Apprentices sentence example

apprentices
  • It was the rule for them to have paying apprentices living with them.
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  • In the trade gilds there were apprentices, companions, and masters.
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  • Where an offence has been committed on the high seas, or aboard ashore, by British seamen or apprentices, the consul makes inquiry on oath, and may send home the offender and witnesses by a British ship, particulars for the Board of Trade being endorsed on the agreement for conveyance.
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  • Graduates of technical schools are received as special apprentices and are directed in a course of four years through the erecting shops, vice shop, blacksmith shop, boiler shop, roundhouse, test department, machine shop, air-brake shop, iron foundry, car shop, work of firing on the road, office work in the motive power accounting department, and drawing room; the most competent may be admitted through the grades of inspector, in the office of the master mechanic or of the road foreman of engines, assistant master mechanic, assistant engineer of motive power, master mechanic and superintendent of motive power.
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  • The working of children under twelve years of age in any factory or manufacturing establishment is unlawful, the working of children between the ages of twelve and thirteen in such places is allowed only on condition that they be employed as apprentices and have attended school for at least four months during the preceding year; and no boy or girl under fourteen is to work in such places during night time.
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  • The consul collects the property (including arrears of wages) of British seamen or apprentices dying abroad, and remits to H.M.
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  • In 1846 an act was passed designating slaves as apprentices bound to service until discharged by their owners, and providing that children of 1 The election to the U.S. Senate in 1865 of John Potter Stockton (1826-1900), a great-grandson of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, created hardly less excitement than the Broad Seal War.
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  • Masters were allowed to keep their ex-slaves as " apprentices " until the 1st of December 1838.
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  • Children are generally bound apprentices at 9 or 10.
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  • He says Poeton can also point to a large proportion of jobs at all levels within the company that are filled by former apprentices.
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  • The company is also the largest employer of engineering apprentices in the UK.
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  • Such an outcome was regularly produced by the apprentices - hence they came to be called greenhorns.
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  • At the end of the session the children will be asked to sign an indenture to become apprentices for a period of 7 years.
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  • During the reciprocal visit in the UK by the German apprentices, British Telecom's trainees acted as workplace mentors.
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  • After hearing evidence, which may be given on oath, the special board issues a " determination," fixing the minimum rate of wages to be paid to various classes of workers of both sexes and different ages in the trade covered by the determination, including apprentices; and specifying the number of hours disputes strikes are, on the whole, the most disastrous that it can adopt.
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  • The statute of 5 Elizabeth, c. 4, also curtailed their jurisdiction over journeymen and apprentices (see Apprentice Ship).
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  • Apprentices were again prominent in the summer of 1648 as royalists in the second civil war.
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  • Origin Apprentices used to be expected to hold the candle so that more experienced workmen were able to see what they were doing.
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  • The skills of the trade are passed down from generation to generation as the young apprentices become master craftsmen.
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  • Luckily for Trump, as well as the apprentices he keeps hiring, he has his reality show and real estate to keep him in the black.
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  • Along with set periods of classroom instruction, apprentices also gain experience through on the job training.
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  • Cadets are sometimes called a mate apprentices.
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  • Direct entry midwives, sometimes known as lay midwives, are those who receive their training by acting as apprentices to other midwives.
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  • Apprentices will often work for no (or little) pay in order to gain the tattooing and drawing experience, but the quality may not be as high as what you would expect from an experienced artist.
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  • Entrusting his namesake and artistry to his apprentices, today his artwork echoes in tattoo parlors across the nation.
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  • The judicial powers of the county court are confined to probate, the appointment of executors, administrators and other personal representatives, and the settlement of their accounts, matters relating to apprentices and to contested elections for county and district officers.
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  • At the British Seamen's Orphans' home boys are fed, clothed and trained as apprentices for the merchant service.
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  • The drawbridge of London Bridge having been lowered by treachery, Tyler and his followers crossed the Thames; and being joined by thousands of London apprentices, artisans and criminals, they sacked and burnt John of Gaunt's splendid palace of the Savoy, the official residence of the treasurer, Sir Robert Hales, and the prisons of Newgate and the Fleet.
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  • Natives were openly transferred from one Boer to another, and the fact that they were described as apprentices by the farmers did not in the least alter the status of the native, who to all intents and purposes became the property of his master.
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  • Many of Whieldon's apprentices afterwards became noted potters, and there can be little doubt that Wedgwood gained greatly at this period of his life by his association with Whieldon.
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  • By a further act of 1541 - which was not repealed until 1845 - artificers, labourers, apprentices, servants and the like were forbidden to play bowls at any time save Christmas, and then only in their master's house and presence.
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  • Now it is true that before 447 B.C., besides the teachers of writing, gymnastics and music, to whom the young Greek resorted for elementary instruction, there were artists and artisans who not only practised their crafts, but also communicated them to apprentices and pupils, and that accordingly the Platonic Protagoras recognizes in the gymnast Iccus, the physician Herodicus, and the musicians Agathocles and Pythoclides, forerunners of the sophists.
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  • It is the outgrowth of the Apprentices' Library Association, founded in 1824, of which General Lafayette laid the corner-stone on the 4th of July of that year.
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  • He reached Philadelphia in October 1726, but a few months later Denham died, and Franklin was induced by large wages to return to his old employer Keimer; with Keimer he quarrelled repeatedly, thinking himself ill used and kept only to train apprentices until they could in some degree take his place.
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  • Among educational institutions there are a large grammar school (1879), on a foundation of 173 Roman Catholic schools adjoining the cathedral, schools for engineering students and dockyard apprentices, and seamen and marines' orphan school.
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  • The championship of Hottentot grievances by the missionaries caused much dissatisfaction among the majority of the colonists, whose views, it may be noted, temporarily prevailed, for in 1812 an ordinance was issued which empowered magistrates to bind Hottentot children as apprentices under conditions differing little from that of slavery.
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  • The latter, however, were to be maintained at the expense of the proprietors up to their eighteenth year, and during that time to be kept, as apprentices, to such work as was suitable for their age.
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  • Since 1869 they continued to exist only as voluntary associations with no public duties; many had been dissolved, and this is said to have brought about bad results in the management of lodging-houses, the condition of apprentices, support during illness, and the maintenance of labor bureaus.
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  • These apprentices, mostly bought from slave traders when little children, formed, however, a very small proportion of the native population, and after some fifteen years' servitude were usually allowed their freedom.
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