered, as well as fresh people who were to watch Kutuzov's actions and report upon them.
  • As a result of the hostility between Kutuzov and Bennigsen, his Chief of Staff, the presence of confidential representatives of the Emperor, and these transfers, a more than usually complicated play of parties was going on among the staff of the army.
  • The war went on independently of them, as it had to go: that is, never in the way people devised, but flowing always from the essential attitude of the masses.
  • Napoleon himself was in Moscow as late as the twenty-fifth.
  • In view of all this information, when the enemy has scattered his forces in large detachments, and with Napoleon and his Guards in Moscow, is it possible that the enemy's forces confronting you are so considerable as not to allow of your taking the offensive?
  • As in the Austerlitz dispositions, it was written--though not in German this time:
  • They've put two regiments as outposts, and they're having such a spree there, it's awful!
  • While still at a distance he heard as he rode the merry sounds of a soldier's dance song proceeding from the house.
  • He sat in the caleche, dozing and waking up by turns, and listening for any sound of firing on the right as an indication that the action had begun.
  • He, the commander-in-chief, a Serene Highness who everybody said possessed powers such as no man had ever had in Russia, to be placed in this position--made the laughingstock of the whole army!
  • He was in a state of physical suffering as if from corporal punishment, and could not avoid expressing it by cries of anger and distress.
  • As often happens when someone we have trusted is no longer before our eyes, it suddenly seemed quite clear and obvious to him that the sergeant was an impostor, that he had lied, and that the whole Russian attack would be ruined by the absence of those two regiments, which he would lead away heaven only knew where.
  • When Grekov returned, Count Orlov-Denisov, excited both by the abandoned attempt and by vainly awaiting the infantry columns that still did not appear, as well as by the proximity of the enemy, resolved to advance.
  • "Hurrah-ah-ah!" reverberated in the forest, and the Cossack companies, trailing their lances and advancing one after another as if poured out of a sack, dashed gaily across the brook toward the camp.
  • Meantime, according to the dispositions which said that "the First Column will march" and so on, the infantry of the belated columns, commanded by Bennigsen and directed by Toll, had started in due order and, as always happens, had got somewhere, but not to their appointed places.
  • As always happens the men, starting cheerfully, began to halt; murmurs were heard, there was a sense of confusion, and finally a backward movement.
  • "I prefer not to take lessons from anyone, but I can die with my men as well as anybody," he said, and advanced with a single division.
  • He well knew that nothing but confusion would come of this battle undertaken against his will, and as far as was in his power held the troops back.
  • They are asking to attack and making plans of all kinds, but as soon as one gets to business nothing is ready, and the enemy, forewarned, takes measures accordingly.
  • If not, the Guards will not so much as see a little smoke.
  • "That's how everything is done with us, all topsy-turvy!" said the Russian officers and generals after the Tarutino battle, letting it be understood that some fool there is doing things all wrong but that we ourselves should not have done so, just as people speak today.
  • No battle--Tarutino, Borodino, or Austerlitz--takes place as those who planned it anticipated.
  • But to say that he destroyed his army because he wished to, or because he was very stupid, would be as unjust as to say that he had brought his troops to Moscow because he wished to and because he was very clever and a genius.
  • The historians quite falsely represent Napoleon's faculties as having weakened in Moscow, and do so only because the results did not justify his actions.
  • He employed all his ability and strength to do the best he could for himself and his army, as he had done previously and as he did subsequently in 1813.
  • His activity in Moscow was as amazing and as full of genius as elsewhere.
  • Its members will be distinguished by a red ribbon worn across the shoulder, and the mayor of the city will wear a white belt as well.
  • (2) Such supplies will be bought from them at such prices as seller and buyer may agree on, and if a seller is unable to obtain a fair price he will be free to take his goods back to his village and no one may hinder him under any pretense.
  • (3) Sunday and Wednesday of each week are appointed as the chief market days and to that end a sufficient number of troops will be stationed along the highroads on Tuesdays and Saturdays at such distances from the town as to protect the carts.
  • But as food was too precious to be given to foreigners, who were for the most part enemies, Napoleon preferred to supply them with money with which to purchase food from outside, and had paper rubles distributed to them.
  • As to the theaters for the entertainment of the people and the troops, these did not meet with success either.
  • The genuine as well as the false paper money which flooded Moscow lost its value.
  • He gazed at the caleches and carriages in which soldiers were riding and remarked that it was a very good thing, as those vehicles could be used to carry provisions, the sick, and the wounded.
  • Its furry tail stood up firm and round as a plume, its bandy legs served it so well that it would often gracefully lift a hind leg and run very easily and quickly on three legs, as if disdaining to use all four.
  • The look of his eyes was resolute, calm, and animatedly alert, as never before.
  • "You see, dear man, this is not a sewing shop, and I had no proper tools; and, as they say, one needs a tool even to kill a louse," said Platon with one of his round smiles, obviously pleased with his work.
  • The Frenchman looked at the linen, considered for a moment, then looked inquiringly at Pierre and, as if Pierre's look had told him something, suddenly blushed and shouted in a squeaky voice:
  • Those dreadful moments he had lived through at the executions had as it were forever washed away from his imagination and memory the agitating thoughts and feelings that had formerly seemed so important.
  • And this not only stayed with him during the whole of his imprisonment, but even grew in strength as the hardships of his position increased.
  • It was evidently not so much his sufferings that caused him to moan (he had dysentery) as his fear and grief at being left alone.
  • Just as Pierre reached the door, the corporal who had offered him a pipe the day before came up to it with two soldiers.
  • But even as he spoke he began to doubt whether this was the corporal he knew or a stranger, so unlike himself did the corporal seem at that moment.
  • Moreover, just as Pierre was speaking a sharp rattle of drums was suddenly heard from both sides.
  • To fear or to try to escape that force, to address entreaties or exhortations to those who served as its tools, was useless.
  • When that door was opened and the prisoners, crowding against one another like a flock of sheep, squeezed into the exit, Pierre pushed his way forward and approached that very captain who as the corporal had assured him was ready to do anything for him.
  • "What now?" the officer asked with a cold look as if not recognizing Pierre.
  • They looked at him and at his shoes mistrustfully, as at an alien.
  • What have they done? the prisoners on one side and another were heard saying as they gazed on the charred ruins.
  • As they passed near a church in the Khamovniki (one of the few unburned quarters of Moscow) the whole mass of prisoners suddenly started to one side and exclamations of horror and disgust were heard.
  • Again, as at the church in Khamovniki, a wave of general curiosity bore all the prisoners forward onto the road, and Pierre, thanks to his stature, saw over the heads of the others what so attracted their curiosity.
  • All that he now witnessed scarcely made an impression on him--as if his soul, making ready for a hard struggle, refused to receive impressions that might weaken it.
  • Pierre did not see the people as individuals but saw their movement.
  • As if in reaction against the worsening of their position they were all particularly animated and gay.
  • Kutuzov replied to this letter as he had done to the one formerly brought by Lauriston, saying that there could be no question of peace.
  • Dokhturov was unwilling to undertake any action, as it was not clear to him now what he ought to do.
  • By the light of the sparks Bolkhovitinov saw Shcherbinin's youthful face as he held the candle, and the face of another man who was still asleep.
  • Since his appointment as general on duty he had always slept with his door open, giving orders that every messenger should be allowed to wake him up.
  • Since Bennigsen, who corresponded with the Emperor and had more influence than anyone else on the staff, had begun to avoid him, Kutuzov was more at ease as to the possibility of himself and his troops being obliged to take part in useless aggressive movements.
  • Like an experienced sportsman he knew that the beast was wounded, and wounded as only the whole strength of Russia could have wounded it, but whether it was mortally wounded or not was still an undecided question.
  • As if fighting were fun.
  • The undecided question as to whether the wound inflicted at Borodino was mortal or not had hung over Kutuzov's head for a whole month.
  • He imagined all sorts of movements of the Napoleonic army as a whole or in sections--against Petersburg, or against him, or to outflank him.
  • So it came about that at the council at Malo-Yaroslavets, when the generals pretending to confer together expressed various opinions, all mouths were closed by the opinion uttered by the simple-minded soldier Mouton who, speaking last, said what they all felt: that the one thing needful was to get away as quickly as possible; and no one, not even Napoleon, could say anything against that truth which they all recognized.
  • Here as at Tarutino they went after plunder, leaving the men.
  • So both those who knew and those who did not know deceived themselves, and pushed on to Smolensk as to a promised land.
  • Each of them desired nothing more than to give himself up as a prisoner to escape from all this horror and misery; but on the one hand the force of this common attraction to Smolensk, their goal, drew each of them in the same direction; on the other hand an army corps could not surrender to a company, and though the French availed themselves of every convenient opportunity to detach themselves and to surrender on the slightest decent pretext, such pretexts did not always occur.
  • And try as Kutuzov might to restrain the troops, our men attacked, trying to bar the road.
  • All historians agree that the external activity of states and nations in their conflicts with one another is expressed in wars, and that as a direct result of greater or less success in war the political strength of states and nations increases or decreases.
  • But such a war does not fit in under any rule and is directly opposed to a well-known rule of tactics which is accepted as infallible.
  • Guerrilla war (always successful, as history shows) directly infringes that rule.
  • Now only the commanders of detachments with staffs, and moving according to rules at a distance from the French, still regarded many things as impossible.
  • Besides Denisov and Dolokhov (who also led a small party and moved in Denisov's vicinity), the commanders of some large divisions with staffs also knew of this convoy and, as Denisov expressed it, were sharpening their teeth for it.
  • Denisov had two hundred, and Dolokhov might have as many more, but the disparity of numbers did not deter Denisov.
  • Esaul Lovayski the Third was a tall man as straight as an arrow, pale- faced, fair-haired, with narrow light eyes and with calm self- satisfaction in his face and bearing.
  • The men sat huddled up trying not to stir, so as to warm the water that had trickled to their bodies and not admit the fresh cold water that was leaking in under their seats, their knees, and at the back of their necks.
  • There'll hardly be another such chance to fall on a transport as today.
  • "Oh, yes," said Petya, nodding at the first words Denisov uttered as if he understood it all, though he really did not understand anything of it.
  • When Denisov had come to Pokrovsk at the beginning of his operations and had as usual summoned the village elder and asked him what he knew about the French, the elder, as though shielding himself, had replied, as all village elders did, that he had neither seen nor heard anything of them.
  • He was armed with a musketoon (which he carried rather as a joke), a pike and an ax, which latter he used as a wolf uses its teeth, with equal ease picking fleas out of its fur or crunching thick bones.
  • "It won't hurt that devil--he's as strong as a horse!" they said of him.
  • As they approached the watchhouse Denisov stopped, peering into the forest.
  • He lifted his head high and gazed at Denisov as if repressing a laugh.
  • What a wogue--it's just as I thought, said Denisov to the esaul.
  • As if I don't know what sort you want!
  • "But why are you angry?" remonstrated Tikhon, "just as if I'd never seen your Frenchmen!
  • Petya, having left his people after their departure from Moscow, joined his regiment and was soon taken as orderly by a general commanding a large guerrilla detachment.
  • Please take as many as you want, or all if you like....
  • "There's no need for you to go at all," said Denisov, addressing Dolokhov, "and as for him, I won't let him go on any account."
  • "But for you and me, old fellow, it's time to drop these amenities," continued Dolokhov, as if he found particular pleasure in speaking of this subject which irritated Denisov.
  • The man, a soldier with a sack over his shoulder, stopped, came close up to Dolokhov's horse, touched it with his hand, and explained simply and in a friendly way that the commander and the officers were higher up the hill to the right in the courtyard of the farm, as he called the landowner's house.
  • Both fell silent, peering out through the darkness at the sound of Dolokhov's and Petya's steps as they advanced to the fire leading their horses.
  • But, noticing his mistake, he broke off short and, with a frown, greeted Dolokhov as a stranger, asking what he could do for him.
  • Dolokhov, as if he had not heard the question, did not reply, but lighting a short French pipe which he took from his pocket began asking the officer in how far the road before them was safe from Cossacks.
  • Dolokhov remarked that the Cossacks were a danger only to stragglers such as his companion and himself, "but probably they would not dare to attack large detachments?" he added inquiringly.
  • "Well, now he'll come away," Petya thought every moment as he stood by the campfire listening to the talk.
  • But Dolokhov restarted the conversation which had dropped and began putting direct questions as to how many men there were in the battalion, how many battalions, and how many prisoners.
  • It was clearing, and over the tops of the trees clouds were swiftly sailing as if unveiling the stars.
  • Sometimes it looked as if the clouds were passing, and a clear black sky appeared.
  • Sometimes it seemed as if the black spaces were clouds.
  • Petya was as musical as Natasha and more so than Nicholas, but had never learned music or thought about it, and so the melody that unexpectedly came to his mind seemed to him particularly fresh and attractive.
  • He closed his eyes, and, from all sides as if from a distance, sounds fluttered, grew into harmonies, separated, blended, and again all mingled into the same sweet and solemn hymn.
  • As much as I like and as I like! said Petya to himself.
  • As much as I like and as I like! said Petya to himself.
  • His horse by habit made as if to nip his leg, but Petya leaped quickly into the saddle unconscious of his own weight and, turning to look at the hussars starting in the darkness behind him, rode up to Denisov.
  • It seemed to Petya that at the moment the shot was fired it suddenly became as bright as noon.
  • Through the smoke, as he approached the gate, Petya saw Dolokhov, whose face was of a pale-greenish tint, shouting to his men.
  • Wait for the infantry! he exclaimed as Petya rode up to him.
  • "Done for!" repeated Dolokhov as if the utterance of these words afforded him pleasure, and he went quickly up to the prisoners, who were surrounded by Cossacks who had hurried up.
  • From Vyazma onwards the French army, which had till then moved in three columns, went on as a single group.
  • On the third day after leaving Moscow Karataev again fell ill with the fever he had suffered from in the hospital in Moscow, and as he grew gradually weaker Pierre kept away from him.
  • He had learned that as there is no condition in which man can be happy and entirely free, so there is no condition in which he need be unhappy and lack freedom.
  • All around lay the flesh of different animals--from men to horses--in various stages of decomposition; and as the wolves were kept off by the passing men the dog could eat all it wanted.
  • There Platon Karataev was sitting covered up--head and all--with his greatcoat as if it were a vestment, telling the soldiers in his effective and pleasant though now feeble voice a story Pierre knew.
  • But well as he knew it, Pierre now listened to that tale as to something new, and the quiet rapture Karataev evidently felt as he told it communicated itself also to Pierre.
  • The old man was living as a convict, submitting as he should and doing no wrong.
  • Well, one night the convicts were gathered just as we are, with the old man among them.
  • Karataev paused, smiling joyously as he gazed into the fire, and he drew the logs together.
  • And Pierre's soul was dimly but joyfully filled not by the story itself but by its mysterious significance: by the rapturous joy that lit up Karataev's face as he told it, and the mystic significance of that joy.
  • He made as if he did not notice that look and moved hastily away.
  • He again slept as he had done at Mozhaysk after the battle of Borodino.
  • Each drop tried to spread out and occupy as much space as possible, but others striving to do the same compressed it, sometimes destroyed it, and sometimes merged with it.
  • God is in the midst, and each drop tries to expand so as to reflect Him to the greatest extent.
  • Darlings! old soldiers exclaimed, weeping, as they embraced Cossacks and hussars.
  • Pierre sobbed as he sat among them and could not utter a word.
  • The French, excited by all that had happened, were talking loudly among themselves, but as they passed Dolokhov who gently switched his boots with his whip and watched them with cold glassy eyes that boded no good, they became silent.
  • In general they regard Smolensk as the place where they hope to recover.
  • In such a state of affairs, whatever your ultimate plans may be, the interest of Your Majesty's service demands that the army should be rallied at Smolensk and should first of all be freed from ineffectives, such as dismounted cavalry, unnecessary baggage, and artillery material that is no longer in proportion to the present forces.
  • The soldiers, who are worn out with hunger and fatigue, need these supplies as well as a few days' rest.
  • First he rings his bell fearlessly, but when he gets into a tight place he runs away as quietly as he can, and often thinking to escape runs straight into his opponent's arms.
  • Besides, as a result of the frequent and rapid change of position by each army, even what information was obtained could not be delivered in time.
  • And here as in a game of blindman's buff the French ran into our vanguard.
  • And lastly, the final departure of the great Emperor from his heroic army is presented to us by the historians as something great and characteristic of genius.
  • Who has not asked himself how it is that the French were not all captured or destroyed when our three armies surrounded them in superior numbers, when the disordered French, hungry and freezing, surrendered in crowds, and when (as the historians relate) the aim of the Russians was to stop the French, to cut them off, and capture them all?
  • The Russian military historians in so far as they submit to claims of logic must admit that conclusion, and in spite of their lyrical rhapsodies about valor, devotion, and so forth, must reluctantly admit that the French retreat from Moscow was a series of victories for Napoleon and defeats for Kutuzov.
  • So what was the use of performing various operations on the French who were running away as fast as they possibly could?
  • It was impossible first because--as experience shows that a three-mile movement of columns on a battlefield never coincides with the plans--the probability of Chichagov, Kutuzov, and Wittgenstein effecting a junction on time at an appointed place was so remote as to be tantamount to impossibility, as in fact thought Kutuzov, who when he received the plan remarked that diversions planned over great distances do not yield the desired results.
  • It is only possible to capture prisoners if they agree to be captured, just as it is only possible to catch a swallow if it settles on one's hand.
  • Men can only be taken prisoners if they surrender according to the rules of strategy and tactics, as the Germans did.
  • That aim was attained in the first place of itself, as the French ran away, and so it was only necessary not to stop their flight.
  • But pure and complete sorrow is as impossible as pure and complete joy.
  • As soon as anyone entered she got up quickly, changed her position and expression, and picked up a book or some sewing, evidently waiting impatiently for the intruder to go.
  • As soon as anyone entered she got up quickly, changed her position and expression, and picked up a book or some sewing, evidently waiting impatiently for the intruder to go.
  • She felt all the time as if she might at any moment penetrate that on which--with a terrible questioning too great for her strength--her spiritual gaze was fixed.
  • She was gazing where she knew him to be; but she could not imagine him otherwise than as he had been here.
  • Natasha as usual answered before she had time to think what she would say.
  • You know that for me there is nothing in life but you, and to suffer with you is the greatest happiness for me, and he took her hand and pressed it as he had pressed it that terrible evening four days before his death.
  • As she entered the ballroom her father was hurriedly coming out of her mother's room.
  • Terrible anguish struck her heart, she felt a dreadful ache as if something was being torn inside her and she were dying.
  • She went in with rapid steps, pausing at the door for an instant as if struggling with herself, and then ran to her mother.
  • Princess Mary put off her departure, and for three weeks looked after Natasha as if she had been a sick child.
  • The rapidity of the Russian pursuit was just as destructive to our army as the flight of the French was to theirs.
  • And as usual nothing happened in accord with the disposition.
  • The French, avoiding the Russians, dispersed and hid themselves in the forest by night, making their way round as best they could, and continued their flight.
  • Miloradovich, who said he did not want to know anything about the commissariat affairs of his detachment, and could never be found when he was wanted--that chevalier sans peur et sans reproche * as he styled himself--who was fond of parleys with the French, sent envoys demanding their surrender, wasted time, and did not do what he was ordered to do.
  • Not only did his contemporaries, carried away by their passions, talk in this way, but posterity and history have acclaimed Napoleon as grand, while Kutuzov is described by foreigners as a crafty, dissolute, weak old courtier, and by Russians as something indefinite--a sort of puppet useful only because he had a Russian name.
  • Still more difficult would it be to find an instance in history of the aim of an historical personage being so completely accomplished as that to which all Kutuzov's efforts were directed in 1812.
  • Not merely in these cases but continually did that old man--who by experience of life had reached the conviction that thoughts and the words serving as their expression are not what move people--use quite meaningless words that happened to enter his head.
  • His actions--without the smallest deviation--were all directed to one and the same threefold end: (1) to brace all his strength for conflict with the French, (2) to defeat them, and (3) to drive them out of Russia, minimizing as far as possible the sufferings of our people and of our army.
  • He screwed up his eyes with a dissatisfied look as he gazed attentively and fixedly at these prisoners, who presented a specially wretched appearance.
  • He ceased speaking and bowed his head as if in perplexity.
  • At the end of the third verse as the last note died away, twenty voices roared out at once: Oo-oo-oo-oo!
  • When they were out of the village they began talking again as loud as before, interlarding their talk with the same aimless expletives.
  • The wattle wall the men had brought was set up in a semicircle by the Eighth Company as a shelter from the north, propped up by musket rests, and a campfire was built before it.
  • As they turned them over one seemed still alive and, would you believe it, he jabbered something in their lingo.
  • "But they're a clean folk, lads," the first man went on; "he was white-- as white as birchbark--and some of them are such fine fellows, you might think they were nobles."
  • So,' he says, 'we tie our faces up with kerchiefs and turn our heads away as we drag them off: we can hardly do it.
  • But theirs,' he says, 'are white as paper and not so much smell as a whiff of gunpowder.'
  • They used to gobble the same food as the gentry.
  • And as for the wolves, he says...
  • The soldiers simply held their sides as they watched him.
  • All the young soldiers smiled gaily as they watched him.
  • "They are men too," said one of them as he wrapped himself up in his coat.
  • The stars, as if knowing that no one was looking at them, began to disport themselves in the dark sky: now flaring up, now vanishing, now trembling, they were busy whispering something gladsome and mysterious to one another.
  • This was shown not so much by the arrangements it made for crossing as by what took place at the bridges.
  • As long as they remained with their own people each might hope for help from his fellows and the definite place he held among them.
  • As long as they remained with their own people each might hope for help from his fellows and the definite place he held among them.
  • On the twenty-ninth of November Kutuzov entered Vilna--his "dear Vilna" as he called it.
  • In spite of the severe frost some hundred generals and staff officers in full parade uniform stood in front of the castle, as well as a guard of honor of the Semenov regiment.
  • So naturally, simply, and gradually--just as he had come from Turkey to the Treasury in Petersburg to recruit the militia, and then to the army when he was needed there--now when his part was played out, Kutuzov's place was taken by a new and necessary performer.
  • As generally happens, Pierre did not feel the full effects of the physical privation and strain he had suffered as prisoner until after they were over.
  • As generally happens, Pierre did not feel the full effects of the physical privation and strain he had suffered as prisoner until after they were over.
  • Just then he was only anxious to get away as quickly as possible from places where people were killing one another, to some peaceful refuge where he could recover himself, rest, and think over all the strange new facts he had learned; but on reaching Orel he immediately fell ill.
  • He was surprised to find that this inner freedom, which was independent of external conditions, now had as it were an additional setting of external liberty.
  • But even then, at moments of weakness as he had accounted them, his mind had penetrated to those distances and he had there seen the same pettiness, worldliness, and senselessness.
  • As before he was absent-minded and seemed occupied not with what was before his eyes but with something special of his own.
  • The difference between his former and present self was that formerly when he did not grasp what lay before him or was said to him, he had puckered his forehead painfully as if vainly seeking to distinguish something at a distance.
  • "Yes, he is a very, very kind man when he is not under the influence of bad people but of people such as myself," thought she.
  • The doctor who attended Pierre and visited him every day, though he considered it his duty as a doctor to pose as a man whose every moment was of value to suffering humanity, would sit for hours with Pierre telling him his favorite anecdotes and his observations on the characters of his patients in general, and especially of the ladies.
  • Willarski felt dull in Orel and was pleased to meet a man of his own circle and, as he supposed, of similar interests.
  • But to his surprise Willarski soon noticed that Pierre had lagged much behind the times, and had sunk, as he expressed it to himself, into apathy and egotism.
  • He regarded all these occupations as hindrances to life, and considered that they were all contemptible because their aim was the welfare of himself and his family.
  • He was as indifferent as heretofore to money matters, but now he felt certain of what ought and what ought not to be done.
  • But in January Savelich came from Moscow and gave him an account of the state of things there, and spoke of the estimate an architect had made of the cost of rebuilding the town and country houses, speaking of this as of a settled matter.
  • Besides the plunderers, very various people, some drawn by curiosity, some by official duties, some by self-interest--house owners, clergy, officials of all kinds, tradesmen, artisans, and peasants--streamed into Moscow as blood flows to the heart.
  • If it did it was only as a pleasant memory of the distant past.
  • He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.
  • But as soon as he tried to continue the conversation he had begun with Princess Mary he again glanced at Natasha, and a still-deeper flush suffused his face and a still-stronger agitation of mingled joy and fear seized his soul.
  • "What can one say or think of as a consolation?" said Pierre.
  • "And because," Pierre continued, "only one who believes that there is a God ruling us can bear a loss such as hers and... yours."
  • As he spoke now he was considering what impression his words would make on Natasha.
  • Princess Mary--reluctantly as is usual in such cases--began telling of the condition in which she had found Prince Andrew.
  • Pierre kept saying as he leaned toward her with his whole body and eagerly listened to her story.
  • As he listened he did not think of Prince Andrew, nor of death, nor of what she was telling.
  • She spoke, mingling most trifling details with the intimate secrets of her soul, and it seemed as if she could never finish.
  • She got up quickly just as Nicholas entered, almost ran to the door which was hidden by curtains, struck her head against it, and rushed from the room with a moan either of pain or sorrow.
  • "But I am three times as rich as before," returned Pierre.
  • We were not an exemplary couple," he added quickly, glancing at Natasha and noticing on her face curiosity as to how he would speak of his wife, "but her death shocked me terribly.
  • "And did you really see and speak to Napoleon, as we have been told?" said Princess Mary.
  • He now, as it were, saw a new meaning in all he had gone through.
  • Natasha continued to look at him intently with bright, attentive, and animated eyes, as if trying to understand something more which he had perhaps left untold.
  • Princess Mary and Natasha met as usual in the bedroom.
  • With a short coat and his hair cropped; just as if, well, just as if he had come straight from the bath...
  • "I understand why he" (Prince Andrew) "liked no one so much as him," said Princess Mary.
  • And the same mischievous smile lingered for a long time on her face as if it had been forgotten there.
  • "Strange and impossible as such happiness seems, I must do everything that she and I may be man and wife," he told himself.
  • But what a kind, pleasant face and how he smiles as he looks at me.
  • As he drove through the streets past the houses that had been burned down, he was surprised by the beauty of those ruins.
  • She was as he had known her almost as a child and later on as Prince Andrew's fiancee.
  • "No, I am not going," Pierre replied hastily, in a surprised tone and as though offended.
  • "Yes, I wanted to tell you," said he, answering her look as if she had spoken.
  • Tell me what I am to do, dear princess! he added after a pause, and touched her hand as she did not reply.
  • Pierre kept saying as he kissed Princess Mary's hands.
  • There was now not a shadow of doubt in his mind as to whether what he had undertaken was right or wrong.
  • Sometimes it seemed to him that other people were all as pleased as he was himself and merely tried to hide that pleasure by pretending to be busy with other interests.
  • "I may have appeared strange and queer then," he thought, "but I was not so mad as I seemed.
  • Pierre's insanity consisted in not waiting, as he used to do, to discover personal attributes which he termed "good qualities" in people before loving them; his heart was now overflowing with love, and by loving people without cause he discovered indubitable causes for loving them.
  • "Can she have loved my brother so little as to be able to forget him so soon?" she thought when she reflected on the change.
  • "To Petersburg!" she repeated as if unable to understand.
  • Though the surface of the sea of history seemed motionless, the movement of humanity went on as unceasingly as the flow of time.
  • The sea of history was not driven spasmodically from shore to shore as previously.
  • Historic figures were not borne by the waves from one shore to another as before.
  • In dealing with this period they sternly condemn the historical personages who, in their opinion, caused what they describe as the reaction.
  • As if measuring themselves and preparing for the coming movement, the western forces push toward the east several times in 1805, 1806, 1807, and 1809, gaining strength and growing.
  • It is not Napoleon who prepares himself for the accomplishment of his role, so much as all those round him who prepare him to take on himself the whole responsibility for what is happening and has to happen.
  • There is no step, no crime or petty fraud he commits, which in the mouths of those around him is not at once represented as a great deed.
  • The man who ten years before and a year later was considered an outlawed brigand is sent to an island two days' sail from France, which for some reason is presented to him as his dominion, and guards are given to him and millions of money are paid him.
  • It rises again from the same point as before--Paris.
  • And some years pass during which he plays a pitiful comedy to himself in solitude on his island, justifying his actions by intrigues and lies when the justification is no longer needed, and displaying to the whole world what it was that people had mistaken for strength as long as an unseen hand directed his actions.
  • But as soon as the necessity for a general European war presented itself he appeared in his place at the given moment and, uniting the nations of Europe, led them to the goal.
  • Count Ilya Rostov died that same year and, as always happens, after the father's death the family group broke up.
  • As always happens in such cases rivalry sprang up as to which should get paid first, and those who like Mitenka held promissory notes given them as presents now became the most exacting of the creditors.
  • As always happens in such cases rivalry sprang up as to which should get paid first, and those who like Mitenka held promissory notes given them as presents now became the most exacting of the creditors.
  • Nicholas accepted thirty thousand rubles offered him by his brother-in- law Bezukhov to pay off debts he regarded as genuinely due for value received.
  • And to avoid being imprisoned for the remainder, as the creditors threatened, he re-entered the government service.
  • From reports current in town she learned how the Rostovs were situated, and how "the son has sacrificed himself for his mother," as people were saying.
  • Nicholas was the first to meet her, as the countess' room could only be reached through his.
  • But instead of being greeted with pleasure as she had expected, at his first glance at her his face assumed a cold, stiff, proud expression she had not seen on it before.
  • "Oh, I beg your pardon," she said as if waking up.
  • Princess Mary gazed intently into his eyes with her own luminous ones as he said this.
  • As I understand your present life, I think you will always recall it with satisfaction, because the self-sacrifice that fills it now...
  • Within four years he had paid off all his remaining debts without selling any of his wife's property, and having received a small inheritance on the death of a cousin he paid his debt to Pierre as well.
  • He always had before his mind's eye the estate as a whole and not any particular part of it.
  • He was as careful of the sowing and reaping of the peasants' hay and corn as of his own, and few landowners had their crops sown and harvested so early and so well, or got so good a return, as did Nicholas.
  • He disliked having anything to do with the domestic serfs--the "drones" as he called them--and everyone said he spoiled them by his laxity.
  • He understood what she was weeping about, but could not in his heart at once agree with her that what he had regarded from childhood as quite an everyday event was wrong.
  • He was collecting, as he said, a serious library, and he made it a rule to read through all the books he bought.
  • It really seemed that Sonya did not feel her position trying, and had grown quite reconciled to her lot as a sterile flower.
  • She seemed to be fond not so much of individuals as of the family as a whole.
  • Besides that, four times a year, on the name days and birthdays of the hosts, as many as a hundred visitors would gather there for a day or two.
  • Pierre had gone to Petersburg on business of his own for three weeks as he said, but had remained there nearly seven weeks and was expected back every minute.
  • When her husband took his place she concluded, from the rapid manner in which after taking up his table napkin he pushed back the tumbler and wineglass standing before him, that he was out of humor, as was sometimes the case when he came in to dinner straight from the farm--especially before the soup.
  • When they left the table and went as usual to thank the old countess, Countess Mary held out her hand and kissed her husband, and asked him why he was angry with her.
  • As she listened to it she saw before her his smooth handsome forehead, his mustache, and his whole face, as she had so often seen it in the stillness of the night when he slept.
  • As she listened to it she saw before her his smooth handsome forehead, his mustache, and his whole face, as she had so often seen it in the stillness of the night when he slept.
  • At that moment they heard the sound of the door pulley and footsteps in the hall and anteroom, as if someone had arrived.
  • That happened only when, as was the case that day, her husband returned home, or a sick child was convalescent, or when she and Countess Mary spoke of Prince Andrew (she never mentioned him to her husband, who she imagined was jealous of Prince Andrew's memory), or on the rare occasions when something happened to induce her to sing, a practice she had quite abandoned since her marriage.
  • All who had known Natasha before her marriage wondered at the change in her as at something extraordinary.
  • These questions, then as now, existed only for those who see nothing in marriage but the pleasure married people get from one another, that is, only the beginnings of marriage and not its whole significance, which lies in the family.
  • And she not only saw no need of any other or better husband, but as all the powers of her soul were intent on serving that husband and family, she could not imagine and saw no interest in imagining how it would be if things were different.
  • To make up for this, at home Pierre had the right to regulate his life and that of the whole family exactly as he chose.
  • He looked at Natasha with sorrow and surprise as at a bad likeness of a person once dear.
  • But at the door she stopped as if her conscience reproached her for having in her joy left the child too soon, and she glanced round.
  • "He's come!" she exclaimed as she ran past, and Denisov felt that he too was delighted that Pierre, whom he did not much care for, had returned.
  • The storm was long since over and there was bright, joyous sunshine on Natasha's face as she gazed tenderly at her husband and child.
  • As in every large household, there were at Bald Hills several perfectly distinct worlds which merged into one harmonious whole, though each retained its own peculiarities and made concessions to the others.
  • The children and their governesses were glad of Pierre's return because no one else drew them into the social life of the household as he did.
  • He alone could play on the clavichord that ecossaise (his only piece) to which, as he said, all possible dances could be danced, and they felt sure he had brought presents for them all.
  • The countess was sitting with her companion Belova, playing grand- patience as usual, when Pierre and Natasha came into the drawing room with parcels under their arms.
  • She cried as a child does, because her nose had to be cleared, and so on.
  • Thus in the morning--especially if she had eaten anything rich the day before--she felt a need of being angry and would choose as the handiest pretext Belova's deafness.
  • Just as she needed to work off her spleen so she had sometimes to exercise her still-existing faculty of thinking--and the pretext for that was a game of patience.
  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.
  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.
  • "Thank you, my dear, you have cheered me up," said she as she always did.
  • Denisov, not being a member of the family, did not understand Pierre's caution and being, as a malcontent, much interested in what was occurring in Petersburg, kept urging Pierre to tell them about what had happened in the Semenovsk regiment, then about Arakcheev, and then about the Bible Society.
  • As I entered the anteroom I heard Andrusha's peals of laughter and that meant that all was well.
  • The curly- headed, delicate boy sat with shining eyes unnoticed in a corner, starting every now and then and muttering something to himself, and evidently experiencing a new and powerful emotion as he turned his curly head, with his thin neck exposed by his turn-down collar, toward the place where Pierre sat.
  • Everybody sees that things are going so badly that they cannot be allowed to go on so and that it is the duty of all decent men to counteract it as far as they can.
  • Everything is strained to such a degree that it will certainly break, said Pierre (as those who examine the actions of any government have always said since governments began).
  • No independent men, such as you or I, are left.
  • What I say is widen the scope of our society, let the mot d'ordre be not virtue alone but independence and action as well!
  • Pierre maintained the contrary, and as his mental faculties were greater and more resourceful, Nicholas felt himself cornered.
  • But you also say that our oath of allegiance is a conditional matter, and to that I reply: 'You are my best friend, as you know, but if you formed a secret society and began working against the government- -be it what it may--I know it is my duty to obey the government.
  • And you may argue about that as you like!
  • For a long time he was silent, as if astonished, then he jumped out of bed, ran to me in his shirt, and sobbed so that I could not calm him for a long time.
  • In the diary was set down everything in the children's lives that seemed noteworthy to their mother as showing their characters or suggesting general reflections on educational methods.
  • As I see it you were quite right, and I told Natasha so.
  • This evening he listened to Pierre in a sort of trance, and fancy--as we were going in to supper I looked and he had broken everything on my table to bits, and he told me of it himself at once!
  • "Still, I am not the same as his own mother," said Countess Mary.
  • No, but I know I must work to comfort my mother, to repay you, and not to leave the children such beggars as I was.
  • He took this as a sign of approval and a confirmation of his thoughts, and after a few minutes' reflection continued to think aloud.
  • What will become of us if she dies, as I always fear when her face is like that? thought he, and placing himself before the icon he began to say his evening prayers.
  • Natasha and Pierre, left alone, also began to talk as only a husband and wife can talk, that is, with extraordinary clearness and rapidity, understanding and expressing each other's thoughts in ways contrary to all rules of logic, without premises, deductions, or conclusions, and in a quite peculiar way.
  • It is as if she saw straight into their souls.
  • All the time in Petersburg I saw everyone as in a dream.
  • Natasha would have had no doubt as to the greatness of Pierre's idea, but one thing disconcerted her.
  • Judging by what he had said there was no one he had respected so highly as Platon Karataev.
  • You are as like him as two peas--like the boy.
  • Meanwhile downstairs in young Nicholas Bolkonski's bedroom a little lamp was burning as usual.
  • He had dreamed that he and Uncle Pierre, wearing helmets such as were depicted in his Plutarch, were leading a huge army.
  • I only pray God that something may happen to me such as happened to Plutarch's men, and I will act as they did.
  • They described the activity of individuals who ruled the people, and regarded the activity of those men as representing the activity of the whole nation.
  • In the first place the historian describes the activity of individuals who in his opinion have directed humanity (one historian considers only monarchs, generals, and ministers as being such men, while another includes also orators, learned men, reformers, philosophers, and poets).
  • In 1812 it reaches its extreme limit, Moscow, and then, with remarkable symmetry, a countermovement occurs from east to west, attracting to it, as the first movement had done, the nations of middle Europe.
  • The Allies defeated Napoleon, entered Paris, forced Napoleon to abdicate, and sent him to the island of Elba, not depriving him of the title of Emperor and showing him every respect, though five years before and one year later they all regarded him as an outlaw and a brigand.
  • And they defeated the genius Napoleon and, suddenly recognizing him as a brigand, sent him to the island of St. Helena.
  • Biographical historians and historians of separate nations understand this force as a power inherent in heroes and rulers.
  • The answers given by this kind of historian to the question of what force causes events to happen are satisfactory only as long as there is but one historian to each event.
  • As soon as historians of different nationalities and tendencies begin to describe the same event, the replies they give immediately lose all meaning, for this force is understood by them all not only differently but often in quite contradictory ways.
  • As soon as historians of different nationalities and tendencies begin to describe the same event, the replies they give immediately lose all meaning, for this force is understood by them all not only differently but often in quite contradictory ways.
  • They do not recognize it as a power inherent in heroes and rulers, but as the resultant of a multiplicity of variously directed forces.
  • According to this view the power of historical personages, represented as the product of many forces, can no longer, it would seem, be regarded as a force that itself produces events.
  • But the universal historian Gervinus, refuting this opinion of the specialist historian, tries to prove that the campaign of 1813 and the restoration of the Bourbons were due to other things beside Alexander's will--such as the activity of Stein, Metternich, Madame de Stael, Talleyrand, Fichte, Chateaubriand, and others.
  • A third class of historians--the so-called historians of culture-- following the path laid down by the universal historians who sometimes accept writers and ladies as forces producing events--again take that force to be something quite different.
  • Undoubtedly some relation exists between all who live contemporaneously, and so it is possible to find some connection between the intellectual activity of men and their historical movements, just as such a connection may be found between the movements of humanity and commerce, handicraft, gardening, or anything else you please.
  • But not to speak of the intrinsic quality of histories of this kind (which may possibly even be of use to someone for something) the histories of culture, to which all general histories tend more and more to approximate, are significant from the fact that after seriously and minutely examining various religious, philosophic, and political doctrines as causes of events, as soon as they have to describe an actual historic event such as the campaign of 1812 for instance, they involuntarily describe it as resulting from an exercise of power--and say plainly that that was the result of Napoleon's will.
  • Only then, as a result of the contradiction, will they see that they are both wrong.
  • This conception is the one handle by means of which the material of history, as at present expounded, can be dealt with, and anyone who breaks that handle off, as Buckle did, without finding some other method of treating historical material, merely deprives himself of the one possible way of dealing with it.
  • They can be used and can circulate and fulfill their purpose without harm to anyone and even advantageously, as long as no one asks what is the security behind them.
  • As gold is gold only if it is serviceable not merely for exchange but also for use, so universal historians will be valuable only when they can reply to history's essential question: what is power?
  • Having abandoned the conception of the ancients as to the divine subjection of the will of a nation to some chosen man and the subjection of that man's will to the Deity, history cannot without contradictions take a single step till it has chosen one of two things: either a return to the former belief in the direct intervention of the Deity in human affairs or a definite explanation of the meaning of the force producing historical events and termed "power."
  • But as soon as we do not admit that, it becomes essential to determine what is this power of one man over others.
  • The science of jurisprudence regards the state and power as the ancients regarded fire--namely, as something existing absolutely.
  • But in that case the question arises whether all the activity of the leaders serves as an expression of the people's will or only some part of it.
  • If the whole activity of the leaders serves as the expression of the people's will, as some historians suppose, then all the details of the court scandals contained in the biographies of a Napoleon or a Catherine serve to express the life of the nation, which is evident nonsense; but if it is only some particular side of the activity of an historical leader which serves to express the people's life, as other so-called "philosophical" historians believe, then to determine which side of the activity of a leader expresses the nation's life, we have first of all to know in what the nation's life consists.
  • If we unite both these kinds of history, as is done by the newest historians, we shall have the history of monarchs and writers, but not the history of the life of the peoples.
  • The theory of the transference of the collective will of the people to historic persons may perhaps explain much in the domain of jurisprudence and be essential for its purposes, but in its application to history, as soon as revolutions, conquests, or civil wars occur--that is, as soon as history begins--that theory explains nothing.
  • Such is the reply historians who assume that the collective will of the people is delegated to rulers under conditions which they regard as known.
  • (With this method of observation it often happens that the observer, influenced by the direction he himself prefers, regards those as leaders who, owing to the people's change of direction, are no longer in front, but on one side, or even in the rear.)
  • So say the third class of historians who regard all historical persons, from monarchs to journalists, as the expression of their age.
  • Without admitting divine intervention in the affairs of humanity we cannot regard "power" as the cause of events.
  • If the Deity issues a command, expresses His will, as ancient history tells us, the expression of that will is independent of time and is not caused by anything, for the Divinity is not controlled by an event.
  • Apart from that, the chief source of our error in this matter is due to the fact that in the historical accounts a whole series of innumerable, diverse, and petty events, such for instance as all those which led the French armies to Russia, is generalized into one event in accord with the result produced by that series of events.
  • Amid a long series of unexecuted orders of Napoleon's one series, for the campaign of 1812, was carried out--not because those orders differed in any way from the other, unexecuted orders but because they coincided with the course of events that led the French army into Russia; just as in stencil work this or that figure comes out not because the color was laid on from this side or in that way, but because it was laid on from all sides over the figure cut in the stencil.
  • When an event is taking place people express their opinions and wishes about it, and as the event results from the collective activity of many people, some one of the opinions or wishes expressed is sure to be fulfilled if but approximately.
  • When one of the opinions expressed is fulfilled, that opinion gets connected with the event as a command preceding it.
  • Each of them expresses his opinion as to how and where to haul it.
  • When a man works alone he always has a certain set of reflections which as it seems to him directed his past activity, justify his present activity, and guide him in planning his future actions.
  • History shows us that these justifications of the events have no common sense and are all contradictory, as in the case of killing a man as the result of recognizing his rights, and the killing of millions in Russia for the humiliation of England.
  • Examining only those expressions of the will of historical persons which, as commands, were related to events, historians have assumed that the events depended on those commands.
  • If the will of every man were free, that is, if each man could act as he pleased, all history would be a series of disconnected incidents.
  • If in a thousand years even one man in a million could act freely, that is, as he chose, it is evident that one single free act of that man's in violation of the laws governing human action would destroy the possibility of the existence of any laws for the whole of humanity.
  • But regarding him from within ourselves as what we are conscious of, we feel ourselves to be free.
  • To understand, observe, and draw conclusions, man must first of all be conscious of himself as living.
  • A man is only conscious of himself as a living being by the fact that he wills, that is, is conscious of his volition.
  • But his will--which forms the essence of his life--man recognizes (and can but recognize) as free.
  • A man's will seems to him to be limited just because he is not conscious of it except as free.
  • But learning just as certainly that his will is subject to laws, he does not and cannot believe this.
  • A man having no freedom cannot be conceived of except as deprived of life.
  • How should the past life of nations and of humanity be regarded--as the result of the free, or as the result of the constrained, activity of man?
  • They do not see that the role of the natural sciences in this matter is merely to serve as an instrument for the illumination of one side of it.
  • In regard to this question, history stands to the other sciences as experimental science stands to abstract science.
  • In actual life each historic event, each human action, is very clearly and definitely understood without any sense of contradiction, although each event presents itself as partly free and partly compulsory.
  • Whatever presentation of the activity of many men or of an individual we may consider, we always regard it as the result partly of man's free will and partly of the law of inevitability.
  • Our conception of the degree of freedom often varies according to differences in the point of view from which we regard the event, but every human action appears to us as a certain combination of freedom and inevitability.
  • It is the reason why the life and activity of people who lived centuries ago and are connected with me in time cannot seem to me as free as the life of a contemporary, the consequences of which are still unknown to me.
  • But in the Crusades we already see an event occupying its definite place in history and without which we cannot imagine the modern history of Europe, though to the chroniclers of the Crusades that event appeared as merely due to the will of certain people.
  • For if I examine an action committed a second ago I must still recognize it as not being free, for it is irrevocably linked to the moment at which it was committed.
  • To imagine it as free, it is necessary to imagine it in the present, on the boundary between the past and the future--that is, outside time, which is impossible.
  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.
  • But besides this, even if, admitting the remaining minimum of freedom to equal zero, we assumed in some given case--as for instance in that of a dying man, an unborn babe, or an idiot--complete absence of freedom, by so doing we should destroy the very conception of man in the case we are examining, for as soon as there is no freedom there is also no man.
  • And so the conception of the action of a man subject solely to the law of inevitability without any element of freedom is just as impossible as the conception of a man's completely free action.
  • Only by separating the two sources of cognition, related to one another as form to content, do we get the mutually exclusive and separately incomprehensible conceptions of freedom and inevitability.
  • Apart from these two concepts which in their union mutually define one another as form and content, no conception of life is possible.
  • And as the undefinable essence of the force moving the heavenly bodies, the undefinable essence of the forces of heat and electricity, or of chemical affinity, or of the vital force, forms the content of astronomy, physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, and so on, just in the same way does the force of free will form the content of history.
  • But just as the subject of every science is the manifestation of this unknown essence of life while that essence itself can only be the subject of metaphysics, even the manifestation of the force of free will in human beings in space, in time, and in dependence on cause forms the subject of history, while free will itself is the subject of metaphysics.
  • The recognition of man's free will as something capable of influencing historical events, that is, as not subject to laws, is the same for history as the recognition of a free force moving the heavenly bodies would be for astronomy.
  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.
  • But when truth conquered, theology established itself just as firmly on the new foundation.
  • Just as prolonged and stubborn is the struggle now proceeding between the old and the new conception of history, and theology in the same way stands on guard for the old view, and accuses the new view of subverting revelation.
  • In the one case as in the other, on both sides the struggle provokes passion and stifles truth.
  • As in the question of astronomy then, so in the question of history now, the whole difference of opinion is based on the recognition or nonrecognition of something absolute, serving as the measure of visible phenomena.
  • As in the question of astronomy then, so in the question of history now, the whole difference of opinion is based on the recognition or nonrecognition of something absolute, serving as the measure of visible phenomena.
  • Dishes offered include favorites such as steamed sea bass with spinach; miso tuna, served rare with red miso sauce and garnishes of asparagus, wasabi and capers; PanAsia duck and of course Korean BBQ.
  • The typical price range, as of 2010, is $10 to $25 a person.
  • Blazer Pub444 Route 22Purdys, NY 10578(914) 277-4424 Croton Creek Steakhouse and Wine Bar Croton Creek Steakhouse and Wine Bar deserves its popularity as a high-end, bistro-style restaurant with highly creative dishes.
  • It's no wonder the "Riverfront Times" listed easy-going Hodak's as 2009's "Best Place to Get Fatter." Deep-fried dishes---including Hodak's signature "Golden Fried Chicken" platter---have ruled the roost since the 1960s, and are all under $10 as of 2009.
  • It's no wonder the "Riverfront Times" listed easy-going Hodak's as 2009's "Best Place to Get Fatter." Deep-fried dishes---including Hodak's signature "Golden Fried Chicken" platter---have ruled the roost since the 1960s, and are all under $10 as of 2009.
  • Prices as of 2009 are reasonable, usually under $20.
  • Since the 1970s, locals and out-of-towners have packed Cunetto's, hungry for favorites such as toasted ravioli and Cunetto's famous salad.
  • Blueberry Hill serves food daily from 11 a.m. to midnight; prices for most dishes are under $10, as of 2009.
  • Open for lunch and dinner, Sonoma will run you from $15 to $25, as of 2009, on average per person, including drinks and appetizers.
  • A meal here isn't too expensive, running just around $10 per person, as of 2009.
  • Having all of the classic Chinese food staples, such as General Tso's chicken and egg drop soup, this is an ideal place to go to satisfy that Asian-flavor craving.
  • Honey Take-Out Restaurant As the name suggests, this is a take-out establishment, though you can eat in at this small Chinese restaurant.
  • While many people choose to go to chain restaurants such as Chili's, Outback Steakhouse and Applebees, there are plenty of privately owned places that will please your palate.
  • Prices are reasonable, and as the name suggests, they serve the best margaritas.
  • The restaurant offers free delivery, as well as dine-in and take-out services.
  • The restaurant offers free delivery, as well as dine-in and take-out services.
  • As of 2009, dinner here costs a mere $13.95 per person, exclusive of wine and dessert.
  • Here, culinary and hospitality students operate four restaurants as part of their professional training.
  • If you've come for the wood-fired pizza, you'll have plenty of choices there as well including a couple served "a la Cocca"--with a fresh egg baked in the center.
  • Salads include traditional antipasto, as well as a tomato carpaccio on mesclun.
  • Salads include traditional antipasto, as well as a tomato carpaccio on mesclun.
  • A test of any Italian restaurant is whether its offerings will serve as just reward for hiking the hillside towns of Tuscany.
  • The menu is mostly seafood, but there are other choices as well.
  • Its stylish Osteria Bar has an extensive wine list as well as creative martini inventions.
  • Its stylish Osteria Bar has an extensive wine list as well as creative martini inventions.
  • It's only a short drive from Prattville attractions such as the Bass Pro Shop Outdoor World store.
  • This restaurant is also known as Gator's Bar and Grill.
  • Montgomery, AL 36117(334) 272-8510bigeasypoboys.com Gator's Plaza Cafe Gator's Plaza Cafe specializes in Cajun and Caribbean dishes as well as seafood.
  • Montgomery, AL 36117(334) 272-8510bigeasypoboys.com Gator's Plaza Cafe Gator's Plaza Cafe specializes in Cajun and Caribbean dishes as well as seafood.
  • Guests are encouraged to come as they are during the restaurant's business hours on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
  • Kids have their own area at the "Kids Bar," where they can watch cartoons as they chow down.
  • For non-Italian lovers, Little City has burgers and paninis as well as flat-bread roll-ups.
  • For non-Italian lovers, Little City has burgers and paninis as well as flat-bread roll-ups.
  • SImsbury, CT 06070(860) 658-5000harvestcafebakery.com Little City Pizza With polenta croutons on its salads and cheeses such as fontina and romano, Little City Pizza distinguishes itself with distinctive thin-crust pizza offerings.
  • The diner also serves New England specials such as porridge and crab cake sandwiches.
  • In addition to serving lunch and dinner, the restaurant also has a Wife & Chef's Tasting Menu and sponsors numerous events such as cooking classes in Simsbury and around the world.
  • Metro Bis Rated as one of America's best restaurants both by the Zagat Survey and The New York Times, Metro Bis is home to co-owner renowned chef Christopher Prosperi, who works with a seasonal menu focusing on ingredients from local farms.
  • Visitors also flock to Simsbury to attend events such as the Talcott Mountain Music Festival and the Connecticut Theatre Festival.
  • Declared as one of the "Top 100 Best Places to Live" by Money magazine, Simsbury has all the charm of a New England town with a prospering community that thrives on its natural setting and cultural life.
  • As of November 2009, dinner costs a flat fee of $33.99, and lunch costs $20.
  • Desserts include South American treats such as coconut flan, passion fruit mousse and chocolate brigaderos.
  • In addition offering 12 cuts of meat, Rio Sabor has hot entrees such as white fish with coconut milk, raviolis and roasted potatoes with capers, and Brazilian rice with salmon.
  • Scottsdale RoadScottsdale, AZ 85253(480) 609-8866www.fogo.com Rio Sabor Brazilian Steakhouse Vegetarians will continue to feel left out, as North Scottsdale's Rio Sabor Brazilian Restaurant is another dining spot where meat is king.
  • Price range is about $30 to $60 per person as of 2009.
  • The churrascaria style Fogo de Chao uses a similar ordering system as the Brazilian Bull Steakhouse, and diners can choose from 15 cuts of meat.
  • Price range is a little upscale, around $30 to $60 per person as of 2009.
  • Considering Phoenix's reputation for having an endless summer, it should come as no surprise that there are a handful of quality South American restaurants in the area.
  • The owners, veterans of the corporate world, have been offering nutritious catered lunches to businesses as far away as Boston since 2004.
  • The owners, veterans of the corporate world, have been offering nutritious catered lunches to businesses as far away as Boston since 2004.
  • Otherwise, if you desire, you can order a platter directly from the menu, such as fried shrimp and irloin, a cheeseburger, ribeye steak or grilled chicken.
  • A seafood buffet is served on Fridays during this time as well.
  • Also, enjoy a glass of wine with your dinner selection such as Copperidge Cabernet Sauvignon, Citra Pinot Grigio or Nathanson Creek White Zinfandel.
  • The hotel also includes guest services such as a guest laundry, business center, heated outdoor pool, complimentary daily newspaper and an on-site coffee shop.
  • Nearby outdoor adventures include white water rafting, tours of natural landscapes and exploration of Monument Valley and the Grand Canyon, as well as Sedona itself.
  • Nearby outdoor adventures include white water rafting, tours of natural landscapes and exploration of Monument Valley and the Grand Canyon, as well as Sedona itself.
  • The serene environment around the Sedona area provides for a very restful stay while you enjoy guest rooms with arts and crafts furnishings, French doors, flagstone flooring and fireplaces as well as granite counters in the bathrooms.
  • The serene environment around the Sedona area provides for a very restful stay while you enjoy guest rooms with arts and crafts furnishings, French doors, flagstone flooring and fireplaces as well as granite counters in the bathrooms.
  • Expect plenty of fish options like halibut and lobster, as well as surf and turf specials such as Alaskan king crab legs and braised short ribs.
  • Expect plenty of fish options like halibut and lobster, as well as surf and turf specials such as Alaskan king crab legs and braised short ribs.
  • Expect plenty of fish options like halibut and lobster, as well as surf and turf specials such as Alaskan king crab legs and braised short ribs.
  • Thursday nights feature Matthew's Margarita Madness, while Sunday brings in the house steel drum band from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. with 50-cent shellfish such as oysters.
  • Carnivores can relax, however, because alongside the "carrot loaf" and "tofu in oriental orange sauce," meaty delights such as steaks, chicken and shrimp are also on the menu.
  • Stamford, Connecticut 06902(203) 324-9539‎www.labretagnerestaurant.com Lime Restaurant Lime Restaurant advertises itself as a "gourmet natural foods restaurant" with an emphasis on vegetarian cuisine.
  • Stamford, Connecticut 06902(203) 325-3773‎www.eclissestamford.com Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant A full Japanese menu, as well as a sushi bar, await you at Kotobuki, which serves both lunch and dinner.
  • Stamford, Connecticut 06902(203) 325-3773‎www.eclissestamford.com Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant A full Japanese menu, as well as a sushi bar, await you at Kotobuki, which serves both lunch and dinner.
  • Diners have the option of ordering their food as individual portions, or as a "family style" meal.
  • Diners have the option of ordering their food as individual portions, or as a "family style" meal.
  • In addition to a full bar, you'll find such eats as deep fried mushrooms, seafood platters and a killer kielbasa sandwich.
  • Guests can also order tropical cocktails or wine, as well as soda and juice.
  • Guests can also order tropical cocktails or wine, as well as soda and juice.
  • Common barbecue items, like ribs, barbecue sandwiches and smoked meats, are served, as are grilled and fried seafood items, burgers, salads, and desserts.
  • As the name suggests, the restaurant has a full bar, and it also has specialty tropical cocktails and a wine list.
  • Lemongrass Grill and Seafood & Sushi Bar Since Kauai is a tropical island, many visitors to the island like to eat local seafood as part of the Hawaiian travel experience.
  • Indian drinks, such as lassis and jal jeera, and Indian lemonade are available to wash down your meal.1501 14th St.
  • Seasonal options, as well as a full beverage service may be added.
  • Seasonal options, as well as a full beverage service may be added.
  • They also provide catering services and provide dining facilities for private parties, as well as delivery and take-out services.
  • They also provide catering services and provide dining facilities for private parties, as well as delivery and take-out services.
  • It's a good choice for people who want to try Korean food for the first time, as well as for those more familiar with the cuisine.
  • It's a good choice for people who want to try Korean food for the first time, as well as for those more familiar with the cuisine.
  • As of November 2009, Bar Pitti doesn't take reservations and accepts cash only.
  • Delicacies such as frog legs and escargot are served as appetizers and the elegantly designed restaurant serves a variety of main entrees, including roast rack of lamb, New York sirloin steak and veal.
  • Delicacies such as frog legs and escargot are served as appetizers and the elegantly designed restaurant serves a variety of main entrees, including roast rack of lamb, New York sirloin steak and veal.
  • Small and often cramped, Portland's two Por Que No establishments are unique in their ambiance as well as their food.
  • Small and often cramped, Portland's two Por Que No establishments are unique in their ambiance as well as their food.
  • A mainstay in Willamette Week's Restaurant Guide to Portland, Autentica portrays itself as a fine dining establishment that happens to serve Mexican food.
  • In addition to steak, the restaurant also serves dishes, such as blue cheese meatloaf, slow-cooked pork shank or broiled lobster.
  • The restaurant serves seafood, as well as steak, giving guests a wide variety of food from which to choose.
  • The restaurant serves seafood, as well as steak, giving guests a wide variety of food from which to choose.
  • The white-linen covered tables and stone fireplace in the dining room create a warm and inviting atmosphere where guests can finish their meals indulging in desserts such as flan, papaya creme or creme brulee.
  • At this family owned and operated restaurant, prices are reasonable, as most dishes are under $12.
  • They roll up generous-sized burritos with the typical fillings of chicken and steak, but vegan options include fillings such as grilled portobello mushrooms, fresh spinach and garlic, and chickpea with red curry.
  • Stone Soup offers a weigh-your-plate buffet as well as a dine-in vegan and vegetarian menu.
  • Stone Soup offers a weigh-your-plate buffet as well as a dine-in vegan and vegetarian menu.
  • Cilantro's well-reviewed menu offers a combination of authentic and modern Indian dishes, as well as an extensive selection of wine, cocktails and Indian beer.
  • Cilantro's well-reviewed menu offers a combination of authentic and modern Indian dishes, as well as an extensive selection of wine, cocktails and Indian beer.
  • As of 2009, restaurants were open in three locations that include Lulu's Pizza, the Idaho Building, and the Gelato Cafe.
  • Options include creative names such as Godzilla and Rock n Roll.
  • IOU Sushi IOU Sushi offers appetizers such as miso soup, a house salad and rice.
  • Guests who dine in can enjoy a glass of wine or even a martini as they sit down to a relaxing sushi dinner.
  • Be sure to add sides such as cole slaw, corn bread and scrumptious desserts.
  • Portillo's Hot Dog Portillo's Hot Dog restaurant in Tinley Park is one of the first and largest restaurants that Dick Portillo started after opening the original restaurant as a hot dog cart.
  • An offering of Portuguese rolls as each meal is prepared gives you time to enjoy company and sip a glass of wine.
  • A salad bar and steam trays of meats and side dishes such as rice, vegetables and the dishes of the day accompany your choice of a variety of skewered barbecued meats that include bacon-wrapped chicken, sausages and beef.
  • The Hyatt is approximately 5 to 6 miles north and just off the same parkway as the Agricenter, Shelby Farms, Wolf River and Germantown's parks and trails.
  • Kayaking and riverboat rides on the Mississippi River are just a stroll away, as are overlooks, green ways, parks and a river bluff hiking and biking trail. "Duck" amphibious vehicle tours are also available.
  • Less famous are the city's other natural wonders, historical significance and popularity as a centrally-located meeting and convention destination.
  • It's menu features such favorites as fish tacos, penne pasta and chicken wings.
  • Bubby's Serving up breakfast, lunch and dinner since 1990, Bubby's is arguably most well known for owner Ron Silver's world-famous banana and walnut pancakes, as well as its pie socials.
  • Bubby's Serving up breakfast, lunch and dinner since 1990, Bubby's is arguably most well known for owner Ron Silver's world-famous banana and walnut pancakes, as well as its pie socials.
  • The menu features an ample variety of filets, strips and prime rib, as well as pork chops, baby back ribs and seafood.
  • The menu features an ample variety of filets, strips and prime rib, as well as pork chops, baby back ribs and seafood.
  • Tampa, FL 33635(813) 814-9939cubanbreezes.com Pipo's Pipo's is known as Tampa's original Cuban cafe.
  • Columbus DriveTampa, FL 33607(813) 875-2007lateresitarestaurant.com Cuban Breezes Known as "Everybody's Cuban Restaurant," Cuban Breezes welcomes every customer with open arms.
  • From its beautiful, inviting waters to its tropical palm trees, Tampa, Florida is well known as a winter haven with welcomed sunshine, especially for those who live in bitterly cold climates.
  • Columbus Funny Bone145 Easton Town CenterColumbus, OH 43219(614) 471-5653 Ruby Tuesday Ruby Tuesday is open each day from 5 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., providing games, such as pool and arcade machines.
  • Vegetarian dishes include falafel (made from ground garbanzo and fava beans) as well as steamed fresh pumpkin stuffed with an assortment of veggies.
  • Vegetarian dishes include falafel (made from ground garbanzo and fava beans) as well as steamed fresh pumpkin stuffed with an assortment of veggies.
  • Diners get a special treat on Friday and Saturday evenings as well, when the restaurant hosts live entertainment with a top-notch flamenco guitarist and beautiful female belly dancers.
  • Named to theme, you will find dishes like "freedom" fries, Ellis Island pizza, and the children's menu referred to as "rookies." Cannoli, cheesecake, and zeppolies, fried and sugared pieces of dough, grace the dessert menu.
  • His career was short lived as a month after he began the 9/11 attack took place.
  • On it, you will find dishes, such as fried chicken and waffles, fried fish, cornbread, and the family-style Southern Tailgate featuring fried chicken, pulled bbq pork, ribs and three side dishes.
  • The menu includes seafood, chicken, and beef--start with drinks and appetizers while enjoying the unique interior as the chef begins to prepare your food.
  • Benihana This restaurant chain features a show that's nearly as famous as its tasty food.
  • Benihana This restaurant chain features a show that's nearly as famous as its tasty food.
  • As of November 2009, a lunch buffet is offered for $7 per adult.
  • As of November 2009, the average meal price was $20.
  • As of November 2009, nightly Jacuzzi room rates started at about $110, and standard guest rooms cost around $70 per night.
  • As of November 2009, nightly Jacuzzi room rates started at about $100; standard guest rooms cost around $80 per night.
  • As of November 2009, nightly Jacuzzi room rates started at about $110, while standard guest rooms cost around $70 per night.
  • Visit this firm's Web site, or call the customer service number for complete cottage options; here you can input all relevant information and request amenities, such as on-site washer/dryer, Internet access, and air conditioning--just to name a few.
  • In addition, the region boasts more than 100 wineries as well as quaint small towns with shops and local specialty restaurants.
  • In addition, the region boasts more than 100 wineries as well as quaint small towns with shops and local specialty restaurants.
  • Much like a traditional nightclub, the bar at the Cherokee Lanes offers patrons more than 21 years old drink specials throughout the night as well as a limited menu featuring bar food favorites such as pizza and French fries.
  • Much like a traditional nightclub, the bar at the Cherokee Lanes offers patrons more than 21 years old drink specials throughout the night as well as a limited menu featuring bar food favorites such as pizza and French fries.
  • Much like a traditional nightclub, the bar at the Cherokee Lanes offers patrons more than 21 years old drink specials throughout the night as well as a limited menu featuring bar food favorites such as pizza and French fries.
  • Cosmic bowling is bowling done with black-light-sensitive bowling apparatus while a DJ spins the latest in dance and hip-hop music as well as old favorites.
  • Cosmic bowling is bowling done with black-light-sensitive bowling apparatus while a DJ spins the latest in dance and hip-hop music as well as old favorites.
  • It serves as a family fun center during the day and afternoon, adopting a nightclub atmosphere late in the evenings.
  • It also hosts special events, such as a Thanksgiving Day Buffet, New Year's Day Brunch and a Beach Party.
  • The colonial dining rooms provide guests a glimpse of history as they enjoy breakfast.
  • The inn operates as a bed and breakfast but serves breakfast to the public on Sunday mornings.
  • Other rumors name her as a prostitute from the 1920s who went missing while working at the hotel.
  • The Ethiopian Restaurant has a gift shop area as well for those who would like to purchase keepsakes of their visit.
  • The Africa Kine offers entrees such as brouchette crevette, thiebou djeun, dibi couscous and many other lunch and dinner items such as dibi alloco, brochette beef, grilled fish and pintade.
  • The Africa Kine offers entrees such as brouchette crevette, thiebou djeun, dibi couscous and many other lunch and dinner items such as dibi alloco, brochette beef, grilled fish and pintade.
  • The restaurant offers an inviting and intimate Ethiopian decor and has gained recognition as a very popular Ethiopian chef in the New York area.
  • The restaurant specializes in the flavors and spices of Ethiopia and includes such entrees as tibs wot, kitfo, misir wot, shimbra asa and more.
  • Casual dining is also available and the aptly-named The Buffet was voted as the best buffet in Las Vegas by the 2009 Las Vegas Review Journal Reader's poll.
  • Hanni's is an ideal location for meat lovers, but there is a large vegetarian menu as well.
  • Some menu favorites include humus, falafel, aubergines as well as mezze platter dinners.
  • Some menu favorites include humus, falafel, aubergines as well as mezze platter dinners.
  • Dishes include couscous, marinated black seas bass stuffed with garlic as well as Baklava for dessert.
  • Dishes include couscous, marinated black seas bass stuffed with garlic as well as Baklava for dessert.
  • Try classics like pinakbet, made with vegetables and chicken as well as authentic pancit and baka.
  • Try classics like pinakbet, made with vegetables and chicken as well as authentic pancit and baka.
  • The hamlet's green areas, such as the 590-acre Blauvelt State Park, also attract outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy the area's sweeping views of the scenic Hudson Valley.
  • Over time, it transformed into a trendy restaurant receiving rave reviews for décor as well as food.
  • Over time, it transformed into a trendy restaurant receiving rave reviews for décor as well as food.
  • The restaurant started out with meager beginnings as a small eating space in Buckhead.
  • The festive décor also serves as an escape to a tropical locale.
  • There are few neighborhoods that are as diverse as Buckhead in Atlanta.
  • There are few neighborhoods that are as diverse as Buckhead in Atlanta.
  • Muldoon's of Carmel In the heart of downtown Carmel, Muldoon's offers traditional Irish menu items such as Irish Stew and Shepherd's Pie, in combination with the traditional Hoosier pork tenderloin sandwich.
  • Guests will find they can dress as they please, only cash is accepted and that reservations are not available.
  • Credit cards and reservations are accepted and delivery and take-out available as well.
  • Check out either its classic offerings such as dim sum and dumplings, or branch out a bit with some airy pepper-salted squid.
  • Wong's King Seafood Restaurant (8733 SE Division St, Suite 101) is the place in Portland to get dim sum, and it has the crowd to match its reputation, as it fills up quickly during dinner time.
  • Inside, though, is some of the city's best barbecued pork and duck--the meat is fresh cut as each meal is prepared.
  • As you can imagine, there is some great food to be found here.
  • West Side Ling Garden (915 NW 21st Ave) is the place to go in the alphabet district of Northwest Portland, as this Northern Chinese bastion serves top-of-the-line classics such as fried rice with no fuss or muss.
  • West Side Ling Garden (915 NW 21st Ave) is the place to go in the alphabet district of Northwest Portland, as this Northern Chinese bastion serves top-of-the-line classics such as fried rice with no fuss or muss.
  • Permanently at dock on the Delaware River at Penn's Landing, Moshulu's heyday as a trading ship is far behind, but its rank as a fine restaurant has gained it AAA four-diamond rating.
  • Permanently at dock on the Delaware River at Penn's Landing, Moshulu's heyday as a trading ship is far behind, but its rank as a fine restaurant has gained it AAA four-diamond rating.
  • Philadelphia, known as the City of Brotherly Love, adopted the tag line "The City That Loves You Back"---an appropriate sentiment for romantic adventures in the metropolitan area.
  • Pizza is available only at lunchtime, and appetizers such as the Italian minestrone and cold antipasto are only offered on the dinner menu.
  • Ciao Baby The vintage '50s and '60s décor with pictures of the Rat Pack lining the walls is as much a part of this eatery as the huge portions and extensive wine list.
  • Ciao Baby The vintage '50s and '60s décor with pictures of the Rat Pack lining the walls is as much a part of this eatery as the huge portions and extensive wine list.
  • It should come as no surprise then that Commack also is home to a selection of Italian restaurants that feature good food and good wine reminiscent of Old World Italy.
  • A variety of pasta dishes are available as well; these can be prepared with whole-wheat pasta, if requested.
  • Carmine's Italiano4715 Transit RoadWilliamsville, New York 14221(716) 632-2318carminestogo.com Marco's Fine Italian Dining Diners at Marcos can begin their meal with antipasto such as calamari, fava beans, spinach bread or toasted ravioli.
  • Pizza is available as well as a variety of salads and appetizers.
  • Pizza is available as well as a variety of salads and appetizers.
  • From a variety of soups and entrees to the famous chili shrimp and layered bread dishes, Rangoon offers a unique dining experience for patrons who are familiar with Burmese food as well as those who may be trying it for the first time.
  • From a variety of soups and entrees to the famous chili shrimp and layered bread dishes, Rangoon offers a unique dining experience for patrons who are familiar with Burmese food as well as those who may be trying it for the first time.
  • Choose from creations such as the "Pierrepont," made with ham, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, BBQ sauce and provolone cheese.
  • Known as a canoeing and kayaking destination, the area also boasts plenty of back roads and forested trails perfect for biking, hiking and cross-country skiing adventures.
  • As its name implies, this is a tavern and is popular during televised sporting events when hockey and football games are displayed on the bar's six televisions.
  • The area attracts outdoor enthusiasts who are drawn to the water sports and fishing options along the Chemung River, as well as activities such as hockey, golf and baseball.
  • The area attracts outdoor enthusiasts who are drawn to the water sports and fishing options along the Chemung River, as well as activities such as hockey, golf and baseball.
  • The area attracts outdoor enthusiasts who are drawn to the water sports and fishing options along the Chemung River, as well as activities such as hockey, golf and baseball.
  • The menu includes a variety of entrees, such as roasted duck and chicken cordon bleu, gourmet pizzas, pastas, sandwiches and salads.
  • Offering an extensive menu, the seafood is the freshest in the area ranging from pan fried walleye to shrimp scampi, as of 2009.
  • In addition to these offerings, the Chama Guacha includes some authentic Brazilian dishes on the menu such as fried bananas and fried polenta.
  • Large cities such as San Antonio, Dallas and Houston are three of the largest cities in the United States.
  • EDiets.com chose Blimpie subs as the Healthy Dining Restaurant of the month for August 2009.
  • Steakhouse The specialty here is steaks, as indicated by the name, but don't let that fool you.
  • Bradenton also offers a host of outdoor recreational activities, such as kayaking, hiking, snorkeling, camping and bird watching.
  • For the non-raw fish lovers, Kumo also has a large cooked Japanese menu, which includes dishes such as beef teriyaki and chicken tempura.
  • Chang's Chinese Bistro This restaurant in downtown Denver offers an imaginative and varied menu, including starters such as dynamite shrimp and Sichuan chicken flatbread and main courses such as salmon steamed in ginger and wok-charred beef.
  • Chang's Chinese Bistro This restaurant in downtown Denver offers an imaginative and varied menu, including starters such as dynamite shrimp and Sichuan chicken flatbread and main courses such as salmon steamed in ginger and wok-charred beef.
  • The restaurant specializes in Szechwan cooking, and its menu includes unusual offerings such as Peking duck spring rolls, Tokyo sirloin steak and stir-fried dungeness crab.
  • Its menu includes customary Chinese dishes, such as sweet and sour pork and cashew chicken, but it also lists some uncommon choices such as lemongrass chicken and kung pao triple delight.
  • Its menu includes customary Chinese dishes, such as sweet and sour pork and cashew chicken, but it also lists some uncommon choices such as lemongrass chicken and kung pao triple delight.
  • Denver is surrounded by legendary ski resorts, and an hour outside of the city, you can hike, fish, bird watch or hunt, as well as ski downhill or cross-country.
  • Denver is surrounded by legendary ski resorts, and an hour outside of the city, you can hike, fish, bird watch or hunt, as well as ski downhill or cross-country.
  • Amada's menu features such classics as Spanish octopus, garlic shrimp and lobster paella.
  • LacroixRittenhouse Hotel210 West RittenhousePhiladelphia, PA 19103(215) 790-2533lacroixrestaurant.com Amada Amada is an authentic Andalusian tapas bar that brings you as close to traditional Spanish tapas as you can get on this side of the Atlantic.
  • LacroixRittenhouse Hotel210 West RittenhousePhiladelphia, PA 19103(215) 790-2533lacroixrestaurant.com Amada Amada is an authentic Andalusian tapas bar that brings you as close to traditional Spanish tapas as you can get on this side of the Atlantic.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19102 (215) 567-1000lebecfin.com Lacroix at the Rittenhouse When Lacroix at the luxurious Rittenhouse Hotel opened in 2003, it was lauded by "Esquire" magazine as the best new restaurant in the country.
  • Philadelphia is known as the birthplace of the United States, and it has also become the birthplace of some of America's most stunning restaurants.
  • Appetizers begin at $3.25, and entree meals begin at $9.95, as of 2009.
  • It offers a sushi bar, and Asian starters such as pan-seared pot stickers.
  • Entrees begin with chicken fried rice at $10.95 as of 2009.
  • Appetizers begin at $5 with egg rolls, and entrees start at $11, as of 2009.
  • The Chinese restaurant serves popular dishes such as sweet and sour chicken and pork, crab rangoon, egg drop soup and chow mein noodles.
  • Dee's Mandarin Dee's Mandarin is in the Lincoln Park area of Chicago, where you can find the Steppenwolf Theatre Company and popular shops such as Green City Market or the jazz club Kingston Mines.
  • There are also plenty of restaurants to test your palate as well.
  • It is home to popular attractions such as Navy Pier, Shed Aquarium and the Chicago Cubs.
  • Chicago is known as the "Windy City," located in the northern part of Illinois.
  • In Indianapolis, restaurateurs treat diners to Hoosier hospitality as well as gourmet cuisine.
  • In Indianapolis, restaurateurs treat diners to Hoosier hospitality as well as gourmet cuisine.
  • Local newspaper readers have voted Aja Noodle as the best Asian food for four years.
  • The restaurant has vegetarian and vegan selections, as well as traditional noodle dishes with meat.
  • The restaurant has vegetarian and vegan selections, as well as traditional noodle dishes with meat.
  • Its menu is priced for the budget-conscious visitor, with many lunch specials running between $4 and $7 each, as of 2009.
  • A good sampling of cocktails and Indian beers such as Flying Horse Lager leave patrons wanting for nothing.
  • As one of the few Devon Avenue restaurants that serve alcohol, a full bar selection is offered.
  • Some of the best selections are in the heart of a neighborhood known to locals as Little India.
  • As of 2009, Chandlers Steakhouse serves dinner seven days a week and entree prices start at $26.
  • Boise is also home to diverse cultural offerings and entertainment, such as the summer outdoor Shakespeare Festival and Gene Harris Jazz Festival in the park.
  • Auburn, New York 13021(315) 253-4885lascas.com Bistro One A restaurant that describes itself as "casual elegant", Bistro One is located in historic downtown Auburn and serves contemporary American dishes.
  • Auburn, New York 13021(315) 252-9775hollywoodrestaurant.net McMurphy's Irish Pub & Restaurant McMurphy's serves Irish cuisine as well as more traditional, kid-friendly American dishes.
  • Auburn, New York 13021(315) 252-9775hollywoodrestaurant.net McMurphy's Irish Pub & Restaurant McMurphy's serves Irish cuisine as well as more traditional, kid-friendly American dishes.
  • Sit on the deck enjoying a cocktail as you watch the boats pass by and enjoy a great meal at Pelican's Nest.
  • Don't forget to try one of their delicious dessert rolls as a final treat to your sushi dining experience.
  • Enjoy some New Orleans tunes as you dine on crawfish etouffee and some Cajun battered pickles.
  • As of 2009, this restaurant is open seven days a week. 1925 South Ave.
  • This restaurant serves Dim Sum on Sundays. 2920 West Henrietta Road Rochester, NY 14623 (585) 424-4000www.shanghaichineseroc.com Chen Garden The Chen Garden restaurant describes itself as a Chinese restaurant with a modern twist on tradition.
  • Instead, a regular menu of traditional Brazilian fare is offered with dishes such as, fried yucca, Brazilian salmon with garlic and lime and vegetables.
  • There is a playground, shelter house, tennis court and swimming pools, as well as access to the Greenway walking trail and the river.2321 N.
  • There is a playground, shelter house, tennis court and swimming pools, as well as access to the Greenway walking trail and the river.2321 N.
  • The park has a variety of fields, including soccer and baseball, as well as a basketball court.
  • The park has a variety of fields, including soccer and baseball, as well as a basketball court.
  • Pakoras, chicken makhani, tikka masala, seafood specialties and curries are all on the menu, as well as exotic cocktails.
  • Pakoras, chicken makhani, tikka masala, seafood specialties and curries are all on the menu, as well as exotic cocktails.
  • Indian Oven Located three miles from Columbus' Lou Berliner Athletic Complex, which has 32 game fields, a picnic area, a walking trail and a wildlife area, Indian Oven serves traditional dishes, as well as more modern recipes.
  • Indian Oven Located three miles from Columbus' Lou Berliner Athletic Complex, which has 32 game fields, a picnic area, a walking trail and a wildlife area, Indian Oven serves traditional dishes, as well as more modern recipes.
  • Shared guest amenities include business services, such as copying and faxing, evening turn-down service, a concierge desk and local restaurant delivery.
  • There are over five-hundred guest rooms and seventy suites, as well as three ballrooms, a fitness center, lap pool, sauna and business center.
  • There are over five-hundred guest rooms and seventy suites, as well as three ballrooms, a fitness center, lap pool, sauna and business center.
  • It's a National Historic Landmark and contains features such as German silver-nickel fixtures, ceiling murals and rosewood paneling.
  • Both parks contain hiking trails, and Burnet Woods offers a man-made lake for fishing, a disc golf course and a trailside nature center as well.
  • The menu is varied, offering many items from the Russian cuisine such as Georgian beef soup and a chicken cutlet Kiev; however, there are all kinds of other items to choose from with many fish dishes, as well as sushi.
  • The menu is varied, offering many items from the Russian cuisine such as Georgian beef soup and a chicken cutlet Kiev; however, there are all kinds of other items to choose from with many fish dishes, as well as sushi.
  • The menu is varied, offering many items from the Russian cuisine such as Georgian beef soup and a chicken cutlet Kiev; however, there are all kinds of other items to choose from with many fish dishes, as well as sushi.
  • Appetizers such as herring and potatoes or eel and avocado can be ordered to enjoy before indulging in entrees of a wide variety, many fish- or lamb-based.
  • However, for those preferring plainer fare, there also are menu items such as grilled cheese sandwiches and pot roast.
  • Photos of the restaurant's traditional Ukranian-style décor are available on its website, as are assorted reviews.
  • Load up before a long morning hike with vegetarian-friendly breakfast choices such as brioche, omelettes and croissants.
  • While seafood such as salmon, grouper and mahi-mahi factor primely on the menu, chicken, pork and steak round out the offerings along with salads and appetizers.
  • Soups, noodle and rice bowl dishes are available as well as salads and first tastes (appetizers).
  • Soups, noodle and rice bowl dishes are available as well as salads and first tastes (appetizers).
  • On the adult menu, there are signature dishes such as Mandarin kung pao with pork.
  • Greenery Since opening to the public, the Oakland Flower Market also supplies greenery such as leatherleaf, tree ferns, plumosa, lily grass, aspidistra, coffee, baby euc, green pitt,italian ruscus and isralie ruscus.
  • It existed as a wholesale-only establishment until being purchased in 1997, when it was opened to the general public.
  • History The Oakland Flower Market (Piazza International Floral LLC) was originally known as L.
  • The Oakland Flower Market was established as a family business in the late 1920s.
  • Serving traditional casual Italian fare such as individual pizzas, pastas (many vegetarian choices) and veal, the restaurant also has a large wine selection.
  • Enjoy entertainment with your dinner as nightly jazz, piano and vocals turn dinner into a show.2043 Eastlake Ave.
  • The steak menu features such popular entrees such as Top Butt Steak and Juan's Pepper Steak.
  • Be forewarned that this restaurant is popular among residents as well as tourists, and lines can be encountered on weeknight evenings and all day on weekdays.
  • Be forewarned that this restaurant is popular among residents as well as tourists, and lines can be encountered on weeknight evenings and all day on weekdays.
  • San Francisco, CA 94108-1305(415) 392-7958 House of Nanking Look for the House of Nanking restaurant's rainbow-colored sign, noticeable almost as soon as you smell the sweet and savory smells of the restaurant's trademark stir frys.
  • San Francisco, CA 94108-1305(415) 392-7958 House of Nanking Look for the House of Nanking restaurant's rainbow-colored sign, noticeable almost as soon as you smell the sweet and savory smells of the restaurant's trademark stir frys.
  • Chinatown Restaurant The Chinatown Restaurant's uncreative name belies its creative interior decor and inventive Asian cuisine, serving standard traditional Chinese food as well as dishes from northern China.
  • Chinatown Restaurant The Chinatown Restaurant's uncreative name belies its creative interior decor and inventive Asian cuisine, serving standard traditional Chinese food as well as dishes from northern China.
  • Schwartz's Carryout Cafe The Schwartz's Carryout Cafe restaurant in Cohocton has delivery and take out as well as catering available.
  • Schwartz's Carryout Cafe The Schwartz's Carryout Cafe restaurant in Cohocton has delivery and take out as well as catering available.
  • The Italian Fisherman An amazing water setting provides ambiance as you dine at The Italian Fisherman.
  • Along with a vast array of activities and opportunities to explore, the town has many dining choices as well.
  • Make reservations as much as two months in advance.
  • Make reservations as much as two months in advance.
  • Live music as well as the expansive outdoor patio are the big draws here.
  • Live music as well as the expansive outdoor patio are the big draws here.
  • There is a surprisingly large wine list as well, ensuring that you can pair your meal with a perfect bottle or glass.
  • All the other dishes are set at great prices as well.
  • The menu features popular Mexican specialties such as carnitas, tortas, guisados and tamales.
  • The restaurant describes itself as a kitchen, bakery, juice bar and tortilla factory.
  • It has a banquet facility to host business events as well as parties and weddings, and also offers catering services.
  • It has a banquet facility to host business events as well as parties and weddings, and also offers catering services.
  • Pittsford, NY 14534(585) 381-4844 www.crystalbarn.com Mario's Via Abruzzi This location uses its atmosphere, food, music and service to make its guest feel as though they are in Italy.
  • The restaurant is owned by the Scardilla family and boasts exceptional service as one of its largest selling points.
  • Entree prices range from $14 to $45, as of 2009, and the restaurant is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week.
  • As of 2009, entree prices range between $8 and $22, and the restaurant is open for dinner Wednesday through Saturday.
  • Honolulu, HI 96815(808) 922-5551matteoshawaii.com Vino Italian Tapas and Wine Bar Vino opened its doors in 2004 and quickly gained fame among Oahu's locals and visitors as a restaurant with great Italian food, an exceptional wine list and fun ambiance.
  • As of 2009, entree prices start at $19.95, and the restaurant is open daily for dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Choose from specialty sandwiches (including vegetarian options), burgers and classic diner selections such as hot open-faced platters.
  • With specialties such as meatloaf, rib eye and roasted chicken, the restaurant's entrees cover the bases.
  • Offering meat lovers all styles of entrees such as steak burgers, T-bone, filets and rib eye, Logan's also offers mini-sandwiches (called Roadies), salads, fried seafood and more.
  • Vegetarians will also enjoy the large sushi menu (including nonvegetarian items as well).
  • Whether it is a moderately priced authentic Italian dinner, upscale steak or seafood option, or an inexpensive international option such as Chinese or Greek food, Dunkirk's restaurants deliver a delicious array of choices for all to enjoy.
  • Jamestown, NY 14701(716) 664-6204fentongrill.com Andriaccio's Restaurant Order a wrap, panini and salad to go as you head out for a day of adventure on Chautauqua Lake.
  • As of 2009, the meal is $14.00 and includes a salad bar, soup, fresh breads and dessert, with an authentic German or American entree.
  • With picnic tables and antler chandeliers as decor, the restaurant has nightly specials and events for both lunch and dinner.
  • German cuisine is as diverse as the country's culture and has many regional specialties, which Americans improvise and replicate in German/American restaurants and clubs.
  • German cuisine is as diverse as the country's culture and has many regional specialties, which Americans improvise and replicate in German/American restaurants and clubs.
  • Options include omelets and scrambles made from organic eggs, as well as a chorizo hash and plenty of pancakes.
  • Options include omelets and scrambles made from organic eggs, as well as a chorizo hash and plenty of pancakes.
  • Middlesex, New Jersey(732) 667-3863boulevardpub.com Whitlock Tavern La Taverna Restaurant & Bar The Whitlock Tavern started as an inn for travelers in the 1730s.
  • The bar features a selection of fine wines as well as beer and mixed drinks.
  • The bar features a selection of fine wines as well as beer and mixed drinks.
  • The menu features a full line of pastas as well as numerous daily specials, including fish, chicken, steak, liver, veal and calamari main courses, fresh seasonal vegetables and salads and a stupendous antipasto platter.
  • The menu features a full line of pastas as well as numerous daily specials, including fish, chicken, steak, liver, veal and calamari main courses, fresh seasonal vegetables and salads and a stupendous antipasto platter.
  • You can also order a variety of main dishes, including shrimp, fish, steak, chicken and lamb as well as a varied menu of seasonal vegetables.
  • You can also order a variety of main dishes, including shrimp, fish, steak, chicken and lamb as well as a varied menu of seasonal vegetables.
  • Try either a pasta sampler with selections of pasta dishes, such as Black Tagliatelle, or the traditional menu with selections such as Duck Bresaola or Pork Tenderloin.
  • Try either a pasta sampler with selections of pasta dishes, such as Black Tagliatelle, or the traditional menu with selections such as Duck Bresaola or Pork Tenderloin.
  • The restaurant offer menus for a snack at the bar and for brunch, lunch, dinner and special occasions as well as carrying an extensive selection of fine Italian wines.
  • The restaurant offer menus for a snack at the bar and for brunch, lunch, dinner and special occasions as well as carrying an extensive selection of fine Italian wines.
  • Enjoy the menu items, such as pan seared chicken, filet mignon, grilled swordfish and maple brined pork chop.
  • Houston, TX 77056(713) 840-1111rdgbarannie.com Churrascos Esquire listed Churrascos as one of "The 20 Best Steaks in America" September 2008.
  • Magnificent hand-decorated walls and golden ceilings welcome you as you savor the cuisine in candlelight.
  • Small eaters and gourmands will be satisfied, as you can choose from small and medium plates.
  • This reserve earned a congressional designation as a National Wild and Scenic River.
  • Bayou On First The Bayou On First is in the famed Pike Place Market, and the menu is as ample as the restaurant is cozy.
  • Bayou On First The Bayou On First is in the famed Pike Place Market, and the menu is as ample as the restaurant is cozy.
  • The menu offers standard Chinese fare, as well as a special diet menu and chef's specialty dishes.
  • The menu offers standard Chinese fare, as well as a special diet menu and chef's specialty dishes.
  • The restaurant, which offers take-out arrangements, serves Mongolian and Chinese dishes, as well as a few authentic Japanese classics.
  • The restaurant, which offers take-out arrangements, serves Mongolian and Chinese dishes, as well as a few authentic Japanese classics.
  • The menu features classic Chinese fare, as well as delicious, but lesser-known dishes.
  • The menu features classic Chinese fare, as well as delicious, but lesser-known dishes.
  • Diners can select from favorites, such as Fettuccine Alfredo, North Atlantic Salmon Fillet and Rib-eye Steak.
  • The menu includes authentic Italian flavors, such as Shrimp Balsamico, Eggplant El Forno and Puttanesca.
  • Come during the Happy Hour, where you can purchase for less than $2 bar fare, such as steamed mussels or 1/2 pound cheeseburger while sitting at the bar.
  • For non-seafood lovers, there are plenty of other options such as the Ribeye with Chimmichuri.
  • Start with its popular Bang-Bang Shrimp appetizer, and then move onto tempting dishes, such as Shrimp Diablo (a spicy pasta dish) or Sea Bass with mango salsa.
  • Also consider the signature dishes, such as Joe's Etoufee (craw-fish or shrimp) or Fisherman's Platter (catfish, oysters, popcorn shrimp and stuffed crab).
  • Depending on season and availability, Joe's offers different varieties of its namesake such as Blue Crabs, Stone Crabs, Alaskan Snow Crab and Dungeness Crabs.
  • The Chambersburg area of Trenton is known as Trenton's "Little Italy" and is home to a thriving Italian community.
  • Take advantage of its raw bar and seafood specialities such as the seafood risotto and fresh Maine lobster.
  • Zagat-rated as a Best Italian choice and a Top Favorite in New Jersey Overall, Scalini Fedeli is beloved by critics and locals alike.
  • The menu includes ethnic delicacies such as kabob Romania, shawarma and falafel.
  • Its menu includes dishes such as Matza Ball Soup, Vegetarian Mezze Plate with Grilled Pita Bread and Duck à l'Orange with Cherry Relish.
  • The menu also includes a wide variety of gourmet salads, fresh cut vegetables, bread, cheese and Brazilian side dishes as well as a wide array of wines.
  • The menu also includes a wide variety of gourmet salads, fresh cut vegetables, bread, cheese and Brazilian side dishes as well as a wide array of wines.
  • Its authentic churrascaria ambiance complements the cherrywood décor as well as the personality and image of the master chef, specialized kitchen and meat carvers.
  • Its authentic churrascaria ambiance complements the cherrywood décor as well as the personality and image of the master chef, specialized kitchen and meat carvers.
  • With various recreation options, Michigan fits the bill as a fun tourist destination.
  • Diners can come in as early as 6 in the morning any day of the week to enjoy Dave's food, but they must be out before closing time: 3 p.m.
  • Diners can come in as early as 6 in the morning any day of the week to enjoy Dave's food, but they must be out before closing time: 3 p.m.
  • For those whose tastes are simpler, the restaurant offers classic cold and hot sandwiches like tuna melt on rye, beef panini, turkey Cuban and grilled cheese as well as a variety of hamburgers.
  • For those whose tastes are simpler, the restaurant offers classic cold and hot sandwiches like tuna melt on rye, beef panini, turkey Cuban and grilled cheese as well as a variety of hamburgers.
  • As all of these activities can work up an appetite, it is wise to eat at some local restaurants.
  • Pauli Girl and Wurtsburger, and serves domestic beers as well.
  • The menu includes traditional German fare like sausages and schnitzels as well as a selection of salads, sandwiches and homemade desserts.
  • The menu includes traditional German fare like sausages and schnitzels as well as a selection of salads, sandwiches and homemade desserts.
  • The restaurant is a nightlife hot spot as well--on most evenings throughout the spring and summer, live music makes it a destination.
  • Watch ferry boats set off for the New York shore as you enjoy a meal on the Burlington waterfront.
  • Reservations are generally recommended, and are required for high tea, as everything is freshly made to order.
  • Fine antipasti such as Chicken Artichoke Bruschetta, Eggplant Rollantini, soups, panini and a small selection of entrées all round out the menu at Luigi's Italian Restaurant.
  • As one of the largest cities on Florida's West Coast, it also offers good places to eat.
  • The bar is fully stocked and offers their own specialty drinks such as the cruzan mojito and the bumper crop.
  • The shrimp scampi pizza is one menu favorite as is the wasabi beef.
  • They also do special events on holidays such as New Year's Eve.
  • Water sports such as swimming and kayaking are popular here.
  • Shogun of Japan While Shogun is more of a traditional Japanese steakhouse, there are some sushi options for diners who are interested in that as an alternative.
  • Patrons can also fill their stomachs with tasty appetizers such as mozzarella sticks and buffalo wings.
  • The restaurant specializes in pizza, and features many unique options such as Chicken Parmigiana, Seafood Lover's Special and Luigi Goes Hawaiian.
  • Visitors to the Circle Landmark & Lounge enjoy the delicious pasta combinations as well as veal and seafood delights.
  • Visitors to the Circle Landmark & Lounge enjoy the delicious pasta combinations as well as veal and seafood delights.
  • Lakehurst, New Jersey, which is known as the "Airship capital of the world," was the home of the first U.
  • Appetizers, salads, and homemade desserts such as tiramisu and zabaglione are also available on the lunch or dinner menu.
  • Lunch options include soups, salads, sandwiches, and a variety of entrees such as pasta, stir fry, steak, salmon, pot roast, and chicken, with prices ranging from $8-$22.
  • House specialties include Chicken Scampi and Veal Saltimbocca as entrees, and pasta, burgers, steak, and seafood are also available on the extensive menu.
  • Meadowlands Sports Complex is also located in East Rutherford, featuring a racetrack and sporting events such as the New Jersey Nets basketball team.
  • In recent years, the area has emerged as the home of some of the best Turkish restaurants in California.
  • The majority of the entrees are under $20 and desserts such as the Tiramusu Crepe run around $8 to $11. 221 Main St #BHuntington Beach, CA 92648(714) 536-2234luigishb.com Resources Luigi's Mountain Zone Trails
  • Best known for breakfast and brunch, the Cottage Restaurant serves lunch and dinner menus as well.
  • The building was built in 1917 and remained a residence for quite some time until it opened as a restaurant 35 years ago.
  • The brewery often features a daily special such as happy hour prices all day.
  • The menu consists of over ten different steaks all broiled over Bob Kittleman's mesquite charcoal fire pit along with a few non-steak items such as mesquite grilled chicken, Italian spaghetti and the vegetarian plate.
  • Fort Myers, Florida 33931 (239) 437-8664fortmyersschnitzelhouse.com Heinrich's German Grill Heinrich's German Grill gets high marks from former diners for authenticity, with some going so far as to say it's the best German restaurant outside of Germany.
  • The restaurant also offers a good selection of appetizers and tapas, and they do catering as well.
  • It is both meat market and deli, as well as restaurant.
  • It is both meat market and deli, as well as restaurant.
  • Swimming, fishing, and boating opportunities abound all over the area as well.
  • The menu features traditional standards, such as red beans and rice, jambalaya and crawfish, mixed in with more exotic choices, such as alligator, frog legs, and various etouffee.
  • The menu features traditional standards, such as red beans and rice, jambalaya and crawfish, mixed in with more exotic choices, such as alligator, frog legs, and various etouffee.
  • The chef serves classic south Louisiana cuisine, cajun and creole, as well as daily specials.
  • The chef serves classic south Louisiana cuisine, cajun and creole, as well as daily specials.
  • The establishment offers a kids menu, as well as a family special.
  • The establishment offers a kids menu, as well as a family special.
  • Yats on College This noisy Cajun restaurant bustles with activity, and is as much a destination as it is a restaurant.
  • Yats on College This noisy Cajun restaurant bustles with activity, and is as much a destination as it is a restaurant.
  • The trails pass through wooded areas and marshland, offering glimpses of a variety of plants and animals, such as great blue herons, barred and great horned owls, redheaded woodpeckers, red-tailed hawks, kestrels and turkey vultures.
  • Opened in the 1970s as a Mexican restaurant, they have gradually added Cuban and Spanish dishes, creating melange of flavors.
  • New on the North End scene in 2009, Ducali offers starters such as Nachos Italiano made from pizza dough chips, light fare like salads and panini, and vegetarian and meat-topped Neapolitan-style pizzas alike.
  • Dedicated in 1928 as Boston Garden and renamed in 1995 and again in 2005, the TD Garden remains an important venue for concerts, shows and sporting events.
  • Fondue features on the dinner menu both as an entree (Gruyere cheese, white wine and shallots served with croutons) and as a dessert (dark Belgian chocolate served with an assortment of fruits).
  • Fondue features on the dinner menu both as an entree (Gruyere cheese, white wine and shallots served with croutons) and as a dessert (dark Belgian chocolate served with an assortment of fruits).
  • Bottles are priced at retail (as the store portion of the establishment offers carryout wine sales), but there is a $12 corkage fee to have the bottle opened in the restaurant.
  • Clinton, MD 20735(301) 599-7629 Grand Cru Wine Bar and Euro Cafe The Grand Cru is, as the name implies, first and foremost a wine bar, where you can purchase wines by the glass or the bottle.
  • Dessert is where the menu really shines, as you can choose among house specialty fondues such as bananas foster or cookies and cream dream.
  • Dessert is where the menu really shines, as you can choose among house specialty fondues such as bananas foster or cookies and cream dream.
  • Vegetarians aren't forgotten, even the ones who do not eat dairy-the vegetarian selection has pasta and tofu as well as vegetables that can be cooked in your choice of broth.
  • Vegetarians aren't forgotten, even the ones who do not eat dairy-the vegetarian selection has pasta and tofu as well as vegetables that can be cooked in your choice of broth.
  • When it comes to land sports, though, Annapolis can also claim a distinction (besides hosting the annual Army/Navy football game)-it serves as the end point of the annual Race Across America sponsored by the UltraMarathon Cycling Association.
  • Featuring a primarily Tex-Mex menu with all of the traditional Mexican favorites like burritos, enchiladas and chili rellenos, Pancho Villa's also serves a few traditional American items such as hamburgers.
  • Featuring a menu that is as varied as it is lengthy, Maggie's Krooked Cafe serves everything from eggs jardiniere to tofu to polenta to eggplant in a setting suitable for families, couples or singles.
  • Featuring a menu that is as varied as it is lengthy, Maggie's Krooked Cafe serves everything from eggs jardiniere to tofu to polenta to eggplant in a setting suitable for families, couples or singles.
  • This mountain destination has many recreational opportunities as well as some of the most beautiful waterfalls in the United States.
  • This mountain destination has many recreational opportunities as well as some of the most beautiful waterfalls in the United States.
  • You can also enjoy other classic American bar food like chicken wings, nachos and tuna melts, as well as more ambitious dishes like panko-encrusted crab cakes.
  • You can also enjoy other classic American bar food like chicken wings, nachos and tuna melts, as well as more ambitious dishes like panko-encrusted crab cakes.
  • Best known for their dosas--a crepe made from rice and black lentils--Devi also offers many other delicious treats such as a wide variety of chutneys both hot and cold, and a carrot halwa (semolina pudding) for dessert.
  • Those who enjoy beer or wine with their meal are encouraged to bring their own, as none is available on the menu.
  • Indian beverage choices such as mango lassi (a mix of fresh fruit and spiced yogurt) and chai tea are also available.
  • Most offer buffet options that won't bust your wallet as well as meal options for the strict vegetarian in your group.
  • Most offer buffet options that won't bust your wallet as well as meal options for the strict vegetarian in your group.
  • King David's Super Sampler allows you to taste Greek dishes such as grape leaves, kibbeh, shish kabobs, hommus, babaganouge, falafel patties, pita and Greek salad.
  • Both the lunch and dinner menus are filled with Greek dishes including some suitable for vegetarians, such as the vegetable sampler.
  • The restaurant owners recommend ordering several plates as a meal.
  • Try one of the delectable desserts such as dark chocolate bruschetta or grilled banana.
  • Vegetarians do not have to go hungry here either, as there are many items on the menu for them.
  • After a day of hiking through the Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, why not start off with menu items such as marinated olives and grilled meats.
  • Here, visitors can find nature parks and reserves, downtown walking tours, and beautifully landscaped green areas such as the Shaker Village and Jacobson Park.
  • Horse lovers have recognized Lexington, Ky. as a special place for decades.
  • Entrees include seared sea scallops as well as hot and pungent shrimp in coconut milk.
  • Entrees include seared sea scallops as well as hot and pungent shrimp in coconut milk.
  • Dinner options include small plates such as crawfish cakes and duck breast.
  • For lunch, Tsunami offers a range of soups and sandwiches as well as several seafood entrees.
  • For lunch, Tsunami offers a range of soups and sandwiches as well as several seafood entrees.
  • Vietnamese dishes such as the Chicken with Lemon grass, makes Sam's stand out among other Chinese restaurants.
  • As a vegetarian, you also have several delicious lunch and dinner choices--make sure you ask the chefs to leave out the chicken stock.
  • Foods from different regions of China as well as standard Chinese dishes like sesame chicken or broccoli and beef are also available.
  • Foods from different regions of China as well as standard Chinese dishes like sesame chicken or broccoli and beef are also available.
  • The friendly wait staff serves egg omelettes, speciality homemade burgers such as the breakfast burger or the mondo burger with cheddar cheese and bacon.
  • And for dinner, Denny's cooks up deep Southern cuisine such as golden-fried chopped beef steaks glazed with country gravy, or country-fried steak and eggs with grits.
  • The 24-hour menu includes sandwiches, egg entrées such as crab eggs benedict, Italian sausage and eggs, vegetarian frittatas, and a whole section devoted to fettuccine entrees.
  • Otherwise known as Avon-by-the-Sea, this seaside community offers popular beaches right off the Atlantic Ocean as well as the quieter Sylvan Lake and its famous swans.
  • Otherwise known as Avon-by-the-Sea, this seaside community offers popular beaches right off the Atlantic Ocean as well as the quieter Sylvan Lake and its famous swans.
  • Otherwise known as Avon-by-the-Sea, this seaside community offers popular beaches right off the Atlantic Ocean as well as the quieter Sylvan Lake and its famous swans.
  • Affordable and employing with a friendly staff, Chili Willies offers generous portions as well as made in-house salsa and tortillas.
  • Affordable and employing with a friendly staff, Chili Willies offers generous portions as well as made in-house salsa and tortillas.
  • A perfect place for a first date, dine on familiar Italian classics such as Chicken Fiorentina, Veal Sorrentino and Gnocchi Bolognese.
  • An extensive wine and cocktail menu is available, as well as some great kids choices.
  • An extensive wine and cocktail menu is available, as well as some great kids choices.
  • Those who like spirits with their meal can choose from the Brews & BBQ menu, which pairs up popular menu items such as pulled pork sandwiches with a range of beer choices.
  • It serves a variety of breakfast foods as well as lunch.
  • It serves a variety of breakfast foods as well as lunch.
  • The menu items include dishes such as fried shrimp, mozzarella sticks and onion rings.
  • If you are hosting a special event, Saviano's is available to cater as long as you make a reservation.
  • If you are hosting a special event, Saviano's is available to cater as long as you make a reservation.
  • The menu items at Saviano's include classic Italian dishes such as penne, mussel marinara and pizza.
  • Since 1947, this family restaurant has served the Jersey Shore classics such as penne with vodka sauce and sautéed calamari over linguine marinara.
  • Indeed, critics seem to agree, as Hunan Taste has received honors by the likes of Reader's Digest and Zagat's Survey.
  • Eating at Qdoba won't hurt your wallet, either, as most meals fall under the $10 line.
  • Only the shrimp entrees and combo meals are more than $10, as of 2009.
  • Graziano's offers both a take-out menu and a sit-down menu, with an appetizer list that includes a delicious antipasto, as well as fabulous homemade soup.
  • Graziano's offers both a take-out menu and a sit-down menu, with an appetizer list that includes a delicious antipasto, as well as fabulous homemade soup.
  • The staff tries hard to make patrons feel as though they've been invited to the family table.
  • Patrons enjoy the family feel of Johnnie's, as well as its beautiful location near Oneida Lake, which provides gorgeous scenery to dine by.
  • Patrons enjoy the family feel of Johnnie's, as well as its beautiful location near Oneida Lake, which provides gorgeous scenery to dine by.
  • The menu also features fresh local catches, such as pike, perch, and bullhead, and an assortment of other reliably delicious entrees and sandwiches.
  • The menu was designed to accommodate fine dining as well as family dining, offering a range of appetizers and entrees.
  • The menu was designed to accommodate fine dining as well as family dining, offering a range of appetizers and entrees.
  • Wood floors and gentle lighting help to create a warm and comfortable feeling, accented by a staff that encourages patrons to feel as though they are welcome and valued guests.
  • The spices and preparation of the food make it almost as spicy as some Spanish and Mexican dishes.
  • The spices and preparation of the food make it almost as spicy as some Spanish and Mexican dishes.
  • S., was opened as a dance hall and biergarten as well as restaurant in 1933, but closed its doors in 2007.
  • S., was opened as a dance hall and biergarten as well as restaurant in 1933, but closed its doors in 2007.
  • S., was opened as a dance hall and biergarten as well as restaurant in 1933, but closed its doors in 2007.
  • Domestic brews are also available, as are soft drinks, coffee, tea and hot chocolate.26 Annapolis St.
  • German specialties include goulash, sauerbraten, wiener schnitzel,and breaded pork loin as well as a selection of sausages: bratwurst, knockwurst, bauernwurst and weisswurst.
  • German specialties include goulash, sauerbraten, wiener schnitzel,and breaded pork loin as well as a selection of sausages: bratwurst, knockwurst, bauernwurst and weisswurst.
  • The Annapolis area is very cosmopolitan, as the city is about equidistant from the cities of Washington, D.
  • Each dinner entrée comes with two side dishes; try the Crab Imperial Stuffed Tilapia for $35 or the Jumbo Fried Shrimp for $20 (prices as of 2009).
  • Elate For contemporary American food, few restaurants in River North rate as highly as does Elate.
  • Elate For contemporary American food, few restaurants in River North rate as highly as does Elate.
  • For diners who want their seafood as close to nature as possible, there is a raw bar for oysters, clams, shrimp and--for those over 21--shooters complete with vodka.125 Bayview Ave.
  • For diners who want their seafood as close to nature as possible, there is a raw bar for oysters, clams, shrimp and--for those over 21--shooters complete with vodka.125 Bayview Ave.
  • The park stands out as a small tribute to nature surrounded by imposing skyscrapers.
  • Prices won't break the bank too much, as two people could easily dine for $50, even after ordering appetizer and dessert.
  • Open for both lunch and dinner, the dress code is business casual and there is live entertainment on the weekends, as well as an outside patio that opens depending on the weather.
  • Open for both lunch and dinner, the dress code is business casual and there is live entertainment on the weekends, as well as an outside patio that opens depending on the weather.
  • Self-described as upscale dining since the 1970s, Portofino offers an extensive wine list in addition to its dinner menu.
  • Portofino can provide you with not only a nourishing meal but also a lovely view of the Detroit River, as the restaurant is situated directly on the docks, complete with its own Portofino Friendship yacht that you can set sail on before or after dinner.
  • Known as the "Heart of Downriver," Wyandotte and the surrounding area is chock-full of local favorites--both mom 'n pop restaurants and fine dining establishments.
  • Located on the Detroit River, Wyandotte has been designated by the federal government as a Preserve American Community.
  • The trail starts in Moline's vibrant downtown, with restaurants, bars, cafes, hotels and the iWireless Center, formerly known as The Mark, which hosts concerts and sporting events.
  • The India House The only Indian restaurant in Moline, The India House (also known as the Great Indian Restaurant), provides fresh authentic cuisine from all corners of India.
  • The dinner menu also includes an impressive selection of salads and small plates, as well as a selection of cheeses that is out of this world.
  • The dinner menu also includes an impressive selection of salads and small plates, as well as a selection of cheeses that is out of this world.
  • You can savor the fresh taste of the Southwest Chicken or Taco Salads, or chow down on a sandwich, such as the Girlie Cheezie, made with four types of cheese.
  • If you just polished off a Belly Buster sandwich, you might as well be daring again and order a "Big Girl Foo-Foo" drink to wash it down.
  • Manhattan has five golf courses to choose from, along with outdoor activities, such as hiking, biking and horseback riding in Randolph State Park.
  • There are a variety of mild, hot or spicy dishes provided on the lunch and dinner buffet as well as vegetarian dishes.
  • There are a variety of mild, hot or spicy dishes provided on the lunch and dinner buffet as well as vegetarian dishes.
  • Indulge in delicious Indian food on the lunch and dinner buffet, such as Tandoori Chicken (chicken marinated in a spicy yogurt), Pakora (batter-fried vegetables or meats) and Saags (spiced spinach).
  • Dress casually and enjoy authentic North Indian and Pakistani food, such as clay oven-roasted Tandoori Chicken, a large selection of exotic Indian breads, lamb, shrimp and fish dishes, and desserts.
  • The Hamilton County Park District offers over 35 miles of hiking trails, as well as fishing, camping, canoeing, paddling, horseback riding and more.
  • The Hamilton County Park District offers over 35 miles of hiking trails, as well as fishing, camping, canoeing, paddling, horseback riding and more.
  • Stanlunds allows pets for a $10 surcharge, as of December 2009.
  • Accommodation is in traditional hotel rooms, as well as private casitas, where you can enjoy all the amenities of home, but without all the hustle-bustle.
  • Accommodation is in traditional hotel rooms, as well as private casitas, where you can enjoy all the amenities of home, but without all the hustle-bustle.
  • Nightly steak specials are also offered, as well as alternative options, like shellfish, chicken and chops.
  • Nightly steak specials are also offered, as well as alternative options, like shellfish, chicken and chops.
  • The menu offers standard Chinese fare, with items such as pork fried rice and crab Rangoon.
  • Lexington Park, MD 20653(301) 862-3309 Emily's Oriental Express is a small Chinese restaurant specializing, as the name indicates, in takeout and delivery orders, although there is an option to dine in if you prefer.
  • Seafood items such as steamed shrimp are also available, as are a few non-Chinese dishes such as pizza and sushi rolls.
  • Seafood items such as steamed shrimp are also available, as are a few non-Chinese dishes such as pizza and sushi rolls.
  • Seafood items such as steamed shrimp are also available, as are a few non-Chinese dishes such as pizza and sushi rolls.
  • It offers a wide range of Chinese dishes such as noodles dishes, fried rice and pork, chicken and beef stir.
  • Lexington Park, MD 20653(301) 863-6190http://mypekingrestaurant.com Bon Buffet Bon Buffet is the place to go if you've really worked up an appetite, as the buffet is all-you-can eat.
  • Orders may be faxed in or phoned in, but there is as of yet no option to order online as the website is still under construction.
  • Orders may be faxed in or phoned in, but there is as of yet no option to order online as the website is still under construction.
  • There is a restaurant with a full bar, but the restaurant is seldom crowded as the restaurant does the bulk of its business through carryout or delivery.
  • Specials include such items as Peking duck, roast duck Cantonese-style, and General Tso's shrimp.
  • Prices are reasonable, generally around $5 (as of December 2009).
  • If you are at a loss as to what to order, go for the Picadillo.
  • The plantain baskets, which come stuffed with your choice of garlic shrimp or ground beef, are delicious, as is the black bean soup.
  • As a result, it has been attracting more and more tourists---including visitors interested in exploring the great outdoors.
  • Despite its past reputation as a hotbed for violent activity, the local government has recently invested a lot of time and resources into developing Camden's waterfront area.
  • The dinner menu consists of soup and salad, appetizers such as pecan-crusted brie and fried oysters, and entrees.
  • The entrees include Linguine Pomodoro, Crab and Shrimp Chimichanga, as well as quesadillas and burgers.
  • The entrees include Linguine Pomodoro, Crab and Shrimp Chimichanga, as well as quesadillas and burgers.
  • Start your meal with a soup or salad and appetizers, such as chicken wings or cheese sticks.
  • There is quite a variety to choose from, as well---the Napa Valley burger, which comes with melted goat cheese and honey mustard, is delicious.
  • The menu includes lots of German favorites like various schnitzels, sauerbraten, and cordon bleu, as well as some fresh Vienna style meals: lemon chicken, shrimp Vienna and also Vienna style pork schnitzel and goulash.
  • The menu includes lots of German favorites like various schnitzels, sauerbraten, and cordon bleu, as well as some fresh Vienna style meals: lemon chicken, shrimp Vienna and also Vienna style pork schnitzel and goulash.
  • Authentic desserts like Black Forest cake and sacher tortes are offered for after dinner, as are a variety of delicious coffee drinks spiked with brandy, vodka or schnapps.
  • With the beautiful Atlantic Ocean and intricate canal system, boating, swimming and fishing are popular, and getting around by water is almost as easy as on land.
  • With the beautiful Atlantic Ocean and intricate canal system, boating, swimming and fishing are popular, and getting around by water is almost as easy as on land.
  • There are a few vegetarian options such as penne with broccoli and eggplant parmigiana.
  • Guests can choose from a variety of pasta entrees, such as gnocchi, penne vodka, baked penne parmigiana and lasagna.
  • It is also near several area golf courses, such as Dutcher Golf Course and Quaker Country Club.
  • Cacciatore's Trattoria and Pizzeria offers several signature dishes, such as chicken cacciatore and bucatini boscaiola, a mixture of pancetta, sage and mushrooms in a brandy cream sauce.
  • As of 2009, the prices are mid range and plate sizes are generous.
  • Open to guests, as well as visitors to the area, the Steakhouse at the Inn is an upscale, yet casual, restaurant.
  • Open to guests, as well as visitors to the area, the Steakhouse at the Inn is an upscale, yet casual, restaurant.
  • Known to many as a hangout for locals, the restaurant offers a full menu, with a range of choices from fajitas to fish and chips.
  • The drink menu also includes several signature cocktails such as a pomegranate margarita, lemonade with Grey Goose, and a cilantro martini.1035 SW Stark St.
  • During the festival, the restaurant sells food and drinks and sets up games for children, as well as provides information about local fisheries.208 SW Ankeny St.
  • During the festival, the restaurant sells food and drinks and sets up games for children, as well as provides information about local fisheries.208 SW Ankeny St.
  • Additionally, guests can enjoy an alcoholic beverage made in the restaurant bar, or the old shocking room, as they call it.
  • The menu, which changes seasonally, is inspired by Mediterranean fare and features appetizers such as oysters, soups, salads and entrees such as paella prawns, halibut, salmon and daily fresh fish specials.
  • The menu, which changes seasonally, is inspired by Mediterranean fare and features appetizers such as oysters, soups, salads and entrees such as paella prawns, halibut, salmon and daily fresh fish specials.
  • Dinner offers even more options with larger size portions of the lunch specials, sushi served as a platter or a la carte.
  • Part of a larger group of restaurants known as The Mandarin Group, their menu is as thick as a book because it offers so many entrees.
  • Part of a larger group of restaurants known as The Mandarin Group, their menu is as thick as a book because it offers so many entrees.
  • Part of a larger group of restaurants known as The Mandarin Group, their menu is as thick as a book because it offers so many entrees.
  • Order a traditional robust meal of pasta with meatballs or lasagna or try something more elaborate such as a veal or seafood dish.
  • Cattlemen's Steakhouse This steakhouse is the real thing as it even has its own butcher shop.
  • Broadway Haysville, KS 67060(316) 522-1113vfw6957.org Jim's Steak House Fans of this steak house come from as far away as Kansas City and have been filling its tables for more than 50 years.
  • Broadway Haysville, KS 67060(316) 522-1113vfw6957.org Jim's Steak House Fans of this steak house come from as far away as Kansas City and have been filling its tables for more than 50 years.
  • When at Ozumo, do as locals do and order from the Chef's Original Dishes.
  • The culinary experiences of San Francisco are abundant but the sushi is upheld by residents and visitors alike as a must for travelers.
  • Lil Kims Cove has plenty to keep you entertained and you might as well start with a game of Texas hold 'em, offered every Thursday and Saturday.
  • Along with a nice selection of burgers, you can also choose oriental favorites such as, Bulgoki and Ya ki Mon Do.
  • The food menu offers delicious entrees, such as chop steak, chicken bayou and wild Alaskan sockeye salmon.
  • For dinner, its homemade meatloaf is a guest favorite as is the roast beef.
  • The omelets here are as massive as they are delicious.
  • The omelets here are as massive as they are delicious.
  • Their pizza is legendary as is their American-Italian fusion style of preparing food.
  • They remodeled the dining room in 1980s as their fame spread throughout the region.
  • Wild game fans will savor such appetizers as Bison Carpaccio and a Charcuterie Platter with duck prosciutto, buffalo sausage, venison-smoked cheddar salami and a venison currant terrine.
  • The menu includes such items as yak burgers, duck tenderloin, fried alligator and elk steak.
  • Hunters Located right off Interstate 90 in Post Falls, GW Hunters is known as North Idaho's home for wild game.
  • Their website, karmaflagstaff.com, posts pictures of their customers as a customary thank you.
  • Karma Sushi specializes in Japanese Sushi as well.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner; its menu features cold and hot appetizers, soup, salads and pasta dishes such as penne, linguini with red or white clam sauce, fussilli romana with pink sauce, cavatelli with broccoli, manicotti and ravioli.
  • The Inn has discounts on meals between 3 and 6 p.m. from Monday through Saturday, as well as a Tuesday night dining special, when six of the Inn's entrees are $12 from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • The Inn has discounts on meals between 3 and 6 p.m. from Monday through Saturday, as well as a Tuesday night dining special, when six of the Inn's entrees are $12 from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • The menu features a tapas, lunch and dinner menu whose selections include garden salads, seafood, beef and chicken tapas, and authentic entrée selections such as paella, red snapper, tuna, skirt steak, filet mignon and suckled pig.
  • The town is also home to numerous parks and fields where residents can partake of numerous recreational activities, such as hiking, soccer, running and swimming.
  • This restaurant is also known for its selection of appetizers, such as crab cakes, bacon-wrapped scallops, Polish sausage and fried asparagus.
  • Guests can also choose from a variety of sandwiches such as jalapeno burgers, shrimp po' boys, BLTs and vegetarian California burgers.
  • Guests can also watch sailboats drifting by as they dine on smoked chicken, ribs and steak.
  • Saltgrass Steak house also offers a kids' menu with selections such as baby-back ribs, cheeseburgers and corn dogs.
  • Bath, NY 14810 (607) 776-3390bathcountryclub.net Chat-A-Whyle Restaurant As the name would imply, the Chat-A-Whyle Restaurant is a great place to gather and socialize with friends over a plate of tempting food.
  • Der Braumeister serves traditional German favorites with a modern twist, such as the potato pancake reuben or beer tenderloin.
  • Although it seems an unlikely haven for Mexican affair with a mere six percent total Latino population as of 2007 according to the U.
  • The dinner menu offers vegetarian and seafood dishes, as well as diet specials.
  • The dinner menu offers vegetarian and seafood dishes, as well as diet specials.
  • Tandoori Chef serves lunch buffet Monday through Thursday for $7.95, as of December 2009, while its weekend buffet is priced at $8.95.
  • Located close to the New York City, visitors know Hackensack in New Jersey as "A City in Motion." The bustling city offers its residents and visitors 15 parks to relax.
  • You can satisfy your Middle Eastern cravings with appetizers such as tabbouleh and baba ghannouj and entrees such as lahm mashwi and the vegetarian kibbit laqtin mashwi.
  • You can satisfy your Middle Eastern cravings with appetizers such as tabbouleh and baba ghannouj and entrees such as lahm mashwi and the vegetarian kibbit laqtin mashwi.
  • As in the Northwest region of France, or Brittany, Creperie Beau Monde serves both sweet and savory crepes.
  • Traditional favorites are served, such as onion soup, beef bourguignon and steak frites.
  • The menu and setting are varied enough that one can stop in for an afternoon coffee---or café, as the French say---or can have a full dinner.
  • It is known for the famous imported German soft pretzels served with their signature homemade Bier Cheese, but it serves many other German and American dishes as well.
  • Skipper's has a children's menu in case you have the little ones with you as well.
  • Noah's also provides specials such as pollo al mattone, crab cakes and scampi linguine with fresh Maine red shrimp.
  • Stonington is a charming little town in Connecticut with an estimated population of 18,366 people as of 2004.
  • As with the rooms at the other Caeasar's Resorts, guests can choose a room with heart-shaped or 7-foot champagne glass whirlpool.
  • A putting green, driving range and nine-hole golf course are popular as well.
  • Rates as of 2009 start in the mid-200s per night and vary throughout the year.
  • The Old Mill Inn also has a full bar, complete feature a listing of specialty cocktails, beer, and wine selections, including local varietals from Long Island's North Fork, as well as those from California, France, and Italy.
  • The Old Mill Inn also has a full bar, complete feature a listing of specialty cocktails, beer, and wine selections, including local varietals from Long Island's North Fork, as well as those from California, France, and Italy.
  • The lunch and dinner menu changes with the seasons, generally offering soup, salad, small plate and entrée selections, such as beet penne, salmon, crab cakes, lobster, duck, steak, and a burger, to name a few options.
  • Diners will also enjoy the Touch of Venice's scenic grounds on grass that overlooks the bay, as well as its private dining facilities that can fit large parties.
  • Diners will also enjoy the Touch of Venice's scenic grounds on grass that overlooks the bay, as well as its private dining facilities that can fit large parties.
  • The menu includes antipasti, salad, pasta, and entrees such as swordfish, chicken, tuna, and veal.
  • Desperados also offers several signature side dishes such as corn pudding, cornbread with honey butter, coleslaw and salted potatoes.
  • The menu includes favorites such as hamburgers, nachos, jalapeno poppers, barbecued ribs and mozzarella sticks.
  • This establishment also serves delectable pasta entrees, such as orecchietta, spaghetti with tomato and meat sauce, fettuccine and tortellini alfredo, tubular pasta, and linguini in white or red clam sauce, to name a few.
  • The restaurant also offers numerous themed events, such as an all-you-can-eat brunch, and beer appreciation night, where participants learn everything there is to know about beer.
  • Additionally, the restaurant offers selections for those following a low-calorie/low-carb plan, as well as a separate children's menu.
  • Additionally, the restaurant offers selections for those following a low-calorie/low-carb plan, as well as a separate children's menu.
  • Caldwell's natural landscape makes it an ideal place to partake in numerous recreational activities, such as tennis, biking, and hiking at many of the area's trails.
  • Choose from starters such as grilled lobster tail mojito with avocado salsa and plantain chips or Thai lettuce wraps.
  • The main menu features pulled pork, brisket, chicken and ribs as well as salads, sandwiches and plenty of homemade sides.
  • The main menu features pulled pork, brisket, chicken and ribs as well as salads, sandwiches and plenty of homemade sides.
  • The menu includes gluten-free, nut-free and vegetarian items as well.
  • A variety of salads, such as the warm wild mushroom salad with herbs and pecorino, make great starters.
  • Dance 'til dawn as you sip on some of Tampa's best margaritas and mojitos.
  • For those on the run Bender's offers take out service as well.
  • Denver, CO 80202(303) 377-5896www.cafeberlindenver.com Helga's German Restaurant and Deli Run by Helga, Herbert and their family, Helga's Deli began in 1989 as a small German restaurant with only four tables and has grown in size since then.
  • Their lunch, dinner and drink menus feature items such as currywurst, weiner schnitzel, sauerbrauten, and bratwurst along with German beers, schnapps and wine.
  • Head west and you will find yourself in the beauty of the Rocky Mountains with activities such as skiing, hiking, biking, rafting, and climbing.
  • The chefs are Indian, as is all the staff, so you get the true Indian experience here.
  • Boating enthusiasts will enjoy Boston, as boating, sailing, kayaking and canoeing is possible all around Boston Harbor.
  • Boston, Massachusetts, is known as a walking city.
  • A winner of the Readers Choice award for Best of Brevard, owners Heidi and meisterchef Edmund serve eccentric dishes such as escargot bourguignonne and filet steak a la Madagascar.
  • Edelweiss Prepare to feel as though you have stepped into the past as you walk through the doors of Edelweiss.
  • Edelweiss Prepare to feel as though you have stepped into the past as you walk through the doors of Edelweiss.
  • The menu, described as 'refined comfort food,' features American cuisine.
  • Note that Bistro 22 is closed on Sundays, as of November 2009.
  • Meetinghouse remains a popular brunch spot with favorites like its Salmon Platter, Stuffed French Toast and a Lobster Roll, as well as creative finds like its Roasted Beet Carpaccio with gorgonzola and arugula.
  • Meetinghouse remains a popular brunch spot with favorites like its Salmon Platter, Stuffed French Toast and a Lobster Roll, as well as creative finds like its Roasted Beet Carpaccio with gorgonzola and arugula.
  • A treat for the taste buds and an entertaining night on the town, this restaurant is sure to become a fast favorite as you delight in rolling up your sleeves and demonstrating your culinary skills.
  • Cook Au Vin has knowledgeable staff who will provide you with helpful tips as you sharpen your cooking skills and work towards becoming a culinary expert.
  • The kitchen will be prepared and stocked for you upon your arrival, making the experience as simple as it is fun.
  • The kitchen will be prepared and stocked for you upon your arrival, making the experience as simple as it is fun.
  • On their standard menu, the restaurant is pleased to feature a variety of sauteed and grilled steaks, marinated rack of lamb, chicken and seafood dishes, as well as Mexican dining standards such as burritos and enchiladas.
  • On their standard menu, the restaurant is pleased to feature a variety of sauteed and grilled steaks, marinated rack of lamb, chicken and seafood dishes, as well as Mexican dining standards such as burritos and enchiladas.
  • On their standard menu, the restaurant is pleased to feature a variety of sauteed and grilled steaks, marinated rack of lamb, chicken and seafood dishes, as well as Mexican dining standards such as burritos and enchiladas.
  • From the many TVs tuned to a variety of sporting events to the American menu heavy on steak, chicken, ribs and seafood, the Upper Sports Deck meets every expectation, making it a restaurant for food lovers as well as sports lovers.
  • From the many TVs tuned to a variety of sporting events to the American menu heavy on steak, chicken, ribs and seafood, the Upper Sports Deck meets every expectation, making it a restaurant for food lovers as well as sports lovers.
  • Now with four locations, A G features a menu that is as long on Italian favorites like eggplant Parmesan, calamari and pasta as it is on their own signature pizza.
  • Now with four locations, A G features a menu that is as long on Italian favorites like eggplant Parmesan, calamari and pasta as it is on their own signature pizza.
  • This moderately priced restaurant serves traditional Mexican dishes such as chile con queso and chiles rellenos, as well as American favorites like rib-eye steak and rainbow trout.
  • This moderately priced restaurant serves traditional Mexican dishes such as chile con queso and chiles rellenos, as well as American favorites like rib-eye steak and rainbow trout.
  • This moderately priced restaurant serves traditional Mexican dishes such as chile con queso and chiles rellenos, as well as American favorites like rib-eye steak and rainbow trout.
  • Guests can also choose from sides such as macaroni and cheese, green chile polenta, potato salad and mashed potatoes.
  • This restaurant specializes in local comfort food such as ribs and barbecued chicken.
  • If you're looking for some entertainment with your meal, Rokbonki is the perfect place as it turns cooking into an art, right by your table.
  • This establishment offers filet mignon and rib-eyes, as well as pork chops, meatloaf and duck.
  • This establishment offers filet mignon and rib-eyes, as well as pork chops, meatloaf and duck.
  • A northern suburb of Chicago, Arlington Heights is home to Arlington International Race Track as well as many other shopping and entertainment venues.
  • A northern suburb of Chicago, Arlington Heights is home to Arlington International Race Track as well as many other shopping and entertainment venues.
  • Enjoy views of the bay as you dine inside or enjoy the ocean breezes from the sundeck.
  • The menu includes local favorites such as mussels, crab cakes and fresh Maine lobster.
  • The restaurant hours vary as it is frequently booked for special events.
  • The food is as top quality as the surroundings with appetizers such as exotic mushroom napoleon setting the stage for entrees like the double-cut white marble pork chop.
  • The food is as top quality as the surroundings with appetizers such as exotic mushroom napoleon setting the stage for entrees like the double-cut white marble pork chop.
  • The food is as top quality as the surroundings with appetizers such as exotic mushroom napoleon setting the stage for entrees like the double-cut white marble pork chop.
  • Valet parking is available, as is complimentary car services for guests living within the city of Boston.
  • Dishes are inspired by French and Italian cuisine and can be ordered a la carte or as part of a three-course or seven-course tasting menu.
  • Locke-Ober The Locke-Ober first opened its doors in 1883 as a French restaurant.
  • Brunch items feature a tofu scramble as well as egg sandwiches, wraps, frittatas and benedicts, and classics including French toast (made with brioche and Wisconsin apple compote), buttermilk pancakes with local maple syrup, and a malted Belgian waffle.
  • Brunch items feature a tofu scramble as well as egg sandwiches, wraps, frittatas and benedicts, and classics including French toast (made with brioche and Wisconsin apple compote), buttermilk pancakes with local maple syrup, and a malted Belgian waffle.
  • As befits such an eco-friendly hotel, the brunch does feature a number of healthy options, including a house-made granola with oats, honey, nuts and dried fruits as well as organic chicken and salmon.
  • As befits such an eco-friendly hotel, the brunch does feature a number of healthy options, including a house-made granola with oats, honey, nuts and dried fruits as well as organic chicken and salmon.
  • As befits such an eco-friendly hotel, the brunch does feature a number of healthy options, including a house-made granola with oats, honey, nuts and dried fruits as well as organic chicken and salmon.
  • The Easter buffet also includes specialties such as roast lamb and smoked whitefish and an extensive dessert selection sure to tempt, although fresh fruit also is available for the health-conscious.924 E.
  • Its old-world elegance extends to the restaurant, which is popularly known as Astor Street.
  • The preferred dinner menu is Hong Kong-style shrimp dumplings (for $8), with grilled New York sirloin with au poivre (for $22) as the entree.
  • Be sure to contact Kobe to check its hours before venturing out as it closes between lunch and dinner each day.
  • Walk-ins are welcome but reservations are recommended as the restaurant frequently has a waiting list.
  • This restaurant contains a traditional dinner seating area as well as a cocktail bar and a sushi bar.
  • This restaurant contains a traditional dinner seating area as well as a cocktail bar and a sushi bar.
  • The house seafood sauce known as yum-yum sauce is as delicious as the name implies.
  • The house seafood sauce known as yum-yum sauce is as delicious as the name implies.
  • The house seafood sauce known as yum-yum sauce is as delicious as the name implies.
  • The menu features Japanese favorites such as hibachi shrimp, teriyaki steak and lobster steak dinners.
  • The restaurant serves entertainment along with quality food as master chefs prepare and serve your meal right at your table, delighting the whole family.
  • In fact, On Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, you can have just that, with the "Taste of Portugal" prix fixe dinner offered for only $19.99 (as of November 2009).
  • Children's, lunch and bar menus also are available, as is a specially priced early bird menu (offered from 4 to 6 p. m.
  • Other options include a prix fixe complete dinner menu, complete with soup or salad, your choice of appetizer and entree, coffee or tea, and flan, creme brulee or cheesecake for dessert, all for the price of $28.95 (as of November 2009).
  • Adega Grill The Ironbound neighborhood of Newark, often known as "Little Portugal," is home to the Zagat-rated Adega Grill.
  • This means that New Jersey is definitely the go-to spot for Portuguese cuisine in the Mid-Atlantic region, as there are numerous Portuguese restaurants throughout the state.
  • Although many people tend to think of New Jersey as the "Turnpike State," it actually has a lot to offer the outdoor enthusiast.
  • Zio Ciccio also serves gourmet pizza such as shrimp Florentine and grinders such as Mortadella, Bocconcini with roasted peppers.
  • Zio Ciccio also serves gourmet pizza such as shrimp Florentine and grinders such as Mortadella, Bocconcini with roasted peppers.
  • Delight in specialty dishes such as Sicilian style mussels in a garlic, white wine broth.
  • Sample appetizers such as artichoke stuffed with lobster and fresh tarragon aioli.
  • There even are eight egg roll options available, ranging from spring veggie, priced at 75 cents (as of November 2009) to crab ($2.55) and lobster ($2.95).217 Dix Ave.
  • Menu items include Chinese standards such as pepper steak, General Tso's chicken, pork fried rice and vegetable lo mein.
  • Buffet items feature not only Chinese dishes but also seafood (snow crab, mussels and shrimp), meats such as roast beef and baked chicken, and desserts that include Hershey's ice cream.
  • China Buffet China Buffet is a good option for the truly hungry, as it offers all you can eat of a wide variety of dishes.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts enjoy boating on nearby Lake Champlain and Lake George as well as skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing down West Mountain and Gore Mountain.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts enjoy boating on nearby Lake Champlain and Lake George as well as skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing down West Mountain and Gore Mountain.
  • Grecian variations on conventional dishes are also available such as Yarithes Scorthates, a house innovation on a classic prawns entrée.
  • Bellingham, WA 98225(360) 676-1087Dirtydanharris.com Five Columns Restaurant Five Columns Restaurant focuses on traditional Greek cooking as well as American classics that grace steakhouse menus worldwide.
  • Bellingham, WA 98225(360) 676-1087Dirtydanharris.com Five Columns Restaurant Five Columns Restaurant focuses on traditional Greek cooking as well as American classics that grace steakhouse menus worldwide.
  • If you like it hot, be sure to order off the "Szechuan Heaven" menu, featuring spicy fare such as sauteed beef short ribs with triple chili pepper and spicy hot seafood soup pot.
  • What won it the top honor is the fact that it serves authentic Szechuan dishes, even going so far as to make its own noodles.
  • Seattle, WA 98104(206) 622-8181 Chiang's Gourmet Chiang's Gourmet was chosen by the Chef Seattle website as Seattle's top Chinese restaurant, despite its out-of-the-way Lake City location and unassuming exterior.
  • The siu mai dumplings are particularly tasty, as are the hum bow buns.
  • Plates are generous-sized and reasonably priced, costing around $3 to $4 each (as of spring 2009).
  • In fact, you're better off visiting on a weekday, as it's one of the most popular dim sum places in town (for good reason), and tends to be packed on Saturdays and Sundays.
  • These authentic Chinese dishes include such items as the bizarrely named, yet tasty "ants on the tree" (bean thread noodles with ground pork in a spicy red sauce), bitter melon with jalapeno chili and kung pao yao hwa (pork kidney).
  • For under $7 (as of 2009), you can enjoy specialties ranging from the familiar (kung pao chicken, Mongolian beef) to the less well-known (deep-cooked potato, diced fish with pickled pepper), all of these accompanied by soup and steamed or fried rice.
  • It's situated right on Lake Union, where you'll be able to watch other outdoor enthusiasts kayaking, canoeing and sailing as you dine.
  • Explore the city as you savor the aroma of morning coffee from the local cafés and when exhausted, enjoy a sumptuous meal in an Indian restaurant.
  • Long Boulevard, between Palm and Ocean Boulevards, serves seaside breakfast classics such as crab cakes benedict.
  • Visitors can enjoy live music at the raw bar, sample the catch of the day, or enjoy cocktails and traditional Lowcountry favorites such as spicy shrimp and grits.
  • Traditional surf-and-turf favorites like braised pork shoulder and crab cakes are available as well.
  • Elmira's primary claim to fame is as the birthplace for writer Mark Twain.
  • When canal use gave way to railroads in the late 1800s, Elmira found itself as a junction between the New York Central and Erie Railroads.
  • The menu represents South-Indian and North-Indian dishes and their Indian lunch buffet is complimented by Indo-Chinese items as well.
  • Choices like pan-seared Mahi Mahi tacos with fresh mango salsa have been pointed out as tasty, health-conscious menu options by "Austin Fit" magazine.
  • Austin, TX 78704(512) 444-0012www.currasgrill.com Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant Mesquite grilled steak and chicken are the specialties here, and can be ordered as entrees or in quesadillas, nachos or enchiladas.
  • Sylvan Beach, NY 13157(315) 762-9949captainjohn.com Canal View Cafe Overlooking the Barge Canal, the Canal View Cafe is a traditional American restaurant, featuring sandwiches and salads, as well as steaks and seafood.
  • Sylvan Beach, NY 13157(315) 762-9949captainjohn.com Canal View Cafe Overlooking the Barge Canal, the Canal View Cafe is a traditional American restaurant, featuring sandwiches and salads, as well as steaks and seafood.
  • The menu boasts one-pound Maine lobster tails daily, as well as 20-ounce Brazilian lobster tails and the house specialty--a two-pound cut of prime rib.
  • The menu boasts one-pound Maine lobster tails daily, as well as 20-ounce Brazilian lobster tails and the house specialty--a two-pound cut of prime rib.
  • Gus' Steak House5698 State Highway 12Norwich, NY 13815-3201(607)336-4777gussteakhouse.com Canasawacta Country Club The private Canasawacta Country Club is open to the public for dinner seven days a week from April to September, as of November 2009.
  • Fred's Inn has an all-you-can-eat seafood buffet on Fridays, a Prime Rib buffet on Saturdays and champagne brunch on Sunday mornings, as of November 2009.
  • The restaurant is regarded as one of the finest Italian restaurants in upstate New York.
  • Choose from entrees such as mussels marinière with garlic, white wine, and parsley, or tiger prawns with garlic, white wine, and a bisque Marseillaise.
  • The menu features appetizers such as a tartelette of roasted tomatoes, chevre cheese, and basil, or flash-fried calamari with a spicy tomato sauce.
  • You might also wish to try a more traditional dessert, such as the warm pecan-raisin bread pudding with whipped cream.
  • Voted as having the "Best French Onion Soup" in 2007, Danielle's delights with an extensive menu including soups, sandwiches, salads and, of course, crêpes.
  • Cafe Rolle Since 2002, Cafe Rolle's mission has been to provide exciting, authentic French gourmet food, as well as private cooking classes conducted in the comfort of your own home.
  • Cafe Rolle Since 2002, Cafe Rolle's mission has been to provide exciting, authentic French gourmet food, as well as private cooking classes conducted in the comfort of your own home.
  • The lake provides visitors with activities such as swimming, boating and fishing.
  • Warwick, NY 10990(845) 986-6099chateauhathorn.com Jesters Restaurant and Pub Goose Pond State Park is host to all wildlife you can spot while traveling along the numerous nature trails such as Highland Trail.
  • The Chateau Hathornis serves specialties as pasta a la mode, smoked trout and escargot.
  • There is an extensive tea and coffee list and a large selection of pastries, such as bagels, scones, muffins and croissants.
  • The breakfast classics include eggs (any style), omelets, oatmeal and yogurt, as well as breakfast sandwiches and breakfast burritos.
  • The breakfast classics include eggs (any style), omelets, oatmeal and yogurt, as well as breakfast sandwiches and breakfast burritos.
  • Patrons can enjoy classics, such as eggs and bacon, while also catering to the healthy and diet conscious, with sides such as quinoa or fruit, and vegetarian-friendly specialties, such as Suzies Herbed Tofu and Bob's Tofu Burrito and gluten-free hotcakes.
  • Patrons can enjoy classics, such as eggs and bacon, while also catering to the healthy and diet conscious, with sides such as quinoa or fruit, and vegetarian-friendly specialties, such as Suzies Herbed Tofu and Bob's Tofu Burrito and gluten-free hotcakes.
  • Patrons can enjoy classics, such as eggs and bacon, while also catering to the healthy and diet conscious, with sides such as quinoa or fruit, and vegetarian-friendly specialties, such as Suzies Herbed Tofu and Bob's Tofu Burrito and gluten-free hotcakes.
  • The menu features a complete breakfast buffet, along with meal items such as eggs benedict, french toast Grand Marnier, buttermilk pancakes and buttermilk biscuits and sausage gravy.
  • There is plenty of fun to be had in the city, such as riding on over 850 miles of off-road bike paths or tubing down Clear Creek River.
  • This restaurant features an ever-changing menu with daily specials and market prices, along with classic dishes such as Jerk Chicken with fried rice for $6.50.
  • Jamaican James Jerk Pit Restaurant & Catering brings Caribbean flavors to North Jersey and is close to Morris Canal and Minisink Parks, as well as Lake Hopatcong.
  • Jamaican James Jerk Pit Restaurant & Catering brings Caribbean flavors to North Jersey and is close to Morris Canal and Minisink Parks, as well as Lake Hopatcong.
  • Enjoy classic, heart pub food like bacon cheddar burgers and jerk chicken quesadillas as you soak up the atmosphere at this lively joint.
  • The menu offers a variety of appetizers like coconut shrimp, crab cakes, quesadillas and beef nachos, as well as sandwiches, burgers and salads.
  • The menu offers a variety of appetizers like coconut shrimp, crab cakes, quesadillas and beef nachos, as well as sandwiches, burgers and salads.
  • All prices are as of 2009.2409 Dune DriveAvalon, NJ 08202(609) 967-3300www.rocknchair.net/
  • Entrees range from $15.95 for classics, such as spaghetti and meatballs and penne primavera to $30.95 for dishes including wasabi scallops and filet mignon.
  • As of 2009, lunch entrees range from $6.50 to $15.75, and dinner entrees run from $19.00 to $39.95.
  • The bar offers Indian beers and wines, as well as American beverages.
  • The bar offers Indian beers and wines, as well as American beverages.
  • Café Bombay233 Mill StreetBristol, PA 19007(215) 788-4239cafebombay.biz India Garden This Pittsburgh restaurant is known for its expansive lunch buffet, as well as its selection of Indian beers.
  • Café Bombay233 Mill StreetBristol, PA 19007(215) 788-4239cafebombay.biz India Garden This Pittsburgh restaurant is known for its expansive lunch buffet, as well as its selection of Indian beers.
  • Café Bombay's menu also lists a variety of vegetarian entrees, such as vegetable curry, palak paneer, aloo gobi, dal thakuda and chana masala.
  • This restaurant offers Bristol residents and visitors an array of North Indian dishes, as well as South Indian choices.
  • This restaurant offers Bristol residents and visitors an array of North Indian dishes, as well as South Indian choices.
  • There are pasta dishes to choose as well as seafood and small bites for those who choose not to indulge so heavily.
  • There are pasta dishes to choose as well as seafood and small bites for those who choose not to indulge so heavily.
  • In addition to their churrasco, they have a full entrée menu from which to choose, as well as inventive salads and sides.
  • In addition to their churrasco, they have a full entrée menu from which to choose, as well as inventive salads and sides.
  • As with most Brazilian establishments, the emphasis is on meat; it is perfectly grilled or roasted on a churrasco rotisserie.
  • Olive Garden's chefs make the journey to the Institute to learn how to make fancy dishes such as Manicotti Farmagio with Shrimp, to bring them to a restaurant near you.
  • A full selection of other dishes such as shrimp,chicken, steak, and pasta are available, all specially prepared and served with homemade sauces and fresh side dishes.
  • Most noted for their cheese biscuits, crab leg specials, mix-and-match options, and unique creations such as Lobster Pizza, Peach Bourbon BBQ Scallops, and Shrimp Jambalaya.
  • The Deptford Mall serves as the hub of the activity, bringing people in droves to the area as well.
  • The Deptford Mall serves as the hub of the activity, bringing people in droves to the area as well.
  • Tucker's also serves burgers, subs, fried chicken, pasta and rice dishes, soups and salads, and entrees, such as steak, salmon and chicken breast.
  • For dinner, prosciutto stuffed chicken is a local favorite as well as penne San Remo.
  • For dinner, prosciutto stuffed chicken is a local favorite as well as penne San Remo.
  • The Minneapolis restaurant is just as spectacular as other locations, with an enormous menu offering some of the best Italian food in Minneapolis.
  • The Minneapolis restaurant is just as spectacular as other locations, with an enormous menu offering some of the best Italian food in Minneapolis.
  • The dinner menu includes butternut squash cappelletti and leave room for dessert, as the steamed chocolate spice cake is superb.
  • The restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a wonderful Sunday brunch.
  • The restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a wonderful Sunday brunch.
  • Minneapolis is known as having one of the best parks systems in the United States, with its parks all connected to form the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway.
  • Rio Picante also offers a spinach salad and an Azuni salad (a mixture of lettuce, pecans, grapes, grilled chicken and pineapple) as vegan options.
  • The owners are dedicated to supporting local artists, as original artwork hangs on the restaurant's walls.
  • Appetizers include a variety of breads such as bhatura, poori and garlic naan.
  • Golden Europe Restaurant Golden Europe Restaurant of Arvada, Colorado serves traditional German cuisine, such as Jager Schnitzel, breaded tenderloin, potato pancakes and liver dumpling soup.
  • It also has a full restaurant menu that includes appetizers such as French onion soup and fried goat cheese and main dishes featuring Dungeness crab and halibut caught by local fishermen.
  • The cooks buy their Dungeness crab from local San Francisco fishermen and offer an array of crab dishes, such as crab cakes and crab sandwiches.
  • Seafood tops the list of foods on the menus, as do baked goods and famous chocolates.
  • Long a docking point for local fishermen, this oceanside spot still houses their boats, as well as a wide selection of shops, activities and restaurants.
  • Long a docking point for local fishermen, this oceanside spot still houses their boats, as well as a wide selection of shops, activities and restaurants.
  • The only vegetarian option on the dinner menu is the salad bar ($12.95 as an entrée).
  • It was chosen as a top pick in the Best Authentic Mexican food category in 2004.
  • Winter Park, Colo., located along Highway 40, is one of the easier ski resorts to drive to from the Front Range and is usually frequented by weekend warriors trying to get as much snow time in before heading back to work on Monday.
  • The restaurant also features an extensive wine list with varietals from Italy as well as those from local vineyards.
  • The restaurant also features an extensive wine list with varietals from Italy as well as those from local vineyards.
  • All food is made daily and features pasta dishes such as penne, rigatoni, baked ziti and fussili, cold antipasti, fresh chicken, veal and seafood, as well as tasty desserts such as homemade Italian cookies and cakes.
  • All food is made daily and features pasta dishes such as penne, rigatoni, baked ziti and fussili, cold antipasti, fresh chicken, veal and seafood, as well as tasty desserts such as homemade Italian cookies and cakes.
  • All food is made daily and features pasta dishes such as penne, rigatoni, baked ziti and fussili, cold antipasti, fresh chicken, veal and seafood, as well as tasty desserts such as homemade Italian cookies and cakes.
  • All food is made daily and features pasta dishes such as penne, rigatoni, baked ziti and fussili, cold antipasti, fresh chicken, veal and seafood, as well as tasty desserts such as homemade Italian cookies and cakes.
  • These items such as steak, chicken, ribs and shrimp are marinated in hickory and various blends of fruit wood for up to 16 hours so that they retain a smoky taste that "delivers the perfect, off-the-bone tender barbecue," according to its website.
  • The menu is served during lunch and dinner and features numerous meat and grilled items such as pork nachos, pig wings, brisket salad, po' boy sandwiches, pork ribs, baby-back ribs as well as the traditional hamburger.
  • The menu is served during lunch and dinner and features numerous meat and grilled items such as pork nachos, pig wings, brisket salad, po' boy sandwiches, pork ribs, baby-back ribs as well as the traditional hamburger.
  • The menu is served during lunch and dinner and features numerous meat and grilled items such as pork nachos, pig wings, brisket salad, po' boy sandwiches, pork ribs, baby-back ribs as well as the traditional hamburger.
  • While not advertised as such, Vegetarian Paradise is a fully vegan menu with absolutely no meat, dairy or eggs anywhere on the menu.
  • Relax with an authentic chilled Indian beer as you savor delicacies from their exhaustive menu.
  • Dakshin Indian Cuisine Dakshin Indian Cuisine, also known as the New Cholaa specializes in South-Indian and Indo-Chinese food for the past eight years.
  • Reservations are required as the restaurant is small, but quaint.
  • It does not, as yet, seem to be available outside West Virginia, however; so if you'd like to try it yourself, your best bet is to plan a trip to Williamstown.215 Highland Ave.
  • Helvetia, WV 26224(304) 924-6435 Villa da Vinci The Villa da Vinci is, as the name implies, not a German restaurant, but an Italian one, featuring a pretty standard array of subs, pizza and pasta dishes as well as steak, chicken and fish.
  • Helvetia, WV 26224(304) 924-6435 Villa da Vinci The Villa da Vinci is, as the name implies, not a German restaurant, but an Italian one, featuring a pretty standard array of subs, pizza and pasta dishes as well as steak, chicken and fish.
  • Helvetia, WV 26224(304) 924-6435 Villa da Vinci The Villa da Vinci is, as the name implies, not a German restaurant, but an Italian one, featuring a pretty standard array of subs, pizza and pasta dishes as well as steak, chicken and fish.
  • Esquire Magazine even named the restaurant as having one of the best breakfasts in America and enthused about its homemade corned-beef hash, fried potatoes and buckwheat flapjacks.
  • This award-winning inn draws guests from all over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area, as does its restaurant.
  • Bavarian Inn The Bavarian Inn, located in the college town of Shepherdstown, is actually a luxury hotel as well as a restaurant, featuring 72 rooms with gas fireplaces, whirlpool baths and other upscale amenities.
  • Bavarian Inn The Bavarian Inn, located in the college town of Shepherdstown, is actually a luxury hotel as well as a restaurant, featuring 72 ro