Aphorism sentence example

aphorism
  • He often begins an aphorism with a quoted passage.
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  • It proves the old aphorism that if something looks too good to be true then it probably is.
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  • After every translated aphorism, I briefly comment on the association it invoked in me.
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  • The force of this criterion is best expressed in Bishop Butler's famous aphorism, " Probability is the very guide of life.
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  • For Lassalle, who coined the aphorism on science and the proletariat, science, like the state, stands above the class struggle.
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  • Soon afterward, their empire disintegrates, and over the passage of time Outer Mongolia becomes an aphorism for obscurity.
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  • The old aphorism ' travel broadens the mind ' has been wholly forgotten.
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  • These are arranged, professedly on the basis of the aphorism of Augustine, Lombard's favourite authority, that "omnis doctrina vel rerum est vel signorum," into four books, of which the first treats of God, the second of the creature, the third of the incarnation, the work of redemption, and the virtues, and the fourth of the seven sacraments and eschatology.
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  • But the increase of size which constitutes growth is the result of a process of molecular intussusception, and therefore differs altogether from the process of growth by accretion, which may be observed in crystals and is effected purely by the external addition of new matter - so that, in the well-known aphorism of Linnaeus, the word "grow" as applied to stones signifies a totally different process from what is called "growth" in plants and animals.
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  • Its natural form is the aphorism, and to this and to its epigrammatic brilliance, vigour, and uncompromising revolt against all conventions in science and conduct it owes its persuasiveness.
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  • This was popularly condensed into the aphorism, yet current in Holland, that "Art is not the business of the government," and Thorbecke was condemned as the author of it.
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  • Working on these lines, and attaching special importance to common descent, naturalists applied the term with more and more precision, until Linnaeus, in his Philosophia botanica, gave the aphorism, "species tot sunt diversae, quot diversae formae ab initio sunt creatae" - "just so many species are to be reckoned as there were forms created at the beginning."
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