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armagnac

armagnac

armagnac Sentence Examples

  • About the end of the 9th century Fezensac (comitatus Fedentiacus), in circumstances of which no trustworthy record remains, was erected into an hereditary countship. This latter was in its turn divided, the south-western portion becoming, about 960, the countship of Armagnac (pages Armaniacus).

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  • From this time onward the Armagnac party, with the dauphin, afterwards King Charles VII., at its head, was the national party, while the Burgundians united with the English.

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  • a large army of Armagnacs to enforce his claims in Switzerland, and the war which ensued took the name of the Armagnac war (Armagnakenkrieg).

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  • On the death of Charles of Armagnac, in 1497, the countship was united to the crown by King Charles VII., but was again bestowed on Charles, the nephew of that count, by Francis I., who at the same time gave him his sister Margaret in marriage.

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  • James of Armagnac, grandson of Bernard VII., was made duke of Nemours in 1462, and was succeeded in the dukedom by his second son, John, who died without issue, and his third son, Louis, in whom the house of Armagnac became extinct in 1503.

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  • In 1789 Armagnac was a province forming part of the Gouvernement-general of Guienne and Gascony; it was divided into two parts, High or White Armagnac, with Auch for capital, and Low or Black Armagnac. At the Revolution the whole of the original Armagnac was included in the department of Gers.

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  • Armagnac (Montbeliard, 1894).

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  • In the 10th century Count Bernard of Armagnac founded the Benedictine abbey of St Orens, the monks of which, till 1308, shared the jurisdiction over Auch with the archbishops - an arrangement which gave rise to constant strife.

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  • ROQUELAURE, a title derived from a small commune in France (dep. of Gers), and borne by a French family of Armagnac, one member of which was Antoine, baron de Roquelaure (1544-1625), who was in the service of Henry IV.

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  • Having entered the church he held many ecclesiastical appointments, and became dean of the Arches in 1423; then devoting his time to secular affairs he was sent on an embassy to Calais in 1439, and to John IV., count of Armagnac, in 1442.

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  • Count John of Armagnac, whom Martin had excommunicated as a protector of schismatics, was also driven to make submission.

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  • The Armagnac administrators who had been driven out of Paris by the duke of Bedford gathered round the young king, nicknamed the "king of Bourges," but he was weak in body and mind, and was under the domination of Jean Louvet and Tanguy du Chastel, the instigators of the murder of John the Fearless, and other discredited partisans.

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  • The following year he was fighting the English, and in 1443 aided his father to suppress the revolt of the count of Armagnac. His first important command, however, was in the next year, when he led an army of from 15,000 to 20,000 mercenaries and brigands, - the product of the Hundred Years' War, - against the Swiss of the canton of Basel.

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  • count of Armagnac, whose death at the opening of March 1473 ended the power of one of the most dangerous houses of the south.

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  • The king and the dauphin, powerless in the hands of Duke John and the Parisians, appealed secretly to the Armagnac princes for deliverance.

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  • In 1368 his greatest vassals, the counts of Armagnac, Prigord and Comminges, displayed their disloyalty by appealing to the king of France as their~suzerain against the legality of Edwards imposts.

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  • This he was able to accomplish without any interference from the government at Paris, for the constable Armagnac, who had succeeded the captive Orleans at the head of the anti-B urgundian party, had no troops to spare.

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  • Louis XI., who had joined his troops to those of the princes of Anjou, attached Boffille to his own person, made him his chamberlain and conferred on him the vice-royalty of Roussillon and Cerdagne (1471), together with certain important lordships, among others the countship of Castres, confiscated from James of Armagnac, duke of Nemours (1476), and the temporalities of the bishopric of Castres, confiscated from John of Armagnac. He also entrusted him with diplomatic negotiations with Flanders and England.

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  • This was the end of the great feudal coalitions, for royal vengeance soon settled the account of the lesser vassals; the duke of Alencon was condemned to prison for life; the count of Armagnac was killed; and the Germans were soon to disembarrass Louis of Charles the Bold.

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  • count of Armagnac, whose death at the opening of March 1473 ended the power of one of the most dangerous houses of the south.

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  • This was the end of the great feudal coalitions, for royal vengeance soon settled the account of the lesser vassals; the duke of Alencon was condemned to prison for life; the count of Armagnac was killed; and the Germans were soon to disembarrass Louis of Charles the Bold.

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  • It was bordered by Limousin, Rouergue, Armagnac, Perigord and Agenais.

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  • Meanwhile a change had taken place in the domestic politics of France; the Burgundians seized Paris in May 1418; the constable Armagnac and many of his Triumph partisans were massacred, and John the Fearless got of the possession of the person of the mad Charles VI., Bur- and became the responsible ruler of France.

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  • Gascogne (Astarac, Armagnac).

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  • On the slope of its hills grow the grapes from which the famous Armagnac brandy is made.

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  • Under the English rule the counts of Armagnac were turbulent and untrustworthy vassals; and the administration of the Black Prince, tending to favour the towns of Aquitaine at the expense of the nobles, drove them to the side of France.

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  • Af ter the death of her husband, by whom she had no children, she married Henry of Albret, king of Navarre; and thus the count 563 ship of Armagnac came back to the French crown along with the other dominions of Henry IV.

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  • erected a countship of Armagnac in favour of Henry of Lorraine, count of Harcourt, in whose family it continued till the Revolution.

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  • Nevertheless, a new league was formed against the duke of Burgundy in the following year, principally at the instance of Bernard, count of Armagnac, from whom the party opposed to the Burgundians took its name.

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  • The counts of Armagnac possessed a castle in the city, which was the capital of Armagnac in the middle ages.

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  • The most important results of Beckington's missions to France were one Latin journal, written by himself, referring to the embassy to Calais; and another, written by one of his attendants, relating to the journey to Armagnac.

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  • Armagnac >>

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  • Attached by King Louis to the sieur de Beaujeu in the expedition against John V., count of Armagnac, Jouffroy was accused of taking the town of Lectoure by treachery, and of being a party to the murder of the count of Armagnac (1473).

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  • In medieval times the English valued its wines (which include Armagnac brandy) more highly than those of Bordeaux.

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  • The well tended vineyards are the source of Armagnac, probably the original brandy of France.

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  • The Charente region, the grapes of which furnish brandy, as do those of Armagnac (department of Gers).

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  • Gascogne (Astarac, Armagnac).

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  • He was created count of Poitiers in 1356, and was made the king's lieutenant in southern France, though the real power rested chiefly with John of Armagnac, whose daughter Jeanne he married in 1360.

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  • He broke with John after the murder of Orleans, though he tried to prevent civil war, and only finally joined the Armagnac party in 1410.

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  • The Hussite wars, the feuds of Burgundian and Armagnac, the renewal of the Hundred Years' War, all prevented it from drawing new blood from the west.

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  • It was bordered by Limousin, Rouergue, Armagnac, Perigord and Agenais.

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  • ARMAGNAC, formerly a province of France and the most important fief of Gascony, now wholly comprised in the department of Gers.

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  • In the, 5th century, when it attained its greatest extent, it included, besides Armagnac, the neighbouring territories of Fezensac, Fezensaguet, Pardiac, Pays de Gaure, Riviere Basse, Eauzan and Lomagne, and stretched from the Garonne to the Adour.

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  • Armagnac is a region of hills ranging to a height of 1000 ft., watered by the river Gers and other rivers which descend fanwise from the plateau of Lannemezan.

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  • On the slope of its hills grow the grapes from which the famous Armagnac brandy is made.

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  • About the end of the 9th century Fezensac (comitatus Fedentiacus), in circumstances of which no trustworthy record remains, was erected into an hereditary countship. This latter was in its turn divided, the south-western portion becoming, about 960, the countship of Armagnac (pages Armaniacus).

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  • Under the English rule the counts of Armagnac were turbulent and untrustworthy vassals; and the administration of the Black Prince, tending to favour the towns of Aquitaine at the expense of the nobles, drove them to the side of France.

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  • From this time onward the Armagnac party, with the dauphin, afterwards King Charles VII., at its head, was the national party, while the Burgundians united with the English.

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  • a large army of Armagnacs to enforce his claims in Switzerland, and the war which ensued took the name of the Armagnac war (Armagnakenkrieg).

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  • On the death of Charles of Armagnac, in 1497, the countship was united to the crown by King Charles VII., but was again bestowed on Charles, the nephew of that count, by Francis I., who at the same time gave him his sister Margaret in marriage.

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  • Af ter the death of her husband, by whom she had no children, she married Henry of Albret, king of Navarre; and thus the count 563 ship of Armagnac came back to the French crown along with the other dominions of Henry IV.

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  • erected a countship of Armagnac in favour of Henry of Lorraine, count of Harcourt, in whose family it continued till the Revolution.

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  • James of Armagnac, grandson of Bernard VII., was made duke of Nemours in 1462, and was succeeded in the dukedom by his second son, John, who died without issue, and his third son, Louis, in whom the house of Armagnac became extinct in 1503.

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  • In 1789 Armagnac was a province forming part of the Gouvernement-general of Guienne and Gascony; it was divided into two parts, High or White Armagnac, with Auch for capital, and Low or Black Armagnac. At the Revolution the whole of the original Armagnac was included in the department of Gers.

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  • Armagnac (Montbeliard, 1894).

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  • Nevertheless, a new league was formed against the duke of Burgundy in the following year, principally at the instance of Bernard, count of Armagnac, from whom the party opposed to the Burgundians took its name.

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  • In the 10th century Count Bernard of Armagnac founded the Benedictine abbey of St Orens, the monks of which, till 1308, shared the jurisdiction over Auch with the archbishops - an arrangement which gave rise to constant strife.

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  • The counts of Armagnac possessed a castle in the city, which was the capital of Armagnac in the middle ages.

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  • ROQUELAURE, a title derived from a small commune in France (dep. of Gers), and borne by a French family of Armagnac, one member of which was Antoine, baron de Roquelaure (1544-1625), who was in the service of Henry IV.

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  • Benedict XIII., who had on his part tried to call together a council at Perpignan, was by this time recognized hardly anywhere but in his native land, in Scotland, and in the estates of the countship of Armagnac. He remained none the less full of energy and of illusions, repulsed the overtures of Sigismund, king of the Romans, who had come to Perpignan to persuade him to abdicate, and, abandoned by nearly all his adherents, he took refuge in the impregnable castle of Peniscola, on a rock dominating the Mediterranean (1415).

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  • Having entered the church he held many ecclesiastical appointments, and became dean of the Arches in 1423; then devoting his time to secular affairs he was sent on an embassy to Calais in 1439, and to John IV., count of Armagnac, in 1442.

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  • The most important results of Beckington's missions to France were one Latin journal, written by himself, referring to the embassy to Calais; and another, written by one of his attendants, relating to the journey to Armagnac.

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  • Count John of Armagnac, whom Martin had excommunicated as a protector of schismatics, was also driven to make submission.

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  • The Armagnac administrators who had been driven out of Paris by the duke of Bedford gathered round the young king, nicknamed the "king of Bourges," but he was weak in body and mind, and was under the domination of Jean Louvet and Tanguy du Chastel, the instigators of the murder of John the Fearless, and other discredited partisans.

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  • of Armagnac, and the dauphin, afterwards Louis XI.

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  • Humphrey of Gloucester favoured an Armagnac alliance.

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  • John Gerson, the foremost theologian of France, wrote a manual of instructions (still extant) for the first of his tutors, Jean Majoris, a canon of Reims. His second tutor, Bernard of Armagnac, was noted for his piety and humility.

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  • The following year he was fighting the English, and in 1443 aided his father to suppress the revolt of the count of Armagnac. His first important command, however, was in the next year, when he led an army of from 15,000 to 20,000 mercenaries and brigands, - the product of the Hundred Years' War, - against the Swiss of the canton of Basel.

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  • Attached by King Louis to the sieur de Beaujeu in the expedition against John V., count of Armagnac, Jouffroy was accused of taking the town of Lectoure by treachery, and of being a party to the murder of the count of Armagnac (1473).

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  • of Armagnac, and presently formed alliances with the dukes of Berry, Bourbon and Brittany, and others who formed the party known as the Armagnacs (see Armagnac), against the Burgundians who had gained the upper hand in the royal council.

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  • The king and the dauphin, powerless in the hands of Duke John and the Parisians, appealed secretly to the Armagnac princes for deliverance.

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  • Paris was governed by Bernard of Armagnac, constable of France, who expelled all suspected of Burgundian sympathies and treated Paris like a conquered city.

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  • himself; and in John III., count of Armagnac. The prospect of his briliant progress to Rome was ever before his eyes; and in his thoughts force of arms, of French arms, was to be the instrument of his glorious triumph over his competitor.

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  • In 1368 his greatest vassals, the counts of Armagnac, Prigord and Comminges, displayed their disloyalty by appealing to the king of France as their~suzerain against the legality of Edwards imposts.

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  • This he was able to accomplish without any interference from the government at Paris, for the constable Armagnac, who had succeeded the captive Orleans at the head of the anti-B urgundian party, had no troops to spare.

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  • Meanwhile a change had taken place in the domestic politics of France; the Burgundians seized Paris in May 1418; the constable Armagnac and many of his Triumph partisans were massacred, and John the Fearless got of the possession of the person of the mad Charles VI., Bur- and became the responsible ruler of France.

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  • Louis XI., who had joined his troops to those of the princes of Anjou, attached Boffille to his own person, made him his chamberlain and conferred on him the vice-royalty of Roussillon and Cerdagne (1471), together with certain important lordships, among others the countship of Castres, confiscated from James of Armagnac, duke of Nemours (1476), and the temporalities of the bishopric of Castres, confiscated from John of Armagnac. He also entrusted him with diplomatic negotiations with Flanders and England.

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  • Whether due to passion or caprice this cost the duke his life, for John the Fearless had him assassinated in 1407, and thus let loose against one another the Burgundians and the Armagnacs, so-called because the son of the murdered duke was the son-in-law of the count of Armagnac (see ARaJAGNAc).

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  • The well tended vineyards are the source of Armagnac, probably the original brandy of France.

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  • There are other regions as well - such as Armagnac - that also produce brandies.

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  • Almost every wine region in France produces red wine, with the exception of Armagnac and Cognac, which focus almost entirely on the production of brandy.

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  • Armagnac - Grows grapes for the production of Armagnacs like its counterpart, Cognac.

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  • The Charente region, the grapes of which furnish brandy, as do those of Armagnac (department of Gers).

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  • He was created count of Poitiers in 1356, and was made the king's lieutenant in southern France, though the real power rested chiefly with John of Armagnac, whose daughter Jeanne he married in 1360.

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  • He broke with John after the murder of Orleans, though he tried to prevent civil war, and only finally joined the Armagnac party in 1410.

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  • The Hussite wars, the feuds of Burgundian and Armagnac, the renewal of the Hundred Years' War, all prevented it from drawing new blood from the west.

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  • ARMAGNAC, formerly a province of France and the most important fief of Gascony, now wholly comprised in the department of Gers.

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  • In the, 5th century, when it attained its greatest extent, it included, besides Armagnac, the neighbouring territories of Fezensac, Fezensaguet, Pardiac, Pays de Gaure, Riviere Basse, Eauzan and Lomagne, and stretched from the Garonne to the Adour.

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  • Armagnac is a region of hills ranging to a height of 1000 ft., watered by the river Gers and other rivers which descend fanwise from the plateau of Lannemezan.

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  • For five years (1427-1432) a private war between these two exhausted the Armagnac forces, and central France returned to anarchy.

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  • Humphrey of Gloucester favoured an Armagnac alliance.

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  • John Gerson, the foremost theologian of France, wrote a manual of instructions (still extant) for the first of his tutors, Jean Majoris, a canon of Reims. His second tutor, Bernard of Armagnac, was noted for his piety and humility.

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  • Paris was governed by Bernard of Armagnac, constable of France, who expelled all suspected of Burgundian sympathies and treated Paris like a conquered city.

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  • himself; and in John III., count of Armagnac. The prospect of his briliant progress to Rome was ever before his eyes; and in his thoughts force of arms, of French arms, was to be the instrument of his glorious triumph over his competitor.

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  • Charles of Orleans being a captive and his father-in-law, the count of Armagnac, highly unpopular, John the Fearless, hitherto prudently neutral, re-entered Paris, amid scenes of carnage, on the invitation of the citizen Perrinet le Clerc.

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  • For five years (1427-1432) a private war between these two exhausted the Armagnac forces, and central France returned to anarchy.

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  • Charles of Orleans being a captive and his father-in-law, the count of Armagnac, highly unpopular, John the Fearless, hitherto prudently neutral, re-entered Paris, amid scenes of carnage, on the invitation of the citizen Perrinet le Clerc.

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