How to use Argues in a sentence

argues
  • This is why Dulce argues with you.

    6
    2
  • In his Theodicy Leibnitz argues, like not a few predecessors, that this universe must be regarded as the best of all possible universes.

    3
    1
  • The former distinctly argues against the idea of a deterioration of man in the past.

    3
    1
  • Adam Ferguson (Institutes of Moral Philosophy, p. 119, new ed., 1800) argues that " the desire for immortality is an instinct, and can reasonably be regarded as an indication of that which the author of this desire wills to do."

    0
    0
  • He nowhere formally argues for the truth of theism.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Ultimately, he argues, if not immediately, there must be a rational cause to account for so rational an effect.

    0
    0
  • Passing now to the later schoolmen, a bare mention must be made of Thomas Aquinas, who elaborately argues for the absolute creation of the world out of nothing, and of Albertus Magnus, who reasons against the Aristotelian idea of the past eternity of the world.

    0
    0
  • Gassendi distinctly argues against the existence of a world-soul or a principle of life in nature.

    0
    0
  • In the introduction to his work Von der Weltseele, however, he argues in favour of the possibility of a transmutation of species in periods incommensurable with ours.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay, however, doubts this (The Church in the Roman Empire, London, 1893), and argues that it was due to a long series of instructions to provincial governors (mandata, not decreta) who interpreted their duty largely in conformity with the attitude of the reigning emperor.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Marillier further argues that if, on the other hand, there was no bond between god and people but that of the common meal, it does not appear that the god is a totem god; there is no reason why the animal should have been a totem; and in any case this idea of sacrifice can hardly have been anything but a slow growth and consequently not the origin of the practice.

    0
    0
  • Loscher affirms in regard to miracles that " solus Deus potest tum supra naturae vires turn contra naturae leges agere "; and Buddaeus argues that in them a " suspensio legum naturae " is followed by a restitutio.

    0
    0
  • The author of these receipts is not under any delusion that he is transmuting metals; the MS. is merely a workshop manual in which are described processes in daily use for preparing metals for false jewellery, but it argues considerable knowledge of methods of making alloys and colouring metals.

    0
    0
  • Vallard, all of Argues, near Dieppe, whose charts were compiled between 1541 and 1554.

    0
    0
  • Here Clement argues that wealth, if rightly used, is not unchristian.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In connexion with these two features of a Roman city supposed to be found in Ancient London the author argues for the continuity of the city through the changes of Roman and Saxon dominion.

    0
    0
  • It argues the Kheta a people of considerable civilization.

    0
    0
  • At Boghaz Keui, Euyuk and Jerablus, the facial type is very markedly non-Semitic. But not much stress can be laid on these differences owing to (i) great variety of execution in different sculptures, which argues artists of very unequal capacity; (2) doubt whether individual portraits are intended in some cases and not in others.

    0
    0
  • He argues against the setting up of classic art as an unchanging type, valid for all peoples and all times.

    0
    0
  • In the Kalligone (1800), work directed against Kant's Kritik der Urteilskraft, Herder argues for the close connexion of the beautiful and the good.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Thus Kunze reconstructs a creed of Antioch for the 3rd century, and argues that it is independent of the Roman Creed.

    0
    0
  • There remains a short piece without title, the Commedia in prosa, which, if it be Machiavelli's, as internal evidence of style sufficiently argues, might be accepted as a study for both the Clizia and the Mandragola.

    0
    0
  • Collier argues naively that if universal consent means the consent of those who have considered the subject, it may be claimed for his view.

    0
    0
  • It is true that Harnack has adduced arguments which cannot be discussed here to prove that Irenaeus was not born till about 140; 15 but against this we may quote the decision of Lipsius, who puts the date of his birth at 130, 16 while Lightfoot argues for 120.17 The fact that Irenaeus never quotes Polycarp does not count for much.

    0
    0
  • Ameghino argues that this creature is still living, while Dr Moreno advances the theory that the animal has been extinct for a long period, and that it was domesticated by a people of great antiquity, who dwelt there prior to the Indians.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Argues is situated near the confluence of the rivers Varenne and Bethune; the forest of Argues stretches to the north-east.

    0
    0
  • The interest of the place centres in the castle dominating the town, which was built in the 11th century by William of Argues; his nephew, William the Conqueror, regarding it as a menace to his own power, besieged and occupied it.

    0
    0
  • In 1589 its cannon decided the battle of Argues in favour of Henry IV.

    0
    0
  • The church of Argues, a building of the 16th century, preserves a fine stone rood screen, statuary, stained glass and other relics of the Renaissance period.

    0
    0
  • Hobbes argues in the case of the Pentateuch that two authors are distinguishable - Moses and a much later compiler and editor.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Father Simon in his Histoire critique du Vieux Testament (1682) also argues that the Pentateuch is the work of more than one author, and makes an important advance towards a systematic analysis of the separate elements by observing that the style varies, being sometimes very curt and sometimes very copious " although the variety of the matter does not require it."

    0
    0
  • For various reasons (here following Koppe, who just previously in additions to his translation of Lowth's Isaiah had shown himself the pioneer of the higher criticism of the book of Isaiah) he argues that " in our Isaiah are many oracles not the work of this prophet."

    0
    0
  • The care taken in the selecting and ordaining of the seven deacons argues a religious character for the common meals, which they were to serve.

    0
    0
  • In the West, Augustine, like Eusebius and Theodoret, calls the elements signs or symbols of the body and blood signified in them; yet he argues that Christ " took and lifted up his own body in his hands when he took the bread."

    0
    0
  • Against such the writer argues in Paul's name, as Luke had already done.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Like Leibnitz, he proceeds from the fact that our perceptions are sometimes conscious, sometimes unconscious, to the inconsequent conclusion, that there are beings with nothing but unconscious perceptions; and by a similar non sequitur, because there is the idea of an end in will, he argues that there must be an unconscious idea of an end in instinctive, in reflex, in all action.

    0
    0
  • Taking substance entirely in the sense of substrate, he argues that there is no evidence of a substantial substrate beneath mental operations; that there is nothing except unitary experience consisting of ideas, feelings, volitions, and their unity of will; and that soul in short is not substantia, but actus.

    0
    0
  • Starting from consciousness, he argues that all known things are phenomena of consciousness.

    0
    0
  • King now 2 plausibly argues, is not certain; nor whether the 32 kings who revolted and were conquered by Manishtusu, as we now learn, were by the Mediterranean, as Winckler argued, or by the Persian Gulf, as King holds.

    0
    0
  • The former, he argues, are in the last resort libertinists and antinomians; the latter must be regarded as ascetic Judaists.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Nitzsch argues against the doctrine of the annihilation of the wicked, regards the teaching of Scripture about eternal damnation as hypothetical, and thinks it possible that Paul reached the hope of universal restoration.

    0
    0
  • From the remains of fortifications there he argues that the Hyksos were uncivilized desert people, skilled in the use of the bow, and must thus have destroyed by their archery the Egyptian armies trained to fight hand-tohand; further;, that their hordes were centered in Syria, but were driven thence by a superior force in the East to take refuge in the islands and became a sea-power--whence the strange description "Hellenic" in Manetho, which most editors have corrected to CtXAoi, "others."

    0
    0
  • The Plea for the Constitution (403 B.C.) is interesting for the manner in which it argues that the wellbeing of Athens-now stripped of empire-is bound up with the maintenance of democratic principles.

    0
    0
  • The mere fact that they produced a literature in Latin argues a power of creation as well as receptivity.

    0
    0
  • Weege (in Jahrbuch, 1916) on the two most important series of paintings at Corneto argues that these were executed in the archaic style of North Ionia by a Greek artist who had lived among the Etruscans long enough to understand their national life and spirit.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The most important of these are a work On Fate, in which he argues against the Stoic doctrine of necessity; and one On the Soul, in which he contends that the undeveloped reason in man is material (vas 5XeKOr) and inseparable from the body.

    0
    0
  • Erigena argues the question entirely on speculative grounds, and starts with the bold affirmation that philosophy and religion are fundamentally one and the same- "Conficitur inde veram esse philosophiam veram religionem, conversimque veram religionem esse veram philosophiam."

    0
    0
  • So Sigwart, in order to reduce universals to hypotheticals, while admitting that existence is usually thought, argues that it is not stated in the universal judgment; so also Bosanquet.

    0
    0
  • Philip invaded Normandy, took Lyonsla-Foret and Eu, and, establishing himself in Gournay, besieged Argues.

    0
    0
  • Philip abandoned the siege of Argues in a fit of fury, marched to the Loire, burning everywhere, and then returned to Paris.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Wright, Biblical Studies (1886) argues ably for the symbolic theory.

    0
    0
  • Evans, who argues ingeniously that the alphabet was taken over from Crete by the " Cherethites and Pelethites " or Philistines, who established for themselves settlements on the coast of Palestine.

    0
    0
  • In any case, the very difference of the perspective of Acts and of Galatians, in recording the same epochs in Paul's history, argues such an independence in the former as is compatible only with an early date.

    0
    0
  • Kirchhoff argues that the Artacia of the Argonautic story must have been taken from the real Artacia, and the Artacia of the Odyssey again from that of the Argonautic story.

    0
    0
  • Assuming the words here, "as he is only a valet," to refer to Dauger, and taking into account the employment of Dauger from 1675 to 1680 as Fouquet's valet, Mr Lang now obtains a solution of the problem of why a mere valet should be a political Funck-Brentano argues that "un ancien prisonnier qu'il avait a Pignerol" (du Junca's words) cannot apply to Dauger, because then du Junca would have added "et a Exiles."

    0
    0
  • He argues that, as the name "God" or "Son of God" was given in the O.T.

    0
    0
  • So far from being a remedy, he argues, it is an aggravation.

    0
    0
  • Here he argues that the more love we have for ourselves, the less we can spare for our Maker.

    0
    0
  • What is done in material semblance, he then argues, is repeated in the unseen medium of the Spirit.

    0
    0
  • Chubb dwells with special emphasis on the fact that Christ preached the gospel to the poor, and argues, as Tindal had done, that the gospel must therefore be accessible to all men without any need for learned study of evidences for miracles, and intelligible to the meanest capacity.

    0
    0
  • As a man, Vieira would have made a nobler figure if he had not been so great an egotist and so clever a courtier, and the readiness with which he sustained directly opposite opinions at short intervals with equal warmth argues a certain lack of sincerity.

    0
    0
  • Although he denies liberty to the will in this sense - indeed, strictly speaking, neither liberty nor necessity, he says, is properly applied to the will, " for the will itself is not an agent that has a will " - he nevertheless insists that the subject willing is a free moral agent, and argues that without the determinate connexion between volition and motive which he asserts and the libertarians deny, moral agency would be impossible.

    0
    0
  • This disposition, he argues, has no regard primarily to beauty in the object, nor is it primarily based on gratitude.

    0
    0
  • The main events in that long struggle were the victory of Argues over Charles, duke of Mayenne, on the 28th of September 1589; 9f Ivr_y, on the 14th of March 1590; the siege of Paris (1590); of Rouen (1592); the meeting of the Estates of the League (1593), which the Satire Menippee turned to ridicule; and finally the conversion of Henry IV.

    0
    0
  • He argues in the first book against the innateness of our knowledge of God and of morality; yet in the fourth book he finds that the existence of God is demonstrable, being supported by causal necessity, without which there can be no knowledge; and he also maintains that morality is as demonstrable as pure mathematics.

    0
    0
  • Hume argues that custom is a sufficient practical explanation of this gradual enlargement of our objective experience, and that no deeper explanation is open to man.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly, in the Republic he has no objection to trying the question of the intrinsic superiority of philosophic or virtuous' life by the standard of pleasure, and argues that the philosophic (or good) man alone enjoys real pleasure, while the sensualist spends his life in oscillating between painful want and the merely neutral state of painlessness, which he mistakes for positive pleasure.

    0
    0
  • With a similar stress on the self-conscious side of moral action, he argues that rightness of conduct depends solely on the intention, at one time pushing this doctrine to the paradoxical assertion that all outward acts as such are indifferent.'

    0
    0
  • In the same spirit, under the reviving influence of ancient philosophy (with which, however, he was imperfectly acquainted and the relation of which to Christianity he extravagantly misunderstood), he argues that the old Greek moralists, as inculcating a disinterested love of good - and so implicitly love of God as the highest good - were really nearer to Christianity than Judaic legalism was.

    0
    0
  • Thus, Hugo of St Victor (1077-1141) argues that all love is necessarily so far " interested " that it involves a desire for union with the beloved; and since eternal happiness consists in this union, it cannot truly be desired apart from God; while Bernard of Clairvaux (1091-1153) more elaborately distinguishes four stages by which the soul is gradually led from (I) merely selfregarding desire for God's aid in distress, to (2) love him for his loving-kindness to it, then also (3) for his absolute goodness, until (4) in rare moments this love for himself alone becomes the sole all-absorbing affection.

    0
    0
  • He argues that Hobbes's atomic materialism involves the conception of an objective physical world, the object not of passive sense that varies from man to man, but of the active intellect that is the same in all; there is therefore, he urges, an inconsistency in refusing to admit a similar exercise of intellect in morals, and an objective world of right and wrong, which the mind by its normal activity clearly apprehends as such.

    0
    0
  • He first follows Shaftesbury in exhibiting the social affections as no less natural than the appetites and desires which tend directly to self-preservation; then reviving the Stoic view of the prima naturae, the first objects of natural appetites, he argues that pleasure is not the primary aim even of the impulses which Shaftesbury allowed to be " self-affections "; but rather a result which follows upon their attaining their natural ends.

    0
    0
  • But to Butler's more cautious mind the completeness of this harmony did not seem sufficiently demonstrable to be taken as a basis of moral teaching; he has at least to contemplate the possibility of a man being convinced of the opposite; and he argues that unless we regard conscience as essentially authoritative - which is not implied in the term " moral sense " - such a man is really bound to be vicious; " since interest, one's own happiness, is a manifest obligation."

    0
    0
  • He argues that men having no free will have really no desert; therefore the divine equity must ultimately distribute happiness in equal shares to all; therefore I must ultimately increase my own happiness most by conduct that adds most to the general fund which Providence administers.

    0
    0
  • Like Price he holds that an action is not good unless done from a good motive, and that this motive must be essentially different from natural inclination of any kind; duty, to be duty, must be done for duty's sake; and he argues, with more subtlety than Price or Reid, that though a virtuous act is no doubt pleasant to the virtuous agent, and any violation of duty painful, this moral pleasure (or pain) cannot strictly be the motive to the act, because it follows instead of preceding the recognition of our obligation to do it.'

    0
    0
  • The First and Second Olynthiacs of Demosthenes were spoken in that year in support of sending one force to defend Olynthus and another to attack Philip. "Better now than later," is the thought of the First Olynthiac. The Second argues that Philip's strength is overrated.

    0
    0
  • He argues that "the world-order, being in process as a moral order, permits breaches everywhere into which Satan can obtain entrance" (pp. 99, 102).

    0
    0
  • Alexander in his book on demonic possession maintains that "the confession of Jesus as the Messiah or Son of God is the classical criterion of genuine demonic possession" (p. 150), and argues that as "the Incarnation indicated the establishment of the kingdom of heaven upon earth," there took place "a counter movement among the powers of darkness," of which "genuine demonic possession was one of the manifestations" (p. 249).

    0
    0
  • Hansen (Die Cirripedien der Plankton-Exp., 1899, p. 53) argues that various nauplii of a type not previously described may probably be referred to this group or family.

    0
    0
  • The Department for Transport argues that ' the onset of community annoyance ' sets in when noise averages out at 57 decibels.

    0
    0
  • Phillips cogently argues that it also directly impacts on presidential elections and on American foreign policy.

    0
    0
  • We've been blinded by the money raised, he argues, fooled by a show biz sham.

    0
    0
  • Eddie Ford argues that it is an essentially bourgeois ideology, and presents a communist analysis.

    0
    0
  • Baudrillard argues that the period of modernity was structured by production and dominated by the bourgeoisie.

    0
    0
  • He argues the case for seeing contemporary 'global ' changes as more than economic and cultural in nature.

    0
    0
  • Melanie Phillips argues that the purpose of Labor's attack is to " stifle debate " .

    0
    0
  • Conversely, he argues that corporeal things, however small, are always divisible.

    0
    0
  • Acting independently, he argues, governments make policy decisions that are too egalitarian.

    0
    0
  • Crucially, he argues, Labor must find a way of using its beliefs to explain its policies to an increasingly skeptical electorate.

    0
    0
  • Bennett also argues that in such a case even weak global supervenience entails strong individual supervenience.

    0
    0
  • The report argues that by offering personalized education and health services peopleâs expectations will increase and create a demand-led pressure for reform.

    0
    0
  • From The Times, November 6 04 Benedict Nightingale argues that Greeks understood fanaticism better than anyone.

    0
    0
  • However, Carter argues, the measures introduced so far haven't been particularly far-reaching, leaving plenty of opportunities for crafty traders.

    0
    0
  • Sparks argues that Trent remained rooted at the spot and must have used the waist-level finder due to his concern about stabilizing the camera.

    0
    0
  • The new Tory leader, argues former No10 special adviser Patrick Diamond, inherits no ' reformist mantle ' from his predecessors.

    0
    0
  • He argues that, under Tony Blair, the Party faces an uncertain future.

    0
    0
  • Horton argues that there is a strong case to be made for charging Burma's regime with genocide or at least attempted genocide.

    0
    0
  • For the desire to eliminate evil, argues Todorov, entails abolishing the very indeterminacy that makes freedom - and evil - possible.

    0
    0
  • Perez argues that social change requires the very institutional nature of the Catholic Church that held back liberation theology.

    0
    0
  • He argues that to give an intentional explanation of a system's behavior is merely to adopt the " intentional stance " toward it.

    0
    0
  • It argues for a close interrelation between the mystery religions of the ancient world and the origins of Christianity.

    0
    0
  • Thus this project argues that far from breeding intolerance, realism is actually required for tolerance to be present.

    0
    0
  • He argues that the campaign season is causing lawmakers to rush ahead rather than carefully consider President Bush's proposals.

    0
    0
  • This work also argues that liberalism - in practice an eminently flexible approach - cannot on its own explain policy.

    0
    0
  • He argues that to be anonymous or to move residence is a fundamental liberty that is about to be taken away from us.

    0
    0
  • Harte also argues that fairy lore has an elite, courtly rather folk origin.

    0
    0
  • Labor loyalist Polly Toynbee argues that you should ' Hold your nose, vote Blair and Brown will be the victor ' .

    0
    0
  • At the end of the Physics, Aristotle argues from the nature of moved movers that they require a first unmoved mover.

    0
    0
  • He argues for a methodological pluralism in the present.

    0
    0
  • He argues that postmodernism is the ally of U.S. philosophical pragmatism.

    0
    0
  • The profusion of plants argues for a profusion of plants argues for a profusion of burning regimes.

    0
    0
  • Behan argues that many Communists simply did not take the leadership protestations of moderation at face value.

    0
    0
  • He argues that traditions were created in response to 9th century conditions and then redacted back several centuries.

    0
    0
  • He also argues that it is the Son of God's experience of suffering as a man that is truly redemptive and life-giving.

    0
    0
  • This paper argues that in many instances British were chasing red herrings.

    0
    0
  • A leader in the Guardian argues that the current council tax system is extremely regressive and needs reform.

    0
    0
  • First, it argues that relativism provides a plausible account of moral justification.

    0
    0
  • Foster argues that the fall of selenium levels trigger the reduction in CD4 cells, which in turn cause further decline in serum selenium.

    0
    0
  • Sulloway argues that birth order affects personality - ' eldest siblings being conservative and responsible compared with their more rebellious younger sibs.

    0
    0
  • The author argues that there is more to a successful retirement than amassing a large stash of money.

    0
    0
  • Merkel argues she wants a broad mix that includes solar and wind energy, two renewable sources the past government heavily subsidized.

    0
    0
  • The report argues that ongoing international crises are causing untold human suffering.

    0
    0
  • John Lyons argues rather cleverly that despite the reservations of people like Ullman, strict synonymy is possible.

    0
    0
  • Helen suggests using a topper instead but Tony argues against this as they will grow back.

    0
    0
  • Secondly, he argues that the NHS is extremely wasteful.

    0
    0
  • In particular he argues that the unique role of the familiar in English witchcraft needs a much more detailed historical investigation.

    0
    0
  • In the modern world, Habermas argues, the public sphere has given way to advertising.

    0
    0
  • By contrast, Aguilar argues that growing xenophobia against immigrants is a way of redefining and stabilizing Malaysian national identity.

    0
    0
  • Materialism argues that, as life depends on a material organism, thought is a function of the brain, and the soul is but the sum of mental states, to which, according to the theory of psychophysical parallelism, physical changes always correspond; therefore, the dissolution of the body carries with it necessarily the cessation of consciousness.

    0
    0
  • In " Some Consequences of (naturalistic) Belief," Balfour argues that the results of " naturalism " are unbearable.

    0
    0
  • Paulus Orosius argues that the world has always been a vale of tears.

    0
    0
  • Discussing the theory of capillary attractions, Young' found that at a rough estimate " the extent of the cohesive force must be limited to about the 250-millionth of an inch " (=10 8 cms.), and then argues that " within similar limits of uncertainty we may obtain something like a conjectural estimate of the mutual distance of the particles of vapours, and even of the actual magnitude of the elementary atoms of liquids..

    0
    0
  • He argues that the people must have been then to the west of the great rivers, otherwise the dawn could not be addressed as one who "in shining light, before the wind arises, comes gleaming over the waters, making good paths."

    0
    0
  • He also argues that it is the Son of God 's experience of suffering as a man that is truly redemptive and life-giving.

    0
    0
  • To illustrate, concerning the nature of imperial sanctity, Shillony argues that the Japanese have not typically regarded the reigning emperors as gods.

    0
    0
  • In this paper, Young argues for a rethinking of the science curriculum.

    0
    0
  • Blomberg argues that there is no good reason to think that the revisionist interpretations of modern liberal thinkers are preferable to traditional scholarship.

    0
    0
  • In it Watt argues for the historicity of the satanic verses.

    0
    0
  • The organization argues for greater diversity in the press and scrutinizes media practices that marginalize public interest, minority and dissenting viewpoints.

    0
    0
  • Turkey argues MED TV is a mouthpiece of separatist rebels.

    0
    0
  • Davis argues that the specific tautology implicatures which actually arise in English are not ones that audiences could work out.

    0
    0
  • This argues strongly for brain being on the taverna menu, bought-in whole and cracked open on the premises.

    0
    0
  • He argues that in the digital era unbiased reporting is more important than ever.

    0
    0
  • In the Platonic tradition, he argues, truth was understood as something to be unveiled.

    0
    0
  • The majority of the traditional medical community argues that no connection exists.

    0
    0
  • There is a significant segment of the autism community that argues that vaccinations are still a possible cause of autism despite the 2009 vaccine court ruling and the discredited 1998 Lancet study, and demand more research into the matter.

    0
    0
  • The mainstream medical community argues that childhood vaccines, especially the MMR vaccine, is safe and protects children from potentially fatal diseases.

    0
    0
  • Skinner's theory, Operant Conditioning, which argues that positive behavior can be encouraged with positive reinforcement.

    0
    0
  • This "secret" is one Escape argues would then be shared.

    0
    0
  • He argues, from the principle quicquid est in effectibus esse et in causis, that the elements and the whole world have sensation, and thus he appears to derive the organic part of nature out of the so-called " inorganic."

    2
    3
  • Yahweh's kingdom cannot perish even for a time; nay, Isaiah argues that it must remain visible, and visible not merely in the circle of the like-minded whom he had gathered round him and who formed the first germ of the notion of the church, but in the political form of a kingdom also.

    1
    1