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argon

argon

argon Sentence Examples

  • The weight of a mixture of argon and nitrogen prepared from the dissolved gases showed an excess of 24 mg.

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  • (I) it is a corruption of the ancient name, Egeopelago; (2) it is from the modern Greek, `Ayco iraayo, the Holy Sea; (3) it arose at the time of the Latin empire, and means the Sea of the Kingdom (Arche); (4) it is a translation of the Turkish name, Ak Denghiz, Argon Pelagos, the White Sea; (5) it is simply Archipelagus, Italian, arcipelago, the chief sea.

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  • Of these, argon and its allies were the last to be definitely isolated.

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  • At this temperature the nitrogen combines with the magnesium, and thus the argon is concentrated.

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  • Norman Collie to separate argon by diffusion into two parts, which should have different densities or refractivities, led to no distinct effect.

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  • ijXcos, the sun), a gaseous chemical element, the modern discovery of which followed closely on that of argon.

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  • In the absence of liquid air the helium must be purified by the methods employed for argon (q.v.).

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  • One remarkable discovery, however, of general interest, was the outcome of a long series of delicate weighings and minute experimental care in the determination of the relative density of nitrogen gas - undertaken in order to determine the atomic weight of nitrogen - namely, the discovery of argon, the first of a series of new substances, chemically inert, which occur, some only in excessively minute quantities, as constituents of the 1 The barony was created at George IV.'s coronation in 1821 for the wife of Joseph Holden Strutt, M.P. for Maldon (1790-1826) and Okehampton (1826-1830), who had done great service during the French War as colonel of the Essex militia.

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  • In 1894 he was associated with Lord Rayleigh in the discovery of argon, announced at that year's meeting of the British Association in Oxford, and in the following year he found in certain rare minerals such as cleveite the gas helium which till that time had only been known on spectroscopic evidence as existing in the sun.

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  • The elements are usually divided into two classes, the metallic and the non-metallic elements; the following are classed as non-metals, and the remainder as metals: Of these hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, neon, krypton, xenon and helium are gases, bromine is a liquid, and the remainder are solids.

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  • The molecule of every compound must obviously contain at least two atoms, and generally the molecules of the elements are also polyatomic, the elements with monatomic molecules (at moderate temperatures) being mercury and the gases of the argon group. The laws of chemical combination are as follows: I.

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  • It is found that mercury vapour, helium, argon and its associates (neon, krypton, &c.) have the value 1.67; hence we conclude that these gases exist as monatomic molecules.

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  • The process was developed by Madame Lefebre in 1859; by Meissner in 1863, who found that moist gases gave a better result; and by Prim in 1882, who sparked the gases under pressure; it was also used by Lord Rayleigh in his isolation of argon.

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  • Lord Rayleigh has made many investigations of the absolute densities of gases, one of which, namely on atmospheric and artificial nitrogen, undertaken in conjunction with Sir William Ramsay, culminated in the discovery of argon.

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  • 1.40 Argon.

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  • Cavendish made many analyses: from more than soo determinations of air in winter and summer, in wet and clear weather, and in town and country, he discerned the mean composition of the atmosphere to be, oxygen 20 833% and nitrogen 79.167% The same experimenter noticed the presence of an inert gas, in very minute amount; this gas, afterwards investigated by Rayleigh and Ramsay, is now named argon.

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  • p. 187) also used a single dust-tube with a sounder to find 7 for argon, and again the value was 1.66.

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  • Paschen 6 has further extended the method and added a number of infra-red lines to the spectra of helium, argon, oxygen and other elements.

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  • ARGON (from the Gr.

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  • Although, as was natural, Cavendish was satisfied with his result, and does not decide whether the small residue was genuine, it is probable that his residue was really of a different kind from the main bulk of the "phlogisticated air," and contained the gas afterwards named argon.

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  • The most conspicuous group in the argon spectrum at atmospheric pressure is that first recorded by A.

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  • It is of interest to note that the argon spectrum may be fully developed by operating upon a miniature scale, starting with only 5 c.c. of air (Phil.

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  • The argon ultimately found was 75 o c.c., or a little more than I% of the atmospheric nitrogen used.

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  • p. 66, 1895) gave 1 186 c.c. as the amount of argon present in loo c.c. of mixed atmospheric nitrogen and argon.

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  • The residual argon, derived doubtless from the water used to manipulate the gases, was but a small 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 5°00 Argon Red Zinc Hydrogen Hy F FIG.

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  • The density of argon, prepared and purified by magnesium, was found by Sir William Ramsay to be 19.941 on the O = 16 scale.

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  • The volume actually weighed was 163 c.c. Subsequently large-scale operations with the same apparatus as had been used for the principal gases gave an almost identical result (19.940) for argon prepared with oxygen.

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  • Argon is soluble in water at 12° C. to about 4.0%, that is, it is about 22 times more soluble than nitrogen.

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  • Argon is contained in the gases liberated by many thermal springs, but not in special quantity.

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  • The most remarkable physical property of argon relates to the constant known as the ratio of specific heats.

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  • This is precisely the number found from the velocity of sound in argon as determined by Kundt's method, and it leaves no room for any sensible energy of rotatory or vibrational motion.

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  • It may be added that helium has the same character as argon in respect of specific heats (Ramsay, Proc. Roy.

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  • The refractivity of argon is 961 of that of air.

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  • This low refractivity is noteworthy as strongly antagonistic to the view at one time favoured by eminent chemists that argon was a condensed form of nitrogen represented by N3.

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  • The viscosity of argon is I.

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  • 21, referred to air, somewhat higher than for oxygen, which stands at the head of the list of the principal gases ("On some Physical Properties of Argon and Helium," Proc. Roy.

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  • the red glow of argon was readily obtained with a voltage of 2000, but not with much less.

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  • As soon as a spark-gap was introduced, or the condenser began to emit the humming sound peculiar to it, the beautiful blue glow so characteristic of argon immediately appeared.

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  • p. 77, 1897.) The behaviour of argon at low temperatures was investigated by K.

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  • From the manner of its preparation it was clear at an early stage that argon would not combine with magnesium or calcium at a red heat, nor under the influence of the electric discharge with oxygen, hydrogen or nitrogen.

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  • Nor does it appear that any well-defined compound of argon has yet been prepared.

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  • Berthelot that under the influence of the silent electric discharge, a mixture of benzene vapour and argon underwent contraction, with formation of a gummy product from which the argon could be recovered.

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  • The facts detailed in the original memoir led to the conclusion that argon was an element or a mixture of elements, but the question between these alternatives was left open.

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  • These gases agree with argon in respect of the ratio of the specific heats and in being non-oxidizable under the electric spark.

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  • As originally defined, argon included small proportions of these gases, but it is now preferable to limit the name to the principal constituent and to regard the newer gases as "companions of argon."

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  • Sir William Ramsay considers that probably the volume of all of them taken together does not exceed part of that of the argon.

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  • Now that liquid air is available in many laboratories, it forms an advantageous starting-point in the preparation of argon.

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  • Being less volatile than nitrogen, argon accumulates relatively as liquid air evaporates.

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  • Apollonius Rhodius (Argon, iv.

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  • This Appears To Be Actually The Case For Monatomic Gases Such As Mercury Vapour (Kundt And Warburg, 1876), Argon And Helium (Ramsay, 1896).

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  • He found that a small fraction, not more thanoth part, resisted the change, and in this residue he doubtless had a sample of the inert gas argon which was only recognized as a distinct entity more than a hundred years later.

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  • Baker), and when this is not so, indirect methods are available, except with bromine and fluorine (and also with the so-called inert gases - argon, helium, &c.), which so far have yielded no oxides.

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  • argon filled low emissivity double glazing.

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  • There is also the issue of the increased cost of using argon.

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  • Rayleigh discovered the gas argon and was awarded the Nobel prize for physics in 1904.

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  • Plasma gases include argon, hydrogen, nitrogen and mixtures thereof, as well as air and oxygen.

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  • The windows and rooflights are softwood frame with double glazed argon filled low emissivity glass.

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  • The U2 has an argon filled cavity with copper sulfate water absorbing capsule.

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  • Rayleigh is perhaps most famous for his discovery the inert gas argon in 1895, work which earned him a Nobel Prize in 1904.

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  • The electrical connections to the calorimeter are actually made to thin metallic members in the liquid argon (" electrodes " ).

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  • argon plasma coagulation.

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  • argon laser unit repaired at no cost to the country.

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  • argon ion beam milling.

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  • argon atoms that Ghandi breathed in his long life.

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  • argon gas under high pressure.

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  • argon in air.

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  • It is then usually partially backfilled with argon to avoid the possibility of forming a glow discharge.

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  • collimated proportional counter filled with argon and carbon dioxide.

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  • All windows are timber-framed with argon filled low emissivity double-glazing.

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  • Argon beaming is a viable technique for treating oesophageal dysplasia since it only destroys a depth of 2mm into the mucosa.

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  • milliwatt argon laser beam.

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  • photolithography process, followed by dry etching using argon ion beam milling.

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  • Role of argon plasma coagulation in the treatment of portal hypertensive gastropathy.

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  • ijXcos, the sun), a gaseous chemical element, the modern discovery of which followed closely on that of argon.

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  • 8 a to oxidize when sparked with oxygen, and on examining it spectroscopically he saw that the spectrum was not that of argon, but was characterized by a bright yellow line near to, but not identical with, the D line of sodium.

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  • In the absence of liquid air the helium must be purified by the methods employed for argon (q.v.).

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  • (I) it is a corruption of the ancient name, Egeopelago; (2) it is from the modern Greek, `Ayco iraayo, the Holy Sea; (3) it arose at the time of the Latin empire, and means the Sea of the Kingdom (Arche); (4) it is a translation of the Turkish name, Ak Denghiz, Argon Pelagos, the White Sea; (5) it is simply Archipelagus, Italian, arcipelago, the chief sea.

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  • One remarkable discovery, however, of general interest, was the outcome of a long series of delicate weighings and minute experimental care in the determination of the relative density of nitrogen gas - undertaken in order to determine the atomic weight of nitrogen - namely, the discovery of argon, the first of a series of new substances, chemically inert, which occur, some only in excessively minute quantities, as constituents of the 1 The barony was created at George IV.'s coronation in 1821 for the wife of Joseph Holden Strutt, M.P. for Maldon (1790-1826) and Okehampton (1826-1830), who had done great service during the French War as colonel of the Essex militia.

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  • In 1894 he was associated with Lord Rayleigh in the discovery of argon, announced at that year's meeting of the British Association in Oxford, and in the following year he found in certain rare minerals such as cleveite the gas helium which till that time had only been known on spectroscopic evidence as existing in the sun.

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  • The elements are usually divided into two classes, the metallic and the non-metallic elements; the following are classed as non-metals, and the remainder as metals: Of these hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, neon, krypton, xenon and helium are gases, bromine is a liquid, and the remainder are solids.

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  • The molecule of every compound must obviously contain at least two atoms, and generally the molecules of the elements are also polyatomic, the elements with monatomic molecules (at moderate temperatures) being mercury and the gases of the argon group. The laws of chemical combination are as follows: I.

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  • The periodic law (see Element) permits a grouping of the elements according to their valency as follows: - Group 0: helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon appear to be devoid of valency.

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  • The synthesis of nitric acid by passing electric sparks through moist air by Cavendish is a famous piece of experimental work, for in the first place it determined the composition of this important substance, and in the second place the minute residue of air which would not combine, although ignored for about a century, was subsequently examined by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay, who showed that it consists of a mixture of elementary substances - argon, krypton, neon and xenon (see Argon).

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  • It is found that mercury vapour, helium, argon and its associates (neon, krypton, &c.) have the value 1.67; hence we conclude that these gases exist as monatomic molecules.

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  • The process was developed by Madame Lefebre in 1859; by Meissner in 1863, who found that moist gases gave a better result; and by Prim in 1882, who sparked the gases under pressure; it was also used by Lord Rayleigh in his isolation of argon.

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  • Lord Rayleigh in 1894 found that the density of atmospheric nitrogen was about 2% higher than that of chemically prepared nitrogen, a discovery which led to the isolation of the rare gases of the atmosphere (see Argon).

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  • Lord Rayleigh has made many investigations of the absolute densities of gases, one of which, namely on atmospheric and artificial nitrogen, undertaken in conjunction with Sir William Ramsay, culminated in the discovery of argon.

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  • 1.40 Argon.

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  • Cavendish made many analyses: from more than soo determinations of air in winter and summer, in wet and clear weather, and in town and country, he discerned the mean composition of the atmosphere to be, oxygen 20 833% and nitrogen 79.167% The same experimenter noticed the presence of an inert gas, in very minute amount; this gas, afterwards investigated by Rayleigh and Ramsay, is now named argon.

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  • Of these, argon and its allies were the last to be definitely isolated.

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  • p. 187) also used a single dust-tube with a sounder to find 7 for argon, and again the value was 1.66.

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  • Paschen 6 has further extended the method and added a number of infra-red lines to the spectra of helium, argon, oxygen and other elements.

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  • It combines directly with nitrogen, when heated in the gas, to form the nitride Mg 3 N 2 (see Argon).

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  • ARGON (from the Gr.

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  • Although, as was natural, Cavendish was satisfied with his result, and does not decide whether the small residue was genuine, it is probable that his residue was really of a different kind from the main bulk of the "phlogisticated air," and contained the gas afterwards named argon.

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  • The evidence of the existence of a new gas (named Argon on account of its chemical inertness), and a statement of many of its properties, were communicated to the Royal Society (see Phil.

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  • of small quantities of argon and for determinations of the amount present in various samples of gas, e.g.

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  • The most conspicuous group in the argon spectrum at atmospheric pressure is that first recorded by A.

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  • It is of interest to note that the argon spectrum may be fully developed by operating upon a miniature scale, starting with only 5 c.c. of air (Phil.

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  • The argon ultimately found was 75 o c.c., or a little more than I% of the atmospheric nitrogen used.

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  • p. 66, 1895) gave 1 186 c.c. as the amount of argon present in loo c.c. of mixed atmospheric nitrogen and argon.

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  • The residual argon, derived doubtless from the water used to manipulate the gases, was but a small 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 5°00 Argon Red Zinc Hydrogen Hy F FIG.

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  • At this temperature the nitrogen combines with the magnesium, and thus the argon is concentrated.

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  • The density of argon, prepared and purified by magnesium, was found by Sir William Ramsay to be 19.941 on the O = 16 scale.

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  • The volume actually weighed was 163 c.c. Subsequently large-scale operations with the same apparatus as had been used for the principal gases gave an almost identical result (19.940) for argon prepared with oxygen.

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  • Argon is soluble in water at 12° C. to about 4.0%, that is, it is about 22 times more soluble than nitrogen.

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  • The weight of a mixture of argon and nitrogen prepared from the dissolved gases showed an excess of 24 mg.

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  • Argon is contained in the gases liberated by many thermal springs, but not in special quantity.

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  • The most remarkable physical property of argon relates to the constant known as the ratio of specific heats.

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  • This is precisely the number found from the velocity of sound in argon as determined by Kundt's method, and it leaves no room for any sensible energy of rotatory or vibrational motion.

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  • It may be added that helium has the same character as argon in respect of specific heats (Ramsay, Proc. Roy.

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  • The refractivity of argon is 961 of that of air.

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  • This low refractivity is noteworthy as strongly antagonistic to the view at one time favoured by eminent chemists that argon was a condensed form of nitrogen represented by N3.

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  • The viscosity of argon is I.

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  • 21, referred to air, somewhat higher than for oxygen, which stands at the head of the list of the principal gases ("On some Physical Properties of Argon and Helium," Proc. Roy.

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  • the red glow of argon was readily obtained with a voltage of 2000, but not with much less.

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  • As soon as a spark-gap was introduced, or the condenser began to emit the humming sound peculiar to it, the beautiful blue glow so characteristic of argon immediately appeared.

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  • p. 77, 1897.) The behaviour of argon at low temperatures was investigated by K.

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  • From the manner of its preparation it was clear at an early stage that argon would not combine with magnesium or calcium at a red heat, nor under the influence of the electric discharge with oxygen, hydrogen or nitrogen.

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  • Nor does it appear that any well-defined compound of argon has yet been prepared.

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  • Berthelot that under the influence of the silent electric discharge, a mixture of benzene vapour and argon underwent contraction, with formation of a gummy product from which the argon could be recovered.

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    0
  • The facts detailed in the original memoir led to the conclusion that argon was an element or a mixture of elements, but the question between these alternatives was left open.

    0
    0
  • Norman Collie to separate argon by diffusion into two parts, which should have different densities or refractivities, led to no distinct effect.

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  • These gases agree with argon in respect of the ratio of the specific heats and in being non-oxidizable under the electric spark.

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  • As originally defined, argon included small proportions of these gases, but it is now preferable to limit the name to the principal constituent and to regard the newer gases as "companions of argon."

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  • Sir William Ramsay considers that probably the volume of all of them taken together does not exceed part of that of the argon.

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  • Now that liquid air is available in many laboratories, it forms an advantageous starting-point in the preparation of argon.

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  • Being less volatile than nitrogen, argon accumulates relatively as liquid air evaporates.

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  • Apollonius Rhodius (Argon, iv.

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  • This Appears To Be Actually The Case For Monatomic Gases Such As Mercury Vapour (Kundt And Warburg, 1876), Argon And Helium (Ramsay, 1896).

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  • He found that a small fraction, not more thanoth part, resisted the change, and in this residue he doubtless had a sample of the inert gas argon which was only recognized as a distinct entity more than a hundred years later.

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  • Baker), and when this is not so, indirect methods are available, except with bromine and fluorine (and also with the so-called inert gases - argon, helium, &c.), which so far have yielded no oxides.

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  • The tiny spaces are filled with thick gases like argon for insulation.

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  • Besides argon, another filler that's used is plastic film.

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  • In addition to offering 100 percent pure argon oils, you'll also find some of the latest in news and research into this unique product.

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  • There are five designs: Alto, Argon, Celcio, Leggero, and Nuvola.

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  • The word allergy comes from two Greek words: alos, meaning "other" and argon, meaning "action."

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  • 8 a to oxidize when sparked with oxygen, and on examining it spectroscopically he saw that the spectrum was not that of argon, but was characterized by a bright yellow line near to, but not identical with, the D line of sodium.

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  • of small quantities of argon and for determinations of the amount present in various samples of gas, e.g.

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