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archdeacon

archdeacon

archdeacon Sentence Examples

  • The office of archdeacon is of great antiquity.

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  • When the expression Natural Theology comes to the front once more with Archdeacon W.

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  • Where the archdeacon had a jurisdiction co-ordinate with the bishop, it was called a peculiar.

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  • Archdeacon >>

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  • For these and other services Bonner had been rewarded by the grant of several livings, and in 1535 he was made archdeacon of Leicester.

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  • The same year he offended the court by a Whig sermon, but in 1779 became archdeacon of Ely.

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  • The idea, however, did not spread until, in 1261, Jacob Pantaleon, archdeacon of Liege, ascended the papal throne as Urban IV.

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  • He was commended to the hospitality of Anne Boleyn's father, the earl of Wiltshire, in whose house at Durham Place he resided for some time; the king appointed him archdeacon of Taunton and one of his chaplains; and he also held a parochial benefice, the name of which is unknown.

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  • less the archdeacon knew nothing of the German Paley professor, and would have cared nothing for him how ever well he had known him.

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  • Ordinarily, the appeal from an archdeacon or his official lay to the court of the bishop; but by custom the appeal might be to the court of the metropolitan.

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  • The Constitutions of Clarendon, in 1164, made the appeal from the court of the archdeacon lie to the court of the bishop.

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  • c. 86 (the " Church Discipline Act ") creates new tribunals; and first a commission of inquiry appointed by the bishop of five persons, of whom the vicar-general, or an archdeacon, or a rural dean of the diocese must be one.

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  • Each bishop is assisted by at least two officers with judicial or quasi-judicial powers, the " archimandrite " who adjudicates upon causes of revenue and the archdeacon who adjudicates on questions between deacons (op. cit.

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  • (Tebaldo Visconti);pope from the 1st of September 1271, to the moth of January 1276, was born at Piacenza in 1208, studied for the church, and became archdeacon of Liege.

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  • At the desire of Leo (then archdeacon of Rome) he wrote against Nestorius his De Incarnatione Domini in seven books.

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  • Originally the archdeacon was, as the name implies, the chief of the deacons attached to the bishop's cathedral, his duty being, besides preaching, to supervise the deacons and their work, i.e.

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  • During the 8th and 9th centuries the office tended to become more and more exclusively purely administrative, the archdeacon by his visitations relieving the bishop of the minutiae of government and keeping him informed in detail of the condition of his diocese.

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  • The archdeacon had thus become, on the one hand, the oculus episcopi, but on the other hand, armed as he was with powers of imposing penance and, in case of stubborn disobedience, of excommunicating offenders, his power tended more and more to grow at the bishop's expense.

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  • By the 12th century the archdeacon had become practically independent of the bishop, whose consent was only required in certain specified cases.

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  • The power of the archdeacon reached its zenith at the outset of the 1 3th century.

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  • In the Roman Church to-day the office of archdeacon is merely titular, his sole function being to present the candidates for ordination to the bishop. The title, indeed, hardly exists save in Italy, where the archdeacon is no more than a dignified member of a chapter, who takes rank after the bishop. The ancient functions of the archdeacon are exercised by the vicar-general.

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  • In the Church of England, on the other hand, the office of archdeacon, which was first introduced at the Norman conquest, survives, with many of its ancient duties and prerogatives.

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  • The functions of the archdeacon are in the present day ancillary in a general way to those of the bishop of the diocese.

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  • In the Episcopal church of America the office of archdeacon exists in only one or two dioceses.

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  • The death of Archdeacon Lucien Bonaparte, the recognized head of the family, having placed property at the disposal of the sons, they bought a house, which became the rendezvous of the democrats and of a band of volunteers whom they raised.

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  • The king put forward his chaplain, Hugh; the pope supported the archdeacon, John the Scot, who had been canonically elected.

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  • Its immediate occasion was the disputation at Heidelberg (1568) for the doctorate of theology by George Wither or Withers, an English Puritan (subsequently archdeacon of Colchester), silenced (1565) at Bury St Edmunds by Archbishop Parker.

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  • In 1791 he was made prebendary of Salisbury, and in 1804 archdeacon of Wiltshire.

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  • On his return he was happy in winning the good opinion of Amalric I.; he was made first canon and then archdeacon of Tyre, and tutor of the future Baldwin IV.

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  • Sometime before 1040 Berengar was made archdeacon of Angers.

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  • His early friend and school companion, Adelmann, archdeacon of Liege, wrote to him letters of expostulation on the subject of this report in 1046 and 1048; and a bishop, Hugo of Langres, wrote (about 1049) a refutation of the views which he had himself heard Berengar express in conversation.

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  • In 1154 he was promoted to be archdeacon of Canterbury, after first taking deacon's orders.

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  • Henry on his side looked to find in Becket the archbishop a coadjutor as loyal as Becket the archdeacon; and anticipated that the Church would once more be reduced to that state of dependence in which she had stood during the latter years of Henry I.

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  • In 1840 Hare was appointed archdeacon of Lewes, and in the same year preached a course of sermons at Cambridge (The Victory of Faith), followed in 1846 by a second, The Mission of the Comforter.

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  • Archdeacon Hare married in 1844 Esther, a sister of his friend Frederick Maurice.

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  • Carlyle's Life of John Sterling was written through dissatisfaction with the "Life" prefixed to Archdeacon Hare's book.

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  • A Latin epitaph, discovered in the 18th century, says, however, that he was archdeacon of Paris, and declares that he died in the city of Avignon in 1449.

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  • By special command of Raimund, archbishop of Toledo, the chief of these works were translated from the Arabic through the Castilian into Latin by the archdeacon Dominicus Gonzalvi with the aid of Johannes Avendeath (=ben David), a converted Jew, about 1150.

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  • by Peter of Blois, then archdeacon of London, and therefore a man of some authority on the subject.

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  • (Odo or Otho or Eudes de Lagary), pope from the 12th of March 1088 to the 29th of July 1099, was born of knightly rank at Lagary (or Lagery or Lagny), near Reims. He studied for the church, became archdeacon of Auxerre, and later joined the congregation of Cluny.

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  • Meanwhile he became archdeacon of Berkshire (1673), prebendary of Norwich, rector of St Giles's-in-theFields, and in 1681 dean of Norwich.

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  • Walter the archdeacon is a historical personage; whether his book has any real existence may be fairly questioned.

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  • The archdeacon's court, the sessions and the county elections were long held at Lostwithiel, but all have now been removed.

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  • He was twice married, first to Anna Barton, a sister of John Sterling's wife, secondly to a half-sister of his friend Archdeacon Hare.

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  • Maurice also contributed many prefaces and introductions to the works of friends, as to Archdeacon Hare's Charges, Kingsley's Saint's Tragedy, &c.

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  • In January 1841 Shuttleworth, bishop of Chichester, appointed him archdeacon, whereupon he began a personal visitation of each parish within his district, completing the task in 1843.

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  • Kattenbusch supposes that Anatolius, bishop of Constantinople, or his archdeacon Aetius, who read the creed at the 2nd session of the council, took up the idea that through its likeness to the Roman Creed it would be a useful weapon against Eutyches and others who were held to interpret the Nicene Creed in an Apollinarian sense.

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  • Denison, archdeacon of Taunton, Lord Shaftesbury, and others formed a strong committee of protest, whilst Pusey declared that "the choice was the most frightful enormity ever perpetrated by a prime minister."

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  • See Archdeacon E.

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  • Of the twelve homilies contained in the first book, four (the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th) are probably to be attributed to Cranmer, and one (the 12th) possibly to Latimer; one (the 6th) is by Bonner; another (the 5th) is by John Harpsfield, archdeacon of London, and another (the 11th) by Thomas Becon, one of Cranmer's chaplains.

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  • issued a bull for their extermination, and Alberto de' Capitanei, archdeacon of Cremona, put himself at the head of a crusade against them.

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  • Fesch therefore stood almost in the relation of an uncle to the young Bonapartes, and after the death of Lucien Bonaparte, archdeacon of Ajaccio, he became for a time the protector and patron of the family.

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  • In the year 1789, when the French Revolution broke out, he was archdeacon of Ajaccio, and, like the majority of the Corsicans, he felt repugnance for many of the acts of the French government during that period; in particular he protested against the application to Corsica of the act known as the "Civil Constitution of the Clergy" (July 1790).

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  • Froude, archdeacon of Totnes, was born at Dartington, Devon, on the 23rd of April 1818.

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  • Letters of the archdeacon Epiphanius to the patriarch Maximianus (Migne, Patr.

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  • After holding the living of Chigwell (1597-1605) he became chaplain to Bancroft (then bishop of London), and afterwards archdeacon of Essex (1603-1609), rector of Stisted and bishop of Chichester (1609-1619) and archbishop of York (1629).

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  • The duke of Little Poland, 1 Archdeacon of Gnesen 1367: vice-chancellor of Poland; d.

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  • He, however, much regretted the gradual and very natural trend of his new English allies towards extreme Ultramontane views, of which Archdeacon, afterwards Cardinal, Manning ultimately became an enthusiastic advocate.

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  • Paulo de Thebas (Coimbra, 1904); Archdeacon Dowling, The Abyssinian Church, (London, 1909); and periodicals as under COPTIC CHURCH.

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  • He served as archdeacon of Lincoln, canon of York and dean of the court of arches before 1323, when he became bishop of Winchester, an appointment which was made during his visit to Pope John XXII.

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  • In 1871 Archdeacon J.

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  • Dr William Hutchinson, archdeacon of St Albans.

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  • a Dr Robert Teigh, archdeacon of Middlesex.

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  • 1894), bishop of Bath and Wells; Archdeacon H.

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  • Ginsburg; the Rev. Dr Gotch of Bristol; Archdeacon Benjamin Harrison (1808-1887), Hebraist; the Rev. Stanley Leathes (1830-1900), professor of Hebrew at King's College, London; Professor M `Gill; Canon Robert Payne Smith (1819-1895), regius professor of divinity at Oxford, dean of Canterbury (1870); Professor J.

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  • Humphry (1815-1886), vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London; the Rev. Benjamin Hall Kennedy, canon of Ely; William Lee (1815-1883), archdeacon of Dublin, and professor of ecclesiastical history in the university; J.

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  • Only the first vacancy was filled up. Dean Merivale was co-opted, and on his resignation Professor, afterwards Archdeacon, Edwin Palmer.

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  • The Greek Text of the New Testament adopted by the Revisers was edited for the Clarendon Press by Archdeacon Palmer (Oxford, 1881).

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  • In 1851 he was preferred to the valuable living of East Brent, Somerset, and in the same year was made archdeacon of Taunton.

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  • For many years Archdeacon Denison represented the extreme High Tory party not only in politics but in the Church, regarding all "progressive" movements in education or theology as abomination, and vehemently repudiating the "higher criticism" from the days of Essays and Reviews (1860) to those of Lux Mundi (1890).

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  • In 1827 Strachan became archdeacon of York.

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  • Within the precincts of the cathedral grounds stood the bishop's palace (now in ruins), the houses of the dean and archdeacon (now North and South Colleges), and the manses of the canons.

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  • WILLIAM STEPHEN RAIKES HODSON (1821-1858), known as "Hodson of Hodson's Horse," British leader of light cavalry during the Indian Mutiny, third son of the Rev. George Hodson, afterwards archdeacon of Stafford and canon of Lichfield, was born on the lgth of March 1821 at Maisemore Court, near Gloucester.

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  • In Carthage the archdeacon and later the bishop Caecilianus severely blamed a certain Lucilla for carrying about with her a relic which she used to kiss before receiving the Eucharist (Optatus, De schism.

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  • His choice fell upon the archdeacon Boniface (pope as Boniface II.).

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  • In a letter of safe-conduct dated 1357, allowing him to go to Oxford for study, he is described as archdeacon of Aberdeen.

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  • iii.) of a "Treteis" which Barbour made by way of "a genealogy" of "Brutus lynagis"; and elsewhere in that poem there are references to the archdeacon's "Stewartis Oryginale."

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  • his Latin treatise on the Eucharist, which remained in the Royal Library unprinted, till in 1885 it was published (with translation and introduction) by Archdeacon G.

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  • But Thomas Becket, archdeacon of Canterbury, a younger statesman whom Theobald had discovered and promoted, soon became all-powerful.

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  • The doctrine of universal restoration was maintained by Thomas Erskine of Linlathen on the ground of the Fatherhood of God, and Archdeacon Wilson anticipates such discipline after death as will restore all souls to God.

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  • About 578 he was ordained "seventh deacon" (or possibly archdeacon) of the Roman Church, and in the following spring Pope Pelagius II.

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  • The men evangelists have to pass an examination by the archdeacon of Middlesex, and are then (since 1896) admitted by the bishop of London as "lay evangelists in the Church"; the mission sisters must likewise pass an examination by the diocesan inspector of schools.

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  • In 1765 he was appointed preacher at Lincoln's Inn, and in 1767 he became archdeacon of Gloucester.

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  • On his return to England, he was successively appointed prebendary of Lincoln, archdeacon of Lincoln (1347), and in 1349 archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • Richard was sent to Oxford at the expense of Thomas de Neville, afterwards archdeacon of Durham.

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  • Archdeacon William Coxe's History of the House of Austria, 1218-1792 (3 vols., London, 1817), with its continuation by W.

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  • Some five years later, on the nomination of the duke of Wellington, William Broughton was sent out to work in this enormous jurisdiction as archdeacon of Australia.

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  • 1279), chancellor of England and archbishop of York, was a son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton, Wiltshire, and after serving as canon and archdeacon of Wells, was chosen bishop of Bath and Wells in May 1264.

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  • He had been already some years archdeacon of Taunton, and the archdeaconry of Norfolk was added to it in March 1529, which two years later he resigned for that of Leicester.

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  • He was then presented to the archdeacon of Bologna by one or more doctors, who were required to have satisfied themselves of his fitness by private examination.

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  • The successful candidate received from the archdeacon the formal " licence to teach " by the authority of the pope in the name of the Trinity, and was invested with the insignia of office.

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  • charged Richard Leneveu, archdeacon of Auge in the diocese of Lisieux, and Jean de Picquigni, vidame of Amiens, to make an investigation, which lasted several months.

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  • After filling several subordinate offices he became archdeacon of Liege.

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  • He had amassed some wealth, which on his return to Rome he so employed among the poor as to secure for himself great popularity; and, when Vigilius was summoned to Byzantium in 544, Pelagius, now archdeacon, was left behind as his vicar, and by his tact in dealing with Totila, the Gothic invader, saved the citizens from murder and outrage.

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  • In 1643 he was made archdeacon of Chichester.

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  • In 1549 he was placed on a commission to examine Anabaptists, and in 1551 he was appointed chancellor to Bishop Ridley, select preacher at Canterbury, and a commissioner for the reform of the canon law; in 1552 Coverdale made him archdeacon of Exeter.

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  • In his dedication to the king he is pleased to state that Veremundus, a Spaniard by birth, was archdeacon of St Andrews, and that he wrote in Latin a history of Scotland from the origin of the nation to the reign of Malcolm III., to whom he inscribed his work.

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  • It was granted by John in 1204 to Hugh, archdeacon of Wells, who sold it to the bishop of Bath and Wells in 1229, whose successors were overlords until 1 553, when the bishop granted it to the king.

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  • In 1782 he became archdeacon of Carlisle.

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  • Hence the phenomena came to be collectively called electrical, a term first used by William Barlowe, archdeacon of Salisbury, in 1618, and the study of them, electrical science.

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  • But in 1199 the celebrated Gerald de Barri (Giraldus Cambrensis), archdeacon of Brecon and a member of the famous Norman baronial house of de Barri, and also through his grandmother Nesta a great-grandson of Prince Rhys ap Tudor of Deheubarth, was elected bishop by the chapter of St Davids.

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  • 9 a a memorial cross was erected in the cathedral close of St Asaph in order to perpetuate the names and national services of the eight leading Welsh translators of the Scriptures: - Bishops Davies, Morgan and Parry; William Salesbury; Thomas Huet; Dr Davies of Mallwyd; Archdeacon Edmund Prys (1541-1624), author of a popular Welsh metrical version of the Psalter; and Gabriel Goodman, dean of Westminster (1528-1601), a native of Ruthin, who greatly assisted Bishop Morgan in his task.

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  • After holding minor preferments he was appointed archdeacon of Stafford in 1534 and graduated D.D.

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  • and was appointed archdeacon of Canterbury; he was consulted by Pope Gregory IX.

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  • In 1768 he attended the eldest son of the 4th earl of Aylesford to Oxford as private tutor; and, after receiving through the earl and Bishop Lowth various minor preferments, which by dispensations he combined with his first living, he was installed in 1781 as archdeacon of St Albans.

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  • After serving as a soldier he studied at Poitiers, and then returning to Normandy became chaplain to Duke William (William the Conqueror) and archdeacon of Lisieux.

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  • Shortly after becoming chaplain to the bishop of London in 1762 he was appointed to a prebendal stall of St Paul's and to the vicarage of Kensington, and in 1764 he was made archdeacon of London.

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  • That he was, as stated by Archdeacon Thomas Martin, the author of a Life of Wykeham, published in 1597, taught classics, French and geometry by a learned Frenchman on the site of Winchester College, is a guess due to Wykeham's extant letters being in French and to the assumption that he was an architect.

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  • In 1841 he was appointed archdeacon of the East Riding.

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  • The most important is the Historia salonitanorum pontificum et spalatensium, by Thomas, archdeacon of Spalato (1200-1268).

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  • In November 1839 he was installed archdeacon of Surrey, in August 1840 was collated canon of Winchester and in October he accepted the rectory of Alverstoke.

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  • The secession to the Church of Rome of his brother-in-law, Archdeacon (afterwards Cardinal) Manning, and then of his brothers, as well as his only daughter and his son-in-law, Mr and Mrs J.

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  • 1841) was appointed canon residentiary of Westminster in 1894, chaplain of the House of Commons in 1896 and archdeacon of Westminster in 190o; he has published several volumes of sermons.

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  • , by his widow, Amelia Heber (1830), which also contains a number of Heber's miscellaneous writings; The Last Days of Bishop Heber, by Thomas Robinson, A.M., archdeacon of Madras (1830);(1830); T.

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  • At an early age Henry entered the household of Bishop Robert Bloet, who appointed him, immediately after the death of Nicholas (II Io), archdeacon of Hertford and Huntingdon.

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  • It is certain that Athanasius was young when he took orders, and that he must soon have entered into close relations with his bishop, whom, after the outbreak of the Arian controversy, he accompanied as archdeacon to the council of Nicaea.

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  • He had some connexion with the Channel Islands, and resided for some time in Jersey; and he held livings in Yorkshire and in Leicestershire before he became archdeacon of Winchester in 1387.

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  • In 1700 he became rector of St Botolph's, Aldgate, London, and in 1701 archdeacon of Huntingdon.

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  • Having received a monastic education, he became archdeacon of Liege and papal legate of Innocent IV.

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  • The Norman Conquest of England was contemporaneous with the supreme influence of the greatest exponent of the theory of ecclesiastical supremacy, the archdeacon Hildebrand, who in 1073 mounted the papal throne as Gregory VII.

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  • Private correspondence appeared earlier in the voluminous epistles of Peter of Blois, archdeacon of Bath (ed.

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  • Intended for a business career, he took orders during the pontificate of his uncle, Eugenius IV., and was appointed successively archdeacon of Bologna, bishop of Cervia, bishop of Piacenza, protonotary of the Roman Church, and in 1440 cardinal-deacon of Sta Maria Nuova.

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  • In 1172 he was appointed to collect tithe in Wales, and showed such vigour that he was made archdeacon.

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  • In 1670 he became archdeacon of Canterbury, and two years after he was appointed rector of Ickham, Kent.

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  • In December 1624 he was made a prebendary of Durham, and in the following year archdeacon of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • In 1373 he became archdeacon of Taunton, and in April 1374 was consecrated bishop of Ely.

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  • The office appears as early as the 4th century as that of the priest who presided over the presbyters of the diocese and assisted the bishop in matters of public worship, much as the archdeacon helped him in administrative affairs.

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  • It thus became strictly subordinate to the jurisdiction of the archdeacon.

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  • In Rome itself, as the office of archdeacon grew into that of cardinal-camerlengo, so that of archpriest of St Peter's developed into that of the cardinal-vicar.

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  • Quite naturally, the archdeacon took in the Becket question the same side as his friends.

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  • Diceto's fragmentary Domesday of the capitular estates has been edited by Archdeacon Hale in The Domesday of St Paul's, pp. 109 ff.

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  • It was not till about the middle of the 12th century that under the patronage of Raymond, archbishop of Toledo, a society of translators, with the archdeacon Dominicus Gundisalvi at their head, produced Latin versions of the Commentaries of Avicenna, and Ghazali, of the Fons Vitae of Avicebron, and of several Aristotelian treatises.

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  • The friends of the late bishop fixed their choice on Caecilian, the archdeacon, and secured his election and his consecration by Felix, the bishop of Aptunga, before the other party were ready for action.

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  • In 1668 he was admitted archdeacon of Canterbury upon the king's presentation, but he resigned the post in 1670.

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  • Early in the reign of Henry II., however, he is found acting as a clerk in the king's court, probably under Thomas Becket, and he was one of the officials who assisted Henry in carrying out his great judicial and financial reforms. In 1162, or 1163, he was appointed archdeacon of Poitiers, but he passed most of his time in England, although in the next two or three years he visited Pope Alexander III.

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  • In 1663 he was prebendary of Ripon, in 1667 prebendary of Salisbury, in 1668 archdeacon of Merioneth, in 1672 dean of Bangor and prebendary of St Paul's, London, in 1680 bishop of St Asaph, in 1689 lord-almoner, in 1692 bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and in 1699 bishop of Worcester.

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  • Probate for goods and property held solely within an archdeaconry was granted at the archdeacon's court.

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  • archdeacon's visitation usually takes place during the course of a mid-week service in early summer.

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  • archdeacon's faculty will need to be applied for.

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  • archdeacon's good humor shone brightly in his face.

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  • I am, I must confess, gratified by the offer " " I should think so, " said the archdeacon.

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  • Born in a noble family, he became archdeacon of Tours in France, where his father was bishop.

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  • It is advisable to consult the archdeacon if proposing to undertake any work.

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  • archdeacon hurried to his own territory, there to unburden his heart to his faithful partner.

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  • Robert was also the first bishop to appoint an archdeacon in Hereford and he began to acquire books for the cathedral.

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  • Helen Cunliffe, the new archdeacon of St Albans.

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  • His first archdeacon was named Elias, 5 and his second Robert, and the archdeaconry was conterminous with the diocese.

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  • archdeacon long, Mr. R.B. WOOD, draper, Malton, to Eliza, youngest daughter of Mr Geo.

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  • At the time of his election to the see of Exeter, he was also archdeacon of St. David's.

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  • Its rector was the Archdeacon of St Andrews who appointed a vicar to do the work of a parish priest.

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  • In 1397 he was made archdeacon of Dorset by Richard Mitford, bishop of Salisbury, but litigation was still going on about it in the papal court till the 27th of June 1399, when the pope extinguished the suit, imposing perpetual silence on Nicholas Bubwith, master of the rolls, his opponent.

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  • Chicheley was parson of Sherston, Wiltshire, and prebendary of Nantgwyly in the college of Abergwilly, North Wales; on the 23rd of February 1401/2, now called doctor of laws, he was pardoned for bringing in, and allowed to use, a bull of the pope " providing " him to the chancellorship of Salisbury cathedral, and canenries in the nuns' churches of Shaftesbury and Wilton in that diocese; and on the 9th of January 1402/3 he was archdeacon of Salisbury.

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  • The king put forward his chaplain, Hugh; the pope supported the archdeacon, John the Scot, who had been canonically elected.

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  • For these and other services Bonner had been rewarded by the grant of several livings, and in 1535 he was made archdeacon of Leicester.

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  • The same year he offended the court by a Whig sermon, but in 1779 became archdeacon of Ely.

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  • The idea, however, did not spread until, in 1261, Jacob Pantaleon, archdeacon of Liege, ascended the papal throne as Urban IV.

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  • He was commended to the hospitality of Anne Boleyn's father, the earl of Wiltshire, in whose house at Durham Place he resided for some time; the king appointed him archdeacon of Taunton and one of his chaplains; and he also held a parochial benefice, the name of which is unknown.

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  • When the expression Natural Theology comes to the front once more with Archdeacon W.

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  • less the archdeacon knew nothing of the German Paley professor, and would have cared nothing for him how ever well he had known him.

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  • (c) The archdeacon acquires a concurrent ordinary jurisdiction with the bishop (see Archdeacon).

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  • Ordinarily, the appeal from an archdeacon or his official lay to the court of the bishop; but by custom the appeal might be to the court of the metropolitan.

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  • The Constitutions of Clarendon, in 1164, made the appeal from the court of the archdeacon lie to the court of the bishop.

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  • No bishop or archdeacon " shall any longer hold pleas in the Hundred concerning episcopal law nor draw a cause which concerns the rule of such to the judgment of men of the world " (Stubbs, Select Charters, part iii.).

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  • Where the archdeacon had a jurisdiction co-ordinate with the bishop, it was called a peculiar.

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  • exercised original jurisdiction in spiritual causes by delegated commissions (see Archdeacon Hale, Precedents in Criminal Cases, p. xlviii.).

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  • c. 86 (the " Church Discipline Act ") creates new tribunals; and first a commission of inquiry appointed by the bishop of five persons, of whom the vicar-general, or an archdeacon, or a rural dean of the diocese must be one.

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  • Each bishop is assisted by at least two officers with judicial or quasi-judicial powers, the " archimandrite " who adjudicates upon causes of revenue and the archdeacon who adjudicates on questions between deacons (op. cit.

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  • (Tebaldo Visconti);pope from the 1st of September 1271, to the moth of January 1276, was born at Piacenza in 1208, studied for the church, and became archdeacon of Liege.

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  • At the desire of Leo (then archdeacon of Rome) he wrote against Nestorius his De Incarnatione Domini in seven books.

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  • ARCHDEACON (Lat.

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  • The office of archdeacon is of great antiquity.

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  • Originally the archdeacon was, as the name implies, the chief of the deacons attached to the bishop's cathedral, his duty being, besides preaching, to supervise the deacons and their work, i.e.

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  • During the 8th and 9th centuries the office tended to become more and more exclusively purely administrative, the archdeacon by his visitations relieving the bishop of the minutiae of government and keeping him informed in detail of the condition of his diocese.

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  • The archdeacon had thus become, on the one hand, the oculus episcopi, but on the other hand, armed as he was with powers of imposing penance and, in case of stubborn disobedience, of excommunicating offenders, his power tended more and more to grow at the bishop's expense.

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  • The custom, moreover, had grown up of bestowing the coveted office of archdeacon on the provosts, deans and canons of the cathedral churches, and the archdeacons were thus involved in the struggle of the chapters against the episcopal authority.

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  • By the 12th century the archdeacon had become practically independent of the bishop, whose consent was only required in certain specified cases.

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  • The power of the archdeacon reached its zenith at the outset of the 1 3th century.

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  • In the Roman Church to-day the office of archdeacon is merely titular, his sole function being to present the candidates for ordination to the bishop. The title, indeed, hardly exists save in Italy, where the archdeacon is no more than a dignified member of a chapter, who takes rank after the bishop. The ancient functions of the archdeacon are exercised by the vicar-general.

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  • In the Church of England, on the other hand, the office of archdeacon, which was first introduced at the Norman conquest, survives, with many of its ancient duties and prerogatives.

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  • The functions of the archdeacon are in the present day ancillary in a general way to those of the bishop of the diocese.

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  • Every archdeacon is entitled to appoint an official to preside over his archidiaconal court, from which there is an appeal to the consistory court of the bishop. The archdeacons are ex officio members of the convocations of their respective provinces.

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  • It is the privilege of the archdeacon of Canterbury to induct the archbishop and all the bishops of the province of Canterbury into their respective bishoprics, and this he does in the case of a bishop under a mandate from the archbishop of Canterbury, directing him to induct the bishop into the real, actual, and corporal possession of the bishopric, and to install and to enthrone him; and in the case of the archbishop, under an analogous mandate from the dean and chapter of Canterbury, as being guardians of the spiritualities during the vacancy of the archiepiscopal see.

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  • In the Episcopal church of America the office of archdeacon exists in only one or two dioceses.

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  • The death of Archdeacon Lucien Bonaparte, the recognized head of the family, having placed property at the disposal of the sons, they bought a house, which became the rendezvous of the democrats and of a band of volunteers whom they raised.

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  • Its immediate occasion was the disputation at Heidelberg (1568) for the doctorate of theology by George Wither or Withers, an English Puritan (subsequently archdeacon of Colchester), silenced (1565) at Bury St Edmunds by Archbishop Parker.

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  • In 1791 he was made prebendary of Salisbury, and in 1804 archdeacon of Wiltshire.

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  • On his return he was happy in winning the good opinion of Amalric I.; he was made first canon and then archdeacon of Tyre, and tutor of the future Baldwin IV.

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  • Sometime before 1040 Berengar was made archdeacon of Angers.

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  • His early friend and school companion, Adelmann, archdeacon of Liege, wrote to him letters of expostulation on the subject of this report in 1046 and 1048; and a bishop, Hugo of Langres, wrote (about 1049) a refutation of the views which he had himself heard Berengar express in conversation.

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  • In 1154 he was promoted to be archdeacon of Canterbury, after first taking deacon's orders.

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  • Henry on his side looked to find in Becket the archbishop a coadjutor as loyal as Becket the archdeacon; and anticipated that the Church would once more be reduced to that state of dependence in which she had stood during the latter years of Henry I.

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  • In 1840 Hare was appointed archdeacon of Lewes, and in the same year preached a course of sermons at Cambridge (The Victory of Faith), followed in 1846 by a second, The Mission of the Comforter.

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  • Archdeacon Hare married in 1844 Esther, a sister of his friend Frederick Maurice.

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    0
  • Carlyle's Life of John Sterling was written through dissatisfaction with the "Life" prefixed to Archdeacon Hare's book.

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  • A Latin epitaph, discovered in the 18th century, says, however, that he was archdeacon of Paris, and declares that he died in the city of Avignon in 1449.

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  • William secured the benevolent neutrality of the emperor Henry IV.; the influence of the archdeacon Hildebrand obtained for the expedition the solemn approval of Pope Alexander II.

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  • Be that as it may, the deacon was long considered to be the " servant of the widows and the poor " (Jerome, Ep. 146), and the archdeacon, who first appears towards the end of the 4th century, owes the greatness of his position to the fact that he was the chief administrator of church funds (see Archdeacon).

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  • By special command of Raimund, archbishop of Toledo, the chief of these works were translated from the Arabic through the Castilian into Latin by the archdeacon Dominicus Gonzalvi with the aid of Johannes Avendeath (=ben David), a converted Jew, about 1150.

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  • When brought before the emperor, Gerbert admitted his skill in all branches of the quadrivium, but lamented his comparative ignorance of logic. Eager to supply this deficiency he followed Lothair's ambassador Germanus, archdeacon of Reims, to that city, for the sake of studying under so famous a dialectician in the episcopal schools which were rising into reputation under Archbishop Adalbero (969-989).

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  • by Peter of Blois, then archdeacon of London, and therefore a man of some authority on the subject.

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  • (Odo or Otho or Eudes de Lagary), pope from the 12th of March 1088 to the 29th of July 1099, was born of knightly rank at Lagary (or Lagery or Lagny), near Reims. He studied for the church, became archdeacon of Auxerre, and later joined the congregation of Cluny.

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  • Meanwhile he became archdeacon of Berkshire (1673), prebendary of Norwich, rector of St Giles's-in-theFields, and in 1681 dean of Norwich.

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  • Among the principal were the London Review (1775-1780), A New Review (1782-1786), the English Review (1783-1796), incorporated in 1797 with the Analytical Review (1788-1799), the AntiJacobin Review and Magazine (1798-1821), and the British Critic (1793-1843), the organ of the High Church party, and first edited by Archdeacon Nares and Beloe.

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  • Of his early life little is known, except that he received a liberal education under the eye of his paternal uncle, Uchtryd, who was at that time archdeacon, and subsequently bishop, of Liandaff.

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  • This famous work, which the author has the audacity to place on the same level with the histories of William of Malmesbury and Henry of Huntingdon, professes to be a translation from a Celtic source; "a very old book in the British tongue" which Walter, archdeacon of Oxford, had brought from Brittany.

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  • Walter the archdeacon is a historical personage; whether his book has any real existence may be fairly questioned.

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  • The archdeacon's court, the sessions and the county elections were long held at Lostwithiel, but all have now been removed.

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  • He was twice married, first to Anna Barton, a sister of John Sterling's wife, secondly to a half-sister of his friend Archdeacon Hare.

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  • Maurice also contributed many prefaces and introductions to the works of friends, as to Archdeacon Hare's Charges, Kingsley's Saint's Tragedy, &c.

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  • In January 1841 Shuttleworth, bishop of Chichester, appointed him archdeacon, whereupon he began a personal visitation of each parish within his district, completing the task in 1843.

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  • Kattenbusch supposes that Anatolius, bishop of Constantinople, or his archdeacon Aetius, who read the creed at the 2nd session of the council, took up the idea that through its likeness to the Roman Creed it would be a useful weapon against Eutyches and others who were held to interpret the Nicene Creed in an Apollinarian sense.

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  • After the bishop or his commissary has instituted the presentee, he issues a mandate under seal, addressed to the archdeacon or some other neighbouring clergyman, authorizing him to induct the clerk into his benefice, - in other words, to put him into legal possession of the temporalities, which is done by some outward form, and for the most part by delivery of the bell-rope to the clerk, who thereupon tolls the bell.

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  • Denison, archdeacon of Taunton, Lord Shaftesbury, and others formed a strong committee of protest, whilst Pusey declared that "the choice was the most frightful enormity ever perpetrated by a prime minister."

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  • See Archdeacon E.

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  • Of the twelve homilies contained in the first book, four (the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th) are probably to be attributed to Cranmer, and one (the 12th) possibly to Latimer; one (the 6th) is by Bonner; another (the 5th) is by John Harpsfield, archdeacon of London, and another (the 11th) by Thomas Becon, one of Cranmer's chaplains.

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  • issued a bull for their extermination, and Alberto de' Capitanei, archdeacon of Cremona, put himself at the head of a crusade against them.

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  • Fesch therefore stood almost in the relation of an uncle to the young Bonapartes, and after the death of Lucien Bonaparte, archdeacon of Ajaccio, he became for a time the protector and patron of the family.

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  • In the year 1789, when the French Revolution broke out, he was archdeacon of Ajaccio, and, like the majority of the Corsicans, he felt repugnance for many of the acts of the French government during that period; in particular he protested against the application to Corsica of the act known as the "Civil Constitution of the Clergy" (July 1790).

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  • Froude, archdeacon of Totnes, was born at Dartington, Devon, on the 23rd of April 1818.

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  • Letters of the archdeacon Epiphanius to the patriarch Maximianus (Migne, Patr.

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  • After holding the living of Chigwell (1597-1605) he became chaplain to Bancroft (then bishop of London), and afterwards archdeacon of Essex (1603-1609), rector of Stisted and bishop of Chichester (1609-1619) and archbishop of York (1629).

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  • The duke of Little Poland, 1 Archdeacon of Gnesen 1367: vice-chancellor of Poland; d.

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  • He, however, much regretted the gradual and very natural trend of his new English allies towards extreme Ultramontane views, of which Archdeacon, afterwards Cardinal, Manning ultimately became an enthusiastic advocate.

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  • Paulo de Thebas (Coimbra, 1904); Archdeacon Dowling, The Abyssinian Church, (London, 1909); and periodicals as under COPTIC CHURCH.

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  • He served as archdeacon of Lincoln, canon of York and dean of the court of arches before 1323, when he became bishop of Winchester, an appointment which was made during his visit to Pope John XXII.

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  • In 1871 Archdeacon J.

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  • Dr William Hutchinson, archdeacon of St Albans.

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  • a Dr Robert Teigh, archdeacon of Middlesex.

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  • 1894), bishop of Bath and Wells; Archdeacon H.

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  • Ginsburg; the Rev. Dr Gotch of Bristol; Archdeacon Benjamin Harrison (1808-1887), Hebraist; the Rev. Stanley Leathes (1830-1900), professor of Hebrew at King's College, London; Professor M `Gill; Canon Robert Payne Smith (1819-1895), regius professor of divinity at Oxford, dean of Canterbury (1870); Professor J.

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  • Humphry (1815-1886), vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London; the Rev. Benjamin Hall Kennedy, canon of Ely; William Lee (1815-1883), archdeacon of Dublin, and professor of ecclesiastical history in the university; J.

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  • Only the first vacancy was filled up. Dean Merivale was co-opted, and on his resignation Professor, afterwards Archdeacon, Edwin Palmer.

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  • The Greek Text of the New Testament adopted by the Revisers was edited for the Clarendon Press by Archdeacon Palmer (Oxford, 1881).

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  • In 1851 he was preferred to the valuable living of East Brent, Somerset, and in the same year was made archdeacon of Taunton.

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  • For many years Archdeacon Denison represented the extreme High Tory party not only in politics but in the Church, regarding all "progressive" movements in education or theology as abomination, and vehemently repudiating the "higher criticism" from the days of Essays and Reviews (1860) to those of Lux Mundi (1890).

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  • In 1827 Strachan became archdeacon of York.

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  • Within the precincts of the cathedral grounds stood the bishop's palace (now in ruins), the houses of the dean and archdeacon (now North and South Colleges), and the manses of the canons.

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  • WILLIAM STEPHEN RAIKES HODSON (1821-1858), known as "Hodson of Hodson's Horse," British leader of light cavalry during the Indian Mutiny, third son of the Rev. George Hodson, afterwards archdeacon of Stafford and canon of Lichfield, was born on the lgth of March 1821 at Maisemore Court, near Gloucester.

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  • In Carthage the archdeacon and later the bishop Caecilianus severely blamed a certain Lucilla for carrying about with her a relic which she used to kiss before receiving the Eucharist (Optatus, De schism.

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  • His choice fell upon the archdeacon Boniface (pope as Boniface II.).

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  • In a letter of safe-conduct dated 1357, allowing him to go to Oxford for study, he is described as archdeacon of Aberdeen.

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  • iii.) of a "Treteis" which Barbour made by way of "a genealogy" of "Brutus lynagis"; and elsewhere in that poem there are references to the archdeacon's "Stewartis Oryginale."

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  • his Latin treatise on the Eucharist, which remained in the Royal Library unprinted, till in 1885 it was published (with translation and introduction) by Archdeacon G.

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  • But Thomas Becket, archdeacon of Canterbury, a younger statesman whom Theobald had discovered and promoted, soon became all-powerful.

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  • The doctrine of universal restoration was maintained by Thomas Erskine of Linlathen on the ground of the Fatherhood of God, and Archdeacon Wilson anticipates such discipline after death as will restore all souls to God.

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  • About 578 he was ordained "seventh deacon" (or possibly archdeacon) of the Roman Church, and in the following spring Pope Pelagius II.

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  • The men evangelists have to pass an examination by the archdeacon of Middlesex, and are then (since 1896) admitted by the bishop of London as "lay evangelists in the Church"; the mission sisters must likewise pass an examination by the diocesan inspector of schools.

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  • In 1765 he was appointed preacher at Lincoln's Inn, and in 1767 he became archdeacon of Gloucester.

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  • On his return to England, he was successively appointed prebendary of Lincoln, archdeacon of Lincoln (1347), and in 1349 archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • Richard was sent to Oxford at the expense of Thomas de Neville, afterwards archdeacon of Durham.

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  • Archdeacon William Coxe's History of the House of Austria, 1218-1792 (3 vols., London, 1817), with its continuation by W.

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  • Some five years later, on the nomination of the duke of Wellington, William Broughton was sent out to work in this enormous jurisdiction as archdeacon of Australia.

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  • 1279), chancellor of England and archbishop of York, was a son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton, Wiltshire, and after serving as canon and archdeacon of Wells, was chosen bishop of Bath and Wells in May 1264.

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  • He had been already some years archdeacon of Taunton, and the archdeaconry of Norfolk was added to it in March 1529, which two years later he resigned for that of Leicester.

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  • He was then presented to the archdeacon of Bologna by one or more doctors, who were required to have satisfied themselves of his fitness by private examination.

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  • The successful candidate received from the archdeacon the formal " licence to teach " by the authority of the pope in the name of the Trinity, and was invested with the insignia of office.

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  • charged Richard Leneveu, archdeacon of Auge in the diocese of Lisieux, and Jean de Picquigni, vidame of Amiens, to make an investigation, which lasted several months.

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  • After filling several subordinate offices he became archdeacon of Liege.

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  • He had amassed some wealth, which on his return to Rome he so employed among the poor as to secure for himself great popularity; and, when Vigilius was summoned to Byzantium in 544, Pelagius, now archdeacon, was left behind as his vicar, and by his tact in dealing with Totila, the Gothic invader, saved the citizens from murder and outrage.

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  • In 1643 he was made archdeacon of Chichester.

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  • In 1549 he was placed on a commission to examine Anabaptists, and in 1551 he was appointed chancellor to Bishop Ridley, select preacher at Canterbury, and a commissioner for the reform of the canon law; in 1552 Coverdale made him archdeacon of Exeter.

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  • In his dedication to the king he is pleased to state that Veremundus, a Spaniard by birth, was archdeacon of St Andrews, and that he wrote in Latin a history of Scotland from the origin of the nation to the reign of Malcolm III., to whom he inscribed his work.

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  • It was granted by John in 1204 to Hugh, archdeacon of Wells, who sold it to the bishop of Bath and Wells in 1229, whose successors were overlords until 1 553, when the bishop granted it to the king.

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  • In 1782 he became archdeacon of Carlisle.

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  • Hence the phenomena came to be collectively called electrical, a term first used by William Barlowe, archdeacon of Salisbury, in 1618, and the study of them, electrical science.

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  • But in 1199 the celebrated Gerald de Barri (Giraldus Cambrensis), archdeacon of Brecon and a member of the famous Norman baronial house of de Barri, and also through his grandmother Nesta a great-grandson of Prince Rhys ap Tudor of Deheubarth, was elected bishop by the chapter of St Davids.

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  • 9 a a memorial cross was erected in the cathedral close of St Asaph in order to perpetuate the names and national services of the eight leading Welsh translators of the Scriptures: - Bishops Davies, Morgan and Parry; William Salesbury; Thomas Huet; Dr Davies of Mallwyd; Archdeacon Edmund Prys (1541-1624), author of a popular Welsh metrical version of the Psalter; and Gabriel Goodman, dean of Westminster (1528-1601), a native of Ruthin, who greatly assisted Bishop Morgan in his task.

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  • After holding minor preferments he was appointed archdeacon of Stafford in 1534 and graduated D.D.

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  • and was appointed archdeacon of Canterbury; he was consulted by Pope Gregory IX.

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  • In 1768 he attended the eldest son of the 4th earl of Aylesford to Oxford as private tutor; and, after receiving through the earl and Bishop Lowth various minor preferments, which by dispensations he combined with his first living, he was installed in 1781 as archdeacon of St Albans.

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  • After serving as a soldier he studied at Poitiers, and then returning to Normandy became chaplain to Duke William (William the Conqueror) and archdeacon of Lisieux.

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  • Shortly after becoming chaplain to the bishop of London in 1762 he was appointed to a prebendal stall of St Paul's and to the vicarage of Kensington, and in 1764 he was made archdeacon of London.

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  • That he was, as stated by Archdeacon Thomas Martin, the author of a Life of Wykeham, published in 1597, taught classics, French and geometry by a learned Frenchman on the site of Winchester College, is a guess due to Wykeham's extant letters being in French and to the assumption that he was an architect.

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  • The bishops of England have also jurisdiction to examine clerks who may be presented to benefices within their respective dioceses, and they are bound in each case by the 95th canon of 1604 to inquire and inform themselves of the sufficiency of each clerk within twenty-eight days, after which time, if they have not rejected him as insufficiently qualified, they are bound to institute him, or to license him, as the case may be, to the benefice, and thereupon to send their mandate to the archdeacon to induct him into the temporalities of the benefice.

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  • In 1841 he was appointed archdeacon of the East Riding.

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  • The most important is the Historia salonitanorum pontificum et spalatensium, by Thomas, archdeacon of Spalato (1200-1268).

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  • In November 1839 he was installed archdeacon of Surrey, in August 1840 was collated canon of Winchester and in October he accepted the rectory of Alverstoke.

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  • The secession to the Church of Rome of his brother-in-law, Archdeacon (afterwards Cardinal) Manning, and then of his brothers, as well as his only daughter and his son-in-law, Mr and Mrs J.

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  • 1841) was appointed canon residentiary of Westminster in 1894, chaplain of the House of Commons in 1896 and archdeacon of Westminster in 190o; he has published several volumes of sermons.

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  • , by his widow, Amelia Heber (1830), which also contains a number of Heber's miscellaneous writings; The Last Days of Bishop Heber, by Thomas Robinson, A.M., archdeacon of Madras (1830);(1830); T.

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  • His father, by name Nicholas, was a clerk, who became archdeacon of Cambridge, Hertford and Huntingdon, in the time of Remigius, bishop of Lincoln (d.

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  • At an early age Henry entered the household of Bishop Robert Bloet, who appointed him, immediately after the death of Nicholas (II Io), archdeacon of Hertford and Huntingdon.

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  • It is certain that Athanasius was young when he took orders, and that he must soon have entered into close relations with his bishop, whom, after the outbreak of the Arian controversy, he accompanied as archdeacon to the council of Nicaea.

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  • He had some connexion with the Channel Islands, and resided for some time in Jersey; and he held livings in Yorkshire and in Leicestershire before he became archdeacon of Winchester in 1387.

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  • In 1700 he became rector of St Botolph's, Aldgate, London, and in 1701 archdeacon of Huntingdon.

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  • by the archdeacon Wibert (1615), Marcellinus and Idatius (1619), Anastasius the librarian (1620), Eusebius of Caesarea (1643), Hincmar (1645), Hrabanus Maurus (1647), Rufinus and Loup de Ferrieres (1650), &c., and above all his edition of the capitularies of Charles the Bald (Karoli Calvi et successorum aliquot Franciae regum capitula, 1623) and of the councils of ancient France (Concilia antiquae Galliae, 1629, 3 vols., new ed.

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  • Having received a monastic education, he became archdeacon of Liege and papal legate of Innocent IV.

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  • The Norman Conquest of England was contemporaneous with the supreme influence of the greatest exponent of the theory of ecclesiastical supremacy, the archdeacon Hildebrand, who in 1073 mounted the papal throne as Gregory VII.

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  • Private correspondence appeared earlier in the voluminous epistles of Peter of Blois, archdeacon of Bath (ed.

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  • Intended for a business career, he took orders during the pontificate of his uncle, Eugenius IV., and was appointed successively archdeacon of Bologna, bishop of Cervia, bishop of Piacenza, protonotary of the Roman Church, and in 1440 cardinal-deacon of Sta Maria Nuova.

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  • In 1172 he was appointed to collect tithe in Wales, and showed such vigour that he was made archdeacon.

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  • In 1670 he became archdeacon of Canterbury, and two years after he was appointed rector of Ickham, Kent.

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  • In December 1624 he was made a prebendary of Durham, and in the following year archdeacon of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • In 1373 he became archdeacon of Taunton, and in April 1374 was consecrated bishop of Ely.

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  • The office appears as early as the 4th century as that of the priest who presided over the presbyters of the diocese and assisted the bishop in matters of public worship, much as the archdeacon helped him in administrative affairs.

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  • It thus became strictly subordinate to the jurisdiction of the archdeacon.

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  • In Rome itself, as the office of archdeacon grew into that of cardinal-camerlengo, so that of archpriest of St Peter's developed into that of the cardinal-vicar.

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  • Quite naturally, the archdeacon took in the Becket question the same side as his friends.

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  • Diceto's fragmentary Domesday of the capitular estates has been edited by Archdeacon Hale in The Domesday of St Paul's, pp. 109 ff.

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  • It was not till about the middle of the 12th century that under the patronage of Raymond, archbishop of Toledo, a society of translators, with the archdeacon Dominicus Gundisalvi at their head, produced Latin versions of the Commentaries of Avicenna, and Ghazali, of the Fons Vitae of Avicebron, and of several Aristotelian treatises.

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  • The friends of the late bishop fixed their choice on Caecilian, the archdeacon, and secured his election and his consecration by Felix, the bishop of Aptunga, before the other party were ready for action.

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  • In 1668 he was admitted archdeacon of Canterbury upon the king's presentation, but he resigned the post in 1670.

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  • Early in the reign of Henry II., however, he is found acting as a clerk in the king's court, probably under Thomas Becket, and he was one of the officials who assisted Henry in carrying out his great judicial and financial reforms. In 1162, or 1163, he was appointed archdeacon of Poitiers, but he passed most of his time in England, although in the next two or three years he visited Pope Alexander III.

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  • In 1663 he was prebendary of Ripon, in 1667 prebendary of Salisbury, in 1668 archdeacon of Merioneth, in 1672 dean of Bangor and prebendary of St Paul's, London, in 1680 bishop of St Asaph, in 1689 lord-almoner, in 1692 bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and in 1699 bishop of Worcester.

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  • Its rector was the Archdeacon of St Andrews who appointed a vicar to do the work of a parish priest.

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