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apprehend

apprehend

apprehend Sentence Examples

  • To apprehend it is really the first great step in philosophical education.

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  • I am confident that the police will apprehend the criminals soon.

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  • The child couldn't quite apprehend the idea of going to school every day, making the first few weeks difficult.

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  • It was thus comparatively easy to show how the individual could learn to apprehend and embody the moral law in his own conduct.

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  • But almost at once he reverted to his former manner of life, and, although James failed to apprehend him, he was forced to take refuge in France about 1595.

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  • At first highly skeptical, especially when Johnny implicates a sheriff's deputy who is Bannerman's good friend, by the end of the pilot he and Johnny have joined forces to apprehend the perp.

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  • It was difficult to apprehend the philosophical discussion, but Julia tried her best to learn from it.

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  • apprehend any suspects.

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  • Metaphysically, all realities are parts of one ultimate reality; but logically, even philosophers think more often only of finite realities, existing men, dogs, horses, &c.; and children know that their parents exist long before they apprehend ultimate reality.

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  • The essential holiness of God, - do we rightly apprehend what it is?

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  • Hume also claims that we never directly apprehend the self.

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  • MR IRVING: My Lord, I had clearly apprehend exactly what your Lordship intends with that word.

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  • apprehend what it is?

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  • apprehend by faith from outside of ourselves.

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  • unveil what is hidden or obscure in the way we apprehend the art world.

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  • mystical as regards the faculty by which it claims to apprehend philosophic truth.

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  • to apprehend him.

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  • To apprehend it is really the first great step in philosophical education.

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  • Further, we apprehend by means of a light which does not come from ourselves.

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  • apprehend an offender.

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  • apprehend thieves who may be taking advantage of open stands from which valuable items can easily be stolen.

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  • Howie, with his disappointment intensified, vowed to do everything it took to apprehend the culprit he nicknamed the Delabama Killer.

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  • The transference can enable the analysand to ' traverse the fantasy ' and apprehend the dependence of his/her subjectivity on objet a.

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  • Governments are creating large DNA databases of suspects, if not the entire population of a nation, so as to better apprehend criminals.

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  • An assault is committed when a person intentionally or recklessly causes another to apprehend the immediate infliction of unlawful force.

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  • The combined effect of both matters was that warrants to apprehend accused persons, sometimes in matters of relative triviality, were granted unnecessarily.

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  • Animals and plants as agents of disease or injury form part of the larger subject of the struggle for existence between living organisms, as is recognized even by those who do not so readily apprehend that diseased conditions in general are always signs of defeat in the struggle for existence between the suffering organism and its environment, living and non-living.

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  • But almost at once he reverted to his former manner of life, and, although James failed to apprehend him, he was forced to take refuge in France about 1595.

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  • Real knowledge consists in comprehending this all-pervading harmony as embodied in the manifold of perception, and the senses are "bad-witnesses," because they apprehend phenomena, not as its manifestation, but as "stiff and dead."

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  • The failure to apprehend historical method has often led to the fallacious argument that the trustworthiness of individual features justifies our accepting the whole, or that the elimination of unhistorical elements will leave an historical residuum.

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  • Not only were the virtues to be explained by their relation to a common or universal good which only intelligence could apprehend, but there was nothing in all the furniture of heaven or earth which in like manner did not receive reality from the share it had in such an intelligible idea or essence.

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  • (m) In the garden: the Roman soldiers come to apprehend Him, fall back upon the ground at His declaration " I am He."

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  • In the mechanical processes which we can experimentally modify at will, and which therefore we learn to apprehend with greatest fulness, whenever an effect on a body, B, is in causal connexion with a process instituted in another body, A, it is usually possible to discover a mechanical connexion between the two bodies which allows the influence of A to be traced all the way across the intervening region.

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  • In carrying out this scientific procedure false steps will from time to time be made, which will have to be retraced, or rather amended; but the combination of experimental science with theory has elevated our presumption of the rationality of all natural processes, so far as we can apprehend them at all, into practical certainty; so that, though the mode of presentation of the results may vary from age to age, it is hardly conceivable that the essentials of the method are not of permanent validity.

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  • The man who impeaches the knowing faculties because of the fact of relation which they involve is pursuing the phantom of an apprehension which, as Lotze expresses it, does not apprehend things, but is itself things; he is desiring not to know but to be the things themselves.

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  • This we are in a position to apprehend and constructively to exhibit to ourselves in the successive forms which its development assumes, for it is the same spirit, though unconscious, of which we become aware in selfconsciousness.

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  • This first position is psychological idealism in a new form and supported by new reasons; for, if experience derives its matter from mental sensations and its form from mental synthesis of sensations, it can apprehend nothing but mental objects of sense, which, according to Kant, are sensible ideas having no existence outside our thought, not things in themselves; or phenomena, not noumena.

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  • Hence Schelling objected to the Hegelian dialectic on the ground that, although reason by itself can apprehend notions or essences, and even that of God, it cannot deduce a priori the existence either of God or of Nature, for the apprehension of which experience is required.

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  • Who has proved that, when I scent an odour in my nostrils, I apprehend not odour but a sensation of odour; and so for the other senses?

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  • It was thus comparatively easy to show how the individual could learn to apprehend and embody the moral law in his own conduct.

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  • The obvious defects of this theory, (I) that the senses alone cannot apprehend matter itself, (2) that it is not clear how the multiplicity of phenomena could result from these two forces, and (3) that he adduced no evidence to substantiate the existence of these two forces, were pointed out at the time by his pupil, Patrizzi (see article on PATRIZZI, FRANCESCO).

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  • He seizes upon the fundamental incompatibility of a consciousness which can apprehend, and yet is separated from, the "thing-in-itself."

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  • In some cases of induction concerned with objects capable of abstraction and simplification, we have a power of identification, by which, not a priori but in the act of inducing a conclusion, we apprehend that the things signified ..SisP.

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  • Thus by combined induction and identification we apprehend that one and one are the same as two, that there is no difference between a triangle and a three-sided rectilineal figure, that a whole must be greater than its part by being the whole, that inter-resisting bodies necessarily force one another apart, otherwise they would not be interresisting but occupy the same place at the same moment.

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  • Metaphysically, all realities are parts of one ultimate reality; but logically, even philosophers think more often only of finite realities, existing men, dogs, horses, &c.; and children know that their parents exist long before they apprehend ultimate reality.

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  • It marks only that we feel our knowledge to be inadequate, and for the reason that there may be another species of sensation than ours, that other beings may not be tied by the special laws of our constitution, and may apprehend, as Plato says, by the soul itself apart from the senses.

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  • It would seem that the perception intended to constitute the standard of truth is one which, by producing a mental counterpart of a really existent external thing, enables the percipient, in the very act of sense, to " lay hold of " or apprehend an object in virtue of the presentation or sense impression of it excited in his own mind.

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  • More exactly, it may be said that the Platonism of Plato's maturity included the following principal doctrines: (i.) the supreme cause of all existence is the One, the Good, Mind, which evolves itself as the universe under certain eternal immutable forms called " ideas"; (ii.) the ideas are apprehended by finite minds as particulars in space and time, and are then called " things"; (iii.) consequently the particulars which have in a given idea at once their origin, their being, and their perfection may be regarded, for the purposes of scientific study, as members of a natural kind; (iv.) the finite mind, though it cannot directly apprehend the idea, may, by the study of the particulars in which the idea is revealed, attain to an approximate notion of it.

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  • Every effort was used to discover, or rather to obtain legal evidence against, the author, whom, Walpole was assured, it would then have taken ten thousand men to apprehend.

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  • Having nothing more to do in the way of visible reformation, yet finding in religion no pleasures to supply the place of the juvenile amusements which he had relinquished, he began to apprehend that he lay under some special malediction; and he was tormented by a succession of fantasies which seemed likely to drive him to suicide or to Bedlam.

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  • We find ourselves in a strange world, between two orders of phenomena which do not belong to us, which we apprehend only on the condition of our distinguishing ourselves from them.

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  • In 1817 the Habeas Corpus Act was suspended, and Sidmouth issued a circular to the lordslieutenant declaring that magistrates might apprehend and hold to bail persons accused on oath of seditious libels.

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  • The metaphysical and theological conception is open to the agnostic objection that the finite mind of man is by hypothesis unable to cognize or apprehend not only an infinite object, but even the very conception of infinity itself; from this standpoint the infinite is regarded as merely a postulate, as it were an unknown quantity (cf.

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  • God had declared a truth meet for all men, which needed no intellectual superiority to understand, in a tongue which each human soul could apprehend.

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  • The combined effect of both matters was that warrants to apprehend accused persons, sometimes in matters of relative triviality, were granted unnecessarily.

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  • The purpose of these seminars is precisely to unveil what is hidden or obscure in the way we apprehend the art world.

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  • It was difficult to apprehend the philosophical discussion, but Julia tried her best to learn from it.

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  • Every effort was used to discover, or rather to obtain legal evidence against, the author, whom, Walpole was assured, it would then have taken ten thousand men to apprehend.

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  • God had declared a truth meet for all men, which needed no intellectual superiority to understand, in a tongue which each human soul could apprehend.

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