How to use Aristophanes in a sentence

aristophanes
  • Aristophanes and Plautus show us how often resort was had to the discipline of the lash even in the case of domestic slaves.

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  • Tne scurrilous motives which Aristophanes suggests for this measure can be entirely disregarded.

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  • Of other 5th-century sources, Aristophanes is obviously a caricaturist, pseudo-Xenophon (de republica Atheniensium) a mere party pamphleteer.

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  • Plutarch (Pericles) gives many interesting details as to Pericles' personal bearing, home life, and patronage of art, literature and philosophy, derived in part from the old comic poets, Aristophanes, Cratinus, Eupolis, Hermippus, Plato and Teleclides; in part from the contemporary memoirs of Stesimbrotus and Ion of Chios.

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  • According to Philochorus, as quoted by a scholiast on Aristophanes, he fled to Elis, where he made the great statue of Zeus for the Eleans, and was afterwards put to death by them.

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  • The Triballi are described as a wild and warlike people (Isocrates, Panathenaicus, 227), and in Aristophanes (Birds, 1565-1693) a Triballian is introduced as a specimen of an uncivilized barbarian.

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  • Such were the Orpheotelestae or Metragyrtae, wandering priests who went round the country with an ass carrying the sacred properties (Aristophanes, Frogs, 159) and a bundle of sacred books.

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  • The views of Diogenes are transferred in the Clouds (264 ff.) of Aristophanes to Socrates.

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  • But, although the legend is first told in Alexandrian times, the "cry of Hylas" occurs long before as the "Mysian cry" in Aeschylus (Persae, 1054), and in Aristophanes (Plutus, 1127) "to cry Hylas" is used proverbially of seeking something in vain.

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  • Besides early work on Aristophanes, Pindar, and Sappho, whose character he vindicated, he edited Alcman (1815), Hipponax (1817), Theognis (1826) and the Theogony of Hesiod (1865), and published a Sylloge epigrammatum Graecorum (Bonn, 1828).

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  • The literature of succeeding centuries furnishes only isolated references; the more important are found in the scholia on Aristophanes, the lexicons of Hesychius, Photius and others, and the Etymologicum Magnum.

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  • From Aristophanes (Peace, 830 ff.) it is concluded that he died before the production of that play (421).

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  • He is further credited by the scholiast on Aristophanes (loc. cit.) with having composed comedies, dithyrambs, epigrams, paeans, hymns, scolia, encomia and elegies; and he is the reputed author of a philosophical treatise on the mystic number three.

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  • Although he was at first on good terms with Aristophanes, their relations subsequently became strained, and they accused each other, in most virulent terms, of imitation and plagiarism.

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  • According to Aristophanes, he was blinded by Zeus because he distributed his gifts without regard to merit.

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  • Hi is the subject of one of the extant comedies of Aristophanes, the Plutus.

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  • The fact, though not mentioned by Thucydides, was inferred from Aristophanes.

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  • The number of tributaries is given by Aristophanes as 1000, but this is greatly in excess of those named in the tribute lists.

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  • About the same time he composed a comedy on the model of Aristophanes, which is unfortunately lost.

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  • We have seen that already, in 1504, he had been engaged upon a comedy in the manner of Aristophanes, which is now unfortunately lost.

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  • This thought begins to appear in literature in the end of the 5th century B.C., when Aristophanes (Frogs, 186) speaks of the plain of Lethe.

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  • The most celebrated critics were Zenodotus; Aristophanes of Byzantium, to whom we owe the theory of Greek accents; Crates of Mallus; and Aristarchus of Samothrace, confessedly the coryphaeus of criticism.

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  • Rutherford devoted special attention to Attic idioms and the language of Aristophanes.

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  • The first four librarians were Zenodotus, Eratosthenes, Aristophanes of Byzantium, and Aristarchus.

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  • The greatest philologist of antiquity was, however, his successor, Aristophanes of Byzantium (195), who reduced accentuation and punctuation to a definite system, and used a variety of critical symbols in his recension of the Iliad and Odyssey.

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  • He also edited Hesiod and Pindar, Euripides and Aristophanes, besides composing brief introductions to the several plays, parts of which are still extant.

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  • In the time of Photius the poets usually studied at school were Homer, Hesiod, Pindar; certain select plays of Aeschylus (Prometheus, Septem and Persae), Sophocles (Ajax, Electra and Oedipus Tyrannus), and Euripides (Hecuba, Orestes, Phoenissae, and, next to these, Alcestis, Andromache, Hippolytus, Medea, Rhesus, Troades,) also Aristophanes (beginning with the Plutus), Theocritus, Lycophron, and Dionysius Periegetes.

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  • In 1494-1515 Aldus Manutius published at Venice no less than twenty-seven editiones principes of Greek authors and of Greek works of reference, the authors including Aristotle, Theophrastus, Theocritus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Demosthenes (and the minor Attic orators), Pindar, Plato and Athenaeus.

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  • In producing Plato, Athenaeus and Aristophanes, the scholar-printer was largely aided by Musurus, who also edited the Aldine Pausanias (1516) and the Etymologicum printed in Venice by another Greek immigrant, Callierges (1499) The Revival of Learning in Italy ends with the sack of Rome (1527).

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  • The Alexandrian critics attributed to him the authorship of four plays previously assigned to Aristophanes.

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  • This event is referred to by Aristophanes in the Clouds (212), where the old farmer, on being shown Euboea on the map "lying outstretched in all its length," remarks, - "I know; we laid it prostrate under Pericles."

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  • In 1548 he took the degree of master of arts; but in the same year he found it necessary to leave England on account of the suspicions entertained of his being a conjurer; these were first excited by a piece of machinery, which, in the Pax of Aristophanes, he exhibited to the university, representing the scarabaeus flying up to Jupiter, with a man and a basket of victuals on its back.

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  • It is probable that Aesop did not commit his fables to writing; Aristophanes (Wasps, 1259) represents Philocleon as having learnt the "absurdities" of Aesop from conversation at banquets, and Socrates whiles away his time in prison by turning some of Aesop's fables "which he knew" into verse (Plato, Phaedo, 61 b).

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  • He also wrote scholia on Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides (with life), and three of the comedies of Aristophanes; the scholia on Pindar, attributed to him in two MSS., are now assigned to Demetrius Triclinius.

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  • Nine comedies of Aristophanes appeared in 1498.

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  • Six comedies entitled Sappho and two Phaon, were produced by the Middle Comedy; but, when we consider, for example, the way in which Socrates was caricatured by Aristophanes, we are justified in putting no faith whatever in such authority.

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  • In Aristophanes (Thesm.973) she "keeps the keys of wedlock."

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  • Finally, although in the sanctuary of Aesculapius healing came directly or indirectly as the patients dreamed, it appears from the burlesque of Aristophanes (Plutus, 653 sqq.) that they first bathed in the sacred spring.

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  • In this way the great Alexandrian school of Homeric criticism began with Zenodotus, the first chief of the museum, and was continued by Aristophanes and Aristarchus.

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  • It was the custom of the Greeks to drink a cup of pure wine in his honour at the end of each meal (Aristophanes, Equites,106).

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  • Dionysius, Alcaeus, Anacreon, Pindar, Bacchylides, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Antiphanes, make frequent and familiar allusion to the Ke rraOos; but in the writers of the Roman and Alexandrian period such reference as occurs shows that the fashion had died out.

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  • He had some odd dislikes, and could find nothing in Aristophanes, Cervantes, Shelley, Scott, Miss Austen, Dickens.

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  • His first comedy was exhibited in 429 B.C. He composed ten plays, of which the Solitary (Movarpoxos) was exhibited in 414 along with the Birds of Aristophanes and gained the third prize.

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  • The Muses carried off the second prize in 405, Aristophanes being first with the Frogs, in which he accuses Phrynichus of employing vulgar tricks to raise a laugh, of plagiarism and bad versification.

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  • Both Cithaeron and Parnes must have been wooded in former times; for on the former are laid the picturesque silvan scenes in the Bacchae of Euripides, and it was from the latter that the wood came which caused the neighbouring deme of Acharnae to be famous for its charcoal - the iiv0paices Hapv70cot of the Acharnians of Aristophanes (348).

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  • Athens must never again seek "empire" in the sense which became odious under the influence of Cleon and Hyperbolus, - when, to use the image of Aristophanes, the allies were as Babylonian slaves grinding in the Athenian mill.

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  • Aristophanes, in the Pax, shows us that the belief in the change of men into stars survived in his own day in Greece.

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  • The character of Cleon is represented by Aristophanes and Thucydides in an extremely unfavourable light.

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  • His plays and translations of Moliere, Aristophanes, and Sophocles have been produced off-Broadway.

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  • Aristophanes comic play set in 411bc includes coarse ribaldry, Greek dancing and Carry On action.

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  • With a lively and fertile fancy Eupolis combined a sound practical judgment; he was reputed to equal Aristophanes in the elegance and purity of his diction, and Cratinus in his command of irony and sarcasm.

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  • During these years he was occupied with classical antiquity; he published a translation of Aeschylus and a paraphrase of Aristophanes, but the work by which he made himself known as a historian was his Geschichte Alexanders des Grossen (Berlin, 1833, and other editions), a book which still remains probably the best work on the subject.

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  • Domestic affliction, ill-health and his official duties made these years comparatively unproductive, but he issued an edition of his collected poems in 1867, and in 1880 won the Karacsonyi prize with his translation of the Comedies of Aristophanes (1880).

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  • Allusions to the sycophants are frequent in Aristophanes and the Attic orators.

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