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arches

arches Sentence Examples

  • long of fourteen arches, still well preserved.

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  • The arches of this period are semicircular and usually highly stilted.

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  • The arches of this period are semicircular and usually highly stilted.

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  • There still remain a minaret and some marble arches and columns.

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  • Towering red rocks formed into arches are a very notable part of Utah's geology.

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  • Its subject, which is of high historical value as a record of costume, represents the translation of the body of St Mark, and gives us a view of the west façade of the church as it was at the beginning of the 13th century before the addition of the ogee gables, with alternating crockets and statues, and the intermediate pinnacled canopies placed between the five great arches of the upper storey.

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  • The gills, borne on four arches, are internal and enclosed in the branchial chambers.

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  • Extending along the front of the town is the boulevard de la Republique, a fine road built by Sir Morton Peto on a series of arches, with a frontage of 3700 ft., and bordered on one side by handsome buildings, whilst a wide promenade overlooking the harbour runs along the other.

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  • gauge and the dimensions of the existing tunnels, arches, and other permanent works.

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  • gauge and the dimensions of the existing tunnels, arches, and other permanent works.

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  • the use of blind arches as an external decoration, and of brick cornices with the points of the bricks projecting like the teeth of a saw, the use of pulvini (cushions) above the capitals of columns and under the spring of an arch, &c. &c., the use of round arches springing direct from these cushions, spherical pendentives, &c.

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  • The town contains many ancient remains, notably the ruins of an ancient bridge in brickwork of twenty-one arches, of substructures in opus reticulation under the church of S.

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  • The facades presented continuous colonnades on each floor with semicircular high stilted arches, leaving a very small amount of wall space.

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  • It has five wide arches, the central one having a span of 35 ft., and is well preserved.

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  • It has five wide arches, the central one having a span of 35 ft., and is well preserved.

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  • The plan of construction shows three parallel walls enclosing two corridors covered with the peculiar pointed arches or vaults characteristic of Palenque.

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  • Three miles to the south of Herat the Kandahar road crosses the river by a masonry bridge of 26 arches now in ruins.

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  • Three miles to the south of Herat the Kandahar road crosses the river by a masonry bridge of 26 arches now in ruins.

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  • In the epistle ambo at Salerno and the gospel ambones at Cava and San Giovanni del Toro in Ravello, the columns support segmental arches carrying the ambones; the epistle ambo at Ravello and all those in Rome are raised on solid marble bases.

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  • Sometimes also a viaduct consisting of a series of arches is preferred to an embankment when the line has to be taken over a piece of fiat alluvial plain, or when it is desired to economize space and to carry the line at a sufficient height to clear the streets, as in the case of various railways entering London and other large towns.

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  • The broad arches allowed fresh air and the clear fiberglass roof let the sunshine in while keeping the rain out.

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  • Specially serious damage was done in the immediate neighbourhood of the chapel, but the finely moulded arches and the magnificent tracery of the east window survived in great part.

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  • The wheels, called naoura, are of the most primitive construction, made of rough branches of trees, with palm leaf paddles, rude clay vessels being slung on the outer edge to catch the water, of which they raise a prodigious amount, only a comparatively small part of which, however, is poured into the aqueducts on top of the dams. These latter are exceedingly picturesque, often consisting of a series of well-built Gothic arches, and give a peculiar character to the scenery; but they are also great impediments to navigation.

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  • Eu has three buildings of importance - the beautiful Gothic church of St Laurent (12th and 13th centuries) of which the exterior of the choir with its three tiers of ornamented buttressing and the double arches between the pillars of the nave are architecturally notable; the chapel of the Jesuit college (built about 1625), in which are the tombs of Henry, third duke of Guise, and his wife, Katherine of Cleves; and the château.

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  • The two first of these three are handsome suspension bridges; the third, an iron structure, replaced a wooden bridge of many arches which was closed in 1881, after standing a little over a century.

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  • Thus, in Canterbury there was an appeal from the dean of Arches to the official principal of the Arches court.

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  • When peculiars were abolished (vide infra) the dean of Arches disappeared, and his title, in the 19th century, was erroneously given to the official principal.

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  • Mackay, " The Development of the Branchial Arterial Arches in Birds, with special reference to the Origin of the Subclavians and Carotids," Phil.

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  • The walls, piers and arches, are all built in brick, covered with stucco, a great portion of which is preserved down to the present day.

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  • My house is not resplendent with ivory and gold; nor is it adorned with marble arches, resting on graceful columns brought from the quarries of distant Africa.

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  • Surmounting all, at the intersection of the arches is a cross.

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  • The building was mainly of white weatherboard over a brick lower floor consisting of six dark brick arches.

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  • It consists of two storeys with open colonnades, forming a long loggia on the ground and first floors, with seventeen arches on the sea front and eighteen on the other facade.

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  • Above this is a lofty third storey, pierced with a few large windows, with pointed arches once filled with tracery, which is now lost.

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  • In this way the mosaics of the two arches of the atrium and those of the Zeno chapel were cleaned and preserved.

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  • The case was dismissed on technical grounds, but appeals were made to the court of arches and the court of delegates.

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  • The columns and capitals were all taken from ancient buildings, Egyptian, Roman and Byzantine, and they carry arches of different forms, semicircular, pointed and horseshoe.

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  • All the arches are pointed and slightly horseshoe, preceding therefore by about two and a half centuries the introduction of the pointed arch into Europe.

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  • The piers carrying the arches have shafts at their angles, the earliest examples known, and the decoration of the walls consists of friezes, borders, and impost-bands, all enriched with conventional patterns interwoven with cufic characters and modelled in stucco.

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  • Maria della Pensola are buildings of the 11th century with flat arches; the former has some good Renaissance sculptures.

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  • Maria della Pensola are buildings of the 11th century with flat arches; the former has some good Renaissance sculptures.

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  • It is a modern town, although many of the houses have the flat roofs, view-turrets (miradores) and horseshoe arches characteristic of Moorish architecture.

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  • The severe west front is relieved by three rows of semicircular arches, and has a central porch (there were at one time three) supported by huge red marble lions, sculptured no doubt with the rest of the façade by Giovanni Bono da Bissone in 1281.

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  • There on the right we see the handsome building of the old bakery, occupying the site of the present library; it has two arcades of Saracenic arches and a fine row of battlements.

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  • The richest ornamentation was applied to the arches and string courses, while plaques of sculpture, roundels and coats of arms adorned the facades.

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  • We find it retaining some traces of Byzantine influence in the decorated surfaces of applied marbles, and in the roundels of porphyry and verd antique, while it also retained certain characteristics of Gothic, as, for instance, in the pointed arches of the Renaissance facade in the courtyard of the ducal palace designed by Antonio Rizzo (1499).

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  • The corner towards the Ponte della Puglia was also restored, and the hideous device of walling up the five last arches, adopted in the 16th century by the architect Da Ponte, was removed without prejudice to the stability of the structure.

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  • It is situated at the foot of vine-clad hills on the right bank of the Loire, to the left bank of which it is united by a bridge of twenty-six arches, many of them dating from the 13th century.

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  • 17) describes the site of the town, the river and the bridge - the latter as built by Augustus, and as having the highest arches that he knew.

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  • At the ninth mile the road crosses a ravine by the well-preserved and lofty Ponte di Nona, with seven arches, the finest ancient bridge in the neighbourhood of Rome.

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  • deep, and then through a series of remarkable underground caves hollowed out of a quartz mountain and, with their arches and white columns, presenting the appearance of a pillared temple.

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  • The surface is often remarkably honeycombed, and the rock weathers into pinnacles, pillars and arches of extraordinary shapes.

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  • There on the right we see the handsome building of the old bakery, occupying the site of the present library; it has two arcades of Saracenic arches and a fine row of battlements.

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  • The richest ornamentation was applied to the arches and string courses, while plaques of sculpture, roundels and coats of arms adorned the facades.

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  • The judge under this act became (upon vacancies occurring) ex officio official principal of the arches court of Canterbury and of the chancery court of York.

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  • The arches bear on the convex outer side the delicate arborescent gills, and on the concave inner side develop a membranous septum with vermicular perforations, a special sifting or filtering contrivance through which the water absorbed by the mouth has to pass before reaching the respiratory organs of the branchial apparatus.

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  • The river is crossed at Stratford by a stone bridge of 14 arches, built by Sir Hugh Clopton in the reign of Henry VII.

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  • The Greek had created the column; the Roman had developed it; the Roman Greek'or Greek Roman had taught the column to bear the cupola; the Saracen had taught it to bear arches of his own favourite pointed shape.

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  • The exterior brick walls are divided by shallow arches and pilasters, as in other churches of Ravenna.

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  • Some pre-Norman work appears in the western wall, the tower arches and south porch are Norman, and there are an Early English chapel and some Decorated windows.

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  • In general it rather resembles a closed crown, consisting of a circlet from which rise two arches intersecting each other at right angles.

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  • Circlet and arches are richly chased and jewelled; they are filled out by a cap of stiff material, often red velvet, ornamented with pictures in embroidery or appliqué metal.

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  • The channel was open in Greek times, but was afterwards covered by Roman arches; it appears to have served as the main drain of the city.

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  • The Greek had created the column; the Roman had developed it; the Roman Greek'or Greek Roman had taught the column to bear the cupola; the Saracen had taught it to bear arches of his own favourite pointed shape.

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  • In Berlin, on the Stadtbahn - which for a part of its length traverses private property - masonry arches, or earthen embankments between retaining walls, were substituted for the metallic structure wherever possible.

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  • A wide porch peeked from behind three stucco arches.

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  • The interior of the mosque is square and is divided into aisles by columns joined by Moorish arches.

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  • that of the fifteen parishes in the deanery of the Arches.

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  • A Sicilian church has nothing in common with a French or an English church; it is sometimes purely Oriental, sometimes a basilica with pointed arches.

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  • BARFURUSH, a town of Persia, in the province of Mazandaran in 36° 32' N., and 52° 42' E., and on the left bank of the river Bawul [Babul], which is here crossed by a bridge of eight arches,.

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  • The dome-shaped roof is supported by twenty arches.

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  • It has a stately transitional Norman tower, and three fine Norman arches.

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  • Mosaics are employed to decorate the spandrils of the arches.

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  • As a contrast to the Ahmedabad mosques, the Kadam Rasul mosque at Gaur in Bengal possesses some characteristics which resemble those of the mosque of Tulun in Cairo, possibly due to the fact that it is entirely built in brick, with massive piers carrying pointed arches.

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  • It forms one of the most decorative features of the synagogue, and of ten takes an architectural design, with columns, arches and a dome.

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  • The southern arm of the Elbe, on the south side of the island of Wilhelmsburg, is crossed by another railway bridge of four arches and 2050 ft.

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  • Purchas), and since the "Ritualists" refused to bow to this decision, parliament intervened with the Public Worship Regulation Act of 1874, which set up a disciplinary machinery for enforcing the law, and at the same time reconstituted the Court of Arches.

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  • Remains of the latter include a nave-arcade with rounded arches.

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  • The shaft, resting upon arches supported by four cast iron columns about 9 ft.

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  • Each of these ruins has been visited by archaeologists who have copied inscriptions, described the temples, triumphal arches, porticos, mausoleums and the other monuments which are still standing, collected statues or other antiquities; and in many cases they have actually excavated.

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  • The arches of the Romanesque portal are beautifully ornamented, in a manner suggestive of Arab influence; the bronze doors, executed by Barisanus of Trani in 1175, rank among the best of their period in southern Italy.

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  • The river is crossed by a bridge of seven arches which was designed by Thomas Telford in 1805 and opened in 1808.

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  • The Pointed arches rest upon pillars, possibly Norman, and above them, below the Decorated clerestory windows, is a series of semicircular arches with flamboyant tracery, a remarkable feature.

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  • The brick campanile has small columns with little pointed arches.

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  • Galgano (infra), built in black and white marble, was begun in the early years of the 13th century, but interrupted by the plague of 1248 and wars at home and abroad, and in 1317 its walls were extended to the baptistery of San Giovanni; a further enlargement was begun in 1339 but never carried out, and a few ruined walls and arches alone remain to show the magnificence of the uncompleted design, which would have produced one of the largest churches in the-world.

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  • In 1868 Sir Robert Phillimore (Dean of the Arches) pronounced the ceremonial use of incense to be illegal in the suit of Martin v.

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  • long and had twenty narrow arches, through which the tides formed dangerous rapids.

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  • It is a massive stone structure of nine arches, carrying a level roadway, and is considered one of the finest bridges of its kind in the world.

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  • The first was built in 1828 from designs of Decimus Burton, and comprises three arches with a frieze above the central arch copied from the Elgin marbles in the British Museum.

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  • This church has various points of interest besides its Norman crypt, from which it took the name of Bow, being the first church in London built on arches.

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  • The ecclesiastical Court of Arches sat here formerly.

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  • It consisted of twenty stone arches and a drawbridge.

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  • mouthpiece, or of the flow of water through the arches of a bridge, with wedge-shaped piers to divide the stream.

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  • Remains of a theatre and of a late mosaic pavement with hunting scenes have been found, three of the bridges across the Bacchiglione and Retrone are of Roman origin, and arches of the aqueduct exist outside Porta S.

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  • A stone bridge, consisting of seventeen arches, was built in 1485 over the river, and made a county bridge under James I.

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  • Exclusive of extensive and flourishing suburbs, the city has a circuit of 12 m.; its streets are well paved and clean; and it possesses a large number of arches, public monuments, temples, hospitals and colleges.

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  • Externally the finest part of the building is the west front, in which the note struck by the range of arches running round the base is repeated by four open arcades.

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  • The lowest range of semicircular arches consists of twenty columns and the second of sixty; and above this is a row of eighteen windows in the same style separated by as many pilasters.

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  • The basement is surrounded by a range of semicircular arches supported by fifteen columns, and above this rise six arcades with thirty columns each.

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  • The Palazzo della Ragione, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 2672 ft., its breadth 89 ft., and its height 78 ft.; the walls are covered with symbolical paintings in fresco; the building stands upon arches, and the upper storey is surrounded by an open loggia, not unlike that which surrounds the basilica of Vicenza; the Palazzo was begun in 1172 and finished in 1219; in 1306 Fra Giovanni, an Augustinian friar, covered the whole with one roof; originally there were three roofs, spanning the three chambers into which the hall was at first divided; the internal partition walls remained till the fire of 1420, when the Venetian architects who undertook the restoration removed them, throwing all three compartments into one and forming the present great hall.

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  • Pop. (1905), 91,124 (including a garrison of 7 500 men), of whom two-thirds are Roman Catholic. The Rhine, which here attains the greatest breadth of its upper course, is crossed by a magnificent bridge of five arches, leading to the opposite town of Castel and by two railway bridges.

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  • high, adorned with marble columns, and cased with mosaic of the most varied designs; a fountain of alabaster - of the kind known as Algerian onyx - stands in the alabaster-paved inner court; and 72 columns support the arches of the interior.

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  • 1298, now transformed into a museum of antiquities, has two series of arches, which rest on alabaster pillars.

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  • Delicate lacework extends from the spring of the arches to the roof.

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  • The arches are circular or pointed.

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  • There also remain ten arches of a bridge which led over the river from Samha on to the road to Shapurkhast, a city situated some distance west.

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  • The tower itself is arcaded in the two lower storeys, having round arches in the lower and triangular in the upper, and there is a round-headed S.

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  • A similarly variegated effect in red and white is produced by building the arches of windows and doors with alternating voussoirs in brick and marble.

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  • A very picturesque battlemented bridge leads from it to the other shore, sloping down over three arches of different sizes, the fortifica- largest next to the castle and the smallest at the other boas.

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  • There are four other bridges across the Adige: one, the graceful Ponte di Pietra, rests upon ancient foundations, while the two arches nearest to the left bank are Roman; but it has been frequently restored.

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  • The early palaces of Verona, before its conquest by Venice, were of noble and simple design, mostly built of fine red brick, with an inner court, surrounded on the ground floor by open arches like a cloister, as, for example, the Palazzo della Ragione, an assize court, begun in the r 2th century.

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  • The arches, round or more often pointed in form, were decorated with moulded terra-cotta enrichments, and often with alternating voussoirs of marble.

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  • The town hall, with its light open loggia of semicircular arches on the ground floor, was designed by Fra Giocondo towards the end of the i 5th century; its sculptured enrichments of pilasters and friezes are very graceful, though lacking the vigorous life of the earlier medieval sculptured ornamentation.

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  • Almost the whole of its external arcades, with three tiers of arches, have now disappeared; it was partly thrown down by an earthquake in 1184, and subsequently used to supply building materials.

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  • The arches of this period are There is every reason to doubt Vasari's statement that Pisanello was a pupil of Andrea del Castagno.

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  • The arches are mostly pointed, and in other respects the influence of northern Gothic was more direct in Verona than in Florence.

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  • The most interesting of these is the Alte Mainbriicke, a red sandstone structure of fourteen arches, 815 ft.

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  • Other bridges are the Obermainbriicke of five iron arches, opened in 1878; an iron foot (suspension) bridge, the Untermainbriicke; the Wilhelmsbriicke, a fine structure, which from 1849 to 1890 served as a railway bridge and was then opened as a road bridge; and two new iron bridges at Gutleuthof and Niederrad (below the city), which carry the railway traffic from the south to the north bank of the Main, where all lines converge in a central station of the Prussian state railways.

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  • The river is here crossed by a bridge of twelve arches, which connects the town with the suburb of The Port.

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  • It is unevenly built on high ground above the river Frome, which is here crossed by a stone bridge of five arches.

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  • The Arches court was also the court of appeal from the consistory courts of the bishops of the province in all testamentary and matrimonial causes.

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  • There are two piers, and a railway viaduct of eleven arches crosses the harbour.

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  • The exterior is well preserved, and is largely decorated with interlacing pointed arches; the windows also are pointed.

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  • The interior was restored in 1 559, though the pointed arches of the nave, borne by ancient granite columns, are still visible: and the only mosaics preserved are those of the apse and the last bay of the choir: they are remarkably fine specimens of the art of the period (1148) and, though restored in 1859-1862, have suffered much less than those at Palermo and Monreale from the process.

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  • One of the figures, a barbarian captive, effeminate like those which appear on Roman triumphal arches, is practically intact.

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  • Many Arab coins, some Kufic inscriptions and several burial-places were left by the Arabs; but they did not establish their religion or leave a permanent impression on the Phoenician inhabitants, or deprive the Maltese language of the characteristics which differentiate it from Arabic. There is no historical evidence that the domination of the Goths and Vandals in the Mediterranean ever extended to Malta: there are fine Gothic arches in two old palaces at Notabile, but these were built after the Norman conquest of Malta.

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  • The Ponte di Cecco (so named from Cecco d'Ascoli), with two arches, is also Roman and belongs to the Via Salaria; the Ponte Maggiore and the Ponte Cartaro are, on the other hand, medieval, though the latter perhaps preserves some traces of Roman work.

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  • He practised as an ecclesiastical lawyer, was an assessor at the trial of Oldcastle, and in 1415 was made dean of the Court of Arches.

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  • An unfavourable judgment was given by the Canterbury Court of Arches in 1862, but reversed by the Privy Council in 1864.

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  • In large levels only the cap pieces for the roof are made of steel joists, but in smaller ones complete arches made of pieces of rails fish-jointed at the crown are used.

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  • It will be noted that this crown is, like its predecessors, what is known as an open crown, without any arches rising from the circlet, but in the accounts of the coronation of Henry IV.

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  • seems to have had three arches, and there is the same number shown on the crown of Henry VII., which ensigns the hawthorn bush badge of that king.

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  • 12) shows two arches, and a crown similarly arched appears on the great seal of Richard III.

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  • on his effigy in Westminster Abbey shows a circlet surmounted by four crosses and four fleurs-de-lys alternately, and has two arches rising from it.

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  • 14 shows the form of crown used by Edward VI., but a tendency (not shown in the illustration) began of flattening the arches of the crown, and on some of the coins of Elizabeth the arches are not merely flattened, but are depressed in the centre, much after the character of the arches of the crown on many of the silver coins of the 19th century prior to 1887.

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  • The crown which strangely enough surmounts the shield with the arms of the Commonwealth on the coins of Oliver Cromwell (as distinguished from those of the Commonwealth itself, which have no crown) is a royal crown with alternate crosses and fleurs-de-lys round the circlet, and is surmounted by three arches, which, though somewhat flattened, are not bent.

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  • 16) shows the arches depressed in the centre, a feature of the royal crown which seems to have been continued henceforward till 1887, when the pointed form of the arches was resumed, in consonance with an idea that such a form indicated an imperial rather than a regal crown, Queen Victoria having been proclaimed empress of India in 1877.

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  • The crown of St Edward, with which the sovereigns were crowned, had a narrow circlet from which rose alternately four crosses and four fleurs-de-lys, and from the crosses sprang two arches, which at their crossing supported an orb and cross.

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  • These arches must have been a later addition, and possibly were first added for the coronation of Henry IV.

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  • Queen Edith's crown had a plain circlet with, so far as can be determined, four crosses of pearls or gems on it, and a large cross patee rising from it in front, and arches of jewels or pearls terminating in a large pearl at the top. A valuation of these ancient crowns was made at the time of the Commonwealth prior to their destruction.

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  • It had been altered for the coronation, and the arches were formed of oak leaves (fig.

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  • 19 shows Queen Victoria's crown with raised arches and without the inner cap of estate, which since the reign of Henry VII.

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  • It is entirely constructed of granite blocks, without cement, and consists of six arches of various sizes, with a total length of 616 feet and a height of about 1 9 0 ft.

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  • One of the arches was broken down in 1213 and rebuilt in 1553; another was blown up by the British troops in 1809, and, though temporarily reconstructed, was again destroyed in 1836, to prevent the passage of the Carlist forces.

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  • The two old churches, St Michael's, the central tower and lofty spire of which rise from Norman arches, and Holy Rood, partly Decorated, are greatly modernized.

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  • South-east of the city, along the valley of the Wadi Melain, are hundreds of large stone arches, magnificent remains of the Roman aqueduct from Zaghwan to Carthage.

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  • Between Zaghwan and Tunis, and accessible by the same railway, is Wadna, the Roman Uthina, where, besides numerous other ruins, are the fairly preserved arches of a large amphitheatre.

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  • Facing the arch, within the Hieron, their rear walls forming one side of the enclosure, are three temples, connected with one another by arches, and forming one design.

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  • It is pleasantly situated on the right bank of the Thames, which is crossed by a bridge of seven arches, built of Purbeck stone in 1785.

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  • Cast iron was about the same time used for arches, and some of the early railway bridges were built with cast iron girders.

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  • The suspension bridge dispenses with the compression member required in girders and with a good deal of the stiffening required in metal arches.

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  • It had eight arches, the greatest span FIG.

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  • above the stream_' This bad six arches and was built of stone blocks without cement.

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  • The arches vary from 51 to 79 ft.

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  • arches of planks bolted together), were built for some of the earlier railways, particularly the Great Western and the Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire.

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  • As railway loads increased and greater spans were demanded, the Howe truss was stiffened by timber arches on each side of each girder.

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  • The span of the arches ranged from 10 to 33 ft., and the total waterway was only 337 ft.

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  • The semi-elliptical shape of the arches, the variation of span, the _ slight curvature of the 26:0'=-----.

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  • above Trinity high-water mark; the arches on each side of the centre have a span of 140 ft., and the abutment arches 130 ft.

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  • In Germany and America twoand three-hinged arches of masonry and concrete have been built, up to 150 ft.

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  • This space is filled with a flooring of reinforced concrete, resting on the two arches, and carrying the central roadway.

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  • Such hinges have been used not only for metal arches, but in a modified form for masonry and concrete arches.

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  • For an elementary account of the theory of arches, hinged or not, reference may be made to a joint by more than one-eighteenth of its depth.

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  • At Rechtenstein a bridge of two concrete arches has been constructed, span 752 ft., with lead articulations: width of arch 11 ft.; depth of arch at crown and springing 2.1 and 2.96 ft.

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  • In Paris the Austerlitz (1800-1806) and Carrousel (1834-1836) bridges had cast iron arches.

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  • Baker stated that it had required patching for ninety years, because the arch and the high side arches would not work together.

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  • Expansion and contraction broke the high arch and the connexions between the arches.

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  • 28 shows one of the wrought iron arches of a bridge over the Rhine at Coblenz.

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  • Of large-span bridges with steel arches, one of the most important is the St Louis bridge over the Mississippi, completed in 1874 (fig.

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  • All that needed to be done was to fish the fractured ribs of the high arches, put oval holes in the fishes, and not screw up the bolts too tight.

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  • Cast iron arches of considerable span were constructed late FIG.

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  • The difficulty of casting heavy arch ribs led to the construction of cast iron arches of cast voussoirs, somewhat like the voussoirs of masonry chambers and air locks, a feat unprecedented in the annals of engineering.

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  • The bridge has three spans, each formed of arches of cast steel.

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  • The rise of the centre arch is 471 ft., and that of the side arches 46 ft.

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  • The arches carry a double railway track and above this a roadway 54 ft.

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  • When arches form the superstructure, the abutment must be so designed as to transmit the resultant thrust to the foundation in a safe direction, and so distributed that no part may be unduly compressed.

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  • In any stiffened suspension bridge the action of the pier will be analogous to that of a pier between two arches.

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  • In the case of the St Louis bridge, half arches were built out on either side of each pier, so that the load balanced.

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  • The bridge was composed of twenty arches supported by stone pillars, several of which are still visible at low water.

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  • In 1731 the famous palace of the Netherlands was destroyed by fire, and the only remains of this edifice are some ruined arches and walls in a remote corner of the grounds of the king's palace.

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  • Note should be made of a short treatise on La Formation francaise des anciens noms du lieu (1867); a memoir De l'ogive et de l'architecture dite ogivale (1850), where he gives his theory on the use of stone arches - important for the history of religious architecture; an article on L'Age de la cathedrale de Laon (1874), in which he fixed the exact date of the birth of Gothic architecture; Histoire du costume en France (1875; 2nd ed.

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  • The offer was accepted, and the bishop was received with triumphal arches and other demonstrations of joy.

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  • A stone arch bridge, with nine arches, built of granite at a cost of $1,700,000 and dedicated in 1908, spans the Connecticut (replacing the old Connecticut river bridge built in 1818 and burned in 1895), and connects Hartford with the village of East Hartford in the township of East Hartford (pop. 1900, 6406), which has important paper-manufacturing and tobacco-growing interests.

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  • The "spacious arches of stone and other vestiges of departed majesty," with which Ker Porter found it surrounded in 1818, were possibly remains of the college (medresseh) and monastery (zavieh) where Ibn Batuta found shelter during his visit to the locality.

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  • He served as archdeacon of Lincoln, canon of York and dean of the court of arches before 1323, when he became bishop of Winchester, an appointment which was made during his visit to Pope John XXII.

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  • From Toulouse to Agen the main canal follows the right bank of the Garonne, crossing the Tarn on an aqueduct at Moissac, while another magnificent aqueduct of twenty-three arches carries it at Agen from the right to the left bank of the river.

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  • Mostly with bony arches across the temporal region.

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  • No bony arches.

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  • But swiftness, the apparatus necessary for climbing, running and digging, the mechanism of the tongue, the muscles of the jaws (hence modifications of the cranial arches) stand also in correlation with the kind of food and with the way in which it has to be procured.

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  • Pleurodont lizards with well-developed limbs; without temporal bony arches; postthoracic ribs united across the abdomen.

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  • Presumably the presence of osteoderms and of complete cranial arches are more archaic than their absence, just as we conclude that limbless forms have been evolved from various groups possessed of fully developed limbs.

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  • The vermiform body is covered with cycloid imbricating scales, devoid of osteoderms. Limbs and even their arches are absent, excepting a pair of flaps which represent the hind-limbs in the males.

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  • The city is supplied with fresh water by means of an aqueduct carried by arches over an extensive valley.

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  • St Mary's, in the centre of the town, and St David's, beyond the Usk, are now mainly modern, though the former has some of the Norman arches of the original church.

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  • A suit on the complaint of a neighbouring clergyman ensued and after various complications Denison was condemned by the archbishops' court at Bath (1856); but on appeal the court of Arches and the privy council quashed this judgment on a technical plea.

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  • square, with pointed arches decorated with diaper work, supported on pairs of columns in white marble, 216 in all, which were alternately plain and decorated by bands of patterns in gold and colours, made of glass tesserae, arranged either spirally or vertically from end to end of each shaft.

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  • Monolithic columns of grey oriental granite (except one, which is of cipollino), evidently the spoils of older buildings, on each side support eight pointed arches much stilted.

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  • The outside of the church is plain, except the aisle walls and three eastern apses, which are decorated with intersecting pointed arches and other ornaments inlaid in marble.

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  • The outsides of the principal doorways and their pointed arches are magnificently enriched with carving and coloured inlay, a curious combination of three styles - Norman-French, Byzantine and Arab.

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  • With the exception of a high dado, itself very beautiful, made of marble slabs with bands of mosaic between them, the whole interior surface of the walls, including soffits and jambs of all the arches, is covered with minute mosaic-pictures in brilliant colours on a gold ground.

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  • - Offences against the law ecclesiastical (not being crimes) committed by clergy of the Church of England as a rule come by letters of request from the bishop of the diocese before the arches court of Canterbury or the chancery court of York (of both of which the same person is judge).

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  • It is beneath one of the ruined arches of a church mentioned by Jerome, and is reached by a few rough steps.

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  • Cistercian houses this was quadrangular, and was divided by pillars and arches into two or three aisles.

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  • The arches of the lavatory are to be seen near the refectory entrance.

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  • A considerable portion of this house was erected on arches over the Skell.

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  • Like the hall in the castle at Winchester, and Westminster Hall, as originally built, it was divided by 18 pillars and arches, with 3 aisles.

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  • In order that the doors when raised may not impede the view under the arches, 1 L.

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  • The ruined skeleton of the great tower arches now terminates the building eastward.

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  • The rocks composing the cliffs are worn into caves, and around the island are many fantastic arches and columns.

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  • at the top, is well known, inasmuch as they were standing till about 1600; and the north gate, the Porta Palatina, still exists; it has a double opening, and two orders of arches above, and is flanked by two sixteen-sided brick towers.

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  • The streets are lighted with electricity and gas, the Ouvidor and some other narrow streets having a great number of gas-pipe arches across them for decorative illumination on festal occasions.

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  • The water supply is derived from three sources: the small streams flowing down the mountain sides which serve small localities; the old Carioca aqueduct, dating from colonial times, which collects a considerable supply from the small streams of the Serra da Carioca and brings it into the city through a covered conduit which once crossed the gap between Santa Thereza and Santo Antonio hills on two ranges of stone arches (now used as a viaduct by the Santa Thereza Tramway Company); and the modern Rio do Ouro waterworks, which brings in an abundant supply from the Serra do Tinqua, N.W.

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  • - The rodent skull is characterized by the great size of the premaxillae, which completely separate the nasals from the maxillae; by the presence of zygomatic arches; and by the wide unoccupied space existing between the incisors and the cheek-teeth; and (except in the Duplicidentata) by the antero-posteriorly elongated glenoid cavity for the articulation of the lower jaw.

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  • The most remarkable feature of the genus is, however, the extraordinary development of the zygomatic arches of the skull, which are enormously expanded vertically, forming great convex bony capsules on the sides of the face, enclosing on each side a large cavity lined with mucous membrane internally, and communicating by a small opening with the mouth.

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  • Having entered the church he held many ecclesiastical appointments, and became dean of the Arches in 1423; then devoting his time to secular affairs he was sent on an embassy to Calais in 1439, and to John IV., count of Armagnac, in 1442.

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  • The beautiful central bridge - the Alte or Augustusbriicke - with 16 arches, built in 17 2 7-1731, and 1420 ft.

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  • Some damage was also inflicted on it in 1813, when Napoleon made it the centre of his operations; one of the buttresses and two arches of the old bridge were then blown up. The dismantling of the fortifications had been begun by the French in, 810, and was gradually completed after 1817, the space occupied by them being appropriated to gardens and promenades.

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  • It is pleasantly situated at the confluence of the streams Laver and Skell with the river Ure, which is crossed by a fine bridge of nine arches.

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  • This was brought to the notice of the Court of Arches in 1845, and Sir H.

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  • The mouth is usually more or less protractile and always toothless; the lower pharyngeal bones, which are large and falciform, subparallel to the branchial arches, are provided with teeth, often large and highly specialized, in one, two or three series (pharyngeal teeth), usually working against a horny plate attached to a vertical process of the basioccipital bone produced under the anterior vertebrae, mastication being performed in the gullet.

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  • The river is crossed by St John's Bridge of nine arches, completed in 1772 from the designs of John Smeaton and widened a century later; by Victoria Bridge, a modern structure connecting South Street with Dundee Road; and farther south (at the end of Tay Street) by a footway alongside of the viaduct belonging to the Caledonian railway.

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  • The church of St Eustachius dates from 1318, and possesses a lofty tower supported on four open arches.

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  • The structures in which steel concrete is used may be analysed as consisting essentially of (I) walls, (2) columns, (3) piles, (4) beams, (5) slabs, (6) arches.

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  • The arches of Porta Nuova are almost the last trace of the inner circuit, constructed after the destruction of the city by Frederick Barbarossa, to which also belonged the Porta dei Fabbri, demolished in 1900.

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  • 0 5 15 on piers and arches to allow the roots to pass outwards into a prepared border, the trees being planted just within the house.

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  • There are in the chancel two freestone effigies, perhaps of the r4th century, besides three sedilia, and a piscina under arches.

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  • The nave, in the Transitional and Decorated styles, with a rich midPointed triforium of broad round arches, has been restored, and used as the parish church since 1862.

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  • The Mosel is spanned by a Gothic freestone bridge of 14 arches, erected in 1344, and also by a railway bridge.

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  • The jaws are short and strong, and the width of the zygomatic arches, and great development of the bony ridges on the skull, give ample space for the attachment of the powerful muscles by which they are closed.

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  • The entrance, a door in a false arcade of black and white marble, leads into a court whose arches support an upper colonnade.

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  • On each side of it were two arches, affording an entrance into the forum, but capable of being closed by gates.

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  • Being in great part excavated in the surface of the hill, instead of the seats being raised on arches, it is wanting also in the picturesque arched corridors which contribute so much to the effect of those other ruins.

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  • The Dee is here crossed by a 14th-century bridge of four arches, "one of the seven wonders of Wales," built by John Trevor, afterwards bishop of St Asaph (Llanelwy).

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  • It was built to consist of two bridges one over the eastern or Damietta branch of the river having 71 arches, the other, over the Rosetta branch, having 61 arches, each arch being of 5 metres or 16.4 ft.

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  • The building was all of stone, the floors of the arches were inverts.

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  • The arches were designed to be fitted with self-acting drop gates; but they were not a success, and were only put into place on the Rosetta branch.

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  • The experiment was repeated year after year till 1867, when the barrage cracked right across from foundation to top. A massive coffer-dam was then erected, covering the eleven arches nearest the crack; but the work was never trusted again, nor the water-surface raised more than about 3 ft.

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  • It consists of a bridge of i i 1 arches, each 5 metres span, with piers of 2 metres thickness.

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  • It lies in a valley sheltered by steep chalk hills on the east, its old-fashioned stone houses lining a single broad street, which crosses the Upper Avon by a bridge of four arches.

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  • It has a fine facade of six arches, and the capitals of the supporting pillars are very curiously carved.

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  • The whole forms a large group of buildings, now partially in ruins, in a style resembling the contemporaneous medieval work in Europe, with pointed arches in several orders.

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  • Returning to England in 1553, he resigned his position at Oxford, which was now that of regius professor of civil law, and was made chancellor of the dioceses of London and of Oxford and dean of arches.

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  • Paolo fuori le Mura at Rome, with pairs of small columns supporting arches, and decorations in coloured mosaic ("Cosmatesque" work).

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  • Within, the palace is unsurpassed for the exquisite detail of its marble pillars and arches, its fretted ceilings and the veil-like transparency of its filigree work in stucco.

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  • Underneath it, to the right, was the principal entrance, and over it are three elegant windows with arches and miniature pillars.

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  • The columns supporting the roof and gallery are irregularly placed, with a view to artistic effect; and the general form of the piers, arches and pillars is most graceful.

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  • The Capella Palatina, at Palermo, the most wonderful of Roger's churches, with Norman doors, Saracenic arches, Byzantine dome, and roof adorned with Arabic scripts, is perhaps the most striking product of the brilliant and mixed civilization over which the grandson of the Norman Trancred ruled.

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  • It has fifteen arches, and is 924 ft.

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  • high, with twenty-eight arches, which extends from the railway station, a castellated building on part of the site of the old castle, to a considerable distance beyond the river.

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  • There are two bridges over the stream: one of three arches, which carries the main street and bazaar, and one of two arches over which is built the Kait Bey mosque.

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