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armagh

armagh

armagh Sentence Examples

  • When he was six years of age he announced his intention of going to Conchobar's court at Emain Macha (Navan Rath near Armagh) to play with the boys there.

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  • In 1152 the place is mentioned as the seat of a synod convened by the papal legate, Cardinal Paparo; in 1224 it was chosen by Lucas de Netterville, archbishop of Armagh, for the foundation of the Dominican friary of which there are still remains; and in 1228 the two divisions of the town received separate incorporation from Henry III.

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  • The constabulary has its headquarters at Armagh, the county being divided into five districts.

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  • The Church of Ireland had at the time of the Act of Union four archbishops, who took their titles from Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam.

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  • The constabulary has its headquarters at Armagh, the county being divided into five districts.

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  • The Church of Ireland had at the time of the Act of Union four archbishops, who took their titles from Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam.

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  • Armagh, on the 10th of February 1835.

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  • It includes the counties Donegal, Londonderry, Antrim, Fermanagh, Tyrone, Ca van, Monaghan, Armagh and Down.

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  • The Robinson anemometer, invented (1846) by Dr Thomas Romney Robinson, of Armagh Observatory, is the best-known and most generally used instrument, and belongs to the first of these.

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  • Canterbury, York, Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam are put in the place of Rome.

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  • Robinson published a number of papers in scientific journals, and the Armagh catalogue of stars (Places of 5345 Stars observed from 1828 to 1854 at the Armagh Observatory, Dublin, 1859), but he is best known as the inventor (1846) of the cup-anemometer for registering the velocity of the wind.

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  • In May of the same year Sir Henry Docwra, at the head of a considerable army, took up a position at Derry, while Mountjoy marched from Westmeath to Newry to support him, compelling O'Neill to retire to Armagh, a large reward having been offered for his capture alive or dead.

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  • He was accused by the archbishop of Armagh of serious moral delinquency, and his recall was demanded both by the primate and the bishop of Meath.

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  • appointed him to the archbishopric of Armagh and primacy of Ireland in July 1669, and in November he was consecrated at Ghent, reaching Ireland in March 1670.

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  • On his return he founded the church and monastery of Armagh, the site of which was granted him by Daire, king of Oriel, and it is probable that the see was intended by him to be specially connected with the supreme ecclesiastical authority.

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  • Some years before his death, which took place in 461, Patrick resigned his position as bishop of Armagh to his disciple Benignus, and possibly retired to Saul in Dalaradia, where he spent the remainder of his life.

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  • ARMAGH, an inland county of Ireland, in the province of Ulster, bounded N.

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  • A rough conglomerate containing blocks of this latter rock forms the hills on which Armagh itself is built; this outlier is probably Permian.

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  • The climate of Armagh is considered to be one of the most genial in Ireland, and less rain is supposed to fall in this than in any other county.

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  • St Peter's chapel formerly served as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Armagh; and in the abbey of the Dominican nuns there is still preserved the head of Oliver Plunkett, the archbishop who was executed at Tyburn in 1681 on an unfounded charge of treason.

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  • He built a new and handsome palace at Drogheda, and he repaired the old disused palace at Armagh and bestowed on it a demesne of 300 acres.

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  • Hoadly's brother, John Hoadly (1678-1746), was archbishop of Dublin from 1730 to 1742 and archbishop of Armagh from the latter date until his death on the 19th of July 1746.

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  • In 1849, on the strong recommendation of Archbishop John MacHale of Tuam, Cullen was nominated as successor to the primatial see of Armagh; and, on his return to Ireland, presided as papal delegate at the national council of Thurles in the August of 1850.

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  • 229-278), issued from the press, claiming to be an answer to a discourse on the same subject by Bishop Bramhall of Londonderry (afterwards archbishop of Armagh, d.

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  • (2) The Church of Ireland, 2 provinces, Armagh and Dublin, with 7 and 6 dioceses respectively.

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  • As the county town Armagh has a court-house, a prison, a lunatic asylum and a county infirmary.

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  • Armagh was a parliamentary borough until 1885; and, having been incorporated in 1613, so remained until 1835.

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  • of Armagh is Emain, Emania, or Navan Fort, with large entrenchments and mounds, the site of a royal palace of Ulster, founded by that Queen Macha who gave her name to the city.

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  • Armagh itself fell before the king Brian Boroime, who was buried here; and before Edward Bruce in 1315, while previous to the English war after the Reformation, it had witnessed the struggles of Shane O'Neill (1564).

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  • He was elected member for Armagh in the first united parliament, and was a well-known character at Westminster till he died on the 11th of April 1816.

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  • ADAM LOFTUS (c. 1533-1605), archbishop of Armagh and Dublin, and lord chancellor of Ireland, the son of a Yorkshire gentleman, was educated at Cambridge.

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  • He accompanied the earl of Sussex to Ireland as his chaplain in 1560, and three years later was consecrated archbishop of Armagh by Hugh Curwen, archbishop of Dublin.

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  • In the course of the 9th century we find mention of nine places in Ireland (including Armagh, Clonmacnoise, Clones, Devenish and Sligo) where communities of these Culdees were established as a kind of annexe to the regular monastic institutions.

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  • In Ireland the Culdees of Armagh endured until the dissolution in 1541, and enjoyed a fleeting resurrection in 1627, soon after which their ancient property passed to the vicars choral of the cathedral.

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  • In 1822 the archbishop of Dublin was translated to Armagh, and Magee succeeded him at Dublin.

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  • ST MALACHY (c. 1094-1148), otherwise known as MaolMaodhog (or Maelmaedhog) Ua Morgair, archbishop of Armagh and papal legate in Ireland, was born at Armagh.

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  • Having been ordained to the priesthood, he for some time acted as vicar of Archbishop Celsus or Ceallach of Armagh, and carried out many reforms tending to increase conformity with the usage of the Church of Rome.

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  • St Peter's chapel formerly served as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Armagh; and in the abbey of the Dominican nuns there is still preserved the head of Oliver Plunkett, the archbishop who was executed at Tyburn in 1681 on an unfounded charge of treason.

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  • In 1822 the archbishop of Dublin was translated to Armagh, and Magee succeeded him at Dublin.

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  • Only about one-twentieth of the land is naturally barren, and Armagh offers a relatively large area of cultivable soil.

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  • Such is the effect of this combination of agricultural occupations with domestic manufactures that the farmers are more than competent to supply the resident population of the county with vegetable, though not with animal food; and some of the less crowded and less productive parts of Ulster receive from Armagh a considerable supply of oats, barley and flour.

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  • The chief towns are Armagh (a city and the county town, pop. 7588), Lurgan (11,782), Portadown (10,092), Tanderagee (1427), Bessbrook (2977) and Keady (1466).

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  • Armagh is divided into eight baronies, and contains twenty-five parishes and parts of parishes, the greater number of which are in the Protestant and Roman Catholic dioceses of Armagh, and a few in the Roman Catholic diocese of Dromore.

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  • Assizes are held at Armagh, and quarter sessions at Armagh,Ballybot, Lurgan,Markethill and Newtown-Hamilton.

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  • Armagh, together with Louth, Monaghan and some smaller districts, formed part of a territory called Orgial or Urial, which was long subject to the occasional incursions of the Danes.

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  • The county was made shire ground in 1586, and called Armagh after the city by Sir John Perrott.

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  • The religious houses were at Armagh, Killevy, Kilmore, Stradhailloyse and Tahenny.

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  • The two archbishoprics of Armagh and Dublin are maintained in the disestablished Church of Ireland.

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  • by Lough Neagh, dividing it from the counties Armagh and Tyrone, and by county Londonderry, the boundary with which is the river Bann.

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  • In Ireland we find Greek characters used in the Book of Armagh (c. 807); and, in the same century, a Greek psalter was copied by an Irish monk of Liege, named Sedulius (fl.

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  • A beautiful modern campanile (1853), erected by Lord John George Beresford, archbishop of Armagh and chancellor of the university, occupies the centre of the square.

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  • Armagh, together with Louth, Monaghan and some smaller districts, formed part of a territory called Orgial or Urial, which was long subject to the occasional incursions of the Danes.

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  • The religious houses were at Armagh, Killevy, Kilmore, Stradhailloyse and Tahenny.

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  • by Lough Neagh, dividing it from the counties Armagh and Tyrone, and by county Londonderry, the boundary with which is the river Bann.

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  • In 1733 George Stone was made dean of Ferns, and in the following year he exchanged this deanery for that of Derry; in 1740 he became bishop of Ferns, in 1743 bishop of Kildare, in 1745 bishop of Derry, and in 1747 archbishop of Armagh.

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  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.

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  • The one is the Confession, which is contained in an imperfect state in the Book of Armagh (c. 807), but complete copies are found in later MSS.

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  • but is not contained in the Book of Armagh.

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  • - Apart from the Letter and Epistle mentioned above our chief sources of information with regard to the life of St Patrick are contained in the Book of Armagh.

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  • Armagh.

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  • Armagh for about 2 r m., joining the Bann at Whitecoat.

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  • Between this lowland and Armagh city, the early Cainozoic basalts form slightly higher ground, while on the west a strip of Trias appears, overlying Carboniferous Limestone.

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  • proceeded to plant with English and Scottish colonists the vast tracts escheated to the crown in Ulster, the whole of the arable and pasture land in Armagh, estimated at 77,800 acres, was to have been allotted in sixty-one portions.

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  • Armagh, nor were the Irish swordsmen or soldiers transplanted into Connaught and Munster from this and some other counties.

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  • The antiquities consist of cairns and tumuli; the remains of the fortress of Emain near the city of Armagh, once the residence of the kings of Ulster; and Danes Cast, an extensive fortification in the south-east of the county, near Poyntzpass, extending into Co.

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  • Armagh, Ireland >>

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  • Attached to the cathedral is Marsh's library, incorporated in 1707, by a request of Primate Marsh, archbishop of Armagh.

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  • Thorkel established himself strongly at Armagh.

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  • Archbishop O'Scanlain, who did much in the building of the cathedral at Armagh, preferred to live at Drogheda, and there he was buried in 1270.

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  • The last of these - Christopher Hampton - who was consecrated to the primacy in 1613, repaired the ruined cathedral of Armagh.

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  • ARMAGH, a city and market town, and the county town of Co.

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  • Armagh, Ireland, in the mid parliamentary division, 89z m.

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  • St Patrick's bell, long preserved at Armagh, the oldest Irish relic of its kind, is now, with its shrine of the year 1091, preserved in the museum of the Royal Irish Academy at Dublin.

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  • Of a synod that was held at Armagh as early as 448, there is an interesting memorial in the Book of Armagh, an Irish MS. dating about A.D.

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  • From this state of decay, however, it was raised, in the second half of the, 8th century, by the unwearied exertions of Archbishop Richard Robinson, 1st Lord Rokeby (1709-1794), which, seconded by similar devotion on the part of succeeding archbishops of the Beresford family, notably Archbishop Lord John George Beresford (1773-1862), made of Armagh one of the best built and most respectable towns in the country.

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  • His manuscripts were bought by Robert Harley (afterwards earl of Oxford), his books by Narcissus Marsh, archbishop of Armagh.

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  • After representing Horsham in the House of Commons for over four years Goulburn was successively member for St Germans, for West Looe, and for the city of Armagh.

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  • Meanwhile he had been designated by Celsus (in whose family the see of Armagh had been hereditary for many years) to succeed him in the archbishopric; in the interests of reform he reluctantly accepted the dignity, and thus became involved for some years in a struggle with the so-called heirs.

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  • Accordingly, in i 13cj, Malachy set out from Ireland with the purpose of soliciting from the pope the pallium (the token of archiepiscopal subjection to Rome) for the archbishop of Armagh.

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  • 26 a whose charter had just been obtained by his uncle, Henry Usher, archbishop of Armagh.

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  • While he was detained on this business the archbishop of Armagh died in January 1625, and the king at once nominated Usher to the vacant primacy; but severe illness and other causes impeded his return to Ireland until August 1626.

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  • In 1634 he took part in the convocation which drafted the code of canons that formed the basis of Irish ecclesiastical law till the disestablishment of the Irish Church in 1869, and defeated the attempt of John Bramhall, then bishop of Derry and later his own successor in Armagh, to conform the Irish Church exactly to the doctrinal standards of the English.

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  • Ireland is divided territorially into four provinces and thirtytwo counties: - (a) Ulster (northern division): Counties Antrim, Armagh, Cavan, Donegal, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry, Monaghan, Tyrone.

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  • Certain conglomeratic beds on which Armagh is built are also believed to be of Permian age.

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  • In 1836 the Ulster railway to connect Belfast and Armagh, and the Dublin and Drogheda railway uniting these two towns were sanctioned.

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  • The only counties in which the Protestant religion predominates are Antrim, Down, Armagh and Londonderry.

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  • The Roman Catholic Church is governed in Ireland b'y 4 archbishops, whose sees are in Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam, and 23 bishops, all nominated by the pope.

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  • At the beginning of the 4th century the three Collas founded the kingdom of Oriel (comprising the present counties of Armagh, Monaghan, north Louth, south Fermanagh) and drove the Ulidians into the eastern part of the province.

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  • He also organized the already existing Christian communities, and with this in view founded a church at Armagh as his metropolitan see (444) It is further due to him that Ireland became linked up with Rome and the Christian countries of the Western church, and that in consequence Latin was introduced as the language of the church.

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  • The story goes that the ardri Aed Oirdnigthe (797-819) made a hostile incursion into Leinster and forced the primate of Armagh and all his clergy to attend him.

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  • Eventually Turgeis established himself in Armagh, whilst his wife Ota settled at Clonmacnoise and profaned the monastery church with pagan rites.

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  • The monastery of Armagh was rebuilt ten times, and as often destroyed.

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  • Turgeis himself is reported to have usurped the abbacy of Armagh.

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  • To enforce this claim he ravaged and plundered a large part of the country, took hostages from Niall Caille the over-king (833-845), drove out the comarba of St Patrick, or archbishop of Armagh, and for a whole year occupied his place as bishop. On his return he plundered the termon lands of Clonmacnoise " up to the church door," an exploit which was repeated the following year.

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  • It is probable that St Patrick established Armagh as a metropolitan see, but the history of the primacy, which during a long period can only have been a shadow, is involved in obscurity.

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  • The antithesis between the king of Dublin and the ardri seems to have had the effect of linking the Dublin Christian community rather with Canterbury than Armagh.

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  • At a national synod held about 1134 Maelmaedoc, in his capacity as bishop of Armagh, was solemnly elected to the primacy; and armed with full power of church and state he was able to overcome all opposition.

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  • Armagh was constituted the seat of the primacy, and Cashel, Tuam and Dublin were raised to the rank of archbishoprics.

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  • The primate of Armagh, the saintly Gelasius, was absent, and presumably his suffragans also, but Giraldus says he afterwards came to the king at Dublin, and favoured him in all things.

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  • Geographical configuration preserved centres of resistance - the O'Neills in Tyrone and Armagh, the O'Donnells in Donegal, and the Macarthies in Cork being the largest tribes that remained practically unbroken.

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  • His first nominee, Dr Richard Turner, resolutely declined the honour, declaring that he would be unintelligible to the people; and Cranmer could only answer that English was spoken in Ireland, though he did indeed doubt whether it was spoken in the diocese of Armagh.

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  • Tyrone, Donegal, Armagh, Cavan, Fermanagh and Derry were parcelled out among English and Scottish colonists, portions being reserved to the natives.

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  • Armagh, Ireland (County) >>

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  • atrocity many atrocities perpetrated against the people of South Armagh some stand out above the rest.

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  • The victims from both sides of the community in South Armagh wish him every success in the upcoming by-election.

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  • dioceses in the province of Armagh, which were united in 1834, run from 1690 to 1975.

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  • drumlin hill of compacted boulder clay on the edge of the then City of Armagh.

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  • Garry, a mature student at Queen's Armagh campus, has dystrophy.

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  • holdring this time he also held the office of County Grand Master of Armagh Orange Lodge.

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  • Paisley appeals to loyalists to stop civil rights marchers in Armagh on 30 November.

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  • metropolitan province of Armagh, having previously been part of Tuam.

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  • FAIR working in close co-operation with local police to look again at the hundreds of unsolved murders in South Armagh.

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  • During this time he also held the office of County Grand Master of Armagh Orange Lodge.

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  • Of the many atrocities perpetrated against the people of South Armagh some stand out above the rest.

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  • FAIR case workers have been assisting the police and already two dossiers on a series of murders in the South Armagh area.

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  • The issue of removing watchtowers and restricting helicopter flights is a clear sop to the IRA of South Armagh.

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  • A fanned Armagh marble stairway leads up to the entrance door on the north facade.

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  • A South Armagh man from a strongly republican village, Aiken showed " no compunction about shooting unarmed Protestants " .

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  • These arrests were in connection with the violent attacks upon the army watchtowers in the South Armagh area in December.

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  • County Down Grand Orange Lodge at its Meeting on Saturday condemned the removal of two security watchtowers in South Armagh.

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  • GEORGE STONE (1708-1764), archbishop of Armagh, was the son of Andrew Stone, a London banker, and was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford.

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  • In 1733 George Stone was made dean of Ferns, and in the following year he exchanged this deanery for that of Derry; in 1740 he became bishop of Ferns, in 1743 bishop of Kildare, in 1745 bishop of Derry, and in 1747 archbishop of Armagh.

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  • Armagh, on the 10th of February 1835.

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  • It includes the counties Donegal, Londonderry, Antrim, Fermanagh, Tyrone, Ca van, Monaghan, Armagh and Down.

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  • The Robinson anemometer, invented (1846) by Dr Thomas Romney Robinson, of Armagh Observatory, is the best-known and most generally used instrument, and belongs to the first of these.

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  • Canterbury, York, Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam are put in the place of Rome.

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  • In 1823 he was appointed astronomer of the Armagh observatory, with which he (from 1824) combined the living of Carrickmacross, but he always resided at the observatory, engaged in researches connected with astronomy and physics, until his death on the 28th of February 1882.

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  • Robinson published a number of papers in scientific journals, and the Armagh catalogue of stars (Places of 5345 Stars observed from 1828 to 1854 at the Armagh Observatory, Dublin, 1859), but he is best known as the inventor (1846) of the cup-anemometer for registering the velocity of the wind.

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  • Sussex, indignant at Shane's request for his sister's hand in marriage, and his demand for the withdrawal of the English garrison from Armagh, was not supported by the queen, who sent the earl of Kildare to arrange terms with O'Neill.

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  • In May of the same year Sir Henry Docwra, at the head of a considerable army, took up a position at Derry, while Mountjoy marched from Westmeath to Newry to support him, compelling O'Neill to retire to Armagh, a large reward having been offered for his capture alive or dead.

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  • When he was six years of age he announced his intention of going to Conchobar's court at Emain Macha (Navan Rath near Armagh) to play with the boys there.

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  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.

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  • He was accused by the archbishop of Armagh of serious moral delinquency, and his recall was demanded both by the primate and the bishop of Meath.

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  • appointed him to the archbishopric of Armagh and primacy of Ireland in July 1669, and in November he was consecrated at Ghent, reaching Ireland in March 1670.

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  • On his return he founded the church and monastery of Armagh, the site of which was granted him by Daire, king of Oriel, and it is probable that the see was intended by him to be specially connected with the supreme ecclesiastical authority.

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  • Some years before his death, which took place in 461, Patrick resigned his position as bishop of Armagh to his disciple Benignus, and possibly retired to Saul in Dalaradia, where he spent the remainder of his life.

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  • The one is the Confession, which is contained in an imperfect state in the Book of Armagh (c. 807), but complete copies are found in later MSS.

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  • but is not contained in the Book of Armagh.

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  • - Apart from the Letter and Epistle mentioned above our chief sources of information with regard to the life of St Patrick are contained in the Book of Armagh.

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  • ARMAGH, an inland county of Ireland, in the province of Ulster, bounded N.

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  • Armagh for about 2 r m., joining the Bann at Whitecoat.

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  • Between this lowland and Armagh city, the early Cainozoic basalts form slightly higher ground, while on the west a strip of Trias appears, overlying Carboniferous Limestone.

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  • A rough conglomerate containing blocks of this latter rock forms the hills on which Armagh itself is built; this outlier is probably Permian.

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  • The climate of Armagh is considered to be one of the most genial in Ireland, and less rain is supposed to fall in this than in any other county.

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  • Only about one-twentieth of the land is naturally barren, and Armagh offers a relatively large area of cultivable soil.

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  • Such is the effect of this combination of agricultural occupations with domestic manufactures that the farmers are more than competent to supply the resident population of the county with vegetable, though not with animal food; and some of the less crowded and less productive parts of Ulster receive from Armagh a considerable supply of oats, barley and flour.

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  • The chief towns are Armagh (a city and the county town, pop. 7588), Lurgan (11,782), Portadown (10,092), Tanderagee (1427), Bessbrook (2977) and Keady (1466).

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  • Armagh is divided into eight baronies, and contains twenty-five parishes and parts of parishes, the greater number of which are in the Protestant and Roman Catholic dioceses of Armagh, and a few in the Roman Catholic diocese of Dromore.

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  • Assizes are held at Armagh, and quarter sessions at Armagh,Ballybot, Lurgan,Markethill and Newtown-Hamilton.

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  • The county was made shire ground in 1586, and called Armagh after the city by Sir John Perrott.

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  • proceeded to plant with English and Scottish colonists the vast tracts escheated to the crown in Ulster, the whole of the arable and pasture land in Armagh, estimated at 77,800 acres, was to have been allotted in sixty-one portions.

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  • Armagh, nor were the Irish swordsmen or soldiers transplanted into Connaught and Munster from this and some other counties.

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  • The antiquities consist of cairns and tumuli; the remains of the fortress of Emain near the city of Armagh, once the residence of the kings of Ulster; and Danes Cast, an extensive fortification in the south-east of the county, near Poyntzpass, extending into Co.

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  • Armagh, Ireland >>

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  • The two archbishoprics of Armagh and Dublin are maintained in the disestablished Church of Ireland.

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  • In Ireland we find Greek characters used in the Book of Armagh (c. 807); and, in the same century, a Greek psalter was copied by an Irish monk of Liege, named Sedulius (fl.

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  • Attached to the cathedral is Marsh's library, incorporated in 1707, by a request of Primate Marsh, archbishop of Armagh.

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  • A beautiful modern campanile (1853), erected by Lord John George Beresford, archbishop of Armagh and chancellor of the university, occupies the centre of the square.

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  • Thorkel established himself strongly at Armagh.

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  • In 1152 the place is mentioned as the seat of a synod convened by the papal legate, Cardinal Paparo; in 1224 it was chosen by Lucas de Netterville, archbishop of Armagh, for the foundation of the Dominican friary of which there are still remains; and in 1228 the two divisions of the town received separate incorporation from Henry III.

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  • Archbishop O'Scanlain, who did much in the building of the cathedral at Armagh, preferred to live at Drogheda, and there he was buried in 1270.

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  • The last of these - Christopher Hampton - who was consecrated to the primacy in 1613, repaired the ruined cathedral of Armagh.

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  • He built a new and handsome palace at Drogheda, and he repaired the old disused palace at Armagh and bestowed on it a demesne of 300 acres.

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  • Hoadly's brother, John Hoadly (1678-1746), was archbishop of Dublin from 1730 to 1742 and archbishop of Armagh from the latter date until his death on the 19th of July 1746.

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  • In 1849, on the strong recommendation of Archbishop John MacHale of Tuam, Cullen was nominated as successor to the primatial see of Armagh; and, on his return to Ireland, presided as papal delegate at the national council of Thurles in the August of 1850.

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  • Laurent (1626-1681) became a pastor, and was the author of Sonnets chretiens sur divers sujets (1677); Charles (1633-1697) was professor of physic at the university of Leiden, and physician to the prince of Orange; Peter (1644-1722) was ordained a priest in the Church of England, and became dean of Armagh.

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  • 229-278), issued from the press, claiming to be an answer to a discourse on the same subject by Bishop Bramhall of Londonderry (afterwards archbishop of Armagh, d.

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  • (2) The Church of Ireland, 2 provinces, Armagh and Dublin, with 7 and 6 dioceses respectively.

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  • ARMAGH, a city and market town, and the county town of Co.

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  • Armagh, Ireland, in the mid parliamentary division, 89z m.

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  • St Patrick's bell, long preserved at Armagh, the oldest Irish relic of its kind, is now, with its shrine of the year 1091, preserved in the museum of the Royal Irish Academy at Dublin.

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  • Of a synod that was held at Armagh as early as 448, there is an interesting memorial in the Book of Armagh, an Irish MS. dating about A.D.

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  • From this state of decay, however, it was raised, in the second half of the, 8th century, by the unwearied exertions of Archbishop Richard Robinson, 1st Lord Rokeby (1709-1794), which, seconded by similar devotion on the part of succeeding archbishops of the Beresford family, notably Archbishop Lord John George Beresford (1773-1862), made of Armagh one of the best built and most respectable towns in the country.

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  • As the county town Armagh has a court-house, a prison, a lunatic asylum and a county infirmary.

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  • Armagh was a parliamentary borough until 1885; and, having been incorporated in 1613, so remained until 1835.

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  • of Armagh is Emain, Emania, or Navan Fort, with large entrenchments and mounds, the site of a royal palace of Ulster, founded by that Queen Macha who gave her name to the city.

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  • Armagh itself fell before the king Brian Boroime, who was buried here; and before Edward Bruce in 1315, while previous to the English war after the Reformation, it had witnessed the struggles of Shane O'Neill (1564).

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  • He was elected member for Armagh in the first united parliament, and was a well-known character at Westminster till he died on the 11th of April 1816.

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  • ADAM LOFTUS (c. 1533-1605), archbishop of Armagh and Dublin, and lord chancellor of Ireland, the son of a Yorkshire gentleman, was educated at Cambridge.

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  • He accompanied the earl of Sussex to Ireland as his chaplain in 1560, and three years later was consecrated archbishop of Armagh by Hugh Curwen, archbishop of Dublin.

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  • His manuscripts were bought by Robert Harley (afterwards earl of Oxford), his books by Narcissus Marsh, archbishop of Armagh.

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  • In the course of the 9th century we find mention of nine places in Ireland (including Armagh, Clonmacnoise, Clones, Devenish and Sligo) where communities of these Culdees were established as a kind of annexe to the regular monastic institutions.

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  • In Ireland the Culdees of Armagh endured until the dissolution in 1541, and enjoyed a fleeting resurrection in 1627, soon after which their ancient property passed to the vicars choral of the cathedral.

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  • After representing Horsham in the House of Commons for over four years Goulburn was successively member for St Germans, for West Looe, and for the city of Armagh.

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  • ST MALACHY (c. 1094-1148), otherwise known as MaolMaodhog (or Maelmaedhog) Ua Morgair, archbishop of Armagh and papal legate in Ireland, was born at Armagh.

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  • Having been ordained to the priesthood, he for some time acted as vicar of Archbishop Celsus or Ceallach of Armagh, and carried out many reforms tending to increase conformity with the usage of the Church of Rome.

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  • Meanwhile he had been designated by Celsus (in whose family the see of Armagh had been hereditary for many years) to succeed him in the archbishopric; in the interests of reform he reluctantly accepted the dignity, and thus became involved for some years in a struggle with the so-called heirs.

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  • Accordingly, in i 13cj, Malachy set out from Ireland with the purpose of soliciting from the pope the pallium (the token of archiepiscopal subjection to Rome) for the archbishop of Armagh.

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  • 26 a whose charter had just been obtained by his uncle, Henry Usher, archbishop of Armagh.

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  • While he was detained on this business the archbishop of Armagh died in January 1625, and the king at once nominated Usher to the vacant primacy; but severe illness and other causes impeded his return to Ireland until August 1626.

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  • In 1634 he took part in the convocation which drafted the code of canons that formed the basis of Irish ecclesiastical law till the disestablishment of the Irish Church in 1869, and defeated the attempt of John Bramhall, then bishop of Derry and later his own successor in Armagh, to conform the Irish Church exactly to the doctrinal standards of the English.

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  • Ireland is divided territorially into four provinces and thirtytwo counties: - (a) Ulster (northern division): Counties Antrim, Armagh, Cavan, Donegal, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry, Monaghan, Tyrone.

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  • Certain conglomeratic beds on which Armagh is built are also believed to be of Permian age.

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  • In 1836 the Ulster railway to connect Belfast and Armagh, and the Dublin and Drogheda railway uniting these two towns were sanctioned.

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  • The only counties in which the Protestant religion predominates are Antrim, Down, Armagh and Londonderry.

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  • The Roman Catholic Church is governed in Ireland b'y 4 archbishops, whose sees are in Armagh, Dublin, Cashel and Tuam, and 23 bishops, all nominated by the pope.

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  • At the beginning of the 4th century the three Collas founded the kingdom of Oriel (comprising the present counties of Armagh, Monaghan, north Louth, south Fermanagh) and drove the Ulidians into the eastern part of the province.

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  • He also organized the already existing Christian communities, and with this in view founded a church at Armagh as his metropolitan see (444) It is further due to him that Ireland became linked up with Rome and the Christian countries of the Western church, and that in consequence Latin was introduced as the language of the church.

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  • The story goes that the ardri Aed Oirdnigthe (797-819) made a hostile incursion into Leinster and forced the primate of Armagh and all his clergy to attend him.

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  • Eventually Turgeis established himself in Armagh, whilst his wife Ota settled at Clonmacnoise and profaned the monastery church with pagan rites.

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  • The monastery of Armagh was rebuilt ten times, and as often destroyed.

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  • Turgeis himself is reported to have usurped the abbacy of Armagh.

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  • To enforce this claim he ravaged and plundered a large part of the country, took hostages from Niall Caille the over-king (833-845), drove out the comarba of St Patrick, or archbishop of Armagh, and for a whole year occupied his place as bishop. On his return he plundered the termon lands of Clonmacnoise " up to the church door," an exploit which was repeated the following year.

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  • It is probable that St Patrick established Armagh as a metropolitan see, but the history of the primacy, which during a long period can only have been a shadow, is involved in obscurity.

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  • The antithesis between the king of Dublin and the ardri seems to have had the effect of linking the Dublin Christian community rather with Canterbury than Armagh.

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  • At the beginning of the 12th century Gilbert, bishop of Limerick and papal legate, succeeded in winning over Celsus, bishop of Armagh (d.

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  • At a national synod held about 1134 Maelmaedoc, in his capacity as bishop of Armagh, was solemnly elected to the primacy; and armed with full power of church and state he was able to overcome all opposition.

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  • Armagh was constituted the seat of the primacy, and Cashel, Tuam and Dublin were raised to the rank of archbishoprics.

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  • The primate of Armagh, the saintly Gelasius, was absent, and presumably his suffragans also, but Giraldus says he afterwards came to the king at Dublin, and favoured him in all things.

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  • Geographical configuration preserved centres of resistance - the O'Neills in Tyrone and Armagh, the O'Donnells in Donegal, and the Macarthies in Cork being the largest tribes that remained practically unbroken.

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  • On the same prelate fell the task of conducting a public controversy with the archbishop of Armagh, George Dowdall, which of course ended in the conversion [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] him as lord-lieutenant, the litany was chanted in English, both cathedrals having been painted, and scripture texts substituted for " pictures and popish fancies."

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  • His first nominee, Dr Richard Turner, resolutely declined the honour, declaring that he would be unintelligible to the people; and Cranmer could only answer that English was spoken in Ireland, though he did indeed doubt whether it was spoken in the diocese of Armagh.

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  • Tyrone, Donegal, Armagh, Cavan, Fermanagh and Derry were parcelled out among English and Scottish colonists, portions being reserved to the natives.

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  • Armagh, Ireland (County) >>

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  • Republican memorial, Crossmaglen, Armagh; sculpted by the Breton artist, Yann Goulet, 1979.

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  • The issue of removing watchtowers and restricting helicopter flights is a clear sop to the IRA of South Armagh.

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  • A fanned Armagh marble stairway leads up to the entrance door on the north facade.

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  • A South Armagh man from a strongly republican village, Aiken showed " no compunction about shooting unarmed Protestants ".

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  • These arrests were in connection with the violent attacks upon the army watchtowers in the South Armagh area in December.

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  • County Down Grand Orange Lodge at its Meeting on Saturday condemned the removal of two security watchtowers in South Armagh.

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