Apollo sentence example

apollo
  • The Lyceum, where Aristotle taught, was originally a sanctuary of Apollo Lyceius.
    40
    9
  • Marsyas found it, and having acquired great skill in playing it, challenged Apollo to a contest with his lyre.
    12
    6
  • Livy mentions a temple of Apollo.
    3
    0
  • He represents the art of playing the flute as opposed to the lyre - the one the accompaniment of the worship of Cybele, the other that of the worship of Apollo.
    2
    0
  • When Admetus was attacked by an illness that threatened to lead to his premature death, Apollo persuaded the Moerae (Fates) to prolong his life, provided any one could be found to die in his place.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • Carry it to Delphi and leave it there in the Temple of Apollo; for Apollo is the fountain of wisdom, the wisest of the wise.
    2
    1
  • Klausen (Aeneas and die Penaten, 1839), the oldest collection of Sibylline oracles appears to have been made about the time of Solon and Cyrus at Gergis on Mount Ida in the Troad; it was attributed to the Hellespontine Sibyl and was preserved in the temple of Apollo at Gergis.
    0
    0
  • The Greeks equated Ubasti with their Artemis, confusing her with the leonine Tafne, sister of Shoou (Apollo).
    0
    0
  • Patroclus, the friend of Achilles, who came to the help of the Greeks, was slain by Hector with the help of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • He himself erected a temple to Zeus Panhellenios and helped Poseidon and Apollo to build the walls of Troy.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • With the same idea he built the temple of the Pythian Apollo and began, though he did not finish, the temple of Zeus (the magnificent columns now standing belong to the age of Hadrian).
    0
    0
  • Lastly, Peisistratus carried out the purification of Delos, the sacred island of Apollo of the Ionians; all the tombs were removed from the neighbourhood of the shrine, the abode of the god of light and joy.
    0
    0
  • Next in date comes the huge temple G, which, as an inscription proves, was dedicated to Apollo; though it was never entirely completed (many of the columns still remain unfluted), it was in use.
    0
    0
  • At length Augustus summoned the representatives of the nation and Nicholaus of Damascus, who spoke for Archelaus, to plead before him in the temple of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The recent excavations by the British School on the site of the Dictaean temple at Palaikastro bear out this conclusion, and an archaic marble head of Apollo found at Eleutherna shows that classical tradition was not at fault in recording the existence of a very early school of Greek sculpture in the island, illustrated by the names of Dipoenos and Scyllis.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Among other Greek remains in the island may be mentioned, besides the great inscription, the archaic temple of the Pythian Apollo at Gortyna, a plain square building with a pronaos added in later times, excavated by Halbherr G 3' ?
    0
    0
  • In his absence the open violence and extortion of Agesilaus, combined with the popular disappointment at the failure of the agrarian scheme, brought about the restoration of Leonidas and the deposition of Cleombrotus, who took refuge at the temple of Apollo at Taenarum and escaped death only at the entreaty of his wife, Leonidas's daughter Chilonis.
    0
    0
  • On the north-west rock the caves known as the grottoes of Pan and Apollo were cleared out; these consist of a slight high-arched indentation immediately to the east of the Clepsydra and a double and somewhat deeper cavern a little farther to the east.
    0
    0
  • On the east side of the lake are remains of baths, including a great octagonal hall known as the Temple of Apollo, built of brickwork, and belonging to the 1st century.
    0
    0
  • At Anaphe, one of the Sporades, they were saved from a storm by Apollo.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Numerous fine works of art have been found on this site, notably the Aphrodite of Melos in the Louvre, the Asclepius in the British Museum, and the Poseidon and an archaic Apollo in Athens.
    0
    0
  • The god of Atha was a form of Horus (Apollo) as the sun-god; his most characteristic representation is as the disk of the sun with outspread wings, so often seen over the doors of shrines, at the top of stelae, &c. In the temple, where he is often figured as a falconheaded man, he is associated with Hathor of Dendera and the child Harsemteus.
    0
    0
  • With Zeus and Apollo, she forms a triad which represents the embodiment of all divine power.
    0
    0
  • Proud of her numerous family, six daughters and six sons, she boasted of her superiority to her friend Leto, the mother of only two children, Apollo and Artemis.
    0
    0
  • As a punishment, Apollo slew her sons and Artemis her daughters.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • According to some, Niobe is the goddess of snow and winter, whose children, slain by Apollo and Artemis, symbolize the ice and snow melted by the sun in spring; according to others, she is an earth-goddess, whose progeny - vegetation and the fruits of the soil - is dried up and slain every summer by the shafts of the sun-god.
    0
    0
  • Burmeister regards the legend as an incident in the struggle between the followers of Dionysus and Apollo in Thebes, in which the former were defeated and driven back to Lydia.
    0
    0
  • In any case the foundation is attributed to the direct instructions of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The oracle of Delphi determined that the city had no founder but Apollo, and in the Athenian War in Sicily Thurii was at first neutral, though it finally helped the Athenians.
    0
    0
  • When the Greeks were visited with pestilence on account of Chryseis, he disclosed the reasons of Apollo's anger.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It had been predicted that he should die when he met his superior in divination; and the prophecy was fulfilled in the person of Mopsus, whom Calchas met in the grove of the Clarian Apollo near Colophon.
    0
    0
  • Mopsus appears to be the incarnation of Apollo of Claros.
    0
    0
  • It is extremely probable that Acrae was not founded until after two obvious outposts had already been occupied - a post guarding the road to Acrae itself, and including the sacred enclosure of Apollo, which later, when it became a quarter of the city, acquired the name Temenites; and another post on the road to the north, in the upper part of the region known as Achradina.
    0
    0
  • At the time of the Athenian siege Syracuse consisted of two quarters - the island and the "outer city" of Thucydides, generally known as Achradina, and bounded by the sea on the north and east, with the adjoining suburbs of Apollo Temenites farther inland at the foot of the southern slopes of Epipolae and Tyche west of the north-west corner of Achradina.
    0
    0
  • The older, belonging probably to the beginning of the 6th century B.C., appears, from an inscription on the uppermost step, to have been dedicated to Apollo.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The temple of Apollo Temenites has entirely disappeared, but the theatre, entirely hewn in the rock, is still to be seen.
    0
    0
  • At the Mermaid Ben Jonson had such companions as Shakespeare, Raleigh, Beaumont, Fletcher, Carew, Donne, Cotton and Selden, but at the Devil in Fleet Street, where he started the Apollo Club, he was omnipotent.
    0
    0
  • Such are the main facts of the Leto legend in its common literary form, which is due especially to the two Homeric hymns to Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The honour paid to her in Delphi and Delos might be explained as part of the cult of her son Apollo; but temples to her existed in Argos; in Mantineia and in Xanthus in Lycia; her sacred grove was on the coast of Crete.
    0
    0
  • It is to be observed that she appears far more conspicuously in the Apolline myths than in those which grew round the great centres of Artemis worship, the reason being that the idea of Apollo and Artemis as twins is one of later growth on Greek soil.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Lycia, one of the chief seats of the cult of Apollo, where most frequent traces are found of the worship of Leto as the great goddess, was probably the earlier home of her religion.
    0
    0
  • In Greek art Leto usually appears carrying her children in her arms, pursued by the dragon sent by the jealous Hera, which is slain by the infant Apollo; in vase paintings especially she is often represented with Apollo and Artemis.
    0
    0
  • He took his share in all kinds of athletic exercises, and it was now that Brookfield said, "It is not fair that you should be Hercules as well as Apollo."
    0
    0
  • According to Sostratus, author of an elegiac poem called Teiresias, he was originally a girl, but had been changed into a boy by Apollo at the age of seven; after undergoing several more transformations from one sex to the other, she (for the final sex was feminine) was turned into a mouse and her lover Arachnus into a weasel (Eustathius on Odyssey, p. 1665).
    0
    0
  • Traces of this union of immigrants with older inhabitants have been detected in the combination of Zeus Herkeios with Apollo Patrons as the ancient gods of the phratry.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The general affairs of the league were managed by a synod which met periodically in the temple of Apollo and Artemis at Delos, the ancient centre sanctified by the common worship of the Ionians.
    0
    0
  • The worships of Apollo and Heracles, though not confined to Dorians, were widely regarded as in some sense " Dorian " in character.
    0
    0
  • The common calendar and cycle of festivals, observed by all Dorians (of which the Carneia was chief), and the distribution in Greece of the worships of Apollo and Heracles, which attained pre-eminence mainly in or near districts historically " Dorian," suggest that these cults, or an important element in them, were introduced comparatively late, and represent the beliefs of a fresh ethnic superstratum.
    0
    0
  • According to Pindar (apud Plutarch), the brothers built the temple of Apollo at Delphi; when they asked for a reward, the god promised them one in seven days; on the seventh day they died.
    0
    0
  • The famous inscriptions with hymns to Apollo accompanied by musical notation were found on stones belonging to this treasury.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A little farther on, but below the Sacred Way, is another open space, of circular form, which is perhaps the iXcos or sacred threshing-floor on which the drama of the slaying of the Python by Apollo was periodically performed.
    0
    0
  • At the north-western corner of the precinct is the theatre, one Precinct Of Apollo Hellenique 1897.
    0
    0
  • The Homeric Hymn to Apollo evidently combines two different versions, one of the approach of Apollo from the north by land, and the other of the introduction of his votaries from Crete.
    0
    0
  • Portions of the pediments of this temple have been found in the excavations; but no sign has been found of the pediments mentioned by Pausanias, representing on the east Apollo and the Muses, and on the west Dionysus and the Thyiades (Bacchantes), and designed by Praxias, the pupil of Calanias.
    0
    0
  • He had, however, the advantage of now being able to present himself to the Greeks as the champion of Apollo in a holy war, and in 352 the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Pheraeans and Phocians.
    0
    0
  • The time was come for Philip to assert himself in Greece, and the Phocians, who still dominated Delphi and held Thermopylae, could furnish a pretext to the champion of Pan-Hellenism and Apollo.
    0
    0
  • With this object he consecrated there his new temple of Apollo (28 B.C.), associated for long with the Julian house, and adopted by Augustus as his special patron at Actium, and transferred to its keeping the Sibylline books, thus marking the new headquarters of the Graeco-Roman religion.
    0
    0
  • Of the surviving monuments of the Greek city the most important is the temple of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • According to Herodotus he made his doubtful adherents deposit pledges of faithfulness in the temple of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • By good fortune the earth here was very deep. On the higher level of the agora and the Apollo temple, where the depth of earth is comparatively slight, there is little hope of important finds.
    0
    0
  • Then, yielding to his wife's entreaties, he sallied forth and defeated the enemy, but was never seen again, having been carried off by the Erinyes, who had heard his mother's curse (or he was slain by Apollo in battle).
    0
    0
  • A more satisfactory explanation has been offered by Dieterich (Abraxas, 117 sqq.), who finds in this chapter an adaptation of the birth of Apollo and the attempt of the dragon Pytho to kill his mother Schopfung and Chaos § 3, Religionsgesch.
    0
    0
  • Here Apollo is born, who four days later slays the dragon.
    0
    0
  • Their great wealth enabled them during their exile to enhance their reputation and secure the favour of the Delphian Apollo by rebuilding the temple after its destruction by fire in J48.
    0
    0
  • The details of his conquests are uncertain, but it is known that in the Cyclades he maintained an alliance with the tyrant Lygdamis of Naxos, and curried favour with the Delian Apollo by dedicating to, him the island of Rheneia.
    0
    0
  • In order to appease the wrath of Apollo, who had visited the camp with a pestilence, Agamemnon had restored Chryseis, his prize of war, to her father, a priest of the god, but as a compensation deprived Achilles, who had openly demanded this restoration, of his favourite slave Briseis.
    0
    0
  • Whereupon he seized the oracular tripod, and so entered upon a contest with Apollo, which Zeus stopped by sending a flash of lightning between the combatants.
    0
    0
  • The fatality by which Hercules kills so many friends as well as foes recalls the destroying Apollo; while his career frequently illustrates the Delphic views on blood-guiltiness and expiation.
    0
    0
  • As Apollo's champion Hercules is Daphnephoros, and fights Cycnus and Amyntor to keep open the sacred way from Tempe to Delphi.
    0
    0
  • The Delians, suffering a dire pestilence, consulted their oracles, and were ordered to double the volume of the altar to their tutelary god, Apollo.
    0
    0
  • Being spurned by Hyacinthus, he caused his death by accident at the hands of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • In many respects he was a counterpart of Apollo, less dignified and powerful, but more human than his greater brother.
    0
    0
  • For example, the last argument would equally apply to Apollo, and would lead to the improbable conclusion that Apollo was a wind-god.
    0
    0
  • The city has several other musical societies - the Apollo and Orpheus clubs (1881 and 1893), a Liederkranz (1886), and a United Singing Society (1896) being among the more prominent; and there are two schools of music - the Conservatory of Music and the College of Music.
    0
    0
  • There are also hot springs and a sacred grotto of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • More than ten years before Cassiodorus founded his monasteries in the south of Italy, Benedict of Nursia (480-543) had rendered a more permanent service to the cause of scholarship by building, amid the ruins of the temple of Apollo on the crest of Monte Cassino, the earliest of those homes of learning that have lent an undying distinction to the Benedictine order.
    0
    0
  • It had temples of Apollo Pythius, Artemis and Zeus.
    0
    0
  • The gods Apollo and Poseidon served him for hire, Apollo tending his herds, while Poseidon built the walls of Troy.
    0
    0
  • When Laomedon refused to pay the reward agreed upon, Apollo visited the land with a pestilence, and Poseidon sent up a monster from the sea, which ravaged the land.
    0
    0
  • In the temples of Apollo and Aphrodite were sacred fish, which may point to a fish cult.
    0
    0
  • The two chief sites to be cleared were the temples of Apollo and of Aphrodite, in both of which successive buildings of various date were found.
    0
    0
  • Both were remarkable for the great mass of early painted pottery that was found; in the temple of Apollo this had been buried in a trench; in that of Aphrodite it was scattered over the whole surface in two distinct strata.
    0
    0
  • At an early period Halicarnassus was a member of the Doric Hexapolis, which included Cos, Cnidus, Lindus, Camirus and Ialysus; but one of the citizens, Agasicles, having taken home the prize tripod which he had won in the Triopian games instead of dedicating it according to custom to the Triopian Apollo, the city was cut off from the league.
    0
    0
  • At last, in his fourth period, after the accession of Alexander, Aristotle at fifty returned to Athens and became the head of his own school in the Lyceum, a gymnasium near the temple of Apollo Lyceius in the suburbs.
    0
    0
  • Its primary business was to regulate the concerns of the temple of Apollo at Delphi.
    0
    0
  • The wealth of the ancient Siphniotes was shown by their treasury at Delphi, where they deposited the tenth of their gold and silver; but, says the legend, they once failed to do this, and Apollo in his anger flooded their mines.
    0
    0
  • Besides these, in 1900 the substructions of a temple of Apollo Daphnephoros were unearthed.
    0
    0
  • The latter was the chief town; its coins are found in considerable number, the types being sometimes the Athenian goddess and her owl, sometimes native religious symbols, the caps of the Dioscuri, Apollo, &c. Few coins of Myrina are known.
    0
    0
  • At the annual festival of Apollo a criminal was obliged to plunge from the summit into the sea, where, however, an effort was made to pick him up; and it was by the same heroic leap that Sappho and Artemisia, daughter of Lygdamis, are said to have ended their lives.
    0
    0
  • The Hyperboreans were thus the bearers of the sacrificial gifts to Apollo over land and sea, irrespective of their home, the name being given to Delphians, Thessalians, Athenians and Delians.
    0
    0
  • Under the influence of the derivation from 130p as, the home of the Hyperboreans was placed in a region beyond the north wind, a paradise like the Elysian plains, inaccessible by land or sea, whither Apollo could remove those mortals who had lived a life of piety.
    0
    0
  • The close connexion of the Hyperboreans with the cult of Apollo may be seen by comparing the Hyperborean myths, the characters of which by their names mostly recall Apollo or Artemis (Agyieus, Opis, Hecaergos, Loxo), with the ceremonial of the Apolline worship. No meat was eaten at the Pyanepsia; the Hyperboreans were vegetarians.
    0
    0
  • At the festival of Apollo at Leucas a victim flung himself from a rock into the sea, like the Hyperborean who was tired of life.
    0
    0
  • Along with Halicarnassus and Cos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindus, Camirus and Ialysus it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs.
    0
    0
  • Bissen, stand on either side of the entrance, and the front is crowned by a group by King, representing Apollo and Pegasus, and the Fountain of Hippocrene.
    0
    0
  • At the south end of the forum are three .halls side by side, similar in plan with a common façade-the central one, the curia or council chamber, the others the offices respectively of the duumvirs and aediles, the principal officials of the city; while the greater part of the west side is occupied by two large buildings-a basilica, which is the largest edifice in Pompeii, and the temple of Apollo, which presents its side to the forum, and hence fills up a large portion of the surrounding space.
    0
    0
  • They were slain by Apollo for having forged the thunderbolt with which Zeus slew Asclepius.
    0
    0
  • It is followed by the later temples at Selinus, among them the temple of Apollo, which is said to have been the greatest in Sicily, and by the wonderful series at Acragas (see Agrigentum).
    0
    0
  • It was noted from early times for its temple and oracle of Apollo, and, as the port of Xanthus and other towns of the same valley, had a large trade, and was regarded as the metropolis of Lycia.
    0
    0
  • Such were the sanctuaries of Zeus Lycaeus in Arcadia, of Poseidon in the island of Calauria, and of Apollo at Delos; they were, however, numerous in Asia Minor.
    0
    0
  • At any rate a whole series of extant drawings enables us to trace the German gradually working out his own ideas of a canon of human proportion in the composition of his famous engraving of "Adam and Eve" (1504); which at first, as a drawing in the British Museum proves, had been intended to be an Apollo and Diana conceived on lines somewhat similar to one of Barbari's.
    0
    0
  • The nicknames which they gave to their later kings were Aramaic; and, except Apollo and Daphne, the great divinities of north Syria seem to have remained essentially native, such as the "Persian Artemis" of Meroe and Atargatis of Hierapolis Bambyce.
    0
    0
  • When Julian visited the place in 362 the impudent population railed at him for his favour to Jewish and pagan rites, and to revenge itself for the closing of its great church of Constantine, burned down the temple of Apollo in Daphne.
    0
    0
  • A temple built of sun-dried brick and timber has been found at Thebes underlying an archaic temple of Ismenian Apollo and standing on Mycenaean tombs (Keramopoullos, 1916), and a more extensive settlement was found at Thermon in Aetolia (Romaios, 1911-3).
    0
    0
  • This lies similarly underneath an archaic Greek temple of Apollo, which was built apparently in the 7th century to replace the " Geometric " temple, an elliptical structure with an exterior ring of columns.
    0
    0
  • The sanctuary of Apollo Corynthos at Longas was excavated in 1911.
    0
    0
  • Other important finds were seven statues of women from a sanctuary of Artemis Polo, .a temple and altar of Apollo Pythius, decorative terra-cottas from an archaic Prytaneion, a cemetery with carved and painted tombstones, and remains of a triumphal arch of Caracalla.
    0
    0
  • Very little was done in 1913-4; the " temple of Apollo Clarius " was found to be an exedra and a propylaea, and an oracular grotto of the god was discovered in the hills.
    0
    0
  • A temple of Zeus was excavated on a terrace of the acropolis; the great temple of Apollo crowned the summit of the hill.
    0
    0
  • The best preserved is an archaic Apollo, whose arms only are missing.
    0
    0
  • No less powerful was the attraction exercised by the shrines of the oracular divinities, though the influx of pilgrims was not limited to certain days, but, year in and year out, a stream of private persons, or embassies from the city-states, came flowing to the temple of Zeus in Dodona or the shrine of Apollo at Delphi.
    0
    0
  • He then attacked the firebreathing bull of Marathon and brought it alive to Athens, where he sacrificed it to Apollo Delphinius.
    0
    0
  • Another story connects him with the musical contest between Apollo and Marsyas (or Pan).
    0
    0
  • At the same time the connexion of Apollo with the dolphin must not be forgotten.
    0
    0
  • Zeus Olympius was figured on his coins, and he erected a statue of Zeus Olympius in the Temple of Apollo at Daphne.
    0
    0
  • On it once stood the gold tripod dedicated to Apollo as a tenth of the spoils.
    0
    0
  • Like other spirits of the woods and fields, he possesses the power of inspiration and prophecy, in which he is said to have instructed Apollo.
    0
    0
  • They accordingly built a fleet at Naupactus, but before they set sail, Aristodemus was struck by lightning (or shot by Apollo) and the fleet destroyed, because one of the Heraclidae had slain an Acarnanian soothsayer.
    0
    0
  • A hodge-podge of pulse was prepared and offered to Apollo (in his capacity as sun god and ripener of fruits) and the Horae, as the first-fruits of the autumn harvest.
    0
    0
  • It was carried in procession by a boy whose parents were both alive to the temple of Apollo, where it was suspended on the gate.
    0
    0
  • Aetiologists connected both offerings with the Cretan expedition of Theseus, who, when driven ashore at Delos, vowed a thank-offering to Apollo if he slew the Minotaur, which afterwards took the form of the eiresione and Pyanopsia.
    0
    0
  • The chief actors in the ceremony were Augustus himself and his colleague Agrippa, - while, as the extant record tells us, the processional hymn, chanted by youths and maidens first before the new temple of Apollo on the Palatine and then before the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol, was composed by Horace.
    0
    0
  • When Apollo and Poseidon became suitors for her hand, she swore to remain a maiden for ever; whereupon Zeus bestowed upon her the honour of presiding over all sacrifices.
    0
    0
  • Thus Apollo has to fight the oracle serpent of Gaia, and it has been observed that where Apollo prevailed in Greek religion the serpent became a monster to be slain.
    0
    0
  • For the Kouretes, the fish and serpent-like peoples struck down by Zeus or Apollo, see Harrison, Annual of Brit.
    0
    0
  • But since in the early times the consuls as a rule spent only the first months of their year of office in Rome, it is probable that a considerable share of religious business devolved on the city praetor; this was certainly the case with the Festival of the Cross-roads (compitalia), and he directed the games in honour of Apollo from their institution in 212.
    0
    0
  • The hymn to the Delian Apollo ends with an address of the poet to his audience.
    0
    0
  • The latter of these may evidently be taken to belong to Salamis in Cyprus and the festival of the Cyprian Aphrodite, in the same way that the Hymn to Apollo belongs to Delos and the Delian gathering.
    0
    0
  • He adds that there was a famous rhapsodist, Cynaethus of Chios, who was said to be the author of the Hymn to Apollo, and to have first recited Homer at Syracuse about the 69th Olympiad.
    0
    0
  • The Apollo of the Iliad has the character of a local Asiatic deity - " ruler of Chryse and goodly Cilla and Tenedos."
    0
    0
  • He may be compared with the Clarian and the Lycian god, but he is unlike the Apollo of Dorian times, the " deliverer " and giver of oracles.
    0
    0
  • Apollo proclaims at his birth that he will declare the counsel of Father Zeus to men.'
    0
    0
  • Zeus gave laws to Minos; Apollo revealed the Spartan constitution to Lycurgus; Zaleucus received the laws for the Locrians from Athena in a dream; Vishnu and Manu condescended to draw up law-books in India.
    0
    0
  • He took an active part in the subjugation of the Gauls in the north of Italy (225), and after the battle of Cannae (216) was employed by the Romans to proceed to Delphi in order to consult the oracle of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • Three couches were prepared for three pairs of gods - Apollo and Latona, Hercules and Diana, Mercury and Neptune.
    0
    0
  • Similar honours were paid to other divinities in subsequent times - Fortuna, Saturnus, Juno Regina of the Aventine, the three Capitoline deities (Jupiter, Juno, Minerva), and in 217, after the defeat of lake Trasimenus, a lectisternium was held for three days to six pairs of gods, corresponding to the twelve great gods of Olympus - Jupiter, Juno, Neptune, Minerva, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Diana, Vulcan, Vesta, Mercury, Ceres.
    0
    0
  • He takes refuge in the temple at Delphi; but, though Apollo had ordered him to do the deed, he is powerless to protect his suppliant from the consequences.
    0
    0
  • With Aeschylus the punishment ends here, but, according to Euripides, in order to escape the persecutions of the Erinyes, he was ordered by Apollo to go to Tauris, carry off the statue of Artemis which had fallen from heaven, and bring it to Athens.
    0
    0
  • The religion of Zeus is then reformed under the influence of the cult of Apollo, who slays the dragon brought up by the earth-goddess on Parnassus, the seat of one of her oldest sanctuaries.
    0
    0
  • Parnassus becomes the holy mountain of Apollo, and Orestes himself an hypostasis of Apollo "of the mountain," just as Pylades is Apollo "of the plain" similarly Electra, Iphigeneia and Chrysothemis are hypostases of Artemis.
    0
    0
  • Apollo, who has urged Orestes to parricide and has himself expiated the crime of slaying the dragon, is able to purify others in similar case.
    0
    0
  • The claim that Apollo can in every case purify from sin is met by Athens with a counterclaim on behalf of the state.
    0
    0
  • Others attach chief importance to the slaying of Neoptolemus (Pyrrhus) by Orestes at Delphi; according to Radermacher (Das Jenseits im Mythos der Hellenen, 1903), Orestes is an hypostasis of Apollo, Pyrrhus the principle of evil, which is overcome by the god; on the other hand, Usener (Archiv fur Religionswesen, vii., 1899, 334) takes Orestes for a god of winter and the underworld, a double of the Phocian Dionysus the "mountain" god (among the Ionians a summer-god, but in this case corresponding to Dionysus j Xavaiyis), who subdues Pyrrhus "the light," the double of Apollo, the whole being a form of the well-known myths of the expulsion of summer by winter.
    0
    0
  • It is related that he and his sister fell asleep in the temple of Apollo Thymbraeus and that snakes came and cleansed their ears, whereby they obtained the gift of prophecy and were able to understand the language of birds.
    0
    0
  • According to other accounts, having been made prisoner by a stratagem of Odysseus, he declared that Philoctetes must be fetched from Lemnos before Troy could be taken; or he surrendered to Diomedes and Odysseus in the temple of Apollo, whither he had fled in disgust at the sacrilegious murder of Achilles by Paris in the sanctuary.
    0
    0
  • The complete plan of the sacred precinct of Apollo has been recovered, as well as those of a considerable portion of the commerical quarter of Hellenistic and Roman times, of the theatre, of the temples of the foreign gods, of the temples on the top of Mount Cynthus, and of several very interesting private houses.
    0
    0
  • H -A-R B_O U Walker & ockerell that formed the chief entrance of the precinct of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The southernmost of these was the temple of Apollo, but only its back was visible from this side.
    0
    0
  • Beyond them a road branches to the right, sweeping round in a broad curve to the space in front of the temple of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The space to the east and south of the temple of Apollo could also be approached directly from the propylaea of entrance, by turning to the right through a passage-like building with a porch at either end.
    0
    0
  • Just to the north of this may be seen the basis of the colossal statue of Apollo dedicated by the Naxians, with its well-known archaic inscription; two large fragments of the statue itself may still be seen a little farther to the north.
    0
    0
  • The temple of Apollo forms the centre of the whole precinct, Delos Precinct Of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • South of it is the precinct of Artemis, containing within it the old temple of the goddess; her more recent temple was to the south of her precinct, opening not into it but into the open space entered through the southern propylaea of the precinct of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • Outside the precinct of Apollo, on the south, was an open place; between this and the precinct was a house for the priests, and within it, in a kind of court, a set of small structures that may perhaps be identified as the tombs of the Hyperborean maidens.
    0
    0
  • To the north of the precinct of Apollo, between it and the sacred lake, there are very extensive ruins of the commercial town of Delos; these have been only partially cleared, but have yielded a good many inscriptions and other antiquities.
    0
    0
  • It supplied a birthplace to Apollo and Artemis, who were born beneath a palm tree beside its sacred lake, and became for ever sacred to these twin deities.
    0
    0
  • In the 6th century B.C. the influence of the Delian Apollo was at its height; Polycrates of Samos dedicated the neighbouring island of Rheneia to his service and Peisistratus of Athens caused all the area within sight of the temple to be cleared of the tombs by which its sanctity was impaired.
    0
    0
  • On the promontory was an ancient temple of Apollo Actius, which was enlarged by Augustus, who also, in memory of the battle, instituted or renewed the quinquennial games called Actia or Ludi Actiaci.
    0
    0
  • Yet in one respect Apollo was more dominant in the political life; for Apollo possessed the more powerful oracle of Delphi.
    0
    0
  • Two projecting cliffs, named the Phaedriadae, frame the gorge in which the Castalian spring flows out, and just to the west of this, on a shelf above the ravine of the Pleistus, is the site of the Pythian shrine of Apollo and the Delphic oracle.
    0
    0
  • The cathedral of St Januarius, occupying the site of temples of Apollo and Neptune, and still containing some of their original granite columns, was designed by Nicola Pisano, and erected between 1272 and 1316.
    0
    0
  • Tradition places on the island a temple of Apollo, which was destroyed by an earthquake in the reign of the emperor Antoninus Pius.
    0
    0
  • Dionysus further possessed the prophetic gift, and his oracle at Delphi was as important as that of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • There are also four building slips opposite the Apollo Bandar (landing-place) on the south-east side of the enclosure.
    0
    0
  • No satisfactory etymology of the name has been given, the least improbable perhaps being that which connects it with the Doric a714XXa ("assembly"), 1 so that Apollo would be the god of political life (for other suggested derivations, ancient and modern, see C. Wernicke in Pauly-Wissowa's Realencyclopddie).
    0
    0
  • In the legend, as set forth in the Homeric hymn to Apollo and the ode of Callimachus to Delos, Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto.
    0
    0
  • The latter, pursued by the jealous Hera, after long wandering found shelter in Delos (originally Asteria), where she bore a son, Apollo, under a palm-tree at the foot of Mount Cynthus.
    0
    0
  • Before this, Delos - like Rhodes, the centre of the worship of the sun-god Helios, with whom Apollo was wrongly identified in later times - had been a barren, floating rock, but now became stationary, being fastened down by chains to the bottom of the sea.
    0
    0
  • Apollo was born on the 7th day (050,ua-yEviis) of the month Thargelion according to Delian, of the month Bysios according to Delphian, tradition.
    0
    0
  • In Homer Apollo appears only as the god of prophecy, the sender of plagues, and sometimes as a warrior, but elsewhere as exercising the most varied functions.
    0
    0
  • Apollo is also the protector of cattle and herds, hence Poimnius (" god of flocks"), Tragius (" of goats"), Kereatas (" of horned animals").
    0
    0
  • Apollo himself is spoken of as a keeper of flocks, and the legends of his service as a herdsman with Laomedon and Admetus point in the same direction.
    0
    0
  • Here probably also is to be referred the epithet Jyceius, which, formerly connected with AUK- (" shine") and used to support the conception of Apollo as a light-god, is now 1 Hesychius; who also gives the explanation crn s (" fold"), in which case Apollo would be the god of flocks and herds.
    0
    0
  • As such Apollo is KovpoTp600s (" rearer of boys") and patron of the palaestra.
    0
    0
  • The transition is easy to Apollo as a warlike god; in fact, the earlier legends represent him as engaged in strife with Python, Tityus, the Cyclopes and the Aloidae.
    0
    0
  • When Apollo Delphinius with his worshippers from Crete took possession of the earth-oracle Python, he received in consequence the name Pythius.
    0
    0
  • That Python was no fearful monster, symbolizing the darkness of winter which is scattered by the advent of spring, is shown by the fact that Apollo was considered to have been guilty of murder in slaying it, and compelled to wander for a term of years and expiate his crime by servitude and purification.
    0
    0
  • Possibly at Delphi and other places there was an old serpentworship ousted by that of Apollo, which may account for expiation for the slaying of Python being considered necessary.
    0
    0
  • Apollo's oracles, which he did not deliver on his own initiative but as the mouthpiece of Zeus, were infallible, but the human mind was not always able to grasp their meaning; hence he is called Loxias (" crooked," "ambiguous").
    0
    0
  • This side of Apollo's character does not appear in Homer, where Paieon is mentioned as the physician of the gods.
    0
    0
  • Here again, as in the case of Aristaeus and Carneius, the question arises 3 Hence some have derived "Apollo" from aroXXi,vac, "to destroy."
    0
    0
  • Apollo is further supposed to be the father of Asclepius (Aesculapius), whose ritual is closely modelled upon his.
    0
    0
  • Such a task can be fitly undertaken by Apollo, since he himself underwent purification after slaying Python.
    0
    0
  • The metrical form of the oracular responses at Delphi, the important part played by the paean and the Pythian nomos in his ritual, contributed to make Apollo a god of song and music, friend and leader of the Muses (µovvayErr i s).
    0
    0
  • He plays the lyre at the banquets of the gods, and causes Marsyas to be flayed alive because he had boasted of his superior skill in playing the flute, and the ears of Midas to grow long because he had declared in favour of Pan, who contended that the flute was a better instrument than Apollo's favourite, the lyre.
    0
    0
  • A less important aspect of Apollo is that of a marine deity, due to the spread of his cult to the Greek colonies and islands.
    0
    0
  • These maritime cults of Apollo are probably due to his importance as the god of colonization, who accompanied emigrants on their voyage.
    0
    0
  • Lastly, as the originator and protector of civil order, Apollo was regarded as the founder of cities and legislation.
    0
    0
  • Thus, at Athens,Apollo Patroos was known as the protector of the Ionians, and the Spartans referred the institutions of Lycurgus to the Delphic oracle.
    0
    0
  • Roscher, in the article "Apollo" in his Lexikon der Mythologie, derives all the aspects and functions of Apollo from the conception of an original lightand sun-god.
    0
    0
  • But the fact of the gradual development of Apollo as a god of light and heaven, and his identification with foreign sun-gods, is no proof of an original Greek solar conception of him.
    0
    0
  • It was said that Apollo soon after his birth spent a year amongst the Hyperboreans, who dwelt in a land of perpetual sunshine, before his return to Delphi.
    0
    0
  • The most usual attributes of Apollo were the lyre and the bow; the tripod especially was dedicated to him as the god of prophecy.
    0
    0
  • Among the Romans the worship of Apollo was adopted from the Greeks.
    0
    0
  • There is a tradition that the Delphian oracle was consulted as early as the period of the kings during the reign of Tarquinius Superbus, and in 4 3 o a temple was dedicated to Apollo on the occasion of a pestilence, and during the Second Punic War (in 212) the Ludi Apollinares were instituted in his honour.
    0
    0
  • But it was in the time of Augustus, who considered himself under the special protection of Apollo and was even said to be his son, that his worship developed and he became one of the chief gods of Rome.
    0
    0
  • He also erected a new temple on the Palatine hill and transferred the secular games, for which Horace composed his Carmen Saeculare, to Apollo and Diana.
    0
    0
  • Apollo was represented more frequently than any other deity in ancient art.
    0
    0
  • As Apollo Agyieus he was shown by a simple conic pillar; the Apollo of Amyclae was a pillar of bronze surmounted by a helmeted head, with extended arms carrying lance and bow.
    0
    0
  • In the riper period cf art the type is softer, and Apollo appears in a form which seeks to combine manhood and eternal youth.
    0
    0
  • The most famous statue of him is the Apollo Belvidere in the Vatican (found at Frascati, 1455), an imitation belonging to the early imperial period of a bronze statue representing him, with aegis in his left hand, driving back the Gauls from his temple at Delphi (27 9 B.C.), or, according to another view, fighting with the Pythian dragon.
    0
    0
  • In the Apollo Citharoedus or Musagetes in the Vatican, he is crowned with laurel and wears the long, flowing robe of the Ionic bard, and his form is almost feminine in its fulness; in a statue at Rome of the older and more vigorous type he is naked and holds a lyre in his left hand; his right arm rests upon his head, and a griffin is seated at his side.
    0
    0
  • The Apollo Sauroctonus (after Praxiteles), copied in bronze at the Villa Albani in Rome and in marble at Paris, is a naked, youthful, almost boyish figure, leaning against a tree, waiting to strike a lizard climbing up the trunk.
    0
    0
  • Bas-reliefs and painted vases reproduce the contests of Apollo with Tityus, Marsyas, and Heracles, the slaughter of the daughters of Niobe, and other incidents in his life.
    0
    0
  • He is said to have been the first priest of Apollo, his connexion with whom is indicated by his traditional birthplaceLycia or the land of the Hyperboreans, favourite haunts of the god.
    0
    0
  • The Delphian poetess Boeo attributed to him the introducion of the cult of Apollo and the invention of the epic metre.
    0
    0
  • In his hymns he celebrated Opis and Arge, two Hyperborean maidens who founded the cult of Apollo in Delos, and in the hymn to Eilythyia the birth of Apollo and Artemis and the foundation of the Delian sanctuary.
    0
    0
  • His reputed Lycian origin corroborates the view that the cult of Apollo was an importation from Asia to Greece.
    0
    0
  • The ancient Calauria, with which Poros is identified, was given, according to the myth, by Apollo to Poseidon in exchange for Delos; and it became in historic times famous for a temple of the sea-god, which formed the centre of an amphictyony of seven maritime states' - Hermione, Epidaurus, Aegina, Athens, Prasiae, Nauplia, and Orchomenus.
    0
    0
  • Starting from the city and encompassing the island, one passes in succession the promontory Posidium; Cape Phanae, the southern extremity of Chios, with a harbour and a temple of Apollo; Notium, probably the south-western point of the island; Laii, opposite the city of Chios, where the island is narrowest; the town Bolissus (now Volisso), the home of the Homerid poets; Melaena, the north-western point; the wine-growing district Ariusia; Cardamyle (now Cardhamili); the north-eastern promontory was probably named Phlium, and the mountains that cross the northern part of the island Pelinaeus or Pellenaeus.
    0
    0
  • In this case the altar of Apollo at Delphi, upon which on the Greek vases Neoptolemus is frequently represented as taking refuge from Orestes, might be regarded as the pedestal of an invisible image of the god, and as fulfilling the same function as did the base of the actual image of Athene in Troy, towards which Cassandra fled from Ajax.
    0
    0
  • He carried off Marpessa, daughter of Evenus, as his wife and dared to bend his bow against Apollo, who was also her suitor.
    0
    0
  • On the chest of Cypselus, Marpessa is represented as following Idas from the temple of Apollo (by whom, according to some, she had been carried off), and there was a painting by Polygnotus of the rape of the Leucippidae in the temple of the Dioscuri at Athens.
    0
    0
  • She is the daughter of Zeus and Leto, twin-sister and counterpart of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • She is said to have been born a day before him (on the 6th of the month) and tradition assigns them different birthplaces - Delos to Apollo, Ortygia to Artemis.
    0
    0
  • Although Apollo has nothing to do with the earlier cult of Artemis, nor Artemis with that of Delphi, their association was a comparatively early one, and probably originated in Delos.
    0
    0
  • Both Opis (or Oupis) and Hecaerge are names of Artemis, the latter being the feminine of Hecaergos, an epithet of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The protecting influence of Artemis was extended, like that of Apollo, to the highest animal, man.
    0
    0
  • In one version of the story of her birth she is said to have been born a day before Apollo, in order to assist Leto at his birth; women in childbirth invoked her aid, and after delivery offered up their clothes or a lock of hair.
    0
    0
  • The idea of Artemis '.s a virgin goddess, the "queen and huntress, chaste and fair," which obtained great prominence in early times, and seems inconsistent with her association with childbirth, is generally explained as due to her connexion with Apollo, but it is suggested by Farnell that irapOE'os originally meant "unmarried," and that "Apreµcs 7r-ap9Evos may have been originally the goddess of a people who had not yet the advanced Hellenic institutions of settled marriage.
    0
    0
  • The idea dates from the 5th century, and was due to her connexion with Hecate and Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The Greek Artemis was usually represented as a huntress with bow and quiver, or torch in her hand, in face very like Apollo, her drapery flowing to her feet, or, more frequently, girt high for speed.
    0
    0
  • Wherever a barbarian hand offered wrong to any city of the Hellenic sisterhood, it was the arm of Athens which should first be stretched forth in the holy strength of Apollo the Averter.
    0
    0
  • When after the great war with Persia the Aegean cities under the leadership of Athens united in a political league (477 B.C.), they chose as its centre the temple of the Delian Apollo, doubtless through a desire to connect the new alliance with the associations of the old amphictyony.
    0
    0
  • The primary function of the council was to administer the temporal affairs of the two shrines, of which the sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi claimed by far the greater share of attention.
    0
    0
  • Sphinxes were represented on the throne of Apollo at Amyclae and on the metopes at Selinus; in the best period of Greek art a sphinx was sculptured on the helmet of the statue of Athena in the Parthenon at Athens; and sphinxes carrying off children were sculptured on the front feet of the throne of Zeus at Olympia.
    0
    0
  • Apollo, Helios, and Hephaestus were fire, Hera was air, Poseidon was water, Artemis was the moon, Kai Ta Xoora 6Aoiws.
    0
    0
  • The relation is that of Apollo to Zeus in Greek myth.
    0
    0
  • The mother of Apollo, according to Aelian, had the misfortune to be changed into a wolf.
    0
    0
  • That the humming-bird (Nuitziton), which was the god's old shape, should become merely his attendant (like the owl of Pallas, the mouse of Apollo, the goose of Priapus, the cuckoo of Hera), when the god received anthropomorphic form, is an example of a process common in'all mythologies.
    0
    0
  • Plutarch remarked the fact that the Greek myths of Cronus, of Dionysus, of Apollo and the Python, and of Demeter, " all the things that are shrouded in mystic ceremonies and are presented in rites," " do not fall short in absurdity of the legends about Osiris and Typhon."
    0
    0
  • Another has been found beneath the pedestal of Apollo in Delos.
    0
    0
  • The other chief Homeric deities are Apollo and Artemis, children of Zeus by Leto, a mortal mother raised to divinity.
    0
    0
  • Apollo is clearly connected in some way with light, as his name 40a i 30s seems to indicate, and with purity.'
    0
    0
  • Smintheus, one of Apollo's titles in Homer, is connected with the field-mouse (0 7.41.003), one of his many sacred animals.
    0
    0
  • Apollo, in any case, is the young and beautiful archer-god of Homer; Artemis, his sister, is the goddess of archery, who takes her pastime in the chase.
    0
    0
  • This adventure was even more ignominious than that of Poseidon and Apollo when they were compelled to serve Laomedon for hire.
    0
    0
  • Together with Apollo, she was worshipped under the name of Alexandra.
    0
    0
  • It was sacred to Apollo and the Muses, and its water was used in the religious purifications of the "Pythian Pilgrims."
    0
    0
  • The centaurs were the offspring of Ixion and Nephele (the rain-cloud), or of Kentauros (the son of these two) and some Magnesian mares or of Apollo acid Hebe.
    0
    0
  • As children of Apollo, they are taken to signify the rays of the sun.
    0
    0
  • The leading poets of the court dedicated to her a collection of verses entitled Isottaei, styled her their mistress and the chosen of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • Besides, some of the inscriptions are very easily read and record " Apollo Ariminaeus " and " Jupiter Arimin aeus."
    0
    0
  • I plan on going to Hammersmith Apollo next week and i was wondering how do i get from bedford to the actual venue.
    0
    0
  • Apollo astronauts who forced NASA to design a window into the capsule, at a very high cost.
    0
    0
  • The final apotheosis showing a tableau of Apollo was glorious.
    0
    0
  • The world's most powerful rocket, Saturn V, was built to launch the Apollo spacecraft, which carried three astronauts.
    0
    0
  • A Google search on the terms " moon hoax " yields a quarter million hits; " apollo fake " a hundred thousand more.
    0
    0
  • The Apollo moon landing is topping many of these lists.
    0
    0
  • A fine fresco of Apollo playing a lyre - see picture - is thought to represent the young Nero.
    0
    0
  • Like her brother Apollo, Artemis was also associated with music, and was frequently depicted carrying a lyre.
    0
    0
  • Apollo is the god of music, playing a golden lyre.
    0
    0
  • Disguising himself as Apollo, brother of Artemis, he overcame any scruples Callisto may have had and they became lovers.
    0
    0
  • Dispensing with the need for locking screws, Sonos sounders and sounder beacons use Time Saver bases from sister company Apollo Fire Detectors.
    0
    0
  • Apollo's Domain [18] implements limited protected subsystems.
    0
    0
  • The Apollo is already teeming with people as I get in, about 20 minutes before Paradise Lost are due to start their set.
    0
    0
  • Thus samples of regolith returned by the Apollo missions proved valuable in studies of the solar wind.
    0
    0
  • It was he who finally removed the last vestiges of the god Apollo, with the laurel band becoming an ear of barley.
    0
    0
  • Each of the three chefs has two woks sitting on burners that look set to propel a minor version of Apollo XV into space.
    0
    0
  • Its connexion with Apollo as the slayer of the python led to its association with battle and victory; hence it became the custom for a paean to be sung by an army on the march and before entering into battle, when a fleet left the harbour, and also after a victory had been won.
    0
    0
  • The Homeric Hymn to Apollo of Delos (7th century) describes an Ionian population in the Cyclades with a loose religious league about the Delian sanctuary.
    0
    0
  • In the year 12 B.C. Augustus sought out and burned a great many spurious oracles and subjected the Sibylline books to a critical revision; they were then placed by him in the temple of Apollo Patrotis on the Palatine, where we hear of them still existing in A.D.
    0
    0
  • As closely connected with religious life, he was an augur and seer; practised magical arts, especially astrology; founded or rendered accessible many important cults, such as those of Apollo and Dionysus; instituted mystic rites, both public and private; prescribed initiatory and purificatory ritual.
    0
    0
  • By the Egyptians this constellation was symbolized as a couple of young kids; the Greeks altered this symbol to two children, variously said to be Castor and Pollux, Hercules and Apollo, or Triptolemus and Iasion; the Arabians used the symbol of a pair of peacocks.
    0
    0
  • The epithet rrpovoia (" forethought") is due, according to Farnell, to a confusion with irpovaLa, referring to a statue of the goddess standing "before a shrine," and arose later (probably spreading from Delphi), some time after the Persian wars, in which she repelled a Persian attack on the temples "by divine forethought"; another legend attributes the name to her skill in assisting Leto at the birth of Apollo and Artemis.
    0
    0
  • He says they chiefly reverence Tahiti (Hestia), next Papaeus and his wife Apia (Zeus and Ge), then Oitosyros (Apollo) and Argimpasa (Aphrodite Urania).
    0
    0
  • At the south end of the forum are three .halls side by side, similar in plan with a common façade-the central one, the curia or council chamber, the others the offices respectively of the duumvirs and aediles, the principal officials of the city; while the greater part of the west side is occupied by two large buildings-a basilica, which is the largest edifice in Pompeii, and the temple of Apollo, which presents its side to the forum, and hence fills up a large portion of the surrounding space.
    0
    0
  • Among others of the name may be mentioned (3) Athenodorus Of Teos, who played the cithara at the wedding of Alexander the Great and Statira at Susa (324 B.C.); (4) a Greek physician of the 1st century A.D., who wrote on epidemic diseases; and two sculptors, of whom (5) one executed the statues of Apollo and Zeus which the Spartans dedicated at Delphi after Aegospotami; and (6) the other was a son of Alexander of Rhodes, whom he helped in the Laocoon group.
    0
    0
  • The Margites - a humorous poem which kept its ground as the reputed work of Homer down to the time of Aristotle - began with the words, " There came to Colophon an old man, a divine singer, servant of the Muses and Apollo."
    0
    0
  • Parnassus was one of the most holy mountains in Greece, hallowed by the worship of Apollo, of the Muses, and of the Corycian nymphs, and by the orgies of the Bacchantes.
    0
    0
  • The epithet Maleatas, which, as the quantity of the first vowel (a) shows,' cannot mean god of "sheep" or "the apple-tree," is probably a local adjective derived from Malea (perhaps Cape Malea), and may refer to an originally distinct personality, subsequently merged in that of Apollo (see below).
    0
    0
  • The chief festivals held in honour of Apollo were the Carneia, Daphnephoria, Delia, Hyacinthia, Pyanepsia, Pythia and Thargelia (see separate articles).
    0
    0
  • Among the other means of discovering the will of the gods were the casting of lots, oracles of Apollo (in the hands of the college sacris faciundis), but chiefly the examination of the entrails of animals slain for sacrifice (see Omen).
    0
    0
  • Here the connexion of Artemis with the Hyperborean legend (see Apollo) is shown in the names of the maidens (Opis, Hecaerge) who were supposed to have brought offerings from the north to Delos, where they were buried.
    0
    0
  • Apollo Oulios), Xuaia ("purifier,") and cccm Lpa, " she who saves from all evils" (cf.
    0
    0
  • She was beloved of Apollo, who promised to bestow on her the spirit of prophecy if she would comply with his desires.
    0
    0
  • Virgil is serene and lovely like a marble Apollo in the moonlight; Homer is a beautiful, animated youth in the full sunlight with the wind in his hair.
    0
    0
  • He was eventually slain by his own grandson Lugh, the god of light, and a Celtic equivalent of Apollo.
    0
    0
  • Apollo 's Domain [18] implements limited protected subsystems.
    0
    0
  • Apollo's Chariot - A theme park favorite and rated among the top 10 steel coasters worldwide, this amazingly smooth coaster ride features an initial drop of 210 feet as well as eight other drops.
    0
    0
  • Belrepayre Airstream & Retro Trailer Park - In the foothills of the Pyrenees mountains in France you can have a drink at this retro trailer park's Apollo Lounge.
    0
    0
  • Joyride Studios produces a line of vehicles and action figures based on the original series, including Colonial Vipers, Cylon, and Apollo.
    0
    0
  • Apollo, Starbuck and Admiral Adama appear in a series of 12-inch action figures from Majestic Studios.
    0
    0
  • Apollo Diamonds, a gem manufacturing company based in Boston, is an innovative newcomer to the jewelry world whose artificial, cultured stones are virtually indistinguishable from natural diamonds.
    0
    0
  • Apollo gems, however, are cultured with a more subtle, technologically sophisticated method.
    0
    0
  • Currently, Apollo Diamonds can create exquisite gems that range from one-quarter to one-half carat in size.
    0
    0
  • Because the technology is still new and under development, Apollo Diamonds has a very limited range of jewelry available.
    0
    0
  • The company's patented process then grows the diamond crystal by crystal through techniques similar to those used by other created diamond manufacturers such as Gemesis and Apollo Diamonds.
    0
    0
  • In addition to aiding during World War II and in Vietnam, the legendary vessel served as the recovery ship for the Apollo 8 space mission.
    0
    0
  • As a result of this, in 1969, the Speedmaster was worn on the Apollo 11 mission and became the first, and only, watch to be worn on the moon.
    0
    0
  • Buzz Aldrin is a retired astronaut and part of the first lunar landing of Apollo 11.
    0
    0
  • Over time, Apollo served as CAG on Galactica, XO on Pegasus, Commander of Pegasus and eventually returned as CAG to Galactica.
    0
    0
  • Lee Adama, eldest son of Admiral Adama, is also known as Apollo which is his Viper pilot call sign.
    0
    0
  • Captain Apollo - Richard Hatch's Apollo was devoted to his father and cut from the same cloth while Jamie Bamber's Apollo played to his father's strengths, but seemed far more refined.
    0
    0
  • In the 1970s version, Athena is Apollo's sister and the daughter of Adama.
    0
    0
  • Midas, king of Phrygia, who had been appointed judge, declared in favour of Marsyas, and Apollo punished Midas by changing his ears into ass's ears.
    0
    1
  • In another version, the Muses were judges and awarded the victory to Apollo, who tied Marsyas to a tree and flayed him alive.
    0
    1
  • The most famous adytum in Greece was in the temple of Apollo at Delphi.
    7
    7
  • Paeans were sung at the festivals of Apollo (especially the Hyacinthia), at banquets, and later even at public funerals.
    4
    5
  • He adopted the name Grynaeus from the epithet of Apollo in Virgil.
    0
    1
  • The swan played a part in classical mythology as the bird of Apollo, and in Scandinavian lore the swan maidens, who have the gift of prophecy and are sometimes confused with the Valkyries, reappear again and again.
    0
    1
  • Having circulated a prophecy that the son of Apollo was to be born again, he contrived that there should be found in the foundations of the temple to Aesculapius, then in course of construction at Abonouteichos, an egg in which a small live snake had been placed.
    0
    1
  • At Delphi he erected a great group in bronze including the figures of Apollo and Athena, several Attic heroes, and Miltiades the general.
    3
    4
  • They were known in Roman times, and many votive altars dedicated to Apollo and the nymphs have been found.
    4
    5
  • As governor of Gallia Narbonensis, he plundered the temple of the Celtic Apollo at Tolosa (Toulouse), which had joined the Cimbri.
    5
    5
  • Aix-la-Chapelle is the Aquisgranum of the Romans, named after Apollo Granus, who was worshipped in connexion with hot springs.
    5
    6
  • He is an especial favourite of Apollo; and later poets even describe him as son of that god.
    0
    1
  • Aphrodite and Apollo preserved it from corruption and mutilation.
    0
    1
  • By the aid of Apollo, who served him as a slave - either as a punishment for having slain the Cyclopes, or out of affection for his mortal master - he won the hand of Alcestis, the most beautiful of the daughters of Pelias, king of Iolcus.
    0
    1
  • I also saw Apollo Belvidere.
    1
    2
  • Apollo (Richard Hatch), who eventually becomes Boxey's stepdad, seeks to help the boy through his emotional pain so he asks Dr. Wilker to build a replacement robotic daggit.
    0
    1
  • They are captured by the Ovions but eventually are turned back over to Apollo by their Queen.
    0
    1
  • Though deeply missed, the Prometheus design contributed to future vessels including the Daedalus, the Odyssey, the Korolev, the Apollo and the George Hammond.
    0
    1
  • The only genuine spacecraft to make the list, the Apollo 13 earns this accolade for being a genuine vessel launched by NASA in 1970 as the third manned mission to the moon.
    0
    1
  • In the classic series he played the role of Captain Apollo and even earned a nomination for a Golden Globe Award for the part.
    0
    1
  • Apollo carried off from Mount Pelion the nymph Cyrene, daughter or granddaughter of the river-god Peneus, and conveyed her to Libya, where she gave birth to Aristaeus.
    3
    6
  • He was often identified with Zeus, Apollo and Dionysus.
    3
    7
  • A terrible struggle took place for the possession of his body, until Apollo rescued it from the Greeks, and by the command of Zeus washed and cleansed it, anointed it with ambrosia, and handed it over to Sleep and Death, by whom it was conveyed for burial to Lycia, where a sanctuary (Sarpedoneum) was erected in honour of the fallen hero.
    3
    9