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aristocratic

aristocratic

aristocratic Sentence Examples

  • Her aristocratic features were pale and her eyes exactly as Xander's mother had once described them: the hue of spring.

  • Her aristocratic features were strong and firm, her eyes the color of spring, circled by silver.

  • The aristocratic origin of Rome, the struggle between the patricians and the plebeians, the laws of the XII.

  • It appears in early times, when Thessaly was mainly governed by a few aristocratic families, as an important city under the rule of the Aleuadae, whose authority extended over the whole district of Pelasgiotis.

  • The aristocratic Moslem families send their sons to be educated in Constantinople or Vienna.

  • It may be said broadly, therefore, that in .episcopacy the government is monarchical; in congregationalism, democratic; and in Presbyterianism, aristocratic or representative.

  • His system, while preserving the democratic theory by recognizing the congregation as holding the church power, was in practice strictly aristocratic inasmuch as the congregation is never allowed any direct use of power, which is invested in the whole body of elders.

  • The remarkable feature of French church polity was its aristocratic nature, which it owed to the system of co-optation; and the exclusion of the congregation from direct and frequent interference in spiritual matters prevented many evils which result from too much intermeddling on the part of the laity.

  • It was applied to those who advocated a policy of "cowardly moderation," and feuillantisme was associated with aristocratic in the mouths of the sansculottes.

  • He had aristocratic privileges and responsibilities, the right to exact retaliation for corporal injuries, and liability to heavier punishment for crimes and misdemeanours, higher fees and fines to pay.

  • In 1075 he caused the investiture of ecclesiastica dignitaries by secular potentates of any degree to be condemned These two reforms, striking at the most cherished privileges ant most deeply-rooted self-indulgences of the aristocratic caste ii Europe, inflamed the bitterest hostility.

  • Thus far the constitution of the city had been wholly aristocratic; in the 13th century the patricians seem to have been united into a gild (Commans-gulde) from whose members the magistrates were chosen.

  • In the year 91, which brought with it the imminent prospect of sweeping political change, with the enfranchisement of the Italian peoples, Sulla returned to Rome, and it was generally felt that he was the man to lead the conservative and aristocratic party.

  • And in the Great Council itself we have the lively image of the aristocratic popular assembly of Rome, the assembly of the populus, that of the curiae, where every man of patrician birth had his place.

  • The assembly of curiae at Rome, originally the democratic assembly of the original people, first grew into an aristocratic assembly, and then died out altogether as a new Roman people, with its own assembly, grew up by its side.

  • All this is signally shown in the history both of Venice and of other aristocratic cities.

  • That in the better times of the aristocracy nobility was not uncommonly granted to worthy persons, that in its worse times it was more commonly sold to unworthy persons, was the affair of the aristocratic body itself.

  • From this purest type of nobility, as seen in the aristocratic commonwealths, we may pass to nobility as seen in states of greater extent - that is, for the most part in monarchies.

  • We have seen how much this takes away from the true notion of nobility as understood in the aristocratic commonwealths.

  • Poland, in short, came nearer than any kingdom or country of large extent to the nature of an aristocracy, as we have seen aristocracy in the aristocratic cities.

  • So intensely aristocratic (hence his nickname 6 AoXoiSopos, "he who rails at the people") was his temperament that he declined to exercise the regal-hieratic office of 1 3avLAeus which was hereditary in his family, and presented it to his brother.

  • On the Continent, the movement was more aristocratic and theoretical; it was part of the intellectual renaissance which found its most striking expression in the principles of the French Revolution.

  • 0111vier, to the fact that for nine years he had been a persona grata in the aristocratic society of Vienna, where the necessity for revenging the humiliation of 1866 was an article of faith.

  • The proprietors had all the powers of a county palatine and proposed to establish a feudal and aristocratic form of government.

  • Both in Europe and in Asia small feudal or aristocratic states tended to consolidate themselves into monarchies, but whereas in Europe from the early days of Rome onwards royalty has often been driven out and replaced temporarily or permanently by popular government, this change seems not to occur in Asia, where revolution means only a change of dynasty.

  • His first literary work, except the bombastic but eloquent Essai sur le despotisme (Neufchatel, 1 775), was a translation of Robert Watson's Philip II., done in Holland with the help of Durival; his Considerations sur l'ordre de Cincinnatus (London, 1788) was based on a pamphlet by Aedanus Burke (1743-1802), of South Carolina, who opposed the aristocratic tendencies of the Society of the Cincinnati, and the notes to it were by Target;, his financial writings were suggested by the Genevese exile, Claviere.

  • The Fula form the aristocratic class.

  • His brilliant parts were somewhat obscured by his rather erratic conduct, and a certain contempt, partly aristocratic and partly intellectual, for commonplace men and ways.

  • The aristocratic party was captained by the township of Heraclea, which had given the first doge, Anafesto, to the newly formed community.

  • An Arabian merchant city is thus necessarily aristocratic, and its chiefs can hardly be other than pure Arabs of good blood.

  • It is a struggle between the king and the haute tour: it is a struggle between the aristocratic feudalism of the Franks and the monarchical feudalism of the Normans.

  • The Malays are an intensely aristocratic people, and show a marvellous loyalty to their rajas and chiefs.

  • The aristocratic council of the Areopagus constituted the chief criminal court, and nominated the magistrates, among whom the chief archon passed judgment in family suits, controlled admission to the genos or clan, and consequently the acquisition of the franchise.

  • But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed on to the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death.

  • Although Caesar could hardly have expected the bill to pass, the aristocratic party would be saddled with the odium of rejecting a popular measure, and the people themselves would be more ready to welcome a proposal by Caesar himself, an expectation fulfilled by the passing of the lex Julia in 59, whereby Caesar at least partly succeeded where Rullus had failed.

  • Weak health, consequent on over-study, prevented him from obtaining the highest academical honours, but he graduated as doctor in theology at the age of twenty-two, and then entered the Accademia dei Nobili ecclesiastici, a college in which clergy of aristocratic birth are trained for the diplomatic service of the Roman Church.

  • Of his early life we are told merely that he became a follower of the statesman Cleisthenes and sided with the aristocratic party in Athenian politics.

  • Pinckney, like many other South Carolina revolutionary leaders, was of aristocratic birth and politics, closely connected with England by ties of blood, education and business relations.

  • In the narrow " wynds " the nobility and gentry paid their visits in sedan chairs, and proceeded in full dress to the assemblies and balls, which were conducted with aristocratic exclusiveness in an alley on the south side of High Street, called the Assembly Close, and in the assembly rooms in the West Bow.

  • (1235-1270), the last man of genius whom the Arpads produced, did something to curb the aristocratic misrule which was to be one of the determining causes of the collapse Bela IV.

  • The Hungarian diet frantically opposed every Austrian alliance as endangering the national independence, but to any unprejudiced observer a union with the house of Habsburg, even with the contingent probability of a Habsburg king, was infinitely preferable to the condition into which Hungary, under native aristocratic misrule, was swiftly drifting.

  • Julius Reviczky (1855-1899) also inclined to the Occidental rather than to the specifically Magyar type of poets; his lyrics are highly finished, aristocratic and pessimistic (Pan halala, " The Death of Pan ").

  • The old citizens thus gradually grew into an exclusive or aristocratic body, called yauopoc or landowners.

  • This was Dionysius (the "Elder"), son of another Hermocrates and an adherent of the aristocratic party, but soon afterwards a demagogue, though supported by some men of rank, among them the historian Philistus (Diod.

  • The aristocratic faction headed by Maso degli Albizzi, a wise and popular statesman, had remained predominant, and at Maso's death in 1417 he was succeeded in the leadership of the party by Niccolo da Uzzano.

  • The mismanagement of the campaign brought about a quarrel between the aristocratic party, led by Rinaldo degli Albizzi, and the popular party, led by Giovanni de' Medici's son Cosimo (1389-1464), although both had agreed to the war before it began.

  • But in spite of Savonarola's popularity there was a party called the Bigi (greys) who intrigued secretly in favour of the return of the Medici, while the men of wealth, called the Arrabbiati, although they hated the Medici, were even more openly opposed to the actual regime and desired to set up an aristocratic oligarchy.

  • Admission to the gild was not restricted to burgesses; nor did the brethren form an aristocratic body having control over the whole municipal polity.

  • The inner town, which lies almost exactly in the centre of the others, is still, unlike the older parts of most European towns, the most aristocratic quarter, containing the palaces of the emperor and of many of the nobility, the government offices, many of the embassies and legations, the opera house and the principal hotels.

  • Soon after this date we find the old aristocratic government of Pisa replaced by a more popular form.

  • The sympathies of Dante Alighieri, the Florentine patriot and foe of Rome, were naturally in favour of the victims of an aristocratic prelate, opposed to all reconciliation with Florence.

  • Among the "Moors" the descendants of the Andalusian refugees form an exclusive and aristocratic class.

  • The falcon (taka), always an honored bird in Japan, where from time immemorial hawking has been an aristocratic pastime, is common enough, and so is the sparrow-hawk (/lai-taka), but the eagle (washi) affects solitude.

  • (~reat preserves of wildduck and teal used to be a frequent feature in the parks attached to the feudal castles of old Japan, when a peculiar method of netting the birds or striking them with falcons was a favorite aristocratic pastime.

  • For the composition of the uta gradually deteriorated from the end ofthe 9th century, when a game called uta-awase became a fashionable pastime, and aristocratic men and women tried to string together versicles of 31 syllables, careful of the form and careless of the thought.

  • Undesignedly it conveys a wonderfully realistic picture of aristocratic life and social ethics in KiOto at the beginning of the 11th century.

  • They were born at the close The Theatre of the 16th century and they owed their origin to the ~growing influence of the commercial class, who asserted a right to be amused but were excluded frons enjoyment of the aristocratic No and the Kyogen.

  • Both of these journals devoted space to social news, a radical departure from the austere restrictions observed by their aristocratic contemporaries.

  • All the artists of this period were men of aristocratic rank and origin, and were held distinct from the carpenterarchitects of the imposing temples which were to contain their works.

  • They worked, too, with a skill little inferior to that of the GotOs, Naras, and other aristocratic sculptors of sword ornaments, and often with a refinement which their relative disadvantages in education and associations render especially remarkable.

  • of swords worn on ceremonial occasions, the ishime (stone-pitting) orjimigaki (polished) styles being considered less aristocratic.

  • Thus the main features of the Japanese dwelling-house were evolved, and little change took place subsequently, except that the brush of the painter was freely used for decorating partitions, and in aristocratic mansions unlimited care was exercised in the choice of rare woods.

  • But the internal quarrels between the Merli, or aristocratic faction, and the Malvezzi, or democratic faction, fomented as they were by the Spaniards, helped to ruin the city (1671-1678).

  • Latin literature ceased to be in close sympathy with the popular spirit, either politically or as a form of amusement, but became the expression of the ideas, sentiment and culture of the aristocratic governing class.

  • Towards everything like disorder, tyranny, or aristocratic oppression, Casimir was always inexorably severe; all disturbers of the peace were remorselessly put to death as the worst enemies of their country and he enjoyed in consequence the honourable title of "the Peasants' King."

  • Finally an agreement was arrived at between the aristocratic constitutionalists and the popular party, as a result of which the grand-duke's participation in the war was formally demanded.

  • But he was an active supporter of many popular movements - particularly of that which ended in the abolition of the slave trade; and he was throughout his entire life sincerely and profoundly attached to the political principles of the Whigs, both in their popular and in their aristocratic aspect.

  • But in this aristocratic caste the women are scrupulously clothed.

  • A renewed defection, inspired apparently by aversion to the aristocratic government of the Walls Of Mantineia.

  • With the aid of John, burgrave of Montfoort, who had been called in, after the manner of the Italian podestas, and endowed with supreme power for the defence of the town, the Utrechters defeated all the efforts of their bishop, aided by the Hollanders and an aristocratic faction.

  • Inside the city the old aristocratic and democratic factions still carried on their traditional struggle, complicated now by religious difficulties.

  • The adhesion of Utrecht to the party of revolt was the work of the aristocratic party, and the critical state of affairs made it for a while dominant in the town.

  • The ultra-Calvinistic Adolph, count of Nuenar, who was elected stadtholder,overthrew the aristocratic government and placed the people in power.

  • The withdrawal of Leicester from the Netherlands was followed by the defeat of Deventer and the return of the aristocratic party to power.

  • It is in this respect superior, and further shows in places a more impartial treatment of the evidence, especially in respect of the aristocratic and absolute governments of Greece.

  • the midst of the political disturbances which preceded the outbreak of the War of American Independence, offered a good opportunity for a public career, and Morris had the aristocratic connexions which tradition required.'

  • He favoured a strong executive holding during good behaviour, an aristocratic senate appointed by the president for life, and the restriction of the suffrage to freeholders.

  • The former were led by Leisler, the latter by Peter Schuyler (1657-1724), Nicholas Bayard (c. 1644-1707), Stephen van Cortlandt (1643-1700),William Nicolls (16 57-- 1723) and other representatives of the aristocratic Hudson Valley families.

  • In 1843 Lindenau was forced by the action of the aristocratic party to resign, and was replaced by Julius Traugotte von Kdnneritz (1792-1866), a statesman of reactionary views.

  • The new baronies and countships, owing their existence entirely to the crown, introduced a strong solvent into aristocratic circles.

  • The streets are fairly wide and straight, and several of the houses belonging to aristocratic Moors, descendants of those expelled from Spain, have fine courts surrounded by arcades, some with marble fountains and planted with orange trees.

  • This brought him into conflict with the aristocratic party, who prevented him from obtaining the aedileship. When about forty years of age he married a lady of patrician rank, Julia, the aunt of Julius Caesar.

  • The general ardour for the restoration of the arts and of learning created an aristocratic public, of which Erasmus was supreme pontiff.

  • During the 17th and 18th centuries, while the Romanist majority of the Swiss cantons steadily refused to accept Geneva as even a subordinate member of the Confederation, the city itself was distracted on several occasions by attempts of the citizens, as a whole, to gain some share in the aristocratic government of the town, though these attempts were only partially successful.

  • As one of the democratic leaders there he was obliged in 1782 to take refuge in England, upon the armed interference of France, Sardinia and Berne in favour of the aristocratic party.

  • At first he was conspicuous for his aristocratic pride and bitter hatred of the plebeians.

  • A born ruler, Casimir introduced a whole series of administrative and economical reforms. He was the especial protector of the cities and the peasants, and, though averse from violent measures, punished aristocratic tyranny with an iron hand.

  • Neither a turbulent minority, nor the neglect of an absentee king; neither the revival of separatist tendencies in Lithuania, nor the outbreaks of aristocratic lawlessness in Poland, could do more than shake the superstructure of the imposing edifice.

  • In 1414, however, intimidated by the growing discontent, which frequently took the form of armed rebellion, the Knights consented to the establishment of a diet, which was re-formed on a more aristocratic basis in 1430.

  • But the aristocratic youth still preferred frequenting the universities of Prague, Padua and Paris, and accordingly the newly founded studium languished.

  • The old gentleman in his aristocratic imperiousness frequently reminds us of the amusing directions given by Sir John Wynne to his chaplain, quoted in Pennant's Tour in Wales.

  • Among his latest productions are his "Psalms of the Future" (Psalmy przyszlosci), which were attacked by the democratic party as a defence of aristocratic views which had already ruined Poland..

  • His sympathies, however, were mostly aristocratic, though modified by the desire of progress.

  • Among the very numerous writers of romances may be mentioned Henry Rzewuski (1791-1866); Joseph Dzierzkowski wrote novels on aristocratic life, and Michael Czajkowski (1808-1876) romances of the Ukraine; Valerius Wieloglowski (1865) gave pictures of country life.

  • Early in the 5th century other aristocratic Romans interested themselves in the textual criticism of Persius and Martial.

  • The youthful aristocracy were thus withdrawn from the old Latin schools of Germany, but the aristocratic schools vanished with the dawn of the 19th century, and the ordinary public schools were once more frequented by the young nobility.

  • The new constitution drawn and adopted in 1776 to take the place of the charter was of an aristocratic rather than a democratic nature.

  • Badly received by the great aristocratic family of the Walid-sidiSheikh, he re-entered Morocco, but the emperor of that country, dreading his influence and fearing difficulties with the French, drove him out.

  • The aristocratic influences in both states have always been on the Southern and Democratic side, but while they were strong enough in Virginia to lead the state into secession they were unable to do so in Kentucky., 1 Most of the early settlers of Kentucky made their way thither either by the Ohio river (from Fort Pitt) or - the far larger number - by way of the Cumberland Gap and the " ` Wilderness Road."

  • Many of these secured royal and aristocratic patronage and encouragement-the tsar of Russia, the kings of Prussia, Bavaria, Sweden, Denmark and Wurttemberg all lending their influence to the enterprise.

  • His career was soon after interrupted by the triumphant return of Sulla (82 B.C.), who ordered him to divorce his wife, and on his refusal deprived him of his property and priesthood and was induced to spare his life only by the intercession of his aristocratic relatives and the college of vestal virgins.

  • This was intolerable to the aristocratic republicans, to whom it seemed becoming that victorious commanders should accept divine honours at the hands of Greeks and Asiatics, but unpardonable that Romans should offer the same worship to a Roman.

  • Cecil had in 1569 triumphed over the conservative and aristocratic party in the council; and Walsingham was the ablest of the new men whom he brought to the front to give play to the new forces which were to carve out England's career.

  • But its aristocratic organization, based as this was on property qualifications which gave the greatest voting power to the richest men, prevented it from being a fitting channel for the expression of plebeian claims. Hence the plebs adopted a new political organization of their own.

  • In 88 B.C. a return was made to the original and more aristocratic system by a law passed by the consuls Sulla and Pompeius.

  • The rise to power of the equestrian order in Rome during the last century of the Republic had to some extent modified the old Roman principle that trade and commerce were beneath the dignity of the governing class; but long after the fall of the Republic the aristocratic notion survived in Rome that industry and handicrafts were only fit for slaves.

  • Aristotle, when speaking of the aristocratic character of the horse, as requiring fertile soil for its support, and consequently being associated with wealth, instances its use among the Chalcidians and Eretrians, and in the former of those two states we find a class of nobles called Hippobotae.

  • and George V., and his popularity in English aristocratic circles, to establish and secure friendly relations between the Cabinets of Vienna and London.

  • Until 1832 there was only one party in the state, the Democratic, but the question of nullification caused a division that year into the (Jackson) Democratic party and the State's Rights (Calhoun Democratic) party; about the same time, also, there arose, chiefly in those counties where the proportion of slaves to freemen was greater and the freemen were most aristocratic, the Whig party.

  • Troup, which represented the interests of the aristocratic and slave-holding communities; the other, formed by John Clarke (1766-1832) and his brother Elijah, found support among the non-slave-holders and the frontiersmen.

  • Johnson began in politics to oppose the aristocratic element .and became the spokesman and champion of the poorer and labouring classes.

  • in 1730 he declared openly in favour of Anne, duchess of Courland, in opposition to the aristocratic Dolgorukis and Golitsuins, and his determined attitude on behalf of autocracy was the chief cause of the failure of the proposed constitution, which would have converted Russia into a limited monarchy.

  • It was the monarchy of the bishops of Rome that naturally benefited by these attacks on the aristocratic principle represented by the high prelacies in the Church.

  • The aristocratic republic of Poland was obviously the most convenient suzerain for a Livonian nobleman; so, in 1698, Patkul proceeded to the court of the king-elector at Dresden and bombarded Augustus with proposals for the partition of Sweden.

  • (1728-1730), Golitsuin was the most prominent statesman in Russia and his high aristocratic theories had full play.

  • The medieval constitution of Groningen, unlike that of Utrecht, was aristocratic. Merchant gild there was none; and the craft gilds were without direct influence on the city government, which held them in subjection.

  • It was supported by the radical left, by a large portion of the Orthodox-Calvinists under Dr Kuyper, and by some Catholics; it had against it the moderate liberals, the aristocratic section of the Orthodox-Calvinists, the bulk of the Catholics, and a few radicals under an influential leader van Houten.

  • Owing to the continued civic unrest it was again excluded in 1427, and only readmitted in 1433 when the old aristocratic constitution was definitively restored.

  • The aristocratic class saw ruin before it if the smallest concession were made to popular wishes, and it soon recovered from the terror into which it had been plunged at the outbreak of the revolution.

  • Their political constitutions were aristocratic; that is, the franchise was confined to the descendants of the original settlers, round whom an excluded body (Ffflos or plebs) was often growing up. The ancient kingship was perhaps kept on or renewed in some of the Siceliot and Italiot towns; but it is more certain that civil dissensions led very early to the rise of tyrants.

  • The demos first sank into political annihilation and the council, no longer popularly elected but an aristocratic order, concentrated the whole administration in its hands.

  • Ennius, on the other hand, was by temperament in thorough sympathy with the dominant aristocratic element in Roman life and institutions.

  • In response to his advances commissaries of the French republic visited him at Iannina and, affecting a sudden zeal for republican principles, he easily obtained permission to suppress the " aristocratic " tribes on the coast.

  • But aristocratic licence proved as mischievous as royal incompetence; and on the death of Christopher II.

  • of the As the government grew more and more aristocratic, nobles.

  • It signified in the first place that the crown was not the highest power in the state, but was subject to the aristocratic Rigsraad, or council of state.

  • This period of aristocratic rule, which dates practically from the accession of Frederick I.

  • Mrs Carlyle was hurt by the fine lady's condescension and her husband's accessibility to aristocratic blandishments.

  • The people were divided into clans, many of them governed as republics, more or less aristocratic. In a few cases several of such republics had formed confederations, and in four cases such confederations had already become hereditary monarchies.

  • As Friederike had fitted into the background of Goethe's Strassburg life, Lotte into that of Wetzlar, and Lili into the gaieties of Frankfort, so now Charlotte von Stein, the wife of a Weimar official, was the personification of the more aristocratic ideals of Weimar society.

  • The appeal of the prophets, " is not for better institutions but for better men, not for the abolition of aristocratic privileges but for an honest and godly use of them."

  • His own temper of mind was conservative and somewhat aristocratic, but he guided political development, often under circumstances of great difficulty, with singular fairness and conspicuous magnanimity.

  • Naturally, there arose much jealousy between the gilds and the aristocratic companies, which exclusively ruled the republic. After an attempt to upset the merchants had been suppressed in 1384, the gilds succeeded, under more favourable circumstances, in 1408.

  • The aristocratic government was again expelled under the dictatorship of Jurgen Wullenweber (c. 1492-1537), till the old order was re-established in 1535.

  • He reformed the constitution in an aristocratic sense, most of the nobility being Imperialists, and put an end to the factions which divided the city.

  • Destined for the bar, he was educated at the aristocratic college of Clermont (now that of Louis-le-Grand).

  • His father, a native of France, died when the boy was in his sixth year, and his mother, a member of an aristocratic Virginia family, then removed to Charleston, South Carolina.

  • Its civic history is much the same as that of other medieval towns: a struggle between the democratic gilds and the aristocratic "families," which ended in 1347 in the inclusion of the former in the governing body, and in the 17th century in the complete exclusion of the latter.

  • Indeed, even prior to the definite establishment of the caste-system, the mingling of the lower race with the upper classes, especially with the aristocratic landowners and still more so with the yeomanry, had probably been going on to such an extent as to have resulted in two fairly well-defined intermediate types of colour between the priestly order and the servile race and to have facilitated the ultimate division into four" colours "(varna).

  • Roman literature, faithfully reflecting the sentiments of the aristocratic salons of the capital, while it almost canonized those who had been his victims, fully avenged their wrongs by painting Nero as a monster of wickedness.

  • Vaughan was a man of very different type from his predecessor; he had none of Manning's intellectual finesse or his ardour in social reform, but he was an ecclesiastic of remarkably fine presence and aristocratic leanings, intransigeant in theological policy, and in personal character simply devout.

  • Latterly it appears to have become aristocratic, and most of the power was concentrated in the hands of the first archon or Proteuon, who in time was superseded by the strategus sent out from Byzantium.

  • Indeed, as the history of the higher religions shows, religion tends in the end to break away from secular government with its aristocratic traditions, and to revert to the more democratic spirit of the primitive age, having by now obtained a clearer consciousness of its purpose, yet nevertheless clinging to the inveterate forms of human ritual as still adequate to symbolize the consecration of life - the quickening of the will to face life earnestly.

  • At present its chief interest is in lumber, but in colonial days it was a settlement of aristocratic rice planters.

  • On the motion of the Estate of Peasants, which had a long memory for aristocratic abuses, the question of the recovery of the alienated crown lands was brought before the Riksdag, and, despite the stubborn opposition of the magnates, a resolution of the Diet directed that all countships, baronies, domains, manors and other estates producing an annual rent of more than 70 per annum should revert to the Crown.

  • The third clause required him, in all cases of preferment, to be guided not " principally," as heretofore, but " solely " by merit,, thus striking at the very root of aristocratic privilege.

  • The aristocratic classes loudly complained that the young king, Gustavus IV., Gustavus still a minor, was being brought up among crypto IV., 1792- Jacobins; while the middle classes, deprived of 1809.

  • He had alienated the sympathy of the aristocratic classes of Chile by his personal vanity and ambition.

  • The aristocratic republic quailed before such an enterprise, though Lucullus, at the height of his successes, entertained the thought (Plut.

  • But he was hampered by poverty and the jealousy of the other European Powers, and, after showing once more his unrivalled mastery over masses of men at the brief Gefle diet (22nd of January-24th of February 1792), he fell a victim to a widespread aristocratic conspiracy.

  • While the Crown was thus acquiring new possessions, its authority in Portugal was temporarily overshadowed by the growth of aristocratic privilege.

  • The head of the aristocratic opposition was the duke of Braganza, who contrived to secure the sympathy of the king and the dismissal of the regent.

  • Cruz de Coimbra, the Chronica da conquista do Algarve and the Livros dos Linhagens, aristocratic registers, portions of which,, like the story of King Arthur, have considerable literary interest..

  • It must not be forgotten, however, that our authorities were all members of the aristocratic party.

  • The more aristocratic Hussites raised an armed force which was known as " the army of the nobles."

  • Livy's easy independent life at Rome, and his aristocratic leanings in politics seem to show that he was the son of well-born and opulent parents; he was certainly well educated, being widely read in Greek literature, and a student both of rhetoric and philosophy.

  • Nor, though his sympathies are unmistakably with the aristocratic party, does he scruple to censure the pride, cruelty and selfishness which too often marked their conduct (ii.

  • But he unquestionably gave undue prominence to the tales of the prowess and glory of the Fabii, and probably also allowed his own strong aristocratic sympathies to colour his version of the early political controversies.

  • Another peculiarity, more fatal to him in that aristocratic age than any other, was his fondness for the common people, which was increased by his passion for a pretty Dutch girl, named Dyveke, who became his mistress in 1507 or 1509.

  • Lord Palmerston never was a Whig, still less a Radical; he was a statesman of the old English aristocratic type, liberal in his sentiments, favourable to the march of progress, but entirely opposed to the claims of democratic government.

  • His principles were democratic, his tastes aristocratic. He did not like crowds, streets, hotels - "the people who fill them oppress me with their excessive civility."

  • He held extreme Catholic views and wrote on the most risque subjects; he gave himself aristocratic airs and hinted at a mysterious past, though his parentage was entirely bourgeois and his youth very hum-drum and innocent.

  • There are also new middle-class quarters at Santa Lucia, Vomero Nuovo and Sant' Efremo, and better houses in the Via Sirignano, on the Riviera di Chiaja, Via Elena and Via Caracciolo at Mergellina, Via Partenope near the Chiatamone, and an aristocratic quarter in the large extensions made in the Rione Amedeo.

  • He disliked his immediate chief Grenville, one of the Whigs who joined Pitt, and a man of thoroughly Whiggish aristocratic insolence, In 1799 he left the foreign office and was named one of the twelve commissioners for India, and in 1800 joint paymaster of the forces, a post which he held till the retirement of Pitt in 1801.

  • The colonization of the eastern provinces and the struggle against the Sla y s necessitated a stronger concentration of aristocratic power, and the reception of Roman law during the 5th and 16th centuries hardened the forms of subjection originated by customary conditions.

  • There were still, however, about a dozen free republics, most of them with aristocratic government, and it was in these that reforming movements met with most approval and support.

  • He certainly set out for Rome from the south of Italy (where he remained as proconsul) at the bidding of the aristocratic party, when the city was threatened by Marius and Cinna, but he displayed little energy, and the engagement which he fought before the Colline gate, although hotly contested, was indecisive.

  • Belonging, it is said, to a rich and distinguished family, Parmenides attached himself, at any rate for a time, to the aristocratic society or brotherhood which Pythagoras had established at Croton; and accordingly one part of his system, the physical part, is apparently Pythagorean.

  • In spite of this policy, however, the Polish element continued to gain, this being partly due to immigration over the eastern border, partly to the repressive policy of the Prussian government, which converted what had been an aristocratic opposition into one that is popular and radical.

  • A House so chosen was an aristocratic body, but it was aristocratic in a far wider sense than the House of Lords was aristocratic. The trading and legal classes found their representation there by the side of the great owners of land.

  • The two sections of which the government was composed had different aims. The Rockingham section, which now looked up to Fox, rested on aristocratic connection and influence; the Shelburne section was anxious to gain popular support by active reforms, and to gain over the king to their side.

  • Before the end of the year the invasion was repulsed, and the ragged armies of the Revolution had overrun Savoy and the Austrian Netherlands, and were threatening the aristocratic Dutch republic Very few governments in Europe were so rooted in the affections of their people as to be able to look without terror on the challenge thus thrown out to them.

  • It Charar~er had departed widely from the Toryism of Pitts of the younger years, which had sought to base itself on Tory popular support, as opposed to the aristocratic ex- party.

  • George III., or those about him, insisted on substituting for the aristocratic division of political power a substantial concentration of it in the hands of the sovereign.

  • The aristocratic principle of government having been destroyed by the Reform Bill, and the House of Lords being practically "abrogated" by that measure, it became necessary that Toryism should start from the democratic basis, from which it had never been alien.

  • The Federalist party gradually showed broad-construction, nationalistic tendencies; the Anti-Federalist party became a strict-construction party and advocated popular rights against the asserted aristocratic, centralizing tendencies of its opponent, and gradually was transformed into the Democratic-Republican party, mustered and led by Thomas Jefferson, who, however, had approved the ratification of the Constitution and was not, therefore, an Anti-Federalist in the original sense of that term.

  • After Choiseul's death he was sent to Stockholm with instructions to help the aristocratic party of the "Hats" with advice and money.

  • MIKHAIL BAKUNIN (1814-1876), Russian anarchist, was born of an aristocratic family at Torjok, in the government of Tver, in 1814.

  • At the completion of his three years' course at Halle he was for two years private tutor in the family of Count Dohna-Schlobitten, developing in a cultivated and aristocratic household his deep love of family and social life.

  • Rome was too tolerant to impose her own institutions by force; it was the conquered peoples who collectively and individually solicited as a favor the right ~f adopting the municipal system, the magistracy, the sacerdotal and aristocratic social system of their conquerors.

  • Upon ground that had been so well levelled by Roman legislation aristocratic institutions naturally flourished.

  • the other hand, pagan and Christian elements in society existed side by side without intermingling, and even openly antagonistic to each otherone aristocratic and the other democratic. In order to induce the masses of the people once more to become loyal to the imperial form of government the emperor Julian tried by founding a new religion to give its functionaries a religious prestige which should impress the popular mind.

  • The increasing number of her adherents, and her inexperience of government on such a vast and complicated scale, obliged her to comply with political necessity and to adopt the system of the state and its social customs. The Church was no longer a fraternity, on a footing of equality, with freedom of belief and tentative as to dogma, but an authoritative aristocratic hierarchy.

  • Still, certain disturbances made him see that aristocratic approval of his kingship might be strengthened if it could claim a divine sanction which no Merovingian had ever received.

  • The struggle was now between the two branches of the royal family, the Orleanist and the Burgundian, between the aristocratic south and the democratic north; while the Siggle deposition of Richard II.

  • From 1436 to 1439 there was a terrible repetition of what happened after the Peace of Brtigny; famine, pestilence, extortions and, later, the aristocratic revolt of the Praguerie, completed the ruin of the country.

  • Of the two contrary currents which have continually mingled and conflicted throughout the course of French history, that of monarchic absolutism and that of aristocratic and democratic liberty, the former was now to carry all before it.

  • Instead of weakening this aristocratic agitation by the see-saw policy of Catherine de Medici, Marie could invent no other device than to despoil the royal treasure by distributing places and money to the chiefs of both parties.

  • Thus the aristocratic constitution of Sieys was transformed into an unavowed dictatorship, a public ratification of which the First Consul obtained by a third coup detat from the intimidated and yet reassured electors-reassured by his dazzling but unconvincing offers of peace to the victorious Coalition (which repulsed them), by the rapid disarmament of La Vende, and by the proclamations in which he filled the ears of the infatuated people with the new talk of stability of government, order, justice and moderation.

  • 3 Though fully conscious that monarchy in America was impossible, he wished to obtain the next best solution in an aristocratic, strongly centralized, coercive, but representative union, with devices to give weight to the influence of class and property.

  • Moreover, his preferences for at least an aristocratic republic were shared by many other men of talent.

  • When he says (p. 140) that " In Hamilton's successful policy there were certainly germs of an aristocratic republic, there were certainly limitations and possibly dangers to pure democracy," this is practically Jefferson's assertion (1792) that " His system flowed from principles adverse to liberty "; but Jefferson goes on to add: " and was calculated to undermine and demolish the republic."

  • Having no further use for his former aristocratic associates, he broke off all connexion with them, and thus felt at liberty to attack the secret combinations for political purposes, the oligarchical clubs to which they mostly belonged.

  • The acceptance of this duty is the only foundation for a moral and just society The aristocratic idea has seldom been better stated.

  • While his temper had become less aristocratic, his Liberalism had grown more tolerant.

  • We learn in them how Caliban (democracy), the mindless brute, educated to his own responsibility, makes after all an adequate ruler; how Prospero (the aristocratic principle, or, if we will, the mind) accepts his dethronement for the sake of greater liberty in the intellectual world, since Caliban proves an effective policeman, and leaves his superiors a free hand in the laboratory; how Ariel (the religious principle) acquires a firmer hold on life, and no longer gives up the ghost at the faintest hint of change.

  • Sarah and Jackson had been 23 and 25 years old respectively, living privileged, English aristocratic lives when they were abducted and turned into vampires.

  • Her aristocratic features were pale and her eyes exactly as Xander's mother had once described them: the hue of spring.

  • Her aristocratic features were strong and firm, her eyes the color of spring, circled by silver.

  • alabaster effigy with long aristocratic features, like a horse's.

  • This aristocratic anarchism is particularly characteristic of the Russian nihilist.

  • The parliamentarian party was suffused with anti-aristocratic feelings even tho it was led by aristocratic feelings even tho it was led by aristocrats, and indeed partly against their leadership.

  • aristocratic patronage of modern architecture.

  • aristocratic mansion dating back to the early 16th Century.

  • aristocratic patron, Vladimir Chaplin.

  • aristocratic landowner, hated by the population of London.

  • aristocratic elite simply does not represent the people.

  • I'm playing a black vegetarian called Yasmine, as well as her very aristocratic mother.

  • It embodies an almost aristocratic disdain for ordinary people who want to raise their living standards.

  • It is still not aristocratic, but it is eminently respectable.

  • I mean oddly enough New College, despite its rather aristocratic background, had a curious reputation for producing Labor politicians.

  • I do not quite like politics; I am too aristocratic, I fear, for that.

  • Thus, the specter of popular revolt keeps haunting Richard II, notwithstanding the strictly aristocratic aspect of its many intrigues and conspiracies.

  • attitude of aristocratic superiority toward the Low Country Sinhalese precluded marriage between them.

  • Once an aristocratic private mansion for the late The Queen Mother's Family, this hotel ouzes charm and grace.

  • After some time they went to Rome where they transformed themselves into a somewhat effete aristocratic body tho they retained residual sovereign powers.

  • An alabaster effigy with long aristocratic features, like a horse's.

  • epitomizes the very essence of the aristocratic English country house.

  • On the palate, the wine was rather more astringent, brisker perhaps, with a touch of aristocratic hauteur.

  • He was the leading aristocratic landowner, hated by the population of London.

  • neglectful husband and infant children to elope with her aristocratic suitor.

  • Until the mid-18th century wealthy aristocratic patrons and royalty were the individuals who were generally painted.

  • Both the Minster and York's many religious houses enjoyed royal and aristocratic patronage, while wealthy citizens often favored the numerous parish churches.

  • The aristocratic troubadours were poets who originated in the south of France where they wrote the lyrics in Provencal (langue d'oc ).

  • Trotsky was writing against a background where brave leftists attempted to assassinate tsars, their ministers and aristocratic accomplices.

  • To such people the aristocratic gods of the Tuatha de Danann may have been too unapproachable, even if access had been allowed them.

  • One may say of him, what Auden said of Cavafy, that his attitude toward poetic vocation was an aristocratic one.

  • The aristocratic owners of these plantations dealt directly with trade, exporting on to the world market from riverside wharfs.

  • The aristocratic origin of Rome, the struggle between the patricians and the plebeians, the laws of the XII.

  • The primary government is aristocratic. Patrician tyranny rouses the populace to revolt, and then democratic equality is established under a republic. Democratic excesses cause the rise of an empire, which, becoming corrupt, declines into barbarism, and, again emerging from it, retraces the same course.

  • He discharged his duties with ability and success, and although the boldness with which he denounced the aristocratic rulers of Rome drew down upon him the enmity of powerful Iren, he won the favour and esteem of the pope, who gave him an official position at his court.

  • Leon was identified with the interests of the democracy of Nicaragua, Granada with the clerical and aristocratic parties.

  • It appears in early times, when Thessaly was mainly governed by a few aristocratic families, as an important city under the rule of the Aleuadae, whose authority extended over the whole district of Pelasgiotis.

  • Towards the south the tribal organization becomes looser and is gradually supplanted by a kind of feudal system; among the powerful aristocratic houses may be mentioned the Vliores at Avlona, who are stated to own over 150 sq.

  • The aristocratic Moslem families send their sons to be educated in Constantinople or Vienna.

  • It may be said broadly, therefore, that in .episcopacy the government is monarchical; in congregationalism, democratic; and in Presbyterianism, aristocratic or representative.

  • His system, while preserving the democratic theory by recognizing the congregation as holding the church power, was in practice strictly aristocratic inasmuch as the congregation is never allowed any direct use of power, which is invested in the whole body of elders.

  • The remarkable feature of French church polity was its aristocratic nature, which it owed to the system of co-optation; and the exclusion of the congregation from direct and frequent interference in spiritual matters prevented many evils which result from too much intermeddling on the part of the laity.

  • The author was hailed as the "German Plato," or the "German Socrates"; royal and other aristocratic friends showered attentions on him, and it is no exaggeration to assert with Kayserling that "no stranger who came to Berlin failed to pay his personal respects to the German Socrates."

  • It was applied to those who advocated a policy of "cowardly moderation," and feuillantisme was associated with aristocratic in the mouths of the sansculottes.

  • First he attempted to hold Vienna against the imperial troops, and, after the capitulation, hastened to Pressburg to offer his services to Kossuth, first defending himself, in a long memorial, from the accusations of treachery to the Polish cause and of aristocratic tendencies which the more fanatical section of the Polish emigrant Radicals repeatedly brought against him.

  • He had aristocratic privileges and responsibilities, the right to exact retaliation for corporal injuries, and liability to heavier punishment for crimes and misdemeanours, higher fees and fines to pay.

  • In 1075 he caused the investiture of ecclesiastica dignitaries by secular potentates of any degree to be condemned These two reforms, striking at the most cherished privileges ant most deeply-rooted self-indulgences of the aristocratic caste ii Europe, inflamed the bitterest hostility.

  • Thus far the constitution of the city had been wholly aristocratic; in the 13th century the patricians seem to have been united into a gild (Commans-gulde) from whose members the magistrates were chosen.

  • In the year 91, which brought with it the imminent prospect of sweeping political change, with the enfranchisement of the Italian peoples, Sulla returned to Rome, and it was generally felt that he was the man to lead the conservative and aristocratic party.

  • And in the Great Council itself we have the lively image of the aristocratic popular assembly of Rome, the assembly of the populus, that of the curiae, where every man of patrician birth had his place.

  • The assembly of curiae at Rome, originally the democratic assembly of the original people, first grew into an aristocratic assembly, and then died out altogether as a new Roman people, with its own assembly, grew up by its side.

  • All this is signally shown in the history both of Venice and of other aristocratic cities.

  • That in the better times of the aristocracy nobility was not uncommonly granted to worthy persons, that in its worse times it was more commonly sold to unworthy persons, was the affair of the aristocratic body itself.

  • From this purest type of nobility, as seen in the aristocratic commonwealths, we may pass to nobility as seen in states of greater extent - that is, for the most part in monarchies.

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