Arise sentence example

arise
  • I cannot explain it; but when difficulties arise, I am not perplexed or doubtful.
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  • In the spermatozoids of Chara, Vascular Cryptogams, and in those of Cycas, Zamia and Ginkgo, the cilia arise from a centrosome-like body which is found on one side of the nucleus of the spermatozoid mother-cell.
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  • Tumours appear to arise spontaneously, i.e.
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  • Other cases arise when we consider the continuity of a function.
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  • There can be little doubt that with a fall in price further uses for rubber would arise, leading to an increased demand, and among them may be mentioned its utilization as a road material.
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  • These are ferns of considerable size, the large leaves of which are borne on a short, erect, swollen stem (Angiopteris, Marattia), or arise from a more or less horizontal rhizome (Danaea, Kaulfussia).
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  • There is no other protection, but slight, imperfectly movable folds of skin arise from the outer rim.
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  • They arise either from the leucoplasts or chloroplasts.
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  • From each of these sub-oesophageal ganglia numerous nerves arise.
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  • It is clear that, since the numerical coefficients of A and of a are each 1, the coefficients in the expansions arise from the grouping and addition of like terms (� 37 (ii.)).
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  • A new and elaborate treaty, the terms of which have come down to us, was now concluded between the Russians and Greeks, a treaty which evidently sought to bind the two nations closely together and obviate all possible differences which might arise between them in the future.
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  • Some of the central cells remain in clumps as "germ-balls," others form a mesenchyma in which "flame-cells" arise; others again give rise to muscles; and at the thicker end of the body, rudiments of the brain and digestive system are observable.
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  • By a series of changes similar to those by which the primary larva arose from a segmented egg, so do these secondary larvae or "rediae" arise from the germ-cells or germ-balls within the sporocyst.
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  • The ovicells are modified zooecia, and contain numerous embryos which in the cases so far investigated arise by fission of a primary embryo developed from an egg.
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  • Then Yahweh shall arise mindful of His oath to the fathers, Israel shall be forgiven and restored, and the heathen humbled.
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  • Thus the primordial matter assumed by the early Greek physicists may be said to be the universal substance out of which particular things arise.
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  • His criticism on the ministers' bill for the government of India was sound in principle, though the evils he foresaw did not arise.
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  • Thus would arise the confusion between Christians and Cretins.
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  • Lord Rayleigh has pointed out that the difference may arise from the heterogeneity of alloys.
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  • Such legends often arise to connect towns bearing identical or similar names (such as are common in Greece) and to justify political events or ambitions by legendary precedents; and this certainly happened during the successive political rivalries of Dorian Sparta with non-Dorian Athens and Thebes.
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  • Macquer and Lavoisier showed that when gold is strongly heated, fumes arise which gild a piece of silver held in them.
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  • Not only did an extreme party arise in Asia Minor rejecting all prophecy and the Apocalypse of John along with it, but the majority cf the Churches and bishops in that district appear (c. 178) to have broken off all fellowship with the new prophets, while books were written to show that the very form of the Montanistic prophecy was sufficient proof of its spuriousness.
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  • In the words of an English officer, "The sun appearing upon the sea, I heard Nol say, ` Now let God arise, and let His enemies be scattered,' and following us as we slowly marched I heard him say, `I profess they run.'" Driven into the broken ground, and penned between Doon Hill and the ravine, the Scots were indeed helpless.
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  • At this congress the differences between Casimir and John of Bohemia were finally adjusted; peace was made between the king of Poland and the Teutonic Order on the basis of the cession of Pomerania, Kulm, and Michalow to the knights, who retroceded Kujavia and Dobrzyn; and the kings of Hungary and Poland further agreed to assist each other in the acquisition of the south-eastern border province of Halicz, or Red Russia (very nearly corresponding to the modern Galicia), in case the necessity for intervention should arise.
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  • Owing to the great elevation and steepness of the mountains, dreadful storms arise among the hollows, often attended with fatal results.
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  • Hence arise the springs which run perennially, several of which have been collected into the gravitation water supplies of the Vignacourt and Fawara aqueducts.
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  • From all these causes, and others, arise confusion and suspicion.
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  • The plenipotentiaries of Great Britain, France, Austria, Russia, Sardinia and Turkey recorded in a protocol, at the instance of Lord Clarendon, their joint wish that "states between which any misunderstanding might arise should, before appealing to arms, have recourse so far as circumstances might allow (en tant que les circonstances l'admettraient) to the good offices of a friendly power."
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  • Whence then do these units arise?
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  • The asexual organs in the case of Cutleria multifida arise on a crustaceous form, Aglaozonia reptans, formerly considered to be a distinct species.
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  • In the three genera, Ophioglossum, Botrychium and Helminthostachys, there is an underground rhizome, from which one leaf or a few leaves with sheathing bases are produced annually; the roots arise in more or less definite relation to the insertion of the leaves.
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  • The stem, from the ground tissue of which sclerenchyma is absent, has a complicated system of steles arranged in concentric circles; the thick roots, the central cylinders of which have several alternating groups of xylem and phloem, arise in relation to these.
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  • Where benefits exceed the lifetime allowance an additional tax charge will arise.
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  • The most instructive classification of the " variations " exhibited by fully formed organisms consists in the separation in the first place of those which arise from antecedent congenital, innate, constitutional or germinal variations from those which arise merely from the operation of variation of the environment or the food-supply upon normally constituted individuals.
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  • The administration of the civil and criminal law involves frequent relations with medicine, and the professional subjects most likely to arise in that connexion, together with a summary of causes celebres, are formed into the department of Medical Jurisprudence.
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  • Griesinger (1817-1868), Bevan Lewis - and in the separation from insanity due to primary disease or defect of nerve elements of such diseases as general paralysis of the insane, which probably arise, as we have said, by the action of poisons on contiguous structures - such as blood-vessels and connective elements - and invade the nervous matter secondarily.
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  • But, here again a disembarkation in face of opposition would have to be risked and a dispersion of resources would arise, while there were strong objections from the point of view of ship transport to conveying troops to a point so distant from the island of Imbros as Bulair; for Imbros was to be utilized as the principal concentration point for the reinforcements from England.
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  • These differences arise primarily from the fact that glass for optical uses is required in comparatively large and thick pieces, while for most other purposes glass is used in the form of comparatively thin sheets; when, therefore, as a consequence 5 and crown glass.
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  • These bubbles arise partly from the air enclosed between the particles of raw materials and partly from the gaseous decomposition products of the materials themselves.
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  • It is impossible to describe this machinery within the limits of this article, but it is notable that the principal difficulties to be overcome arise from the necessity of providing the glass with a perfectly continuous and unyielding support to which it can be firmly attached but from which it can be detached without undue difficulty.
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  • This knowledge, however, is by no means positivistic or empirical, but on the contrary it is dialectical and a priori synthetic, brought about by the spiritual categories; and from it there constantly arise new problems, an ever new position of the fundamental categories.
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  • The body, or " strobila," consists of a usually minute organ of attachment (scolex or its representative) which is imbedded in the intestinal membrane, and of a series of segments that arise from the base of the scolex and increase in size distally.
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  • In this way bladders as large as an orange and containing secondary bladders, A each with a scolex, may arise from a single embryo.
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  • The temptation to use the larger part of any space allotted to the history of feudalism for a discussion of origins does not arise alone from greater interest in that phase of the subject.
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  • His white beard goes on growing, and when it has thrice encircled the stone table before him the end of the world will come; or, according to another version, Charles will arise and after fighting a great battle on the plain of Wals will reign over a new Germany.
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  • Since our book undoubtedly belongs to this category, the question of its pseudonymity must arise.
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  • Indeed, some of the chief contrasts of the two continents arise not so much from geological unlikeness as from their unsymmetrical situation with respect to the equator, whereby the northern one lies mostly in the temperate zone, while the southern one lies mostly in the torrid zone.
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  • After the return of Columbus and his supposed demonstration that the Indies could be reached by sailing west, disputes might obviously arise between the two powers as to their respective "spheres of influence."
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  • A third group, of increasing importance, comprises cases in which curves or surfaces arise out of the application of graphic methods in engineering, physics and statistics.
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  • The failure seems (§ 2) to be due to difficulty in realizing the numerical expression of an area or a solid in terms of a specified unit, while the same difficulty does not arise in the case of linear measure or liquid measure, where the number of units can be ascertained by direct counting.
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  • Here, as usual, the British systems of measures produce a difficulty which would not arise under the metric system.
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  • The conditions are thus similar to those which arise in interpolation (q.v.).
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  • If the presbyter wrote Revelation and was Polycarp's master, such a mistake could easily arise.
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  • Naturally difficulties would arise between Abyssinia and the Sabaean power.
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  • Williams were confirmed as chief justice of the United States, - a contingency which did not arise.
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  • Now, since the moon revolves round the earth in 273 days, hesitation between the two full numbers might easily arise; yet the real explanation of the difficulty appears to be different.
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  • Returning now to the aether, on our present point of view no such complications there arise; it must be regarded as a continuous uniform medium free from any complexities of atomic aggregation, whose function is confined to the transmission of the various types of physical effect between the portions of matter.
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  • With reference to all such further refinements of theory, it is to be borne in mind that the perfect fluid of hydrodynamic analysis is not a merely passive inert plenum; it is also a continuum with the property that no finite internal slip or discontinuity of motion can ever arise in it through any kind of disturbance; and this property must be postulated, as it cannot be explained.
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  • The lines of religious and civil society were identical, and, so long as they remained so, no antagonism could arise between the spiritual and the temporal power.
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  • A sacrificial priesthood will arise as the worship becomes more complex.
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  • Simple galls are those that arise when only one member of a plant is involved; compound galls 1 For figure and description see Zoology of the " Erebus " and " Terror," ii.
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  • He proposed to divide the country into five circles, corresponding to the five provinces, each of which was to undertake to defend the realm in turn should occasion arise.
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  • It would be somewhat later than this, and not until the eschatological outlook became weaker, and men began to turn their regard to the past rather than to the future, that there would gradually arise a more strictly historical interest.
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  • No adequate knowledge of the conditions under which males arise has been established.
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  • Fichtean idealism therefore at once stood out negatively, as abolishing the dogmatic conception of the two real worlds, subject and object, by whose interaction cognition and practice arise, and as amending the critical idea which retained with dangerous caution too many fragments of dogmatism; positively, as insisting on the unity of philosophical interpretation and as supplying a key to the form or method by which a completed philosophic system might be constructed.
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  • On the one hand, it is widely felt that neither the form for the Communion of the Sick, nor yet the teaching with regard to spiritual communion in the third rubric at the end of that service, is sufficient to meet all the cases that arise or may arise.
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  • As it frequently happens that cases come before state courts in which questions of Federal law arise, a provision has been made whereby due respect for the latter is secured by giving the party to a suit who relies upon Federal law, and whose contention is overruled by a state court, the right of having the suit removed to a Federal court.
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  • There may be a difficulty in fixing responsibility upon any person, or small group of persons; because cases may arise in which the executive, being unable to act without the concurrence of the legislature, can hardly be blamed for failing to act, while yet it is unable to relieve itself by resigning; while on.
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  • These errors arise from the default of the scribe or copyist, and, in the case of printed books, the compositor.'
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  • We must also pass over the very important questions that arise as to the gradual extrication of the New Testament idea of the Christ from the elements of Jewish political doctrine which had so strong a hold of many of the first disciples - the relation, for example, of the New Testament Apocalypse to contemporary Jewish thought.
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  • At the point of the collar whence the nerve-cords arise are the cerebral ganglia; from these one pair of connectives passes to a pair of pedal ganglia, and another pair of connectives to a pair of pleural ganglia.
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  • They arise as outgrowths of the sides of the body within the cavity formed by the development of the mantle.
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  • Different states had adjusted their frontiers, Great Britain in British Guiana had settled an outstanding question with Venezuela, France in French Guiana another with Brazil, Great Britain in Newfoundland had removed time-honoured grievances with France, Great Britain in Canada others with the United States of America, and now the most difficult kind of international questions which can arise,.
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  • Lastly, there is a class of difficulties which might arise from preferential treatment of trade from different countries.
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  • The oscillation of the earth's axis may arise in two distinct ways; distinguished as " nutation of the axis " and " variation of latitude.
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  • But only local famines are likely to arise from this cause.
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  • Not only are the resemblances too close, and their character in part not of a kind, to be thus accounted for, but even many of the differences between parallel contexts are rather such as would arise through the revision of a document than through the freedom of oral delivery.
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  • In connexion with this Biran treats most of the obscure problems which arise in dealing with conscious experience, such as the mode by which the organism is cognized, the mode by which the organism is distinguished from extra-organic things, and the nature of those general ideas by which the relations of things are known to us - cause, power, force, &c.
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  • According to him, a body such as the sun is my idea, your idea, ideas of other minds, and always an idea of God's mind; and when we have sensible ideas of the sun, what causes them to arise in our different minds is no single physical substance, the sun, but the will of God's spirit.
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  • But, whereas Leibnitz imputed unconscious perception as well as unconscious appetition to monads, Schopenhauer supposed unconscious will to arise without perception, without feeling, without ideas, and to be the cause of ideas only in us.
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  • The dome walls arise in a series of richly tinted rings, each 8 or io ft.
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  • They differ somewhat from Roman forts in Germany or other provinces, though most of the differences arise from the different usage of wood and of stone in various places.
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  • They always kept up relations of some kind, especially by means of pilgrimages, and it was admitted that in any disputes which might arise with the Eastern Church the pope had the right to speak as representative of the whole of the Western Church.
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  • There was no dispute as to his possessing the authority in spiritual matters necessary to impose reform and overbear the resistance which might arise; no one was better qualified than he to treat with the holders of the temporal power and obtain the support which was necessary from them.
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  • It would not be correct to say that this system or want of system is satisfactory, but the trade manages to rub along very well with it, although inconveniences and disagreements sometimes arise when prices have advanced or declined considerably.
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  • When the equilibria become more complex difficulties of interpretation of the experimental results often arise.
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  • Within the Alps, when normally developed, we may trace the individual folds for long distances and observe how they arise, increase and die out, to be replaced by others of similar direction.
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  • In some Monocotyledons, ordinarily in Chlorophytum, and exceptionally in Phalaenopsis and others, new plants arise on the flower stems.
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  • From the points where the cords meet the cerebral commissure, arise on each an anterior labial commissure and a stomatogastric commissure.
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  • There are two closely connected cerebral ganglia, from which arise the usual two pairs of nerve cords.
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  • But when difficulties and differences arose between North and South, as they were sure to arise, they were not dealt with wisely.
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  • In many Basidiomycetes minute branches arise below the septa; their tips curve over the outside of the latter, and fuse with the cell above just beyond it, forming a clamp-connexion.
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  • This is apparently owing to the facts that too much has been attempted in the definition, and that differences arise according as we aim at a morphological or a physiological definition.
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  • More generally the hypha below the septum grows forwards again, and repeats this process several times before the terminal conidium falls, and so a chain of conidia results, the oldest of which terminates the series (Erysiphe); when the primary branch has thus formed a basipetal series, branches may arise from below and again repeat this process, thus forming a tuft (Penicillium).
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  • Compound sporophores arise when any of the branched or unbranched types of spore-bearing hyphae described above ascend into the air in consort, and are more or less crowded into definite layers, cushions, columns or other complex masses.
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  • Other series of modifications arise in which the tissues corresponding to the stroma invest the sporogenous hyphal ends, and thus enclose the spores, asci, basidia, &c., in a cavity.
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  • In other cases (Hypomyces, Nectria) the perithecia arise on an already mature stroma, while yet more numerous examples can be given (Poronia, Hypoxylon, Claviceps, &c.) where the perithecia originate below the surface of a stroma formed long before.
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  • In other cases (Diplodia, Aecidium, &c.) conidial or oidial "fructifications" arise by a number of hyphae interweaving themselves into a knot, as if they were forming a sclerotium.
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  • In the first group zygospores can arise by the union of branches from the same mycelium and so can be produced by the growth from a single spore; this group includes Spordinia grandis, Spinellus fusiger, some species of Mucor, &c. The majority of forms, however, fall into the heterothallic group, in which the association of branches from two mycelia different in I nature is necessary for the 2, formation of zygospores.
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  • When the ascogonium (female organ) is present the ascogenous hyphae arise from it, with or without its previous fusion with an antheridium.
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  • The latter arise from the crown of a spirally coiled archicarp (bearing an ascogonium at its end) and a straight antheridium.
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  • This very large group of plants is characterized by the possession of a special type of conidiophore - the basidium, which gives its name to the group. The basidium is a unicellular or multicellular structure from which four basidiospores arise as outgrowths; it starts asa binucleate structure, but soon, like the ascus, becomes uninucleate by the fusion of the two nuclei.
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  • The teleutospore, with the sporidia which arise from it, is always present, and the division into genera is based chiefly on vulgaris, with a, aecidium fruits, p, peridium, and sp, spermogonia.
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  • But the indispensable qualities of iron did not shape man's evolution, because its great usefulness did not arise until historic times, or even, as in case of magnetism, until modern times.
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  • Inconsistencies, no doubt, are to be detected in his system, but they arise from the limitations of the view itself, and not, as in the case of Locke and Berkeley, from imperfect grasp of the principle, and endeavour to unite with it others radically incompatible.
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  • Desert conditions also arise from local causes, as in the case of the Indian desert situated in a region inaccessible to either of the two main branches of the south-west monsoon.
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  • The grains of both are very small, only one half as long as those of common millet, but are exceedingly prolific. Many stalks arise from a single root, and a single spike often yields 2 oz.
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  • The leaves always arise from the outer portion of the primary meristem of the plant, and the tissues of the leaf are continuous with those of the stem.
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  • In the axil of previously formed leaves leaf-buds arise.
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  • Error can arise only because we mix up our opinions and suppositions with what we actually feel.
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  • The faults of Diodorus arise partly from the nature of the undertaking, and the awkward form of annals into which he has thrown the historical portion of his narrative.
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  • A similar movement began among the Protestants after the commercial crisis of 1873, which forms an epoch in German thought, since it was from that year that men first began to question the economic doctrines of Liberalism, and drew attention to the demoralization which seemed to arise from the freedom of speculation and the influence of the stock exchangea movement which in later years led to some remarkable attempts to remedy the evil by legislation.
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  • Birkeland (19), who has made a special study of magnetic disturbances in the Arctic, proceeding on the hypothesis that they arise from electric currents in the atmosphere, and who has thence attempted to deduce the position and intensity of these currents, asserts that whilst in the case of many storms the data were insufficient, when it was possible to fix the position of the mean line of flow of the hypothetical current relatively to an auroral arc, he invariably found the directions coincident or nearly so.
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  • If, as is now generally believed, aurora represents some form of electrical discharge, it is only reasonable to suppose that the auroral lines arise from atmospheric gases.
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  • A Greek city Naucratis was allowed to arise at the Bolbitinic mouth of the Nile.
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  • An incident occurred in June 1906 which illustrated the danger which might arise if anything happened to beget the idea that the protecting power had weakened its hold.
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  • Leaf-buds occasionally arise from the roots, when they are called adventitious; this occurs in many fruit trees, poplars, elms and others.
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  • Later they acquiesced in the election of Simon to the high-priesthood with the condition "until there should arise a faithful prophet"; but some of them remonstrated against the combination of the sacred office with the position of political ruler in the person of John Hyrcanus as contrary to the precedent set by Moses at his death.
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  • The multicellular species consist of filaments, branched or unbranched, which arise by the repeated divisions of the cells in parallel planes, no formation of mucilage occurring in the dividing walls.
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  • In Coleochaetaceae the branches are often welded into nexion with each whorl there arise, singly or in pairs, branches which a plate, simulating a parenchyma.
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  • The pyrenoid seems to be of proteid nature and gelatinous consistency, and to arise as a new formation or by division of pre-existing pyrenoids.
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  • The zoospore is usually a pyriform mass of naked protoplasm, the beaked end of which where the cilia arise is devoid of colouring matter.
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  • Zoospores arise in cells of ordinary size and form termed zoosporangia.
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  • In coenocytic forms the zoospores would seem to arise simultaneously, probably because many nuclei are already present.
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  • From the first node arise rhizoids; from the second a lateral bud, which becomes the new plant.
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  • A similar uncertainty exists with reference to certain groups of Phaeophyceae, and the matter will thus arise again.
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  • In Laminariaceae secondary cylindrical props arise obliquely from the base of the thallus.
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  • In Fucus vesiculosus they arise in lateral pairs; in Ascophyllum they are single and median; in Macrocystis one vesicle arises at the base of each thallus segment; in Sargassum and Halidrys the vesicles arise on special branches.
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  • The oogonia arise on a stalk cell from the lining layer of the cavity, the contents dividing to form eight oospheres as in Fucus, four as in Ascophyllum, two as in Pelvetia, or one only as in Halidrys.
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  • It would seem that eight nuclei primarily arise in all Fucaceae, and that a number corresponding to the number of oospheres subsequently formed is reserved, the restbeing discharged to the periphery, where they may be detected at a late stage.
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  • The antheridia, which arise in the conceptacular cavity as special cells of branched filaments, are similarly discharged whole, the antherozoids only escaping when the antheridia are clear of the conceptacle.
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  • In Dictyota the oospheres arise singly in oogonia, crowded together in sori on the surface of the female plant.
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  • These are for the most part long, thin-walled, unicellular and colourless, and arise from the outer cells of the pseudo-cortex, or from the terminal cells of branches when the filaments are free.
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  • These arise from the axial cell, and are multicellular and branched.
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  • They soon fall off, and it is from the persistent basal cell that the branches of unlimited growth arise.
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  • Upon them also the reproductive organs arise in this family.
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  • As a rule the asexual cells, and the male and female sexual cells arise upon different plants, so that the species may be said to be trioecious.
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  • The tetraspores may arise by the simultaneous division of the contents of a sporangium, when they are arranged tetrahedrally, or they may arise by two successive divisions, in which case the arrangement may be zonate when the spores are in a row, or cruciate when the second divisions are at right angles to the first, or tetrahedral when the second divisions are at right angles to the first and also to one another.
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  • In Polysiphonia they cover the joints of the so-called leaves; in Chondria they arise on flattened disks; in the more massive forms they arise in patches on the ordinary surface; in a few cases (Gracilaria, Corallina, Galaxaura) they line the walls of conceptacle-like depressions.
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  • In Batrachospermum filaments arise from the carpogonium on all sides; in Chantransia and Scinaia on one side only; in Helminthora the filaments are enclosed in a dense mucilage; in Nemalion, prior to the formation of the filaments, a sterile segment is cut off below.
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  • In the equally large Bramatherium and Hydaspitherium of India the horns of the males were complex, those of the former including an occipital pair, while those of the latter arise from a common base.
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  • From the moment the apparent recrudescence of the Liberal split over this question seemed to have misled Mr Balfour, who resigned office on the 4th of December, into thinking that difficulties would arise over the formation of a Liberal cabinet; but, whether or not the rumour was correct that a blunder had been made at Stirling and that explanations had ensued which satisfied Mr Asquith and Sir Edward Grey, this anticipation proved unjustified.
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  • Much of the character of organisms is due to various symmetries, radial, bilateral, metameric and so forth, and these symmetries arise, partly at least, from the mode of growth by cell division and the marshalling of groups of cells to the places where they are destined to proliferate.
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  • No doubt a large amount of variation is truly indefinite, so that many meaningless or useless variations arise, and in one sense it is a mere coincidence if a particular variation turn out to be useful.
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  • Here and there throughout Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands there were zealous propagandists, through whose teaching many were prepared to follow as soon as another leader should arise.
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  • It is the grasping, the craving, still existing at the death of the one body that causes the new set of Skandhas, that is, the new body with its mental tendencies and capacities, to arise.
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  • From the different proportion between the idea and the shape in which it is realized arise three different forms of art.
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  • But when curving occurs In different planes at right or other angles (hollowing), the metal has to be drawn or extended on the outside, and important differences arise.
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  • Two levels are hardly likely to have such causes of error arise at exactly corresponding points in their run, and thus two levels furnish an independent control the one on the other.
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  • Analogous difficulties arise in the application of other calorimetric methods.
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  • The difficulties arise in connexion with the determination of the quantities of ice melted or steam condensed, and in measuring the latent heat of fusion or vaporization in terms of other units for the comparison of observations.
    0
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  • Many Of The Uncertainties In The Reduction Of Older Experiments, Such As Those Of Regnault, Arise From Uncertainty In Regard To The Unit In Terms Of Which They Are Expressed, Which Again Depends On The Scale Of The Particular Thermometer Employed In The Investigation.
    0
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  • There is no reason to suppose that any great evils arise from this association, and without it the execution of the many important national public works which now attest its value would have been impossible.
    0
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  • The question will arise some day whether it is really necessary to maintain fifty-six local prisons, with all their elaborate paraphernalia, their imposing buildings and expensive staff, to maintain discipline in daily life and insist upon the proper observance of customs and usages, many of them of purely modern invention.
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  • Below the town is a reservoir containing a spring of clear water called the Anant Nag, slightly sulphurous, from which volumes of gas continually arise; the water swarms with sacred fish.
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  • Thus, behind the screen of the normal shares a number of small tenancies arise which run their economic concerns independently from the cumbersome arrangements of tenure and service, and, needless to add, all these tenancies are burdened with money rents.
    0
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  • It is not a combination of conceptions; it does not arise from conceptions, nor even at first require conception.
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  • Sense, then, is the origin of judgment; and the consequence is that primary judgments are true, categorical and existential judgments of sense, and primary inferences are inferences from categorical and existential premises to categorical and existential conclusions, which are true so far as they arise from outer and inner sense, and proceed to things similar to sensible things.
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  • Lastly, the science of inference is not indeed the science of sensation, memory and experience, but at the same time it is the science of using those mental operations as data of inference; and, if logic does not show how analogical and inductive inferences directly, and deductive inferences indirectly, arise from experience, it becomes a science of mere thinking without knowledge.
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  • Thirdly, there is a determination to reveal the psychological basis of logical processes, and not merely to describe them as they are in adult reasoning, but to explain also how they arise from simpler mental operations and primarily from sense.
    0
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  • Originally such judgments arise from sensory judgments followed by ideas, and are judgments of memory after sense that something sensible existed, e.g.
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  • The subject-predicate relation fails really to arise.
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  • Of the later schools the last to arise was Neoplatonism.
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  • It was because the aftermath of Newtonian science was so rich that the scientific faith of naturalism was able to retain a place besides its epistemological creed that a logician of the school could arise whose spirit was in some sort Baconian, but who, unlike Bacon, had entered the modern world, and faced the problems stated for it by Hume and by Newton.
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  • Hegel's treatment of the categories or thought determinations which arise in the development of the immanent dialectic is rich in flashes of insight, but most of them are in the ordinary but to make explicit those justificatory notions which condition the form of our apprehension.
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  • It is to internal combustion that they owe their success, for it enables them to get all the heat of combustion into the working substance, to use a relatively very high temperature at the top of the range, and at the same time to escape entirely the drawbacks that arise in the air-engine proper through the need of conveying heat to the air through a metallic shell.
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  • The object of this device is not, primarily, to produce work from heat, but to escape the inconveniences that would otherwise arise through extreme cooling of the air during its expansion.
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  • Although the way of the disciple or "chela" is always represented as long and difficult, it is said that as he proceeds, the transcendental faculties which arise to help him enable him to pursue the right course with ever increasing confidence and security.
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  • Among the native races the prevailing diseases, apart from those of a malarial origin, are chiefly such as arise from bad and insufficient food, from intemperance, and from want of cleanliness.
    0
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  • There is some evidence which seems to point to a pronunciation of the voiced mutes which, like the South German pronunciation of g, d, b, but slightly differentiated them from the unvoiced mutes, so that confusion might easily arise.
    0
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  • Given the bacillus, the questions arise, How is it disseminated?
    0
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  • Such a mistake was far more likely to arise in oral transmission of the speech, before it reached Luke at all.
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  • The terms due to F in (33) are such as would arise from frictional resistances proportional to the absolute velocities of the particles, or to mutual forces of resistance proportional to the relative velocities; they are therefore classed as frictional or dissipative forces.
    0
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  • From this principle arise problems of a kind which will be referred to in treating of Trains of Mechanism.
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  • Eccentric.An eccentric circular disk fixed on a shaft, and used to give a reciprocating motion to a rod, is in effect a crank-pin of sufficiently large diameter to surround the shaft, and so to avoid the weakening of the shaft which would arise from bending it so as to form an ordinary crank.
    0
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  • The periodical excess e may arise either from variations in the effort exerted by the prime mover, or from Variations in the resistance of the work, or from both these causes combined.
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  • Corresponding with each pair of myotomes, and subject to the same alternation, two pairs of spinal nerves arise from the neurochord, namely, a right and left pair of compact dorsal sensory roots without ganglionic enlargement, and a right and left pair of ventral motor roots composed of loose fibres issuing separately from the neurochord and passing directly to their termination on the muscle-plates of the myotomes.
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  • Since the outbreak of the Reformation, however, extraordinary crises, calling for immediate decision, might arise at any moment.
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  • The difficulties which threatened to arise about the union were skilfully avoided; the Act of Security provided that the Confession of Faith and the Presbyterian government should " continue without any alteration to the people of this land in all succeeding ages," and the first oath taken by Queen Anne at her accession was to preserve it.
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  • The church could have given more weight to the wishes of the people; she professed to regard patronage as a grievance, and the annual instructions of the assembly to the commission (the committee representing the assembly till its next meeting) enjoined that body to take advantage of any opportunity which might arise for getting rid of the grievance of patronage, an injunction which was not discontinued till 1784.
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  • He suggested that it would be difficult or impossible for the people to meet such heavy demands, that discontent and trouble would arise, and that the better method of procedure was to raise money by levy or imposition.
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  • If any blame attaches to him, it must arise either from his endeavour to force Coke to a favourable decision, in which he was in all probability prompted by a feeling, not uncommon with him, that a matter of state policy was in danger of being sacrificed to some senseless legal quibble or precedent, or from his advice to the king that a rumour should be set afloat which was not strictly true.
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  • His contemporary St Bonaventura complained publicly that he himself and his fellow-friars were often compelled to hold their tongues about the evil clergy; partly because, even if one were expelled, another equally worthless would probably take his place, but "perhaps principally lest, if the people altogether lost faith in the clergy, heretics should arise and draw the people to themselves as sheep that have no shepherd, and make heretics of them, boasting that, as it were by our own testimony, the clergy were so vile that none need obey them or care for their teaching."
    0
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  • The various problems which arise are still under discussion, and are of great importance for the study of Palestinian thought at the age of the parting of the ways.
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  • Haeckel distinguished autogeny and plasmogeny, applying the former term when the formative fluid in which the first living matter was supposed to arise was inorganic and the latter when it was organic, i.e.
    0
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  • A special literature of oracles did indeed arise; the divine words were collected and the circumstances which produced them were recorded; and had Delphi become in fact the centre of Greece, as Plato conceived it, here might have been the nucleus of a scripture.
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  • This is effected by stirring the molten metal with a pole of green wood (" poling "); the products which arise from the combustion and distillation of the wood reduce the oxide to metal, and if the operation be properly conducted " tough-pitch " copper, soft, malleable and exhibiting a lustrous silky fracture, is obtained.
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  • Among cultivated plants, for example, hardier and more tender varieties often arise.
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  • It is, however, certain that whenever any animal or plant is largely propagated constitutional variations will arise, and some of these will be better adapted than others to the climatal and other conditions of the locality.
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  • In the former case it was said to arise ex contractu, from contract, in the latter quasi ex contractu, ex delicto, or quasi ex delicto- that is to say, from tort, or from acts or omissions to which the law practically attached the same results as it did to contract or tort.
    0
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  • In order that future disputes might be amicably settled, a treaty was signed by which it was agreed that any question that might arise should be submitted to the arbitration of Great Britain or in default of that power to the Swiss Confederation.
    0
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  • By opening the stop wider, similar deviations arise for lateral points as have been already discussed for axial points; but in this case they are much more complicated.
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    0
  • If a collective system be corrected for the axis point for a definite wave-length, then, on account of the greater dispersion in the negative components - the flint glasses; - over-correction will arise for the shorter wavelengths (this being the error of the negative components), and under-correction for the longer wave-lengths (the error of crown glass lenses preponderating in the red).
    0
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  • The legends of his work in Ireland probably arise from the influence exercised in that country by the church of Whithorn.
    0
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  • They arise out of a primitive practice on the part of the bishop (local president), examples of which are found in the Didache (Teaching of the Apostles) and in the letters of Clement of Rome and Cyprian.
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  • When the true skin is inflamed various appearances may arise, according to the intensity and extent of the inflammation, and the eruption may be papular, vesicular, pustular, tubercular, bulbous or ulcerative.
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  • The healthy organism can adapt itself to great varieties both in regard to the quality and quantity of food; but when health begins to fail much care may be required, and many ailments arise from dyspepsia.
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  • He came just at a time when the characteristic ideas of the 17th century - the ideas of Louis XIV., of Bossuet and Boileau - had lost their savour, and before another creed could arise to take their place.
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  • Albuquerque, foreseeing the dangers that would arise from a shortage of population in his colonies, had encouraged his soldiers to marry captive Brahman and Mahommedan women, and to settle in India as farmers, shopkeepers or artisans.
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  • We may conceive this pressure to arise from the tendency which the bubble has to contract, or in other words from the surface-tension of the bubble.
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  • No change in the capillary conditions can arise until the interval is reduced to a small fraction of a wave-length of light; but such a reduction, unless extremely local, is strongly opposed by the remaining air.
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  • These provinces would infallibly revolt against the Turkish authority as soon as the Turkish forces withdrew to concentrate for battle in the S., and unless bona fide troops of the Serbian Government came to occupy the countr y, a state of disorder would arise that would equally certainly invite Austrian intervention.'
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  • While agreeing with the Eleatics as to the eternal sameness of Being (nothing can arise out of nothing; nothing can be reduced to nothing), Democritus followed the physicists in denying its oneness and immobility.
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  • The majority of the Roman annalists were men of high birth and education, with a long experience of affairs, and their defects did not arise from seclusion of life or ignorance of letters.
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  • His firm fighting alliance with the Roman general Aetius, with whom he had had many a conflict in previous years, was one of the best auguries for the new Europe that was to arise out of the ruins of the Roman empire.
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  • Metalliferous products containing silver arise in many operations; the chief products which may yield silver economically are copper and lead mattes, burnt argentiferous pyrites and certain drosses and scums. Argentiferous ores consist of silver-bearing base-metal minerals and gangue.
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  • As regards their innervation an apparent exception is found in the case of A pus, where the nerves to the antennules arise, behind the brain, from the oesophageal commissures, but this is, no doubt, a secondary condition, and the nerve-fibres have been traced forwards to centres within the brain.
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  • In some cases three separate nerves arise from the front of the brain, one going to each of the three divisions of the eye.
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  • At the base of the head dorsally are a pair of flat tentacular lobes from the edges of which the cephalic filaments or captacula arise.
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  • This power has been largely acted upon throughout England, and the courts of law have on several occasions decided that such by-laws should be benevolently interpreted, and that in matters which directly arise and concern the people of the county, who have the right to choose those whom they think best fitted to represent them, such representatives may be trusted to understand their own requirements.
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  • The powers and duties of a borough council in the Municipal Corporations Act do not arise or exist to any great extent under that act.
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  • In dealing with the powers and duties of district councils it will be convenient to treat of these first as they arise under the Public Health Acts, and afterwards as they arise under other Public statutes.
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  • In quarter sessions boroughs, however, where the council have the duty of appointing a public analyst, they are under an obligation to put the acts in force from time to time, as occasion may arise.
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  • For all that known dialects prove to the contrary, on the one hand, there may have been one primitive language, from which the descendant languages have varied so widely, that neither their words nor their formation now indicate their unity in long past ages, while, on the other hand, the primitive tongues of mankind may have been numerous, and the extreme unlikeness of such languages as Basque, Chinese, Peruvian, Hottentot and Sanskrit may arise from absolute independence of origin.
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  • In the cases of branching just cited the branches break directly through the sheath of the leaf in connexion with which they arise.
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  • In developing our conception we must discard from consideration the complexities that arise from the organization of the higher living bodies, the differences between one living animal and another, or between plant and animal.
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  • The experiments given by Professor Burr indicate that a closed column is stronger than an open one, but practice does not always support theory, and many other questions besides mere form arise in connexion with the choice of a section; special considerations in the use of columns in buildings sometimes call for a form very different from the circular section, and such include the transfer of loads to the centre of the section, the maximum efficiency under loading, and the requirements for pipe space around or included in the column form.
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  • The young leaves arise on the stem-apex as conical protuberances with winged borders, on which the pinnae appear as rounded humps, usually in basipetal order; the scale-leaves in their young condition resemble fronds, but the lamina remains undeveloped.
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  • In the case, again, of a long-established land tax or rate many questions may arise as to whether the person who is considered to bear the burden in the first instance really bears it in the end.
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  • Various interesting questions arise regarding them.
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  • But such progression may arise in a different way and on different principles from those proposed in defence of a general system of progressive taxation.
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  • They arise from combinations of smaller spots, or from nothing, in a short period, say a day.
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  • The length of their life is difficult to assign, because there is some tendency for a new group to arise where an old one has disappeared; but one is recorded which appeared in the same place for eighteen months; the average is perhaps two months.
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  • It would never get established because currents would arise to exchange the positions of the hotter, less dense, inner parts and the cooler, more dense, outer ones.
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  • Pending more conclusive evidence from the spectroscope, the interpretation of the peculiar surface rotation of the sun appears to be that the central parts of the body are rotating faster than those outside them; for if such were the case the observed phenomenon would arise.
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  • Gotama then spoke to the king on the miseries of the world which arise from passion, and on the possibility of release by following the 1 Vinaya Texts, i.
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  • But such records carried on for a year or many years would afford no knowledge of the worst conditions that could arise in longer periods, were it not for the existence of much older gauges not far distant and subject to somewhat similar conditions.
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  • In narrow rock gorges extremely interesting and complex problems relating to the combined action of horizontal and vertical stresses arise, and in some such cases it is evident that much may be done by means of horizontal curvature to reduce the quantity of masonry without reduction of strength.
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  • Then, again, it must be remembered that although the full consequences of the facts described might arise in a section of the dam I ft.
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  • Aristotle explicitly taught abiogenesis, and laid it down as an observed fact that some animals spring from putrid matter, that plant lice arise from the dew which falls on plants, that fleas are developed from putrid matter, and so forth.
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  • It may now be stated definitely that all known living organisms arise only from pre-existing living organisms.
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  • Before long, however, dissensions began to arise in the sect.
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  • It is clear that errors will arise if the pieces of steel are not truly perpendicular to the plane of the beam, and the adjust - ment of great accuracy would be very tedious.
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  • When the weights which are to be compared are of different metals further complications arise, for the volumes of equal weights of different metals will be different, and therefore the quantity of air displaced by them will be different, and the difference of the weights of air displaced by the two weights must be allowed for.
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  • Its surface consists of a thick sheet of pumiceous sand and dust, from which arise occasional buttes and mesas.
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  • Further complications arise when the lower walls of the mother zooid become thickened and interpenetrated with solenia, from which buds are developed, so that lobose, tufted, or branched colonies are formed.The chief orders of the Synalcyonacea are founded upon the different architectural features of colonies produced by different modes of budding.
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  • In this larva four pairs of mesenteries having the typical Edwardsian arrangement are developed, but the fifth and sixth pairs, instead of forming couples with the first and second, arise in the sulcar chamber, the fifth pair inside the fourth, and the sixth pair inside the fifth.
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  • Buds arise from the edge-zone which already communicate with the cavity of the zooid by the canals.
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  • But some zooids grow to a larger size and develop a number of additional mesenteries, which arise either in the sulcar or the sulcular entocoele, much in the same manner as in Cerianthus.
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  • Hence arise infinite and inextricable difficulties which obstruct the study of canon law; an immense field for controversy and litigation; a thousand perplexities of conscience; and finally contempt for the laws."' We know how the Vatican council had to separate without approaching the question of canonical reform; but this general desire for a recasting of the ecclesiastical code was taken up again on the initiative of Rome.
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  • Canon 46 provides that " if any question shall arise as to the interpretation of this Code of Canons or of any part thereof, the general principles of canon law shall be alone deemed applicable thereto."
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  • When difficulties relating to the quantity and quality of food arise the Romney is a better sheep to meet them than the Lincolns or other longwools.
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  • In other words, the denary scale, though adopted in notation and in numeration, does not arise in the corresponding mental concept until we get beyond too.
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  • The proportion of persons in whom number-forms exist has been variously estimated; but there is reason to believe that the forms arise at a very early stage of childhood, and that they did at some time exist in many individuals who have afterwards forgotten them.
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  • Each process may arise out of either of two distinct operations; but the terminology is based on the processes, not on the operations to which they belong, and the latter are not always clearly understood.
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  • Although multiplication may arise in either of these two ways, the actual process in each case is performed by commencing with the unit and taking it the necessary number of times.
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  • Even where the decimal notation would seem to arise naturally, as in the case of approximate extraction of a square root, the portion which might have been expressed as a decimal was converted into sexagesimal fractions.
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  • Also most fractions cannot be expressed exactly as decimals; and this is also the case for surds and logarithms, as well as for the numbers expressing certain ratios which arise out of geometrical relations.
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  • Where this is not the case, difficulties are apt to arise, which are mainly due to failure to distinguish between the two kinds of division.
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  • Text-books on arithmetic usually contain explanations of the chief commercial transactions in which arithmetical calculations arise; it will be sufficient in the present article to deal with interest and discount, and to give some notes on percentages and rates in the £.
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  • Sensation might arise, for aught we know, so far as causality leads us, not from a world of forces at all, but from a will like our own, though infinitely more powerful, acting upon us, partly furthering and partly thwarting us.
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  • The theme in its main outlines is a popular one in biblical prophecy, but when these 53 verses are carefully examined and compared with prophetical thought elsewhere, several difficult problems arise, an adequate solution of which cannot as yet be offered.
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  • If then we place these groups in a single class, it is not on account of a few anomalous genera, but because the characters set forth above sharply distinguish them from all other echinoderms, and because we have good reason to believe that the ophiurans did not arise independently but have descended from primitive starfish.
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  • The jubilee showed conclusively that, whatever politicians might say, the ties of blood and kinship, which united the two peoples, were too close to be severed by either for some trifling cause; that the wisest heads in both nations were aware of the advantages which must arise from the closer union of the Anglo-Saxon races; and that the true interests of both countries lay in their mutual friendship. A war in which the United States was subsequently engaged with Spain cemented this feeling.
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  • The case is less frequent, but it may arise, that there are covariant systems U= o, V = o, &c., and U' = o, V' = o, &c., each implying the other, but where the functions U, V, &c., are not of necessity covariants of u.
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  • The singular kinds arise as before; in the crunodal and the cuspidal kinds the whole curve is an odd circuit, but in an acnodal kind the acnode must be regarded as an even circuit.
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  • These differences arise mainly from the different arrangement of the constituent elements into which the epidermal cells are modified.
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  • In jerboas, for example, a bunch of twelve or thirteen hairs springs from the same point, while in the polar bear a single stout hair and several slender ones arise together, and in the marmosets three equal-sized hairs form regular groups.
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  • Some of these arise from the umlaut or epenthesis which is so prevalent, and which we have already seen in airya- as compared with the Skt.
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  • He did not condemn fasting altogether, but thought that it ought to be resorted to in the spirit of gospel freedom according as each occasion should arise.
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  • Still, new then of and obscure questionings may still arise.
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  • May a reforming or innovating pope arise?
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  • If we are warranted in regarding the Second Person of the Godhead as in very deed " Himself vouchsafing to be made, " that great Becoming cannot well be suspended upon a contingency which might or might not arise; and theologians in general regard the sin of man as such a contingent event.
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  • Anxious negotiations thus arise, which colour all modern schemes of theology.
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  • New difficulties were to arise and old prejudices to revive in full force.
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  • The leaves of successive whorls alternate with one another, and this applies also to the branches which arise in the axil of the leaf sheath.
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  • The roots which arise from the base of the lateral buds remain undeveloped on the aerial stem.
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  • When new individuals of species which possess a protocorm arise vegetatively from the leaves or roots of young plants, the protocorm appears in the young sporophyte.
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  • The roots, the stele of which is monarch, may arise directly from the stem, or are borne on rhizophores, which spring from the shoot at the point of branching, and root on reaching the soil.
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  • In the megasporangium, on the other hand, the four megaspores, which arise from a single mother-cell, are nourished at the expense of the other sporogenous cells and of the tapetum.
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  • The sporangia arise simultaneously in the sorus, which is borne on the under surface of the ordinary pinna; in those species with large sporangia the latter form a single circle, in others sporangia may also arise from the central part of the receptacle.
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  • The living species have a long rhizome, from the upper surface of which the large leaves arise; these are branched in a pedate manner, each branch being pinnate.
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  • The sporangia, which arise in basipetal succession on the receptacle, dehisce by a median slit, though the annulus is somewhat oblique; they have resemblances to the Gleicheniaceae.
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  • The sorus has a somewhat elongated receptacle, on which the sporangia arise basipetally; the indusium may be cup-shaped, bivalve or wanting.
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  • On the ground mainly of an examination of the sorus and sporangium, Bower has shown that the Filicaceae may be divided into three groups - the Simplices, Gradatae and Mixtae - in which the sporangia arise simultaneously, in basipetal succession, or irregularly in the sorus respectively.
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  • These difficulties arise quite naturally from the obligation, which metaphysicians, theologians, moral philosophers, men of science, and psychologists alike recognize, to give an account, consistent with their theories, of the relation of man's power of deliberate and purposive activity to the rest of the universe.
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  • His theory assumes the correspondence of mind and body, and is applied pari passu to the formation of ideas from sensations, and of " compound vibratiuncules in the medullary substance " from the original vibrations that arise in the organ of sense.2 The same general view was afterwards developed with much vigour and clearness on the psychical side alone by James Mill in his Analysis of the Human Mind.
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  • But the variations thus determined will not be rigorously exact, because the pull from which they arise has been determined on the supposition that the planets are moving in unvarying orbits, whereas the actual pull depends on the actual position of the planets.
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  • This feeling of absolute dependence can arise only in combination with other forms of consciousness.
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  • The episcopal emoluments arise from the mensal parishes, the incumbency of which is retained by the bishops, from licences and from an annual contribution, varying in amount, paid by the clergy of the diocese.
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  • Such a man did not arise; those who afterwards claimed to be ardri lacked the qualities of founders of strong dynasties, and are termed by the annalists " kings with opposition."
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  • This explains why the author did not publish his work immediately, but placed it where he hoped it would be safely preserved till opportunity should arise for its publication.
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  • Another misconception would arise when men had a tradition that they came to their actual seats from this mountain, or that lake or river, or from lands across the sea.
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  • There is in Madrid a Supreme Court, which is modelled upon the French Cour de Cassation, to rule on points of law when appeals are made from the decisions of inferior courts, or when conflicts arise between civil and military jurisdiction.
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  • The function of the barbarians everywhere was to cut the communications of commerce, and the nerves of the imperial administration, thereby throwing the invaded country back into a fragmentary condition from which a new order was to arise in the course of centuries.
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  • Bee-appliance manufacturers are not eligible for membership of its council, nor are those who make bee-keeping their main business; thus no professional jealousies can possibly arise.
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  • The process of hiving a swarm is very simple D and need not occupy many moments of time under ordinary conditions, but so many unlooked-for contingencies may arise that the apiarist would do well to prepare himself beforehand by carefully reading the directions in his text-book.
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  • The aorta gives off a large branch (the anterior aorta) very near its origin, from which arise - first, the left axillary, and afterwards the right axillary and the two carotid arteries.
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  • Internally it expands in the transverse plane, and from the expanded portion the tracheal tubes arise in diverging bundles.
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  • It has even been said that observers at great elevations have failed to see the zodiacal light; but it is scarcely credible that this failure could arise from any other cause than not knowing what it was or where to look for it.
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  • This phenomenon seems to arise from rains which, falling on the chalk hills, sink into the porous soil and reappear after a time from crevices at lower levels.
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  • Moreover, this distance between the object and eye is substantially increased in the compound microscope by the stand; the inconveniences, and in certain circumstances also the dangers, to the eye which may arise, for example by warming the object, are also avoided.
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  • In the case of the dispersive eyepiece, on the contrary, no sharply limited field can arise, but vignetting must occur.
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  • In immersion-systems a very much greater aggregate of rays is used in the representation than is possible in dry-systems. In addition to a considerable increase in brightness the losses due to reflection are avoided; losses which arise in passing to the back surface of the cover-slip and to the front surface of the front lens.
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  • The surfaces of the dividing prisms must be very exact, so that no deterioration of the image may arise from them.
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  • A second error can arise through the inaccuracy of the eyepiece micrometer, and also in the case of a screw micrometer through periodic faults of the screw, and through dead motion.
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  • These changes arise from two causes - the one statical, the other dynamical.
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  • Flowers are produced from flower-buds, just as leaf-shoots arise from leaf-buds.
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  • The term bract is properly applied to the leaf from which the primary floral axis, whether simple or branched, arises, while the leaves which arise on the axis between the bract and the outer envelope of the flower are bracteoles or bractlets.
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  • In describing a branching inflorescence, it is common to speak of the rachis as the primary floral axis, its branches as the secondary floral axes, their divisions as the tertiary floral axes, and so on; thus avoiding any confusion that might arise from the use of the terms rachis, peduncle and pedicel.
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  • There are two distinct types of inflorescence - one in which the flowers arise as lateral shoots from a primary axis, which goes on elongating, and the lateral shoots never exceed in their development the length of the primary axis beyond their point of origin.
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  • When the axis is so shortened that the secondary axes arise from a common point, and spread out as radii of nearly equal length, each ending in a single flower or dividing again in a similar radiating manner, an umbel is produced, as in fig.
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  • In these forms the lateral shoots, developed centripetally upon the primary axis, bear numerous bracteoles, from which floral shoots arise which may have a centripetal arrangement similar to that on the mother shoot, or it may be different.
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  • If other flowers were produced, they would arise as lateral shoots from the bracts below the first-formed flower.
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  • At its base two leaves are produced, in each of which arise secondary axes t' t', ending in single flowers, and at the base of these axes a pair of opposite leaves is produced, giving rise to tertiary axes 1" t", ending in single flowers, and so on.
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  • The stamens arise from the thalamus or torus within the petals, with which they generally alternate, forming one or more whorls, which collectively constitute the androecium.
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  • The Aramaic. and Hebrew v, which seem so different, arise from a circle left open at the top, 0, a form which can be traced in Aramaic from the 5th or 6th century B.C. In the Greek alphabets the circle appears sometimes with a dot in the centre, but in many cases it is doubtful whether this mark is, intentional, or is only the result of fixing a sharp point there while describing the circle.
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  • The Andean range is composed of two great principal chains with a deep intermediate depression, in which, and at the sides of the great chains, arise other chains of minor importance, the chief of which is that called the Cordillera de la Costa of Chile.
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  • Penhallow maintains that these smaller tubes arise as branches from the larger, but other observers have failed to confirm this.
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  • From this separation arise all the difficulties in the effort to develop the notion systematically, and in tracing the history of Kant's philosophical progress we are able to discern the gradual perception on his part that here was to be found the ultimate cause of the perplexities which became apparent in considering the subordinate doctrines of the system.
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  • Subtle problems can arise when computers interpret such denotations as numbers, and not as strings.
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  • Such a negative effect is unlikely to arise where the proposed joint appointees are from the same firm.
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  • In the most extreme circumstances, he suggests, autism may arise because a child receives almost nothing by way of sensitive care.
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  • A duty of care may arise where the official receiver could be considered a bailee of the property.
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  • So problems only arise when building or repair work is being done which would disturb a colony of roosting bats.
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  • Not only bodily elements arise and fall away, also what we call mind arises and falls away, each moment.
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  • The fate of the USSR as a socialist state depends upon that political regime that will arise to replace Stalinist Bonapartism.
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  • A playground buddy system is used to combat bullying, whereby older children intervene when disputes arise or befriend children on their own.
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  • This gradual buildup may explain why the disease takes decades to arise.
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  • They are closely conjoined, since they arise at the same base, share the same object and fall away together.
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  • These differences arise because one or more stability constants has a bad value or indeed should not be present or should not be included.
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  • Fat cells arise from the fibroblast lineage, and consist of a central lipid droplet, surounded by a thin skin of active cytoplasm.
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  • Thy dead men shall live, together with my dead body shall they arise.
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  • And it would stop us from ensuring the safety and reliability of our nation's deterrent, should the need arise.
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  • Examples of indirect sex discrimination are less likely to arise.
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  • Where the premises are situated in a shopping area but are structurally dissimilar to a shop, different considerations may arise.
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  • The geometric continuum is infinitely divisible; segments, no matter how small or how large, can arise.
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  • The Register is used to provide a list of eligible electors should an election arise.
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  • Differences arise due to simplifications in the treatment of surface emissivity, and also errors due to the treatment of cloud microphysics.
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  • Subsequently the mixed emotions that arise from such an event.. .
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  • She advises executors, trustees and beneficiaries when problems arise in the administration or interpretation of trusts, whether in the UK or offshore.
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  • Registration does not in itself guarantee contracts but your details will be available for consideration should the need for consultancy expertise arise.
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  • The scent, packaging design, and superb quality has eschewed fashion fads through the decades to arise as a veritable legend among fragrances.
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  • They are better able to meet basic needs and to deal with sudden expenses that arise, for example from illness or crop failure.
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  • Both substances were present as contaminants in polyamine flocculants and could theoretically arise in drinking water.
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  • Although broadly predictable, the year on year changes in ice dynamics and glacier foreland dynamics is such that new opportunities will constantly arise.
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  • May arise during toaster cutlery etc with microfiber futon cover a lumpy.
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  • The germ cells arise from a region of cytoplasm at the vegetal pole of the egg called the germ plasm.
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  • As a result of this gradual hardening and fibrosis of the fascia, symptoms may arise many years after the original incident.
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  • Several of these arise naturally as crystals, and the truncated icosahedron occurs in real life as a football.
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  • It is important to notify insurers of any potential claim as soon as the institution is aware that a claim may arise.
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  • The amazingly intricate unity seems to arise from nowhere.
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  • Some very worrying conflicts could arise for perfectly law-abiding, fair-minded employers.
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  • Most direct cost to DSA would arise from the introduction of mandatory logbooks.
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  • To address problems that arise in the resultant optimization we introduce a technique called spherical normalization that preconditions the Hessian matrix.
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  • A melanoma can arise within an existing mole by the melanocytes becoming malignant or cancerous.
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  • Even more intractable problems arise where isolating what appears to be the same morpheme leaves behind a residue of uncertain status.
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  • Suddenly there was a faint murmur, for at the upper end of the hut a dark form was seen slowly to arise.
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  • Panna can also come to realize that Nama and rupa arise because of conditions, not without conditions.
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