How to use Artemis in a sentence

artemis
  • The Greeks equated Ubasti with their Artemis, confusing her with the leonine Tafne, sister of Shoou (Apollo).

    5
    1
  • Under Greek influence, he was identified with Hippolytus, who after he had been trampled to death by the horses of Poseidon was restored to life by Asclepius and removed by Artemis to the grove at Aricia, which horses were not allowed to enter.

    3
    1
  • Among the other noteworthy buildings of the Peiraeus were the arsenal (vKEUoOKrl) of Philo and the temples of Zeus Soter, the patron god of the sailors, of the Cnidian Artemis, built by Cimon, and of Artemis Munychia, situated near the fort on the Munychia height; traces of a temple of Asclepius, of two theatres and of a hippodrome remain.

    2
    0
  • The probable origin of the story is the part traditionally taken in the foundation of Syracuse by the Iamidae of Olympia, who identified the spring Arethusa with their own river Alpheus, and the nymph with Artemis Alpheiaia, who was worshipped at Ortygia.

    0
    0
  • Under her native name, Britomartis (= the sweet maiden) or Dictynna, she approaches Artemis and Leto, again associated with an infant god, and this Cretan virgin goddess was worshipped in Aegina under the name of Aphaea.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The dead, who returned to the Great Mother, were objects of a sort of heroworship. This early nature-cult explains many anomalous features of Hellenic religion, especially in the cults of Artemis and Aphrodite.

    0
    0
  • According to Callimachus (Hymn to Diana, 190), she was a nymph, the daughter of Zeus and Carme, and a favourite companion of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • She was afterwards made a goddess by Artemis under the name of Dictynna (Blktvov, " a net").

    0
    0
  • But Agamemnon had offended the goddess Artemis by slaying a hind sacred to her, and boasting himself a better hunter.

    0
    0
  • Agamemnon had offended Artemis, who prevented the Greek fleet from sailing for Troy, and, according to the soothsayer Calchas, could be appeased only by the sacrifice of Agamemnon's daughter.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • According to some accounts the sacrifice was completed, according to others Artemis carried away the maiden to be her priestess in the Tauric Chersonese [[[Crimea]]] and substituted for her a hind.

    0
    0
  • These legends show how closely the heroine is associated with the cult of Artemis, and with the human sacrifices which accompanied it in older times before the Hellenic spirit had modified the barbarism of this borrowed religion.

    0
    0
  • The brother and sister returned to Mycenae; Iphigeneia deposited the image in the deme of Brauron in Attica, where she remained as priestess of Artemis Brauronia.

    0
    0
  • Attica being one of the chief seats of the worship of Artemis, this explains why Iphigeneia is sometimes called a daughter of Theseus and Helen, and thereby connected with the national hero.

    0
    0
  • Originally, Iphigeneia, the "mighty born," is probably merely an epithet of Artemis, in which the notion of a priestess of the goddess had its origin.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • As the great nature-goddess, the attributes of fertility and reproduction are characteristically hers, as also the accompanying immorality which originally, perhaps, was often nothing more than primitive magic. As patroness of the hunt, later identification with Artemis was inevitable.

    0
    0
  • Another statue by Myron, the famous Perseus, stood near the precinct of Artemis Brauronia.

    0
    0
  • At first she was suckled by a she-bear, and then saved by huntsmen, among whom she grew up to be skilled with the bow, swift, and fond of the chase, like the virgin goddess Artemis.

    0
    0
  • For a long time she remained true to Artemis and rejected all suitors, but Meilanion at last gained her love by his persistent devotion.

    0
    0
  • The characteristics of these two heroines (frequently confounded) point to their being secondary forms of the Arcadian Artemis.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Among the objects of interest described by Pausanias as extant in Epidaurus are the image of Athena Cissaea in the Acropolis, the temple of Dionysus and Artemis, a shrine of Aphrodite, statues of Asclepius and his wife Epione, and a temple of Hera.

    0
    0
  • The chief buildings are grouped together, and include temples of Asclepius and Artemis, the Tholos, and the Abaton, or portico where the patients slept.

    0
    0
  • Just to the south of this are the foundations of a small temple of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Proud of her numerous family, six daughters and six sons, she boasted of her superiority to her friend Leto, the mother of only two children, Apollo and Artemis.

    0
    0
  • As a punishment, Apollo slew her sons and Artemis her daughters.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • According to some, Niobe is the goddess of snow and winter, whose children, slain by Apollo and Artemis, symbolize the ice and snow melted by the sun in spring; according to others, she is an earth-goddess, whose progeny - vegetation and the fruits of the soil - is dried up and slain every summer by the shafts of the sun-god.

    0
    0
  • Then followed the dramatic " Lot's Wife," in marble (1878), and" Artemis " (1880), which for grace, elegance and purity of taste the sculptor never surpassed.

    0
    0
  • Information was given him in the spring of 212 (two years from the commencement of the siege) that the Syracusans were celebrating a great festival to Artemis; making use of this opportunity, he forced the Hexapylum entrance by night and established himself in Tyche and on the heights of Epipolae.

    0
    0
  • Here are numerous caves in the rock, used for the worship of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • It is to be observed that she appears far more conspicuously in the Apolline myths than in those which grew round the great centres of Artemis worship, the reason being that the idea of Apollo and Artemis as twins is one of later growth on Greek soil.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In Greek art Leto usually appears carrying her children in her arms, pursued by the dragon sent by the jealous Hera, which is slain by the infant Apollo; in vase paintings especially she is often represented with Apollo and Artemis.

    0
    0
  • The general affairs of the league were managed by a synod which met periodically in the temple of Apollo and Artemis at Delos, the ancient centre sanctified by the common worship of the Ionians.

    0
    0
  • They were famous in the ancient world for their maiden goddess, identified by the Greeks with Artemis Tauropolos or Iphigeneia, whom the goddess was said to have brought to her shrine at the moment when she was to have been sacrificed at Aulis.

    0
    0
  • His father having neglected to sacrifice to Artemis, she sent a wild boar to ravage the laud, which was eventually slain by Meleager.

    0
    0
  • Leros (pop. about 3000) was in ancient times a seat of the worship of Artemis.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Thibron, the Spartan, persuaded the Magnesians to leave their indefensible and mutinous city in 399 B.C. and build afresh at Leucophrys, an hour distant, noted for its temple of Artemis Leucophryne, which, according to Strabo, surpassed that at Ephesus in the beauty of its architecture, though inferior in size and wealth.

    0
    0
  • Humann for the Constantinople Museum in 1891-1893; but most of the frieze of the temple of Artemis Leucophryne, representing an Amazon battle, had already been carried off by Texier (1843) to the Louvre.

    0
    0
  • It had temples of Apollo Pythius, Artemis and Zeus.

    0
    0
  • The other buildings which can be identified are the theatre, the stadium, the council chamber or Bouleuterion, and the propylaeum of the market, while on the shoulder of the mountain are the foundations of a small temple, probably that of Artemis Laphria.

    0
    0
  • Many weights have been found in the temenos of Demeter at Cnidus, the temple of Artemis at Ephesus, and in a temple of Aphrodite at Byblus (44); and the making or sale of weights may have been a business of the custodians of the temple standards.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The temple of Artemis was still to be seen in the time of Pausanias.

    0
    0
  • There is a good deal of evidence to connect the Greek goddess Artemis with a cult of the bear; girls danced as "bears" in her honour, and might not marry before undergoing this ceremony.

    0
    0
  • During the festival of Artemis at Delos, Acontius saw Cydippe, a well-born Athenian maiden of whom he was enamoured, sitting in the temple of the goddess.

    0
    0
  • It was a centre of Greek civilization, devoted especially to the worship of Artemis, and producing famous teachers, of whom Stephen the Byzantine mentions Ariston, Kerykos and Plato.

    0
    0
  • A,jjwfa u4payis, is derived from the stamp impressed on each piece of the earth; in ancient times the stamp was the head of Artemis.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In this part stood the altars of Zeus Agoraios and Artemis Agoraia.

    0
    0
  • In this cult the emperor came to be associated with the common worship of the Ephesian Artemis.

    0
    0
  • The close connexion of the Hyperboreans with the cult of Apollo may be seen by comparing the Hyperborean myths, the characters of which by their names mostly recall Apollo or Artemis (Agyieus, Opis, Hecaergos, Loxo), with the ceremonial of the Apolline worship. No meat was eaten at the Pyanepsia; the Hyperboreans were vegetarians.

    0
    0
  • He offered sacrifices to Artemis Agrotera and Enyalios, superintended epitaphia and arranged for the annual honours paid to the tyrannicides.

    0
    0
  • Antioch in Persis, of course, sends athletes to the great games of Greece, but in this decree it determines to take part in the new festival being started in honour of Artemis at Magnesia.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Further, the Greeks themselves, who were always ready to identify Artemis with the moon, do not seem to have recognized any lunar connexion in Hera.

    0
    0
  • The nicknames which they gave to their later kings were Aramaic; and, except Apollo and Daphne, the great divinities of north Syria seem to have remained essentially native, such as the "Persian Artemis" of Meroe and Atargatis of Hierapolis Bambyce.

    0
    0
  • At Goritsa, the ancient Corcyra, in 1911, the Greek Archaeological Society discovered an early archaic temple of Artemis, the excavation of which was continued until 1914 by Doerpfeld at the expense of the former Emperor of Germany.

    0
    0
  • Other important finds were seven statues of women from a sanctuary of Artemis Polo, .a temple and altar of Apollo Pythius, decorative terra-cottas from an archaic Prytaneion, a cemetery with carved and painted tombstones, and remains of a triumphal arch of Caracalla.

    0
    0
  • The temple, which (as inscriptions show) was dedicated to Artemis, had been half-buried by a landslip from the acropolis hill in the historic earthquake of 17 A.D.

    0
    0
  • Another tradition represents Actaeon as the lover of Semele, and his death as due to the jealousy of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Its fame in later times was chiefly associated with the temple of Despoena, containing the colossal group made by Damophon of Messene, of Despoena and Demeter seated, with Artemis and the Titan Anytus standing beside them.

    0
    0
  • In historic times it was situate on the lower slopes of the hills, Coressus and Prion, which rise out of a fertile plain near the mouth of the river Cayster, while the temple and precinct of Artemis or Diana, to the fame of which the town owed much of its celebrity, were in the plain itself, E.N.E.

    0
    0
  • The deity of the city was Artemis; but we must guard against misconception when we use that name, remembering that she bore close relation to the primitive Asiatic goddess of nature, whose cult existed before the Ionian migration at the neighbouring Ortygia, and that she always remained the virgin-mother of all life and especially wild life, and an embodiment of the fertility and productive power of the earth.

    0
    0
  • Twice in the period 700 -500 B.C. the city owed its preservation to the interference of the goddess; once when the swarms of the Cimmerians overran Asia Minor in the 7th century and burnt the Artemision itself; and once when Croesus besieged the town in the century succeeding, and only retired after it had solemnly dedicated itself to Artemis, the sign of such dedication being the stretching of a rope from city to sanctuary.

    0
    0
  • When Xerxes returned from the march against Greece, he honoured the temple of Artemis, although he sacked other Ionian shrines, and even left his children behind at Ephesus for safety's sake.

    0
    0
  • The Ephesians even dragged out and slew those Romans who had fled to the precinct of Artemis for protection, notwithstanding which sacrilege they soon returned from their new to their former masters, and even had the effrontery to state, in an inscription preserved to this day, that their defection to Mithradates was a mere yielding to superior force.

    0
    0
  • All this time the city was gradually growing in wealth and in devotion to the service of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • On this occasion Nestorius was condemned, and the honour of the Virgin established as Theotokus, amid great popular rejoicing, due, doubtless, in some measure to the hold which the cult of the virgin Artemis still had on the city.

    0
    0
  • With Aeschylus the punishment ends here, but, according to Euripides, in order to escape the persecutions of the Erinyes, he was ordered by Apollo to go to Tauris, carry off the statue of Artemis which had fallen from heaven, and bring it to Athens.

    0
    0
  • He repairs to Tauris with Pylades, the son of Strophius and the intimate friend of Orestes, and the pair are at once imprisoned by the people, among whom the custom is to sacrifice all strangers to Artemis.

    0
    0
  • After a conflict of mutual affection, Pylades at last yields, but the letter brings about a recognition between brother and sister, and all three escape together, carrying with them the image of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Parnassus becomes the holy mountain of Apollo, and Orestes himself an hypostasis of Apollo "of the mountain," just as Pylades is Apollo "of the plain" similarly Electra, Iphigeneia and Chrysothemis are hypostases of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • The sacred road continued its course to the north-east corner of this open space, with the precinct of Artemis on its west side, and, on its east side, a terrace on which stood three temples.

    0
    0
  • South of it is the precinct of Artemis, containing within it the old temple of the goddess; her more recent temple was to the south of her precinct, opening not into it but into the open space entered through the southern propylaea of the precinct of Apollo.

    0
    0
  • It supplied a birthplace to Apollo and Artemis, who were born beneath a palm tree beside its sacred lake, and became for ever sacred to these twin deities.

    0
    0
  • Hecate is frequently identified with Artemis, an identification usually justified by the assumption that both were moon-goddesses.

    0
    0
  • Like Artemis, Hecate is also a goddess of fertility, presiding especially over the birth and the youth of wild animals, and over human birth and marriage.

    0
    0
  • It is suggested that this is due to the fact that, at the time of the adoption of the oriental goddess, the Greeks already possessed lunar divinities in Hecate, Selene, Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Adonis was afterwards killed by a boar sent by Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Other instances of a god being sacrificed to himself as his own enemy are the sacrifice of the goat and bull to Dionysus, and of the bear to Artemis.

    0
    0
  • In his hymns he celebrated Opis and Arge, two Hyperborean maidens who founded the cult of Apollo in Delos, and in the hymn to Eilythyia the birth of Apollo and Artemis and the foundation of the Delian sanctuary.

    0
    0
  • An altar was retained for the service of one particular god, except where through local tradition two or more deities had become intimately associated, as in the case of the altar at Olympia to Artemis and Alpheus jointly, or that of Poseidon and Erechtheus in the Erechtheum at Athens.

    0
    0
  • The Homeric and later conception of Artemis, though by no means the original one, may be noticed first.

    0
    0
  • She is said to have been born a day before him (on the 6th of the month) and tradition assigns them different birthplaces - Delos to Apollo, Ortygia to Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Artemis is the goddess of chastity, an aspect of her character which gradually assumed more and more importance - the protectress of young men and maidens, who defies and contemns the power of Aphrodite.

    0
    0
  • Although Apollo has nothing to do with the earlier cult of Artemis, nor Artemis with that of Delphi, their association was a comparatively early one, and probably originated in Delos.

    0
    0
  • Both Opis (or Oupis) and Hecaerge are names of Artemis, the latter being the feminine of Hecaergos, an epithet of Apollo.

    0
    0
  • Her connexion with the prophetic art is doubtful, although mention is made of an Artemis Sibylla.

    0
    0
  • At Phigalia in Arcadia, Eurynome, represented as half woman and half fish, was probably another form of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • These tend to show that Artemis was first and foremost a nature goddess, whose cult shows numerous traces of totemism.

    0
    0
  • Artemis was naturally also a goddess of trees and vegetation.

    0
    0
  • Near Orchomenus her wooden image stood in a large cedar-tree - an indication that her worship was originally that of the tree itself (KESpeEins, " the cedar goddess"); at Caryae there was an image of Artemis Kapvarts (" the nut-tree goddess").

    0
    0
  • This is clearly expressed in the cult of Artemis Laphria (possibly connected with X a4wpa, "spoils"), at whose festivals all kinds of animals, both wild and tame, as well as fruits, were thrown together on a huge wood fire.

    0
    0
  • The bear was especially associated with her in Arcadia, and in her worship as Artemis Brauronia at Brauron in Attica.

    0
    0
  • Zeus, to conceal the amour, changed Callisto into a she-bear; Hera, however, discovered it, and persuaded Artemis to slay Callisto, who was placed amongst the stars as iiptcros (" the bear").

    0
    0
  • There is no doubt that Callisto is identical with Artemis; her name is an obvious variation of KaXMiaTrt, a frequent epithet of the goddess, to whom a temple was erected on the hill where Callisto was supposed to be buried.

    0
    0
  • Kraus in Classical Review, February 1908, that Aphaea, the cult-name of Artemis at Aegina, is of Semitic origin and means "beautiful."

    0
    0
  • Closely connected with this legend is the worship of Artemis Brauronia.

    0
    0
  • A number of young girls, between five and ten years of age, wearing a bear-skin (afterwards a saffron-coloured robe) danced a bear-dance, called apKTEia, the girls themselves being called ecpKToc. In one account, a maiden was ordered to be sacrificed to the bear Artemis, but a certain man who had a goat called it his daughter and offered it up in secret, just as at Munychium a fawn dressed up as a girl was sacrificed to the goddess.

    0
    0
  • Callisto was originally a bear-goddess worshipped in Arcadia, identified with Artemis, when nothing remained of the original animal-worship but name and ritual.

    0
    0
  • The worship of Callisto being merged in that of the greater divinity, she became the handmaid and companion of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • A stone figure of a bear found on the Acropolis seems to point to the worship of Artemis Brauronia.

    0
    0
  • The custom of flogging youths at the altar of Artemis Orthia 1 at Limnaeum in Laconia, and the legend of Iphigeneia, herself another form of Artemis, connected with Artemis Taurica of the Tauric Chersonese, are usually supposed to point to early human sacrifice (but see Farnell).

    0
    0
  • Scholars differ as to whether Artemis Taurica is identical with Artemis Tauropolos, worshipped chiefly at Samos with a milder ritual, but it is more probable that Tavp07r6Xos simply means "protectress of bulls."

    0
    0
  • The protecting influence of Artemis was extended, like that of Apollo, to the highest animal, man.

    0
    0
  • Boys were brought by their nurses to the temple of Artemis KopvBaXia (= Kovporp60os) and there consecrated to her; at the Apaturia, on the day called KovpEWTts, boys cut off and dedicated their hair to her.

    0
    0
  • As already noticed, in Homer Artemis appears as a goddess of death; closely akin to this is the conception of her as a goddess of war.

    0
    0
  • The idea of Artemis '.s a virgin goddess, the "queen and huntress, chaste and fair," which obtained great prominence in early times, and seems inconsistent with her association with childbirth, is generally explained as due to her connexion with Apollo, but it is suggested by Farnell that irapOE'os originally meant "unmarried," and that "Apreµcs 7r-ap9Evos may have been originally the goddess of a people who had not yet the advanced Hellenic institutions of settled marriage.

    0
    0
  • Another view of the original character of Artemis, which has found much support in modern times, is that she was a moongoddess.

    0
    0
  • But there is no trace of Artemis as such in the epic period, and the Homeric hymn knows nothing of her identification with Selene.

    0
    0
  • Again, various non-Hellenic divinities were identified with Artemis, and their cult gradually amalgamated with hers.

    0
    0
  • The most important of these was Artemis of Ephesus, whose seat was in the marshy valley of the Caystrus.

    0
    0
  • Like the Greek Artemis, she was essentially a nature goddess, the great fostermother of the vegetable and animal kingdom.

    0
    0
  • The Greeks of Ephesus identified her with their own Artemis, and claimed that her birthplace Ortygia was near Ephesus, not in Delos.

    0
    0
  • The usual figure of the Ephesian Artemis, which was said in the first instance to have fallen from heaven, is in the form of a female with many breasts, the symbol of productivity or a token of her function as the all-nourishing mother.

    0
    0
  • Mention may also be made of the following non-Hellenic representatives of Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Leucophryne (or Leucophrys), whose worship was brought by emigrants from Magnesia in Thessaly to Magnesia on the Maeander, was a nature goddess, and her representation on coins exactly resembles that of the Ephesian Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Her cult, however, from the little that is known of it appears to have been more Hellenic. There was an altar and temple of Artemis Pergaea at Perga in Pamphylia, where a yearly festival was held in her honour.

    0
    0
  • Similar figures were Artemis Coloene, worshipped at Lake Coloe near Sardis; Artemis Cordax, celebrated in wanton dances on Mount Sipylus; the Persian Artemis, identical with Anaitis Bendis, was a Thracian goddess of war and the chase, whose cult was introduced into Attica in the middle of the 5th century B.C. by Thracian metics.

    0
    0
  • The Greek Artemis was usually represented as a huntress with bow and quiver, or torch in her hand, in face very like Apollo, her drapery flowing to her feet, or, more frequently, girt high for speed.

    0
    0
  • Another famous statue is one from Gabii, in which she is finishing her toilet and fastening the chlamys over her tunic. In older times her figure is fuller and stronger, and the clothing more complete; certain statues discovered at Delos, imitated from wooden models (oava), are supposed to represent Artemis; they are described as stiff and rigid, the limbs as it were glued to the body without life or movement, garments closely fitting, the folds of which fall in symmetrical parallel lines.

    0
    0
  • For the Roman goddess identified with Artemis see Diana.

    0
    0
  • The deities worshipped by them were Ares (who is consistently assigned to them as a god of war, and as a god of Thracian and generally northern origin) and Artemis, not the usual Greek goddess of that name, but an Asiatic deity in some respects her equivalent.

    0
    0
  • In later art they approach the model of Artemis, wearing a thin dress, girt high for speed; while on the later painted vases their dress is often peculiarly Persian - that is, close-fitting trousers and a high cap called the kidaris.

    0
    0
  • Artemis in like manner is called Phoebe, and in the Latin poets and their modern followers Phoebus and Phoebe are often used simply for the sun and moon respectively.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the Artemis of Arcadia, who is confused with the nymph Callisto, who, again, is said to have become a she-bear, and later a star, and the Brauronian Artemis, whose maiden ministers danced a bear-dance, are goddesses whose legend seems unnatural, .and is felt to need explanation.

    0
    0
  • Apollo, Helios, and Hephaestus were fire, Hera was air, Poseidon was water, Artemis was the moon, Kai Ta Xoora 6Aoiws.

    0
    0
  • Stated in the barest form, these results do not differ greatly from the conclusions of Theagenes of Rhegium, who held that " Hephaestus was fire, Hera was air, Poseidon was water, Artemis was the moon, Kai ra Xoura bµoiws."

    0
    0
  • In other places there were manifest commutations of human sacrifice, as at the altar of Artemis the Implacable at Patrae, where Pausanias saw the wild beasts being driven into the flames.'

    0
    0
  • The other chief Homeric deities are Apollo and Artemis, children of Zeus by Leto, a mortal mother raised to divinity.

    0
    0
  • Apollo, in any case, is the young and beautiful archer-god of Homer; Artemis, his sister, is the goddess of archery, who takes her pastime in the chase.

    0
    0
  • It was a centre of native influences as contrasted with the Greek, which were predominant in Attalia, and it was a great seat of the worship of "Queen" Artemis, here represented as a human-headed cone and a purely Anatolian nature goddess.

    0
    0
  • But of this, as well as of the temple of Artemis that formerly crowned Mount Skopos, no vestiges can now be discovered.

    0
    0
  • You know, I often read all the glossy sales bumf the funds send out such as Artemis.

    0
    0
  • The nymph, you see, was a maiden, and like Artemis, she preferred to remain chaste.

    0
    0
  • There is plenty of outdoor deck space on the Artemis and the wrap around teak promenade deck is good for sunbathers.

    0
    0
  • The only thing that let me down is the fact i can't find a website on it, like the Artemis fowl books.

    0
    0
  • Annotation Artemis is now the main annotation tool used for analysis of microbial genomes at the Sanger Institute.

    0
    0
  • Using Artemis as a sequence analysis tool for prokaryote and small eukaryotic genomes.

    0
    0
  • Within the temple of Artemis, the virgin goddess, there were ritualistic prostitutes.

    0
    0
  • Like her brother Apollo, Artemis was also associated with music, and was frequently depicted carrying a lyre.

    0
    0
  • Philip Wolstencroft at Artemis European Growth applies its ' Growth At a Reasonable Price ' model to mainly medium-sized companies.

    0
    0
  • Some modern writers have suggested that sacred prostitution occurred at the temple of Artemis at Ephesus.

    0
    0
  • Disguising himself as Apollo, brother of Artemis, he overcame any scruples Callisto may have had and they became lovers.

    0
    0
  • The retail tycoons Artemis vehicle will pay out 14 million euros in redundancy payments to the staff.

    0
    0
  • The epithet rrpovoia (" forethought") is due, according to Farnell, to a confusion with irpovaLa, referring to a statue of the goddess standing "before a shrine," and arose later (probably spreading from Delphi), some time after the Persian wars, in which she repelled a Persian attack on the temples "by divine forethought"; another legend attributes the name to her skill in assisting Leto at the birth of Apollo and Artemis.

    0
    0
  • Another story is that they were presumptuous enough to seek Artemis and Hera in marriage, and that Artemis caused them to slay each other unintentionally on the island of Naxos, where they were afterwards worshipped as heroes.

    0
    0
  • According to Professor Ridgeway, however, the Turkish crescent, like that seen on modern horse-trappings, has nothing to do with the new moon, but is the result of the baseto-base conjunction of two claw or tusk amulets, an example of which has been brought to light during the excavations of the site of the temple of Artemis Orthia at Sparta (see Athenaeum, March 21, 1908).

    0
    0
  • Here the connexion of Artemis with the Hyperborean legend (see Apollo) is shown in the names of the maidens (Opis, Hecaerge) who were supposed to have brought offerings from the north to Delos, where they were buried.

    0
    0
  • As such she is Puom opos (" bringer of victory"); the title KoXacvis is possibly connected with 1 The site of the temple of Artemis Orthia was excavated by the British School of Archaeology at Athens (see Annual, 1906).

    0
    0
  • It has been mentioned that Callisto, Iphigeneia, Eilithyia, are only Artemis under different names; to these may be added Adrasteia, Atalanta, Helen, Leto and others (see Wernicke in Pauly-Wissowa's Realencyclopddie).

    0
    0
  • The Artemis of the Odyssey " taking her pastime in the chase of boars and swift deer, while with her the wild wood-nymphs disport them, and high over them all she rears her brow, and is easily to be known where all are fair," is a perfectly rational mythic representation of a divine being.

    0
    0
  • At Ephesus, where she was adored under the form of a meteoric stone, she was identified with the Greek Artemis (see also Great Mother Of The Gods).

    0
    0
  • The ivory figures, however, found by Hogarth on the level of the earliest temple of Artemis show Asiatic influence, and resemble the so-called "Phoenician" ivories from the palace of Sargon at Calah (Nimrud).

    0
    0
  • These are all scenes in the ritual of the indigenous naturalistic religion which was spread, in slightly varying forms, all over Asia Minor, and consisted in the worship of the self-reproductive powers of nature, personified in the great mother-goddess (called by various names Cybele, Leto, Artemis, &c.) and the god her husband-and-son (Attis, Men, Sabazios, &c.), representing the two elements of the ultimate divine nature (see Great Mother Of The Gods).

    0
    0
  • P and O Cruises also offer two child-free ships, the Artemis, and the Acadia.

    0
    0
  • In addition, there are two ships by P and O Cruises, the Artemis and the Acadia, which are child-free.

    0
    0
  • The Greeks and Romans associated the moon with the goddesses Selene, Phoebe, Artemis, Diana and Hectate for childbirth, fertility and life cycles.

    0
    0
  • Designers include Vanity Fair, Gossard Artemis, Shadowline, Van Raalte and Deena Laros.

    0
    0
  • I have an affinity for Aphrodite (Venus) but Athena (Minerva) or Artemis (Diana) are fun as well.

    0
    0
  • She gave the young girl the Roman name for Artemis.

    0
    0
  • In mythology, Artemis was the goddess of the hunt.

    0
    0