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arrogance

arrogance

arrogance Sentence Examples

  • The edge of arrogance surprised her.

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  • His uncle, who appears to have " taken his zeal for ambition," wrote him a severe letter, taking him to task for arrogance and pride, qualities which Bacon vehemently disclaimed.

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  • His uncle, who appears to have " taken his zeal for ambition," wrote him a severe letter, taking him to task for arrogance and pride, qualities which Bacon vehemently disclaimed.

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    42
  • When the guardsman rose, the arrogance was gone from his face, replaced by anger.

    85
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  • Jeffrey naturally declined to appoint a man who, in spite of some mathematical knowledge, had no special qualification, and administered a general lecture upon Carlyle's arrogance and eccentricity which left a permanent sense of injury.

    60
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  • But his arrogance gave much offence.

    55
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  • A glint of triumph lit her gaze, and she added with arrogance, "But you can never command me."

    30
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  • In one of his letters home at this period he calls the campaign a "tissue of mismanagement, blunders, errors, ignorance and arrogance"; and outspoken criticism such as this brought him many bitter enemies throughout his career, who made the most of undeniable faults of character.

    28
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  • In one of his letters home at this period he calls the campaign a "tissue of mismanagement, blunders, errors, ignorance and arrogance"; and outspoken criticism such as this brought him many bitter enemies throughout his career, who made the most of undeniable faults of character.

    28
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  • Memon's arrogance allowed him to enter the meadow without his men.

    25
    14
  • As monk in the neighbouring monastery of Euprepius, and afterwards as presbyter, he became celebrated in the diocese for his asceticism, his orthodoxy and his eloquence; hostile critics, such as the church historian Socrates, allege that his arrogance and vanity were hardly less conspicuous.

    22
    13
  • But the arrogance of Itakh, to whom he owed his Caliphate, became insufferable.

    21
    14
  • Their comrades in the quarters resent this pretension and declare that when in contact with the people the vaisseaux make bad blood by their arrogance and want of tact.

    18
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  • Diihring's clear, incisive writing is disfigured by arrogance and ill-temper, failings which may be extenuated on the ground of his physical affliction.

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  • In 1415 Joanna married James of Bourbon, who kept his wife in a state of semi-confinement, murdered her lover, Pandolfo Alopo, and imprisoned her chief captain, Sforza; but his arrogance drove the barons to rebellion, and they made him renounce the royal.

    16
    10
  • In 1415 Joanna married James of Bourbon, who kept his wife in a state of semi-confinement, murdered her lover, Pandolfo Alopo, and imprisoned her chief captain, Sforza; but his arrogance drove the barons to rebellion, and they made him renounce the royal.

    16
    10
  • Lang's adherence to the older faith, together with his pride and arrogance, made him very unpopular in his diocese of Salzburg; in 1523 he was involved in a serious struggle with his subjects, and in 1525, during the Peasants' War, he had again to fight hard to hold his own.

    16
    11
  • In Egypt, however, monophysitism was as strong as ever, and soon at Constantinople the arrogance of Rome caused a reaction, led by Theodora, the wife of the new emperor Justinian (527565).

    15
    11
  • Belief in the strength of its walls and of the castle that occupied the centre bridge, thus effectually command ing navigation by the river, engendered arrogance and overconfidence, and the people of Dinant thought they could defy the full power of Burgundy.

    14
    9
  • Belief in the strength of its walls and of the castle that occupied the centre bridge, thus effectually command ing navigation by the river, engendered arrogance and overconfidence, and the people of Dinant thought they could defy the full power of Burgundy.

    14
    9
  • He was a very agreeable companion and a thorough man of the world, singularly free from arrogance and pomposity; owing to his small stature, he was often known as "die kleine Excellenz."

    13
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  • Count Casimir Batthyany attacked him in The Times, and Szemere, who had been prime minister under him, published a bitter criticism of his acts and character, accusing him of arrogance, cowardice and duplicity.

    13
    9
  • Moreover, the temper of these more enlightened men was itself opposed to Italian indifference and immorality; it was pugnacious and polemical, eager to beat down the arrogance of monks and theologians rather than to pursue an ideal of aesthetical self-culture.

    12
    8
  • But she certainly did her best to ruin her own chances by showing an unwise arrogance, and a determination toresume at once all the powers that her father had possessed.

    11
    27
  • 456; but the exorbitant claims and exactions of bishops, to which this repugnance to episcopal control is to be traced, far more than to the arrogance of abbots, rendered it increasingly frequent, and, in the 6th century, the practice of exempting religious houses partly or altogether from episcopal control, and making them responsible to the pope alone, received an impulse from Gregory the Great.

    10
    12
  • She knew without a doubt that Romas's arrogance would never allow him to admit his inability to deal with her to anyone.

    10
    18
  • In Kufa a number of the Koreish had settled, and their arrogance became insupportable.

    9
    7
  • During the absence of Alexander, with whom she regularly corresponded on public as well as domestic affairs, she had great influence, and by her arrogance and ambition caused such trouble to the regent Antipater that on Alexander's death (323) she found it prudent to withdraw into Epirus.

    7
    8
  • But the arrogance which she displayed in her prosperity alienated the Londoners and the papal legate, Bishop Henry of Winchester.

    5
    7
  • Charles's demands by no means pleased the citizens, and the arrogance and violence of his soldiers led to riots in which they were assailed with stones in the narrow streets.

    5
    7
  • The overweening arrogance of the Spaniards soon drove the pope back into the ranks of their enemies.

    5
    7
  • The Protestants eagerly sought out the writings which exposed and denounced the arrogance of the popes, while the Romanists attempted to counter them with the numerous lives of the saints.

    5
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  • That he anticipated in any manner the inductive philosophy cannot be contended; his botanical studies did not lead him, like his contemporary Konrad von Gesner, to any idea of a natural system of classification, and he rejected with the utmost arrogance and violence of language the discoveries of Copernicus.

    5
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  • The Protestants eagerly sought out the writings which exposed and denounced the arrogance of the popes, while the Romanists attempted to counter them with the numerous lives of the saints.

    5
    7
  • these respects it formed a marked and valuable contrast to the arrogance of absolutism, to the dogmatism of sensationalism, and to the doctrine of church authority, preached by the theological school of his day.

    5
    9
  • In the time of our Lord the scribes claimed the name with an arrogance which He disapproved (Matt.

    4
    3
  • Basra was at that time full of fugitives from Kufa, Arabian chiefs who resented the arrogance of Mokhtar's adherents, and desired eagerly to regain their former position in Kufa.

    4
    4
  • Only his arrogance and procrastination and Marys own courage saved her throne.

    4
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  • Corso Donati, who for some time was the most powerful man in Florence, made himself many enemies by his arrogance, and was obliged to rely on the popolo grasso, the irritation against him resulting in a rising in which he was killed (1308).

    4
    6
  • Despite his open protests and subterraneous counter-mining, war was actually declared against Sweden in 1675, and his subsequent policy seemed so obscure and hazardous to those who did not possess the clue to the perhaps purposely tangled skein, that the numerous enemies whom his arrogance and superciliousness had raised up against him, resolved to destroy him.

    4
    6
  • His qualities and his defects were alike exhibited on a generous scale; and if his greed and arrogance were colossal, so were his administrative capacity and his appetite for work.

    4
    7
  • Meanwhile Bokhara became an object of rivalry to Russia and England, and envoys were sent by both nations to cultivate the favour of the emir, who treated the Russians with arrogance and the English with contempt.

    4
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  • He was present at the Marburg conference in 1529, at the Augsburg diet in 1530 and at the signing of the Schmalkald articles in 1537, and took part in other public transactions of importance in the history of the Reformation; that he had an exceptionally large number of personal enemies was due to his vehemence, coarseness and arrogance in controversy.

    3
    5
  • But the young duke, galled by Louis's overbearing arrogance, eventually asserted his independence and joined the league of Austria, Spain and Venice against him in r690.

    3
    5
  • Enraged by this unexpected arrogance, Henry summoned a synod of German bishops to Worms in January 1076, and Hildebrand was declared deposed.

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  • The arrogance and the ambition of the popes then stamped Tb R upon the minds of the people an impression that was for,7a7~n never effaced.

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  • Avarice, lofty claims and frequent exhibitions of arrogance made him many foes.

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  • Enraged by this unexpected arrogance, Henry summoned a synod of German bishops to Worms in January 1076, and Hildebrand was declared deposed.

    3
    5
  • 24.1) characterizing his epitaph as written in a vein of "Campanian arrogance" it has been inferred that he was born in one of the Latin communities settled in Campania.

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  • Hieronymus, the grandson of Hiero, thought fit to ally himself with Carthage; he did not live, however, to see the mischief he had done, for he fell in a conspiracy which he had wantonly provoked by his arrogance and cruelty.

    3
    6
  • 24.1) characterizing his epitaph as written in a vein of "Campanian arrogance" it has been inferred that he was born in one of the Latin communities settled in Campania.

    3
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  • But in the last years during which this circle kept together a new spirit appeared in Roman politics and a new power in Roman literature, the revolutionary spirit evoked by the Gracchi in opposition to the long-continued ascendancy of the senate, and the new power of Roman satire, which was exercised impartially and unsparingly against both the excesses of the revolutionary spirit and the arrogance and incompetence of the extreme party among the nobles.

    3
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  • " We shall face the future as our ancestors would have faced it, without disquiet, without arrogance, but in solid and inflexible determination."

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  • the king's harshness and the arrogance and cruelty of his son, found vent in a revolt led by Roberto Sanseverino and Francesco Coppola, which was crushed by means of craft and treachery.

    2
    2
  • But his great wealth and power, as well as the arrogance of his nephew and heir Giannettino Doria, made him many enemies, and in 1547 the Fiesco conspiracy to upset the power of his house took place.

    2
    2
  • But the phrase "Campanian arrogance" seems to have been used proverbially for "gasconade"; and, as there was a plebeian gens Naevia in Rome, it is quite as probable that he was by birth a Roman citizen.

    2
    4
  • There seemed to be only one way in which a king could hope to overcome the arrogance of the princes, and that was to encourage the towns by forming with them a close and enduring alliance.

    2
    4
  • Darnley was esteemed handsome, though his portraits give an opposite impression; his native qualities of cowardice, perfidy, profligacy and overweening arrogance were at first concealed, and in mid April 1565 Lethington was sent to London, not to renew the negotiations with Leicester (as had been designed till the 31st of March), but to announce Mary's intended wedding with her cousin.

    2
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  • You.re right, Kris, I can.t understand how you could turn your back on the person who needed you most and justify it with your shortsighted arrogance.

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  • You haven't lost that arrogance.

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  • When Rob's gaze came back to Carmen, it had lost the arrogance.

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  • But he never wavered in his allegiance to Vespasian, whose favour he retained in spite of his arrogance.

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  • 15, with the a plebeian family in ancient Rome, arrogance.

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  • The arrogance which Pitt displayed towards foreign nations was displayed by Grenville towards classes of the population of the British dominions.

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  • Their arbitrary methods disgusted the nation, and the personal arrogance of the ministers at last disgusted the king.

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  • He made a wretched emissary, and there was no limit to his arrogance, noisiness and indiscretion.

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  • His natural arrogance and tyranny seems to have increased with years, and the second period of his governorship was a stormy one.

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  • If so, parliament was told that temporal possessions ruin the church and drive out the Christian graces of faith, hope and charity; that the priesthood of the church in communion with Rome was not the priesthood Christ gave to his apostles; that the monk's vow of celibacy had for its consequence unnatural lust, and should not be imposed; that transubstantiation was a feigned miracle, and led people to idolatry; that prayers made over wine, bread, water, oil, salt, wax, incense, altars of stone, church walls, vestments, mitres, crosses, staves, were magical and should not be allowed; that kings should possess the jus episcopale, and bring good government into the church; that no special prayers should be made for the dead; that auricular confession made to the clergy, and declared to be necessary for salvation, was the root of clerical arrogance and the cause of indulgences and other abuses in pardoning sin; that all wars were against the principles of the New Testament, and were but murdering and plundering the poor to win glory for kings; that the vows of chastity laid upon nuns led to child murder; that many of the trades practised in the commonwealth, such as those of goldsmiths and armourers, were unnecessary and led to luxury and waste.

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  • To all his three wives, in spite of numerous infidelities, he seems to have been warmly attached; and this is perhaps the best trait in a character otherwise more remarkable for arrogance and heat than for any amiable qualities.

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  • Irenaeus ascribes Satan's fall to "pride and arrogance and envy of God's creation"; and traces man's deliverance from Satan to Christ's victory in resisting his temptations; but also, guided by certain Pauline passages, represents the death of Christ "as a ransom paid to the ` apostasy' for men who had fallen into captivity" (ii.

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  • Accused of violating treaties, breaking oaths, persecuting the church and abetting heresy, Frederick replied by an open letter rebutting these charges, and in equally unmeasured terms denounced the arrogance and want of faith of the clergy from the pope downwards.

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  • When the guardsman rose, the arrogance was gone from his face, replaced by anger.

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  • The edge of arrogance surprised her.

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  • Lydia returned, her old arrogance renewed.

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  • You.re right, Kris, I can.t understand how you could turn your back on the person who needed you most and justify it with your shortsighted arrogance.

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  • With all the insults and arrogance, she couldn.t take her mind off the statue of Rhyn and her sister being at the mercy of such a man.

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  • She knew without a doubt that Romas's arrogance would never allow him to admit his inability to deal with her to anyone.

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  • He once dreamed her naked torso was horribly disfigured by a giant birthmark but the truth was more likely childlike modesty kept in check by a general arrogance that forbade her to admit anything deemed to be a weakness.

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  • You haven't lost that arrogance.

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  • A glint of triumph lit her gaze, and she added with arrogance, "But you can never command me."

    0
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  • Memon's arrogance allowed him to enter the meadow without his men.

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  • When Rob's gaze came back to Carmen, it had lost the arrogance.

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  • arrogance of the elites should never be underestimated.

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  • arrogance of youth, I of course said 'yes ' .

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  • arrogance of academics pontificating about rural affairs - are they letting us down?

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  • arrogance of power, they see no need to explain anything, or seek consent.

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  • arrogance of the man.

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  • arrogance of a government who will not let the people have their say.

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  • The problem is more man's arrogance in thinking we can confine the universe to laws.

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  • We must not demonstrate any arrogance, and we must refrain from any irrational or undemocratic behavior.

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  • The 4 Marys withdraw as Darnley joins Mary, walks down the center, he showing arrogance, she displeasure.

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  • arrogance displayed by the council in ignoring public opinion has also been incredible.

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  • He also has the arrogance to ask what planet these residents inhabit.

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  • But al-Qaeda is growing in support as a result of the ' War on Terror ' and a perceived American ignorant arrogance.

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  • I saw the arrogance of the British colonialists, and how the culture of the Asians allowed colonial dominance.

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  • Only a Prime Minister of breathtaking arrogance could have learned nothing from what has happened.

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  • That we assume we were made in God's image suggests unbelievable arrogance on our part.

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  • I thought, probably with youthful arrogance, that I could improve on that.

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  • President George W.] Bush's imperial arrogance has declared.

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  • The sheer arrogance of the Labor Party knows no bounds.

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  • He will, with supreme arrogance, be attempting to dethrone God in his life.

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  • arrogance on the part of sociologists who hold such a view.

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  • What is disguised as patriotism is nothing more than racial bigotry and arrogance and unfortunately the English are the worst offenders.

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  • boastful arrogance.

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  • composure in the face of Arsenal's now typical arrogance.

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  • culpable ignorance backed by arrogance.

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  • Put on any dress that does not combine extravagance and arrogance.

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  • insufferable arrogance, we're still benefiting from its influence today, argues Andy Medhurst.

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  • While humility is a virtue and we must always safeguard against arrogance, we dare not internalize misdirected and agenda-driven criticism.

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  • Steve was never judgmental and never showed the slightest hint of the arrogance to which he would have been fully entitled.

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  • Julian Evans - The Guardian Bad: ..the collection as a whole is vitiated by a wilful obscurity which borders on arrogance.

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  • overweening arrogance, he is an erratic and unforthcoming conversationalist.

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  • patrician arrogance which simply begged to be cut down to size.

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  • This remedy is for excessive pride and arrogance and helps bring about humility.

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  • shatter complacency and arrogance.

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  • smacks of western arrogance.

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  • stupefying arrogance " during last Saturday's coverage.

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  • swaggering arrogance.

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  • And it is an enduring testament to the corruption, deceit and arrogance of this pitiful and mucky government.

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  • unbelievable arrogance on our part.

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  • Count Casimir Batthyany attacked him in The Times, and Szemere, who had been prime minister under him, published a bitter criticism of his acts and character, accusing him of arrogance, cowardice and duplicity.

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  • He offended the pope by his arrogance and pride, and both pope and emperor by his proposal to set up a new Roman empire, the sovereignty of which would rest directly upon the will of the people.

    0
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  • Only the death of Stephen, the great hospodar of Moldavia, enabled Poland still to hold her own on the Danube; while the liberality of Pope Julius II., who issued no fewer than 29 bulls in favour of Poland and granted Alexander Peter's Pence and other financial help, enabled the Polish king to restrain somewhat the arrogance of the Teutonic Order.

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  • his arrogance and obstinacy, his perverse insistence upon the theoretical and disregard of the actual, made strife inevitableHe provoked disputes with the Italian states over ecclesiastical rights.

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  • Even Jeremy Bentham, restive under appeals to vague and intangible standards, breaks out in despairing indignation against the word " ought " as " the talisman of arrogance, indolence point of the particular theist who speaks to the ques tion.

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  • In the time of our Lord the scribes claimed the name with an arrogance which He disapproved (Matt.

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  • But the arrogance which she displayed in her prosperity alienated the Londoners and the papal legate, Bishop Henry of Winchester.

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  • He resented her arrogance, and a few months after the marriage he gave her cause for jealousy, and disputes arose.

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  • His qualities and his defects were alike exhibited on a generous scale; and if his greed and arrogance were colossal, so were his administrative capacity and his appetite for work.

    0
    0
  • " We shall face the future as our ancestors would have faced it, without disquiet, without arrogance, but in solid and inflexible determination."

    0
    0
  • The two French writers represent Richard as a faithless vassal: in the German writers - Tagino, dean of Passau, who wrote a Descriptio of Barbarossa's Crusade (1189-1190); and Ansbert, an Austrian clerk, who wrote De expeditione Friderici Imperatoris (1187-1196) - Richard appears rather as a monster of pride and arrogance.

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  • He was a very agreeable companion and a thorough man of the world, singularly free from arrogance and pomposity; owing to his small stature, he was often known as "die kleine Excellenz."

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  • In Egypt, however, monophysitism was as strong as ever, and soon at Constantinople the arrogance of Rome caused a reaction, led by Theodora, the wife of the new emperor Justinian (527565).

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  • But the phrase "Campanian arrogance" seems to have been used proverbially for "gasconade"; and, as there was a plebeian gens Naevia in Rome, it is quite as probable that he was by birth a Roman citizen.

    0
    0
  • Hieronymus, the grandson of Hiero, thought fit to ally himself with Carthage; he did not live, however, to see the mischief he had done, for he fell in a conspiracy which he had wantonly provoked by his arrogance and cruelty.

    0
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  • The first noticeable quality in Paracelsus (c. 1490-1541) is his revolutionary independence of thought, which was supported by his immense personal arrogance.

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  • This, however, was not enough for the Florentine democracy, who viewed with alarm the increasing power and arrogance of the grandi, who in spite of their exclusion from many offices were still influential and constituted independent clans within the state.

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  • Corso Donati, who for some time was the most powerful man in Florence, made himself many enemies by his arrogance, and was obliged to rely on the popolo grasso, the irritation against him resulting in a rising in which he was killed (1308).

    0
    0
  • Charles's demands by no means pleased the citizens, and the arrogance and violence of his soldiers led to riots in which they were assailed with stones in the narrow streets.

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  • In Kufa a number of the Koreish had settled, and their arrogance became insupportable.

    0
    0
  • During the absence of Alexander, with whom she regularly corresponded on public as well as domestic affairs, she had great influence, and by her arrogance and ambition caused such trouble to the regent Antipater that on Alexander's death (323) she found it prudent to withdraw into Epirus.

    0
    0
  • But his arrogance gave much offence.

    0
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  • But in the last years during which this circle kept together a new spirit appeared in Roman politics and a new power in Roman literature, the revolutionary spirit evoked by the Gracchi in opposition to the long-continued ascendancy of the senate, and the new power of Roman satire, which was exercised impartially and unsparingly against both the excesses of the revolutionary spirit and the arrogance and incompetence of the extreme party among the nobles.

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  • He was present at the Marburg conference in 1529, at the Augsburg diet in 1530 and at the signing of the Schmalkald articles in 1537, and took part in other public transactions of importance in the history of the Reformation; that he had an exceptionally large number of personal enemies was due to his vehemence, coarseness and arrogance in controversy.

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  • But the young duke, galled by Louis's overbearing arrogance, eventually asserted his independence and joined the league of Austria, Spain and Venice against him in r690.

    0
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  • Diihring's clear, incisive writing is disfigured by arrogance and ill-temper, failings which may be extenuated on the ground of his physical affliction.

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  • Despite his open protests and subterraneous counter-mining, war was actually declared against Sweden in 1675, and his subsequent policy seemed so obscure and hazardous to those who did not possess the clue to the perhaps purposely tangled skein, that the numerous enemies whom his arrogance and superciliousness had raised up against him, resolved to destroy him.

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  • As monk in the neighbouring monastery of Euprepius, and afterwards as presbyter, he became celebrated in the diocese for his asceticism, his orthodoxy and his eloquence; hostile critics, such as the church historian Socrates, allege that his arrogance and vanity were hardly less conspicuous.

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  • But he never wavered in his allegiance to Vespasian, whose favour he retained in spite of his arrogance.

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    0
  • Meanwhile Bokhara became an object of rivalry to Russia and England, and envoys were sent by both nations to cultivate the favour of the emir, who treated the Russians with arrogance and the English with contempt.

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  • Lang's adherence to the older faith, together with his pride and arrogance, made him very unpopular in his diocese of Salzburg; in 1523 he was involved in a serious struggle with his subjects, and in 1525, during the Peasants' War, he had again to fight hard to hold his own.

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  • The treatises of Gerhoh of Reichersberg (1093-1169) abound in trenchant attacks upon the greed and venality of the Curia, the arrogance and extortion of the legates, the abuse of exemptions and appeals, and the German policy of Adrian IV.

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  • The overweening arrogance of the Spaniards soon drove the pope back into the ranks of their enemies.

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  • The German Minnesinger and romance-writers, whose golden age corresponded with that of the Hohenstaufen, were not content only to sing the joy of life or the chivalrous virtues of courage, courtesy and reverence for women; they in some sort anticipated the underlying ideas of the Reformation by championing the claims of the German nation against the papal monarchy and pure religion, as they conceived it, against the arrogance and corruption of the clergy.

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  • There seemed to be only one way in which a king could hope to overcome the arrogance of the princes, and that was to encourage the towns by forming with them a close and enduring alliance.

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  • The arrogance and the ambition of the popes then stamped Tb R upon the minds of the people an impression that was for,7a7~n never effaced.

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  • Jeffrey naturally declined to appoint a man who, in spite of some mathematical knowledge, had no special qualification, and administered a general lecture upon Carlyle's arrogance and eccentricity which left a permanent sense of injury.

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  • Darnley was esteemed handsome, though his portraits give an opposite impression; his native qualities of cowardice, perfidy, profligacy and overweening arrogance were at first concealed, and in mid April 1565 Lethington was sent to London, not to renew the negotiations with Leicester (as had been designed till the 31st of March), but to announce Mary's intended wedding with her cousin.

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  • the king's harshness and the arrogance and cruelty of his son, found vent in a revolt led by Roberto Sanseverino and Francesco Coppola, which was crushed by means of craft and treachery.

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  • D' Arcos came to terms with Masaniello; but in spite of this, and of the assassination of Masaniello, whose arrogance and ferocity had made him unpopular, the disturbances continued, and again the viceroy had to retire to Castelnuovo and make concessions.

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  • But his great wealth and power, as well as the arrogance of his nephew and heir Giannettino Doria, made him many enemies, and in 1547 the Fiesco conspiracy to upset the power of his house took place.

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  • Basra was at that time full of fugitives from Kufa, Arabian chiefs who resented the arrogance of Mokhtar's adherents, and desired eagerly to regain their former position in Kufa.

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  • But the arrogance of Itakh, to whom he owed his Caliphate, became insufferable.

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  • Moreover, the temper of these more enlightened men was itself opposed to Italian indifference and immorality; it was pugnacious and polemical, eager to beat down the arrogance of monks and theologians rather than to pursue an ideal of aesthetical self-culture.

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  • 15, with the a plebeian family in ancient Rome, arrogance.

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  • Their comrades in the quarters resent this pretension and declare that when in contact with the people the vaisseaux make bad blood by their arrogance and want of tact.

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  • That he anticipated in any manner the inductive philosophy cannot be contended; his botanical studies did not lead him, like his contemporary Konrad von Gesner, to any idea of a natural system of classification, and he rejected with the utmost arrogance and violence of language the discoveries of Copernicus.

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  • Avarice, lofty claims and frequent exhibitions of arrogance made him many foes.

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  • At Ascalon there was a lake full of fish near the temple of Atargatis-Derketo, into which she was said to have been thrown together with her son Ichthys (fish) as a punishment for her arrogance, and to have been devoured by fishes; according to another version, ashamed of her amour with a beautiful youth, which resulted in the birth of Semiramis, she attempted to drown herself, but was changed into a fish with human face (see Atargatis).

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  • 456; but the exorbitant claims and exactions of bishops, to which this repugnance to episcopal control is to be traced, far more than to the arrogance of abbots, rendered it increasingly frequent, and, in the 6th century, the practice of exempting religious houses partly or altogether from episcopal control, and making them responsible to the pope alone, received an impulse from Gregory the Great.

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  • these respects it formed a marked and valuable contrast to the arrogance of absolutism, to the dogmatism of sensationalism, and to the doctrine of church authority, preached by the theological school of his day.

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  • power and their arrogance, and doubting their loyalty, he imprisoned them and confiscated their lands.

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  • But she certainly did her best to ruin her own chances by showing an unwise arrogance, and a determination toresume at once all the powers that her father had possessed.

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  • Only his arrogance and procrastination and Marys own courage saved her throne.

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  • The arrogance which Pitt displayed towards foreign nations was displayed by Grenville towards classes of the population of the British dominions.

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  • Their arbitrary methods disgusted the nation, and the personal arrogance of the ministers at last disgusted the king.

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  • He made a wretched emissary, and there was no limit to his arrogance, noisiness and indiscretion.

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  • His natural arrogance and tyranny seems to have increased with years, and the second period of his governorship was a stormy one.

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  • If so, parliament was told that temporal possessions ruin the church and drive out the Christian graces of faith, hope and charity; that the priesthood of the church in communion with Rome was not the priesthood Christ gave to his apostles; that the monk's vow of celibacy had for its consequence unnatural lust, and should not be imposed; that transubstantiation was a feigned miracle, and led people to idolatry; that prayers made over wine, bread, water, oil, salt, wax, incense, altars of stone, church walls, vestments, mitres, crosses, staves, were magical and should not be allowed; that kings should possess the jus episcopale, and bring good government into the church; that no special prayers should be made for the dead; that auricular confession made to the clergy, and declared to be necessary for salvation, was the root of clerical arrogance and the cause of indulgences and other abuses in pardoning sin; that all wars were against the principles of the New Testament, and were but murdering and plundering the poor to win glory for kings; that the vows of chastity laid upon nuns led to child murder; that many of the trades practised in the commonwealth, such as those of goldsmiths and armourers, were unnecessary and led to luxury and waste.

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  • The precepts of good faith, equity, requital of benefits, forgiveness of wrong so far as security allows, the prohibition of contumely, pride, arrogance, - which may all be summed up in the formula, " Do not that to another which thou wouldest not have done to thyself " (i.e.

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  • To all his three wives, in spite of numerous infidelities, he seems to have been warmly attached; and this is perhaps the best trait in a character otherwise more remarkable for arrogance and heat than for any amiable qualities.

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  • Irenaeus ascribes Satan's fall to "pride and arrogance and envy of God's creation"; and traces man's deliverance from Satan to Christ's victory in resisting his temptations; but also, guided by certain Pauline passages, represents the death of Christ "as a ransom paid to the ` apostasy' for men who had fallen into captivity" (ii.

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  • Accused of violating treaties, breaking oaths, persecuting the church and abetting heresy, Frederick replied by an open letter rebutting these charges, and in equally unmeasured terms denounced the arrogance and want of faith of the clergy from the pope downwards.

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  • Because there is division, arrogance, jealousy and quarreling in the church.

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  • Planet of the Apes is a film that sets out to shatter complacency and arrogance.

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  • Many will disagree with this assessment, thinking it smacks of western arrogance.

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  • Some of the reasons for unpopularity are obvious, such as the arrogance and the stench of corruption that surrounds Berlusconi.

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  • The increasingly marginalized far right organ accused the BBC of " stupefying arrogance " during last Saturday 's coverage.

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  • Like every Manc band worth their salt they also have their full quota of swaggering arrogance.

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  • Officials at the MoD are said to be shocked at BAE 's arrogance on the contract for the tanker aircraft.

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  • And it is an enduring testament to the corruption, deceit and arrogance of this pitiful and mucky government.

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  • However she felt about Ben’s arrogance, she couldn’t deny he was a talented artist.

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  • The author's writing style is full of conceit and arrogance, I am disliking this book more by the minute.

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  • Whether it's an attitude of arrogance, or disdain, you'll see that happy self-assurance is the ticket to a great look.

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  • There is a Greek chorus of skepticism regarding the wine rating system, the criteria of the restaurant awards passed out by the magazine every year, its objectivity, its arrogance, and ultimately its bully pulpit influence.

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  • Poyet: This book includes all the basic information about wine "minus the pretense" and "absent the arrogance".

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  • Poyet - This book includes all the basic information about wine "minus the pretense" and "absent the arrogance".

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  • Establish Confidence - Many younger guys confuse the term confidence with arrogance, and end up turning off most girls with their boasting and bragging.

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  • "Get her a whiskey!" on the other hand falls dangerously close to arrogance, unless the man already knows that's what she's drinking.

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  • Eric's arrogance and joie de vivre are parts of his charm.

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  • Bragging - No matter how good you are, no one likes arrogance.

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  • Will his own arrogance and overconfidence trip him up, and earn him a ticket home?

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  • Q is played by actor John deLancie, who gives the character an arrogance that would be charming if it wasn't so annoying.

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