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apprehension

apprehension

apprehension Sentence Examples

  • Her apprehension was assuming a reduced priority.

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  • The silver eyes were fiery, and apprehension fluttered through her.

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  • The silver eyes were fiery, and apprehension fluttered through her.

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  • He felt a wave of apprehension and accelerated heart beat as the door opened.

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  • Reflection shows that our apprehension of the tree is conditioned by the sense-organs with which we have been endowed, and that the apprehension of a blind man, and still more the apprehension of a dog or horse, is quite different from ours.

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  • Davis watched with some apprehension, but Fritz and Royce were doubling over with laughter.

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  • Her apprehension grew as the vamp led her down a maze of hallways through scores of other vamps and past multiple doorways.

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  • But it was rather in the chants and litanies of the ancient religion, such as those of the Salii and the Fratres Arvales, and the dirges for the dead (neniae), and in certain extemporaneous effusions, that some germs of a native poetry might have been detected; and finally in the use of Saturnian verse, a metre of pure native origin, which by its rapid and lively movement gave expression to the vivacity and quick apprehension of the Italian race.

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  • Sensation, as Aristotle said, is not of itself: it is the apprehension of a sensible object in the organism.

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  • It is of course easy to see that Celsus had no apprehension of the spiritual needs even of his own day which it was the Christian purpose to satisfy, that he could not grasp anything of the new life enjoyed by the poor in spirit, and that he underrated the significance of the Church, regarding it simply as one of a number of warring sections (mostly Gnostic), and so seeing only a mark of weakness.

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  • The tsar himself lived in an atmosphere of apprehension, imagining that every man's hand was against him.

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  • The establishment of the Hatti at Carchemish not only made them a commercial people and probably sapped their highland vigour, but also brought them into closer proximity to the rising North Semitic power of Assyria, whose advent had been regarded with apprehension by Hattusil II.

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  • The establishment of the Hatti at Carchemish not only made them a commercial people and probably sapped their highland vigour, but also brought them into closer proximity to the rising North Semitic power of Assyria, whose advent had been regarded with apprehension by Hattusil II.

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  • Though nearly alone I am under no apprehension of defeat."

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  • Apprehension filled her at the thought of facing Jonny or Others.

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  • The more he considered the devastation this would wreak on this woman he cared for, the more apprehension he felt about finding the man.

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  • The report, issued in 1902, showed apprehension to be well founded.

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  • In a similar manner, while he abhorred the French Revolution when it came, he seems to have had no apprehension, like Chesterfield, Burke, or even Horace Walpole, of its approach; nor does he appear to have at all suspected that it had had anything to do with the speculations of the philosophic coteries in which he had taken such delight.

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  • "I will guide you immediately to the dhjan," Talal said with apprehension and another bow.

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  • For a time the Roman propaganda in England, which drew to itself High Churchmen like Newman and Manning, was viewed with apprehension; but though the Roman Catholic Church has grown greatly in influence in the country, the number of its adherents, in proportion to the growth of population, has not very greatly increased.

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  • It broke the men around her from their frozen apprehension, and several of them moved away.

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  • Again, it is surely plain enough that the apprehension by individuals of the evils of poverty, or a sense of duty to their possible offspring, may retard the increase of population, and has in all civilized communities operated to a certain extent in that way.

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  • Generally it may be said that throughout his long reign Francis Joseph remained the real ruler of his dominions; he not only kept in his hands the appointment and dismissal of his ministers, but himself directed their policy, and owing to the great knowledge of affairs, the unremitting diligence and clearness of apprehension, to which all who transacted business with him have borne testimony, lie was able to keep a very real control even of the details of government.

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  • He now entered, unaided save by his own unerring tact and vivid apprehension, upon a course of study which, in two years, placed him on a level with the greatest of his contemporaries.

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  • She could not fathom whether it was curiosity, devotion, gratitude, or apprehension and distrust--but the expression on all the faces was identical.

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  • The faces all expressed animation and apprehension, but it seemed to Pierre that the cause of the excitement shown in some of these faces lay chiefly in questions of personal success; his mind, however, was occupied by the different expression he saw on other faces--an expression that spoke not of personal matters but of the universal questions of life and death.

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  • Yet mysticism persists, as the intuitive and emotional apprehension of the most specifically religious of all truths, viz.

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  • Yet mysticism persists, as the intuitive and emotional apprehension of the most specifically religious of all truths, viz.

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  • She greeted the room full of people with apprehension, her interaction with his sisters with pleasure, her introduction to the clan leaders and her position of master battle planner with both excitement and awe.

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  • She greeted the room full of people with apprehension, her interaction with his sisters with pleasure, her introduction to the clan leaders and her position of master battle planner with both excitement and awe.

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  • At Grunth also some apprehension and alarm could be felt, but the nearer Prince Andrew came to the French lines the more confident was the appearance of our troops.

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  • The superintendent of the Ninth Census, 1870, presented a computation 01 the effects of this causefirst, through direct losses, by wounds or disease, either in actual service of the army or navy, or in a brief term following discharge; secondly, through the retardation of the rate of increase in the colored element, due to the privations, exposures and excesses attendant upon emancipation; thirdly, through the check given to immigration by the existence of war, the fear of conscription, and the apprehension abroad of results prejudicial to the national welfare.

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  • Wellington's intimate association for several years with the sovereigns and statesmen of the Grand Alliance, and his experience of the evils which the Alliance existed to hold in check, naturally led him to dislike Canning's aggressive attitude towards the autocratic powers, and to view with some apprehension his determination to break with the European concert.

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  • The popes were under the constant sway of two contrary influences - on the one hand, the seducing prospect of subduing the Eastern Church and triumphing over the schism, and, on the other, the apprehension of seeing the Normans of Sicily, their competitors in Italy, increasing their already formidable power by successful expeditions into the Balkan Peninsula.

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  • In the same month, twenty-five years afterwards, the execution of his mistress, according to the verdict of her contemporaries in France, avenged the blood of a lover who had died without uttering a word to realize the apprehension which (according to Knox) had before his trial impelled her to desire her brother "that, as he loved her, he would slay Chastelard, and let him never speak word."

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  • The popes were under the constant sway of two contrary influences - on the one hand, the seducing prospect of subduing the Eastern Church and triumphing over the schism, and, on the other, the apprehension of seeing the Normans of Sicily, their competitors in Italy, increasing their already formidable power by successful expeditions into the Balkan Peninsula.

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  • He was reporter of the committee which drew up the constitution of the year III., and his report shows keen apprehension of a return of the Reign of Terror, and presents reactionary measures as precautions against the re-establishment of "tyranny and anarchy."

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  • The defects of Descartes lie rather in his apparently imperfect apprehension of the principle of movements uniformly accelerated which his contemporary Galileo had illustrated and insisted upon, and in the indistinctness which attaches to his views of the transmission of motion in cases of impact.

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  • Replying on the 9th of April 1878 to interpellations by Visconti-Venosta and other deputies on the impending Congress of Berlin, he appeared free from apprehension lest I Italy, isolated, might find herself face to face with a change of the balance of power in the Mediterranean, and declared that in the event of serious complications Italy would be too much sought after rather than too niuch forgotten.

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  • The effect of this pronouncement was great, and it alarmed the Afrikanders, who at this time viewed with apprehension the virtual resumption by Cecil Rhodes of his leadership of the Progressive (British) party at the Cape.

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  • His seeming inconsistencies are reconciled to apprehension, not by a formula of the intellect, but by the many-sidedness of a highly impressible nature.

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  • He couldn't pinpoint what made his instincts restless, but he also saw apprehension in the tense frames and roving eyes of those riding before him.

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  • The claim of positive religion to be something more than the intellectual apprehension of the reason in the universe is thus acknowledged.

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  • Bolivar had, no doubt, regained the personal confidence of the officers and soldiers of the third division; but the republican party, with Santander at their head, continued to regard with undisguised apprehension his ascendancy over the army, suspecting him of a desire to imitate the career of Napoleon.

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  • It is not always a true apprehension of essence, but often, especially in physical matter, such as sound or heat or light, takes superficial effects to be the essence of the thing.

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  • His exegesis owes its interest to his subjective resources rather than to breadth of learning; his power lay in spiritual vision rather than balanced judgment, and in the vivid apprehension of the factors which make the Christian personality, rather than in constructive doctrinal statement.

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  • He had expressed an opinion that the true art of memory was not to be gained by technical devices, but by a philosophical apprehension of things; and the cardinal de Berulle, the founder of the Congregation of the Oratory, was so struck by the tone of the remarks as to impress upon the speaker the duty of spending his life in the examination of truth.

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  • Persian literature after that date, and especially Persian poetry, is full of an ardent natural pantheism, in which a mystic apprehension of the unity and divinity of all things heightens the delight in natural and in human beauty.

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  • Persian literature after that date, and especially Persian poetry, is full of an ardent natural pantheism, in which a mystic apprehension of the unity and divinity of all things heightens the delight in natural and in human beauty.

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  • Few people south of the Balkans dreamed that Bulgaria could be anything but a Russian province, and apprehension was entertained of the results of the union until it was seen that Russia really and entirely disapproved of it.

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  • And of this elemental mode of apprehension and root-truth, the Johannine Gospel is the greatest literary document and incentive extant: its ultimate aim and deepest content retain all their potency.

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  • And of this elemental mode of apprehension and root-truth, the Johannine Gospel is the greatest literary document and incentive extant: its ultimate aim and deepest content retain all their potency.

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  • It was said that persons of high position were concerned in the crime; but although the government offered rewards for the apprehension of the perpetrators, and although General Moyle wrote to the duke of Newcastle that the criminals were "well-known by many of the inhabitants of the town," no one was ever convicted of participation in the murder.

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  • annihilation of all differences but the apprehension of them in organic relation to one another and to the whole to which they belong.

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  • on finding nearly all the ammunition for their heaviest ordnance in the Narrows to be used up, viewed the prospect of a possible fresh fleet attack with some apprehension, as they were under the impression that the assailants had been beaten off on the 18th by the guns and not by the mines.

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  • There can be no doubt that he looked with apprehension on the growing power of the British; but he wisely avoided any serious collision with them.

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  • This incident inspired Itagaki with an apprehension that the country was about to pass under the yoke of a bureaucratic government.

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  • This incident inspired Itagaki with an apprehension that the country was about to pass under the yoke of a bureaucratic government.

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  • So far as a coherent body of theistic doctrine exists, it did not grow out of the great systems, but out of the lesser men who stood nearer to the apprehension of practical citizens.

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  • Much apprehension had been caused by the establishment of a permanent committee for foreign affairs in the Bundesrat, over which the Bavarian representative was to preside; but the clause remained a dead letter.

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  • Much apprehension had been caused by the establishment of a permanent committee for foreign affairs in the Bundesrat, over which the Bavarian representative was to preside; but the clause remained a dead letter.

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  • Hence the study of the mountain ranges of a continent is, for a proper apprehension of its physical conditions and characteristics, as essential as the examination of its extent and position in relation to the equator and poles, and the configuration of its coasts.

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  • 7), the cause of his apprehension " on the ground that he was a descendant of David and a Christian " (Hegesippus ap. Eus.

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  • And here the question arises - Can we vindicate in a reflective or mediate process this spontaneous apprehension of reality?

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  • He turned, regarding her with apprehension.

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  • His gaze bored into hers, immediately identifying the source of her apprehension.

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  • Perhaps the weekend respite from the jury box had lessened Fred's apprehension.

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  • Senor asked, his forehead furrowed with apprehension.

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  • She opened the note with apprehension.

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  • She looked around once more with apprehension.

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  • In this he was disappointed; but he continued to fight against the parliamentarians till August 1652, when a reward was offered for his apprehension.

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  • On the 11th of May a reward of £1000 was offered for his apprehension.

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  • Perceiving the difficulty of the Socratic dictum he endeavoured to give to the word "knowledge" a definite content by divorcing it absolutely from the sphere of sense and experience, and confining it to a sort of transcendental dialectic or logic. The Eleatic unity is Goodness, and is beyond the sphere of sensible apprehension.

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  • He vacillated a great deal about our mode of perceiving the external world; but his final view (edition of Reid's works, note D*) consisted in supposing that (1) sensation is an apprehension of secondary qualities purely as affections of the organism viewed as ego; (2) perception in general is an apprehension of primary qualities as relations of sensations in the organism viewed as non-ego; while (3) a special perception of a so-called " secundo-primary " quality consists in " the consciousness of a resisting something external to our organism."

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  • There is no record that the committee ever met until July 1900, when it was summoned to consider the situation in China; and on that occasion it probably formed a useful support to the government, and helped to still apprehension lest a too adventurous policy should be pursued.

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  • Some political importance attached to Lippe the case, for it was not impossible that similar difficulties might occur elsewhere, and the open support given by the emperor to the prince of Schaumburg-Lippe, who had married his sister, caused apprehension of Prussian aggression.

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  • This and other symptoms caused serious apprehension that some attempt might be made to alter the law of universal suffrage for the Reichstag, and it was policy of this kind which maintained and justified the profound distrust of the governing classes and the class hatred on which Social democracy depends.

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  • ,showed how necessary an efficient fleet was under modern conditions, and also caused some feeling of apprehension for the future arising from the new policy of extension adopted by the United States.

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  • For a short time there was apprehension that the Italian government might not be strong enough to resist the movement, and might even attempt to realize these wishes by means of an alliance with Russia; but the danger quickly passed away.

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  • They have a remarkable quickness of apprehension, a ready wit, a retentive memory, combined, however, with religious pride and hypocrisy, and a disregard for the truth.

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  • and viewed with apprehension any extension of his power.

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  • In a similar way damage of a certain small portion of the temporal lobe of the brain produces loss of intelligent apprehension of words spoken, although there is no deafness and although words seen are perfectly apprehended.

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  • Another region, "the angular region," is similarly related to intelligent apprehension of words seen, though not of words heard.

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  • Claverhouse, now Viscount Dundee, despairing of his party, and under apprehension of an attack in arms, rode northward Killie- with a handful of horse, and began to play the part of Montrose, while the Convention offered the crown to William and Mary, adding the claim of right to dethrone a king who had infringed the laws.

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  • It shows the disturbing forces of these characteristics, which aroused the envy and apprehension of the leaders of religion.

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  • Soon after that date the establishment by the British military authorities of posts within the Waziri country led to apprehension on the part of the local tribesmen.

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  • It seems likely that man has arrived at the apprehension of a whole individual, e.g.

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  • r9) with a detailed system of empiricism, according to which sense is the primary knowledge of particulars, memory is the retention of a sensation, experience is the sum of many memories, induction infers universals, and intelligence is the true apprehension of the universal principles of science, which is rational, deductive, demonstrative, from empirical principles.

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  • Hence arose conceptual logic; according to which conception is a simple apprehension of an idea without belief in being or not being, e.g.

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  • Conception on the other hand is the simple apprehension of an idea, particular or universal, but without belief that anything is or is not, and therefore is unfitted to beget judgment.

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  • Children think long before they speak; and indeed, as mere vocal sounds are not speech, and as the apprehension that a word signifies a thing is a judgment, judgment is originally not an effect, but a cause of significant language.

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  • We know that we need to pass from what Spinoza terms experientia y oga,' where imagination with its fragmentary apprehension is liable to error and neither necessity nor impossibility can be predicated, right up to that which fictionem terminat - namely, intellectio.

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  • Hegel's treatment of the categories or thought determinations which arise in the development of the immanent dialectic is rich in flashes of insight, but most of them are in the ordinary but to make explicit those justificatory notions which condition the form of our apprehension.

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  • The tendency towards the concentration of capital in great industrial corporations had been active to an extent previously undreamt of, with incidental consequences that had aroused much apprehension; and the Democrats accused President McKinley and the Republican party of having fostered the "trusts."

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  • This law embraced both moral and ceremonial elements derived from varied sources, but in the apprehension of the people it was all alike regarded as of divine origin.

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  • Salvation is the comprehension of this fact, and in the apprehension of our essential oneness with the absolute.

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  • With these the historic manifestation of Jesus becomes only a guide to lead us to that immediate apprehension of God which is the end of theology, and to that immediate union with God which is the end of religion.

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  • 3 No answer appears to have been sent to James's letter in 1714; on the contrary, a proclamation was issued (June 23) for his apprehension in case of his arrival in England.

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  • of Chamberlain, who, after mentioning the recent changes among the law officials, says, " There is a strong apprehension that.

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  • On the death of Gregory XI., who had finally returned to Rome from Avignon, he was elected pope in a conclave held under circumstances of great excitement, owing to popular apprehension of an intention of the French cardinals to elect a French pope and again abandon Rome.

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  • The Riksdag refused to sanction his favourite project of a reform of the Swedish army on the Prussian model, for which he laboured all his life, partly from motives of economy, partly from an apprehension of the king's martial tendencies.

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  • He was the pupil and personal friend of many leaders of the higher criticism in Germany, and from the first he advocated views which, though now widely accepted, were then regarded with apprehension.

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  • One isolated " apprehension," however firm its grasp, does not constitute knowledge or science.

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  • Zeno compared sensation to the outstretched hand, flat and open; bending the fingers was assent; the clenched fist was " simple apprehension," the mental grasp of an object; knowledge was the clenched fist tightly held in the other hand.

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  • Founding ethics on the native and cultivable capacity in men to appreciate worth in men and actions, and, like the ancient Greek thinkers whom he followed, associating the apprehension of morality with the apprehension of beauty, he makes morality wholly independent of scriptural enactment, and still more, of theological forecasting of future bliss or agony.

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  • All this activity, though combined with a haughty tone towards foreign governments and diplomatists, did not produce much general apprehension, probably because there was a widespread conviction that he desired to maintain peace, and that his great ability and strength of character would enable him to control the dangerous forces which he boldly set in motion.

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  • Four of his books were of particular importance: Christian Nurture (1847), in which he virtually opposed revivalism and "effectively turned the current of Christian thought toward the young"; Nature and the Supernatural (1858), in which he discussed miracles and endeavoured to "lift the natural into the supernatural" by emphasizing the supernaturalness of man; The Vicarious Sacrifice (1866), in which he contended for what has come to be known as the "moral view" of the atonement in distinction from the "governmental" and the "penal" or "satisfaction" theories; and God in Christ (1849) (with an introductory "Dissertation on Language as related to Thought"), in which he expressed, it was charged, heretical views as to the Trinity, holding, among other things, that the Godhead is "instrumentally three - three simply as related to our finite apprehension, and the communication of God's incommunicable nature."

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  • He uttered no prayer, and he betrayed no apprehension.

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  • Enraged at this defeat, Gilpin's enemies laid their complaint before Bonner, bishop of London, who secured a royal warrant for his apprehension.

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  • As a boy, he showed an extraordinary quickness of apprehension, and, choosing a learned life instead of the knightly career natural to a youth of his birth, early became an adept in the art of dialectic, under which name philosophy, meaning at that time chiefly the logic of Aristotle transmitted through Latin channels, was the great subject of liberal study in the episcopal schools.

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  • Wanting in quickness of apprehension and in native grace, he made up for these deficiencies by a conscientious love of truth and an untiring industry.

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  • The leading idea of the whole is that of the complete separation between understanding and apprehension of real fact.

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  • But this test of necessity is a wholly secondary one; these laws are not thus guaranteed to us; they are each and all given to us, given to our consciousness, in an act of spontaneous apperception or apprehension, immediately, instantaneously, in a sphere above the reflective consciousness, yet within the reach of knowledge.

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  • We thus after all fall back on reflection as our ground for their universal application; mere spontaneity of apprehension is futile; their universality is grounded in their necessity, not their necessity in their universality.

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  • And here the question arises - Can we vindicate in a reflective or mediate process this spontaneous apprehension of reality?

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  • When Cousin thus set himself to vindicate those points by reflection, he gave up the obvious advantage of his other position that the realities in `question are given us in immediate and spontaneous apprehension.

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  • Further apprehension and unrest were caused in central and northern Kurdistan by the Sykes-Picot agreement, which provisionally assigned the Mosul vilayet to France, a Power regarded by the Kurds as violently pro-Christian.

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  • There were many, Archbishop Arundel among them, who looked forward with apprehension to his accession to the throne.

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  • He held the portfolio of ways and communications in the first responsible Magyar administration (March 23, 1848) under Batthyany, but his increasing apprehension of a revolution, with its inevitable corollaries of civil war and a rupture with the dynasty, finally affected his mind, and on the 5th of September he was removed to an asylum.

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  • The apprehension never died out in his mind; and when he knew that the principles and abstractions, the un-English dialect and destructive dialectic, of his former acquaintances were predominant in the National Assembly, his suspicion that the movement would end in disastrous miscarriage waxed into certainty.

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  • In private houses it found its way more slowly, partly from an apprehension of danger attending its use, and partly from the discomfort which was experienced in many cases through the gas being distributed without purification, and to the careless and imperfect manner in which the service pipes were first fitted.

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  • Locke had some apprehension of this transcendent intellectual obligation.

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  • In the foregoing part of the Essay he had dealt with " ideas " and " simple apprehension," here he is concerned with intuitive " judgment " and demonstrative " reasoning," also with judgments and reasonings about matters of fact.

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  • In logic and metaphysics it investigates either the process of apprehension itself, or conceptions such as cause, substance, space, time, which the ordinary scientific consciousness never criticizes.

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  • Just in so far as it presupposes the apprehension of moral facts, it must presuppose a knowledge of the system of social relationships upon which some at least of those facts depend.

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  • The fragments that remain of the moral treatises of Democritus are sufficient, perhaps, to convince us that the turn of Greek philosophy in the direction of conduct, which was actually due to Socrates, would have taken place without him, though in a less decided manner; but when we compare the Democritean ethics with the post-Socratic system to which it has most affinity, Epicureanism, we find that it exhibits a very rudimentary apprehension of the formal conditions which moral teaching must fulfil before it can lay claim to be treated as scientific.

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  • This doubt found expression in the reasoned scepticism of Gorgias, and produced the famous proposition of Protagoras, that human apprehension is the only standard of existence.

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  • apprehension of the act as a means to this good, this good must be pleasure.

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  • exhibited, not in the skilful pursuit, but in the rational disregard of pleasure, - in the clear apprehension of the intrinsic worthlessness of this and most other objects of men's ordinary desires and aims. Pleasure, indeed, Antisthenes declared roundly to be an evil; " Better madness than a surrender to pleasure."

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  • The cardinal assumption of Plato's metaphysic is, that the real is definitely thinkable and knowable in proportion as it is real; so that the further the mind advances in abstraction from sensible particulars and apprehension of real being, the more definite and clear its thought becomes.

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  • But his efforts to supply such an explanation were rendered futile by his imperfect apprehension of what motion is in itself.

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  • For while he maintains constantly his favourite maxim "that there is nothing in the intellect which has not been in the senses" (nihil in intellectu quod non pries fuerit in sensu), while he contends that the imaginative faculty (phantasia) is the counterpart of sense - that, as it has to do with material images, it is itself, like sense, material, and essentially the same both in men and brutes; he at the same time admits that the intellect, which he affirms to be immaterial and immortal - the most characteristic distinction of humanity - attains notions and truths of which no effort of sensation or imagination can give us the slightest apprehension (Op. ii..383).

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  • The logic, which contains at least one praiseworthy portion, a sketch of the history of the science, is divided into theory of right apprehension (bene imaginari), theory of right judgment (bene proponere), theory of right inference (bene colligere), theory of right method (bene ordinare).

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  • the Anticlaudianus he sums up as follows: Reason, guided by prudence, can unaided discover most of the truths of the physical order; for the apprehension of religious truths it must trust to faith.

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  • This extension of Sparta's territory was viewed with apprehension by her neighbours in the Peloponnese.

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  • After an illness that excited apprehension he returned to England, and thenceforward resided at the Oratory until his death, r rth August 1890, making occasional visits to London, and chiefly to his old friend, R.

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  • A further attempt to allay the pope's apprehension lest Sicily should be united with the Empire had been made early in 1216, when Frederick, in a letter to Innocent, promised after his own coronation as emperor to recognize his son Henry as king of Sicily, and to place him under the suzerainty of Rome.

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  • He laboured still, in mingled hope and apprehension, "to prop the frail and worthless fabric,"7 but for its spiritual content of democracy he had no understanding, and even in its nationalism he had little hope.

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  • For the whole mass of cognisable fact, the mundus intelligibilis, is contained impliciter in each monad, and the several modes of apprehension can only be regarded as so many stages in the developing consciousness of the monad.

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  • He turned, regarding her with apprehension.

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  • His gaze bored into hers, immediately identifying the source of her apprehension.

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  • Davis watched with some apprehension, but Fritz and Royce were doubling over with laughter.

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  • Her apprehension grew as the vamp led her down a maze of hallways through scores of other vamps and past multiple doorways.

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  • Perhaps the weekend respite from the jury box had lessened Fred's apprehension.

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  • If Fred's apprehension over his finger prints has any basis in fact, it may be too late.

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  • Her apprehension was assuming a reduced priority.

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  • "I will guide you immediately to the dhjan," Talal said with apprehension and another bow.

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  • It broke the men around her from their frozen apprehension, and several of them moved away.

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  • The more he considered the devastation this would wreak on this woman he cared for, the more apprehension he felt about finding the man.

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  • He felt a wave of apprehension and accelerated heart beat as the door opened.

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  • He couldn't pinpoint what made his instincts restless, but he also saw apprehension in the tense frames and roving eyes of those riding before him.

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  • Senor asked, his forehead furrowed with apprehension.

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  • She opened the note with apprehension.

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  • She looked around once more with apprehension.

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  • Apprehension filled her at the thought of facing Jonny or Others.

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  • apprehension of persistent offenders.

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  • apprehension of the truth become clouded or enslaved to sin.

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  • apprehension of reality.

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  • apprehension of danger seems to have been entertained.

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  • apprehension of a criminal.

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  • One of his attendants expressed an apprehension, that the King would get wet.

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  • The corporate minutes of De Beers on June 20, 1946, reflect this growing apprehension.

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  • An acceptance of the strike prevents apprehension and an increase of the tension in your body that is caused by it.

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  • This is what causes most apprehension in the West.

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  • Crow could feel the apprehension in the toner's confines.

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  • Second, correlations between speaking and writing apprehension were rather low.

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  • Lt Col Sharples said: " There was a buzz of excitement and slight apprehension among the lads.

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  • The issue is whether the violence used in self-defense was proportional to the harm inflicted and to the reasonable apprehension of future harm.

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  • There is also a widespread apprehension that anything missing from the conference agenda will be at a disadvantage in the years to come.

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  • However, initial apprehension is soon overcome by the children's excitement.

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  • In other words, intellectual apprehension of harmony brings about virtue.

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  • But beneath that calm exterior nine thousand people live in constant apprehension of impending calamity.

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  • The negative effect of evaluation apprehension reduces the quantity of ideas produced in groups.

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  • The constant feeling of apprehension which you would experience comes from the release of adrenaline which would also cause atrial fibrillation.

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  • so forewarned, I approached Mr. Pearson with apprehension in the beginning.

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  • maverick cop " Eagle " Li (Lee ), whose driving passion becomes the apprehension of Jeff's tortured soul.

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  • For many of us the apprehension of the higher octaves of Truth is quite beyond us.

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  • paradoxical perception allows the apprehension or revelation of the hidden unconditioned center of all experience.

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  • leaving the porker behind as we disembarked dispelled any apprehension we had previously had about arriving in Ernakulam long before dawn.

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  • residuum of notes including various suggestions as to the apprehension of culprits.

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  • A stomach which he had fallen rather into the habit of pampering of late years gave a little whimper of apprehension.

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  • From the very day of Clement's coronation the king had charged the Templars with heresy, immorality and abuses, and the scruples of the weak pope were at length overcome by apprehension lest the State should not wait for the Church, but should proceed independently against the alleged heretics, as well as by the royal threats of pressing the accusation of heresy against the late Boniface VIII.

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  • He had expressed an opinion that the true art of memory was not to be gained by technical devices, but by a philosophical apprehension of things; and the cardinal de Berulle, the founder of the Congregation of the Oratory, was so struck by the tone of the remarks as to impress upon the speaker the duty of spending his life in the examination of truth.

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  • The defects of Descartes lie rather in his apparently imperfect apprehension of the principle of movements uniformly accelerated which his contemporary Galileo had illustrated and insisted upon, and in the indistinctness which attaches to his views of the transmission of motion in cases of impact.

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  • Regis, by removing the paradoxes and adjusting the metaphysics to the popular powers of apprehension, made Cartesianism popular, and reduced it to a regular system.

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  • The tsar himself lived in an atmosphere of apprehension, imagining that every man's hand was against him.

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  • Few people south of the Balkans dreamed that Bulgaria could be anything but a Russian province, and apprehension was entertained of the results of the union until it was seen that Russia really and entirely disapproved of it.

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  • Replying on the 9th of April 1878 to interpellations by Visconti-Venosta and other deputies on the impending Congress of Berlin, he appeared free from apprehension lest I Italy, isolated, might find herself face to face with a change of the balance of power in the Mediterranean, and declared that in the event of serious complications Italy would be too much sought after rather than too niuch forgotten.

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  • So far as a coherent body of theistic doctrine exists, it did not grow out of the great systems, but out of the lesser men who stood nearer to the apprehension of practical citizens.

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  • In a similar manner, while he abhorred the French Revolution when it came, he seems to have had no apprehension, like Chesterfield, Burke, or even Horace Walpole, of its approach; nor does he appear to have at all suspected that it had had anything to do with the speculations of the philosophic coteries in which he had taken such delight.

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  • In this he was disappointed; but he continued to fight against the parliamentarians till August 1652, when a reward was offered for his apprehension.

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  • Generally it may be said that throughout his long reign Francis Joseph remained the real ruler of his dominions; he not only kept in his hands the appointment and dismissal of his ministers, but himself directed their policy, and owing to the great knowledge of affairs, the unremitting diligence and clearness of apprehension, to which all who transacted business with him have borne testimony, lie was able to keep a very real control even of the details of government.

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  • The gratitude of the Syrians brought him to the knowledge of Sextus Caesar the governor of Syria; but his action inspired the chief men of the Jews with apprehension.

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  • Hence the study of the mountain ranges of a continent is, for a proper apprehension of its physical conditions and characteristics, as essential as the examination of its extent and position in relation to the equator and poles, and the configuration of its coasts.

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  • The opening of M'Clellan's Peninsula Campaign (see Yorktown; Seven Days, &c.) in 1862 caused great apprehension in Richmond, and in May 1862 some of the government records were packed up and preparations made to ship them to a place of safety.

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  • Though nearly alone I am under no apprehension of defeat."

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  • The effect of this pronouncement was great, and it alarmed the Afrikanders, who at this time viewed with apprehension the virtual resumption by Cecil Rhodes of his leadership of the Progressive (British) party at the Cape.

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  • He now entered, unaided save by his own unerring tact and vivid apprehension, upon a course of study which, in two years, placed him on a level with the greatest of his contemporaries.

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  • On the 11th of May a reward of £1000 was offered for his apprehension.

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  • The report, issued in 1902, showed apprehension to be well founded.

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  • on finding nearly all the ammunition for their heaviest ordnance in the Narrows to be used up, viewed the prospect of a possible fresh fleet attack with some apprehension, as they were under the impression that the assailants had been beaten off on the 18th by the guns and not by the mines.

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  • He was reporter of the committee which drew up the constitution of the year III., and his report shows keen apprehension of a return of the Reign of Terror, and presents reactionary measures as precautions against the re-establishment of "tyranny and anarchy."

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  • Reflection shows that our apprehension of the tree is conditioned by the sense-organs with which we have been endowed, and that the apprehension of a blind man, and still more the apprehension of a dog or horse, is quite different from ours.

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  • It was said that persons of high position were concerned in the crime; but although the government offered rewards for the apprehension of the perpetrators, and although General Moyle wrote to the duke of Newcastle that the criminals were "well-known by many of the inhabitants of the town," no one was ever convicted of participation in the murder.

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  • The author was soon discovered; and, as he absconded, an advertisement was issued offering a reward for his apprehension, and giving the only personal description we possess of him, as "a middle-sized spare man about forty years old, of a brown complexion and dark brown-coloured hair, but wears a wig; a hooked nose, a sharp chin, grey eyes, and a large mole near his mouth."

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  • But it was rather in the chants and litanies of the ancient religion, such as those of the Salii and the Fratres Arvales, and the dirges for the dead (neniae), and in certain extemporaneous effusions, that some germs of a native poetry might have been detected; and finally in the use of Saturnian verse, a metre of pure native origin, which by its rapid and lively movement gave expression to the vivacity and quick apprehension of the Italian race.

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  • 7), the cause of his apprehension " on the ground that he was a descendant of David and a Christian " (Hegesippus ap. Eus.

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  • Bolivar had, no doubt, regained the personal confidence of the officers and soldiers of the third division; but the republican party, with Santander at their head, continued to regard with undisguised apprehension his ascendancy over the army, suspecting him of a desire to imitate the career of Napoleon.

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  • The startingpoint of all valid philosophy must be the perception that the essence of all conscious apprehension is the union of opposites - of which that of subject and object is the most fundamental and all-pervasive.

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  • annihilation of all differences but the apprehension of them in organic relation to one another and to the whole to which they belong.

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  • Perceiving the difficulty of the Socratic dictum he endeavoured to give to the word "knowledge" a definite content by divorcing it absolutely from the sphere of sense and experience, and confining it to a sort of transcendental dialectic or logic. The Eleatic unity is Goodness, and is beyond the sphere of sensible apprehension.

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  • As crown-prince, Charles's brusque and downright manners had led many to regard his future accession with some apprehension, yet he proved to be one of the most popular of Scandinavian kings and a constitutional ruler in the best sense of the word.

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  • It is of course easy to see that Celsus had no apprehension of the spiritual needs even of his own day which it was the Christian purpose to satisfy, that he could not grasp anything of the new life enjoyed by the poor in spirit, and that he underrated the significance of the Church, regarding it simply as one of a number of warring sections (mostly Gnostic), and so seeing only a mark of weakness.

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  • Thus a super-spatial and super-temporal interpretation of that first markedly Jewish setting and apprehension of the Christian truth became as necessary as the attachment to the original contingencies.

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  • (c) On the other hand, there is great religious and moral continuity, beneath even theological discontinuity, in the life working below all conscious apprehension of the deeper ideas involved (E.

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  • His seeming inconsistencies are reconciled to apprehension, not by a formula of the intellect, but by the many-sidedness of a highly impressible nature.

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  • The man who impeaches the knowing faculties because of the fact of relation which they involve is pursuing the phantom of an apprehension which, as Lotze expresses it, does not apprehend things, but is itself things; he is desiring not to know but to be the things themselves.

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  • The claim of positive religion to be something more than the intellectual apprehension of the reason in the universe is thus acknowledged.

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  • The superintendent of the Ninth Census, 1870, presented a computation 01 the effects of this causefirst, through direct losses, by wounds or disease, either in actual service of the army or navy, or in a brief term following discharge; secondly, through the retardation of the rate of increase in the colored element, due to the privations, exposures and excesses attendant upon emancipation; thirdly, through the check given to immigration by the existence of war, the fear of conscription, and the apprehension abroad of results prejudicial to the national welfare.

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  • 35.1196 b 34-36) science, prudence, intelligence, wisdom, apprehension (inroX t ' s), in a rough manner very inferior to the classification of science, art, prudence, intelligence, wisdom, all of which are coordinate states of attaining truth, in the Nicomachean Ethics (vi.

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  • In order to acquire the knowledge of the true and primary principles of scientific knowledge, and especially the intelligence of the universal essence of the subject, which is always true, the process of knowledge consists of (I) sense (a'lcO o s), which receives the essence as individual, (2) memory (uvi j), which is a retention of sensible impression, (3) experience (cµirecpia),which consists of a number of similar memories, (4) induction (brayw-y), which infers the universal as a fact (TO iTC), (5) intellect (vas), which apprehends the principle (apxit); because it is a true apprehension that the universal induced is the very essence and formal cause of the subject: thereupon, scientific syllogism (i rcnf µovucos vvXXoycvµos), making the definition (opeg ios) of this essence the middle term (TO, c Vov), becomes a demonstration (6.7rOSee es) of the consequences which follow from the essence in the conclusion.

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  • It is not always a true apprehension of essence, but often, especially in physical matter, such as sound or heat or light, takes superficial effects to be the essence of the thing.

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  • Wellington's intimate association for several years with the sovereigns and statesmen of the Grand Alliance, and his experience of the evils which the Alliance existed to hold in check, naturally led him to dislike Canning's aggressive attitude towards the autocratic powers, and to view with some apprehension his determination to break with the European concert.

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  • There can be no doubt that he looked with apprehension on the growing power of the British; but he wisely avoided any serious collision with them.

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  • His exegesis owes its interest to his subjective resources rather than to breadth of learning; his power lay in spiritual vision rather than balanced judgment, and in the vivid apprehension of the factors which make the Christian personality, rather than in constructive doctrinal statement.

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  • Hence Schelling objected to the Hegelian dialectic on the ground that, although reason by itself can apprehend notions or essences, and even that of God, it cannot deduce a priori the existence either of God or of Nature, for the apprehension of which experience is required.

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  • Sensation, as Aristotle said, is not of itself: it is the apprehension of a sensible object in the organism.

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  • He vacillated a great deal about our mode of perceiving the external world; but his final view (edition of Reid's works, note D*) consisted in supposing that (1) sensation is an apprehension of secondary qualities purely as affections of the organism viewed as ego; (2) perception in general is an apprehension of primary qualities as relations of sensations in the organism viewed as non-ego; while (3) a special perception of a so-called " secundo-primary " quality consists in " the consciousness of a resisting something external to our organism."

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  • For a time the Roman propaganda in England, which drew to itself High Churchmen like Newman and Manning, was viewed with apprehension; but though the Roman Catholic Church has grown greatly in influence in the country, the number of its adherents, in proportion to the growth of population, has not very greatly increased.

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  • In the same month, twenty-five years afterwards, the execution of his mistress, according to the verdict of her contemporaries in France, avenged the blood of a lover who had died without uttering a word to realize the apprehension which (according to Knox) had before his trial impelled her to desire her brother "that, as he loved her, he would slay Chastelard, and let him never speak word."

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  • Darnley at once threw himself into the arms of the party opposed to the policy of the queen and her secretary - a policy which at that moment was doubly and trebly calculated to exasperate the fears of the religious and the pride of the patriotic. Mary was invited if not induced by the king of Spain to join his league for the suppression of Protestantism; while the actual or prospective endowment of Rizzio with Morton's office of chancellor, and the projected attainder of Murray and his allies, combined to inflame at once the anger and the apprehension of the Protestant nobles.

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  • Again, it is surely plain enough that the apprehension by individuals of the evils of poverty, or a sense of duty to their possible offspring, may retard the increase of population, and has in all civilized communities operated to a certain extent in that way.

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  • There is no record that the committee ever met until July 1900, when it was summoned to consider the situation in China; and on that occasion it probably formed a useful support to the government, and helped to still apprehension lest a too adventurous policy should be pursued.

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  • Some political importance attached to Lippe the case, for it was not impossible that similar difficulties might occur elsewhere, and the open support given by the emperor to the prince of Schaumburg-Lippe, who had married his sister, caused apprehension of Prussian aggression.

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  • This and other symptoms caused serious apprehension that some attempt might be made to alter the law of universal suffrage for the Reichstag, and it was policy of this kind which maintained and justified the profound distrust of the governing classes and the class hatred on which Social democracy depends.

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  • ,showed how necessary an efficient fleet was under modern conditions, and also caused some feeling of apprehension for the future arising from the new policy of extension adopted by the United States.

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  • For a short time there was apprehension that the Italian government might not be strong enough to resist the movement, and might even attempt to realize these wishes by means of an alliance with Russia; but the danger quickly passed away.

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  • They have a remarkable quickness of apprehension, a ready wit, a retentive memory, combined, however, with religious pride and hypocrisy, and a disregard for the truth.

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  • and viewed with apprehension any extension of his power.

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  • In a similar way damage of a certain small portion of the temporal lobe of the brain produces loss of intelligent apprehension of words spoken, although there is no deafness and although words seen are perfectly apprehended.

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  • Another region, "the angular region," is similarly related to intelligent apprehension of words seen, though not of words heard.

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  • Claverhouse, now Viscount Dundee, despairing of his party, and under apprehension of an attack in arms, rode northward Killie- with a handful of horse, and began to play the part of Montrose, while the Convention offered the crown to William and Mary, adding the claim of right to dethrone a king who had infringed the laws.

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  • It shows the disturbing forces of these characteristics, which aroused the envy and apprehension of the leaders of religion.

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  • Soon after that date the establishment by the British military authorities of posts within the Waziri country led to apprehension on the part of the local tribesmen.

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  • Its second premise is indeed merely a particular apprehension that one particular is similar to another, whereas the second premise of induction is a universal apprehension that a whole number of particulars is similar to those from which the inference starts; but at bottom these two apprehensions of similarity are so alike as to suggest that the universal premise of induction has arisen as a generalized analogy.

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  • It seems likely that man has arrived at the apprehension of a whole individual, e.g.

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  • r9) with a detailed system of empiricism, according to which sense is the primary knowledge of particulars, memory is the retention of a sensation, experience is the sum of many memories, induction infers universals, and intelligence is the true apprehension of the universal principles of science, which is rational, deductive, demonstrative, from empirical principles.

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  • Hence arose conceptual logic; according to which conception is a simple apprehension of an idea without belief in being or not being, e.g.

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  • Conception on the other hand is the simple apprehension of an idea, particular or universal, but without belief that anything is or is not, and therefore is unfitted to beget judgment.

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  • Children think long before they speak; and indeed, as mere vocal sounds are not speech, and as the apprehension that a word signifies a thing is a judgment, judgment is originally not an effect, but a cause of significant language.

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  • The gulf too, which the Philebus 6 apparently left unbridged between the sensuous apprehension of particulars and the knowledge of universals of even minimum generality led with Speusippus to a formula of knowledge in perception (7rco-Tn- govucit aivOn6cs).

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  • We know that we need to pass from what Spinoza terms experientia y oga,' where imagination with its fragmentary apprehension is liable to error and neither necessity nor impossibility can be predicated, right up to that which fictionem terminat - namely, intellectio.

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  • Hegel's treatment of the categories or thought determinations which arise in the development of the immanent dialectic is rich in flashes of insight, but most of them are in the ordinary but to make explicit those justificatory notions which condition the form of our apprehension.

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  • The tendency towards the concentration of capital in great industrial corporations had been active to an extent previously undreamt of, with incidental consequences that had aroused much apprehension; and the Democrats accused President McKinley and the Republican party of having fostered the "trusts."

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  • This law embraced both moral and ceremonial elements derived from varied sources, but in the apprehension of the people it was all alike regarded as of divine origin.

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  • Salvation is the comprehension of this fact, and in the apprehension of our essential oneness with the absolute.

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  • With these the historic manifestation of Jesus becomes only a guide to lead us to that immediate apprehension of God which is the end of theology, and to that immediate union with God which is the end of religion.

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  • 3 No answer appears to have been sent to James's letter in 1714; on the contrary, a proclamation was issued (June 23) for his apprehension in case of his arrival in England.

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  • The apprehension of God in the last of these five as ether is, according to the Saiva school of philosophy, the highest form of worship, for it is not the worship of God in a tangible form, but the worship of what, to ordinary minds, is vacuum, which nevertheless leads to the attainment of a knowledge of the all-pervading without physical accessories in the shape of any linga, which is, after all, an emblem.

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  • of Chamberlain, who, after mentioning the recent changes among the law officials, says, " There is a strong apprehension that.

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  • On the death of Gregory XI., who had finally returned to Rome from Avignon, he was elected pope in a conclave held under circumstances of great excitement, owing to popular apprehension of an intention of the French cardinals to elect a French pope and again abandon Rome.

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  • The Riksdag refused to sanction his favourite project of a reform of the Swedish army on the Prussian model, for which he laboured all his life, partly from motives of economy, partly from an apprehension of the king's martial tendencies.

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  • He was the pupil and personal friend of many leaders of the higher criticism in Germany, and from the first he advocated views which, though now widely accepted, were then regarded with apprehension.

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  • It was intended as a defence against the great tide of deistical speculation (see Deism), which in the apprehension of many good men seemed likely to sweep away the restraints of religion and make way for a general reign of licence.

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  • seen first in " assent "; if to a true presentation the result is " simple apprehension " (KarecX771/its: this stands in close relation to the KaTaXIj7rTLK' Oavra g ia, of which it is the necessary complement); if to a false or unapprehensive presentation, the result is " opinion " (64a), always deprecated as akin to error and ignorance, unworthy of a wise man.

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  • One isolated " apprehension," however firm its grasp, does not constitute knowledge or science.

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  • Zeno compared sensation to the outstretched hand, flat and open; bending the fingers was assent; the clenched fist was " simple apprehension," the mental grasp of an object; knowledge was the clenched fist tightly held in the other hand.

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  • Founding ethics on the native and cultivable capacity in men to appreciate worth in men and actions, and, like the ancient Greek thinkers whom he followed, associating the apprehension of morality with the apprehension of beauty, he makes morality wholly independent of scriptural enactment, and still more, of theological forecasting of future bliss or agony.

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  • All this activity, though combined with a haughty tone towards foreign governments and diplomatists, did not produce much general apprehension, probably because there was a widespread conviction that he desired to maintain peace, and that his great ability and strength of character would enable him to control the dangerous forces which he boldly set in motion.

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  • Four of his books were of particular importance: Christian Nurture (1847), in which he virtually opposed revivalism and "effectively turned the current of Christian thought toward the young"; Nature and the Supernatural (1858), in which he discussed miracles and endeavoured to "lift the natural into the supernatural" by emphasizing the supernaturalness of man; The Vicarious Sacrifice (1866), in which he contended for what has come to be known as the "moral view" of the atonement in distinction from the "governmental" and the "penal" or "satisfaction" theories; and God in Christ (1849) (with an introductory "Dissertation on Language as related to Thought"), in which he expressed, it was charged, heretical views as to the Trinity, holding, among other things, that the Godhead is "instrumentally three - three simply as related to our finite apprehension, and the communication of God's incommunicable nature."

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  • He uttered no prayer, and he betrayed no apprehension.

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  • Enraged at this defeat, Gilpin's enemies laid their complaint before Bonner, bishop of London, who secured a royal warrant for his apprehension.

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  • As a boy, he showed an extraordinary quickness of apprehension, and, choosing a learned life instead of the knightly career natural to a youth of his birth, early became an adept in the art of dialectic, under which name philosophy, meaning at that time chiefly the logic of Aristotle transmitted through Latin channels, was the great subject of liberal study in the episcopal schools.

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  • Wanting in quickness of apprehension and in native grace, he made up for these deficiencies by a conscientious love of truth and an untiring industry.

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  • The leading idea of the whole is that of the complete separation between understanding and apprehension of real fact.

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  • But this test of necessity is a wholly secondary one; these laws are not thus guaranteed to us; they are each and all given to us, given to our consciousness, in an act of spontaneous apperception or apprehension, immediately, instantaneously, in a sphere above the reflective consciousness, yet within the reach of knowledge.

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  • We thus after all fall back on reflection as our ground for their universal application; mere spontaneity of apprehension is futile; their universality is grounded in their necessity, not their necessity in their universality.

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  • When Cousin thus set himself to vindicate those points by reflection, he gave up the obvious advantage of his other position that the realities in `question are given us in immediate and spontaneous apprehension.

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  • Further apprehension and unrest were caused in central and northern Kurdistan by the Sykes-Picot agreement, which provisionally assigned the Mosul vilayet to France, a Power regarded by the Kurds as violently pro-Christian.

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  • There were many, Archbishop Arundel among them, who looked forward with apprehension to his accession to the throne.

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  • He held the portfolio of ways and communications in the first responsible Magyar administration (March 23, 1848) under Batthyany, but his increasing apprehension of a revolution, with its inevitable corollaries of civil war and a rupture with the dynasty, finally affected his mind, and on the 5th of September he was removed to an asylum.

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  • The apprehension never died out in his mind; and when he knew that the principles and abstractions, the un-English dialect and destructive dialectic, of his former acquaintances were predominant in the National Assembly, his suspicion that the movement would end in disastrous miscarriage waxed into certainty.

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  • In private houses it found its way more slowly, partly from an apprehension of danger attending its use, and partly from the discomfort which was experienced in many cases through the gas being distributed without purification, and to the careless and imperfect manner in which the service pipes were first fitted.

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  • The tests in each case differ; and it is as irrelevant for the theologian to dispute the "knowledge" of the physicist, by arguments from faith and religion, as it is for the physicist to deny the "knowledge" of the theologian from the point of view of one who ignores the possibility of spiritual apprehension altogether.

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  • Locke had some apprehension of this transcendent intellectual obligation.

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  • In the foregoing part of the Essay he had dealt with " ideas " and " simple apprehension," here he is concerned with intuitive " judgment " and demonstrative " reasoning," also with judgments and reasonings about matters of fact.

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  • In logic and metaphysics it investigates either the process of apprehension itself, or conceptions such as cause, substance, space, time, which the ordinary scientific consciousness never criticizes.

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  • Just in so far as it presupposes the apprehension of moral facts, it must presuppose a knowledge of the system of social relationships upon which some at least of those facts depend.

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  • The fragments that remain of the moral treatises of Democritus are sufficient, perhaps, to convince us that the turn of Greek philosophy in the direction of conduct, which was actually due to Socrates, would have taken place without him, though in a less decided manner; but when we compare the Democritean ethics with the post-Socratic system to which it has most affinity, Epicureanism, we find that it exhibits a very rudimentary apprehension of the formal conditions which moral teaching must fulfil before it can lay claim to be treated as scientific.

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  • This doubt found expression in the reasoned scepticism of Gorgias, and produced the famous proposition of Protagoras, that human apprehension is the only standard of existence.

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  • apprehension of the act as a means to this good, this good must be pleasure.

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  • exhibited, not in the skilful pursuit, but in the rational disregard of pleasure, - in the clear apprehension of the intrinsic worthlessness of this and most other objects of men's ordinary desires and aims. Pleasure, indeed, Antisthenes declared roundly to be an evil; " Better madness than a surrender to pleasure."

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  • The cardinal assumption of Plato's metaphysic is, that the real is definitely thinkable and knowable in proportion as it is real; so that the further the mind advances in abstraction from sensible particulars and apprehension of real being, the more definite and clear its thought becomes.

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  • But his efforts to supply such an explanation were rendered futile by his imperfect apprehension of what motion is in itself.

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  • For while he maintains constantly his favourite maxim "that there is nothing in the intellect which has not been in the senses" (nihil in intellectu quod non pries fuerit in sensu), while he contends that the imaginative faculty (phantasia) is the counterpart of sense - that, as it has to do with material images, it is itself, like sense, material, and essentially the same both in men and brutes; he at the same time admits that the intellect, which he affirms to be immaterial and immortal - the most characteristic distinction of humanity - attains notions and truths of which no effort of sensation or imagination can give us the slightest apprehension (Op. ii..383).

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  • The logic, which contains at least one praiseworthy portion, a sketch of the history of the science, is divided into theory of right apprehension (bene imaginari), theory of right judgment (bene proponere), theory of right inference (bene colligere), theory of right method (bene ordinare).

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  • the Anticlaudianus he sums up as follows: Reason, guided by prudence, can unaided discover most of the truths of the physical order; for the apprehension of religious truths it must trust to faith.

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  • This extension of Sparta's territory was viewed with apprehension by her neighbours in the Peloponnese.

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  • After an illness that excited apprehension he returned to England, and thenceforward resided at the Oratory until his death, r rth August 1890, making occasional visits to London, and chiefly to his old friend, R.

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  • A further attempt to allay the pope's apprehension lest Sicily should be united with the Empire had been made early in 1216, when Frederick, in a letter to Innocent, promised after his own coronation as emperor to recognize his son Henry as king of Sicily, and to place him under the suzerainty of Rome.

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  • He laboured still, in mingled hope and apprehension, "to prop the frail and worthless fabric,"7 but for its spiritual content of democracy he had no understanding, and even in its nationalism he had little hope.

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  • For the whole mass of cognisable fact, the mundus intelligibilis, is contained impliciter in each monad, and the several modes of apprehension can only be regarded as so many stages in the developing consciousness of the monad.

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  • HO HO 144/220/A49301A is a residuum of notes including various suggestions as to the apprehension of culprits.

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  • A stomach which he had fallen rather into the habit of pampering of late years gave a little whimper of apprehension.

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  • Like other elements of divorce, child custody can cause a lot of confused apprehension for parents as well as children.

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  • Emotional symptoms range from apprehension and dread to trouble concentrating, irritability, or a sense of being disconnected from oneself.

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  • It is a normal feeling and is typically felt as apprehension, fear, worry or nervousness.

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  • When you are in an anxious state, you are filled with feelings of uneasiness, apprehension or dread.

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  • High school chemistry is a class many students meet with profound apprehension.

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  • This is one topic that should be addressed plainly and without apprehension.

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  • They will have apprehension that they will be unable to control their own aggression.

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  • Replacing shower tub faucets can inspire apprehension in even an experienced do-it-yourselver, but it's a DIY job that you might be able to tackle yourself without too much pain and anguish.

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  • Fear is an intense aversion to or apprehension of a person, place, activity, event, or object that causes emotional distress and often avoidance behavior.

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  • Most folks feel a bit apprehensive when it comes to cutting their hair, but don't feel that same amount of apprehension when it comes to color.

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  • Explain your interest in her but also your apprehension, if you have concerns.

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  • The grief is understandable considering the fear and apprehension that accompany the unknown.

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  • Some people who endorse this method, however, also admit that there is a certain apprehension about allowing the government to have too much involvement within the health care system.

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  • This apprehension certainly has the potential to further confuse a matter that is already quite perplexing.

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  • This should ease any apprehension first-time homebuyers may have about the repair costs associated with owning a home, and will also appeal to buyers who have bought a home before and are familiar with how expensive repairs can be.

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  • While he may not take a completely active role in apprehension, Seagal-at the very least-provides support for the select officers with whom he rides along.

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  • Apprehension runs rampant and all of the while, in the midst of all the dangerous obstacles, there is always potions class and attending his first Yule Ball for Harry to think of.

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  • This was reflected in The Lord of the Rings when Boromir expresses apprehension about the Golden Wood of Lothlorien, followed by Eomer's superstitious comment that a "Lady of the Wood" lives there, and is a sorceress.

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