Antrim sentence example

antrim
  • Glacial gravels are well seen near Antrim town, and as drumlins between Ballymena and Ballycastle.
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  • They are a prolongation of the Cretaceous deposits of Antrim (Ireland).
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  • They are prolonged southwards into Antrim, where similar basalts overlying Secondary strata cover a large territory.
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  • Antrim, and spelled the family name "McKinlay."
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  • In 1910 the Antrim Presbytery, Remonstrant Synod and Synod of Munster were united as the General Synod of the non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland.
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  • During this time of comparative rest, rhyolites were extruded locally in county Antrim; and there is very strong evidence that the granite of the Mourne Mountains, and that which cuts the Carlingford gabbro, were added at the same time to the crust.
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  • During the decade only three counties, Dublin, Down and Antrim, showed any increase, the increase being due to the growth of certain urban areas.
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  • Antrim, over 113,000 tons having been produced in 1905.
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  • The only counties in which the Protestant religion predominates are Antrim, Down, Armagh and Londonderry.
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  • It includes the counties Donegal, Londonderry, Antrim, Fermanagh, Tyrone, Ca van, Monaghan, Armagh and Down.
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  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.
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  • On the death of Domhnall in 911 Niall Glundubh became king of Ailech, and he then attacked and defeated the king of Dalriada at Glarryford, in County Antrim, and the king of Ulidia near Ballymena.
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  • Shane O'Neill (C. 1530-1567) was a chieftain whose support was worth gaining by the English even during his father's lifetime; but rejecting overtures from the earl of Sussex, the lord deputy, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.
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  • He fought an indecisive battle with Sorley Boy MacDonnell near Coleraine in 1564, and the following year marched from Antrim through the mountains by Clogh to the neighbourhood of Ballycastle, where he routed the MacDonnells and took Sorley Boy prisoner.
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  • Attended by a small body of gallowglasses, and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast.
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  • In that year he was elected member of the Irish parliament for Dungannon, and joined the earl of Antrim and other lords in concerting measures for supporting Charles I.
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  • But John O'Neill (1740-1798), who represented Randalstown in the Irish parliament 1761-1783, and the county of Antrim from the latter year till his death, took an active part in debate on the popular side, being a strong supporter of Catholic emancipation.
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  • In defending the town of Antrim against the rebels in 1798 O'Neill received wounds from which he died on the 18th of June, being succeeded as Viscount O'Neill by his son Charles Henry St John (1779-1841), who in 1800 was created Earl O'Neill.
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  • Antrim 1863-1880, and who married in 1873 Louisa, daughter of the 11th earl of Dundonald.
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  • Antrim, Ireland, with which there is daily communication by mail steamer.
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  • Having entered the army at an early age, Conway was elected to the Irish parliament in 1741 as member for Antrim, which he continued to represent for twenty years; in the same year he became a member of the English House of Commons, sitting for Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire, and he remained in parliament, representing successively a number of different constituencies, almost without interruption for more than forty years.
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  • Irish tradition represents the future apostle as tending the herds of a chieftain of the name of Miliucc (Milchu), near the mountain called Slemish in county Antrim, but Bury tries to show that the scene of his captivity was Connaught, perhaps in the neighbourhood of Croagh Patrick.
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  • Amongst these are St James, Antrim Road; St Peter's Roman Catholic chapel, with its Florentine spire; Presbyterian churches in Fitzroy Avenue, and Elmwood Avenue, and the Methodist chapel, Carlisle Circus.
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  • The glens of Antrim are deep notches cut by seaward-running streams through the basalt scarp, their floors being formed of Triassic or older rocks.
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  • Unlike most Irish counties, Antrim owes its principal features to rocks of Mesozoic and Cainozoic age.
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  • Except that the Great Northern railway line from Belfast to the south and west runs for a short distance close to the southern boundary of the county, with a branch from Lisburn to the town of Antrim, the principal lines of communication are those of the Northern Counties system, under the control of the Midland railway of England.
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  • Of the total about 50% are Presbyterians, about 20% each Protestant Episcopalians and Roman Catholics; Antrim being one of the most decidedly Protestant counties in Ireland.
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  • The principal towns are Antrim (pop. 1826), Ballymena (10,886), Ballymoney (2952), Carrickfergus (4208), Lame (6670), Lisburn (11,461) and Portrush (1941).
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  • At what date the county of Antrim was formed is not known, but it appears that a certain district bore this name before the reign of Edward II.
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  • The earliest known inhabitants were of Celtic origin, and the names of the townlands or subdivisions, supposed to have been made in the 13th century, are pure Celtic. Antrim was exposed to the inroads of the Danes, and also of the northern Scots, who ultimately effected permanent settlements.
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  • There are some remains of the ecclesiastic establishments at Bonamargy, where the earls of Antrim are buried, Kells, Glenarm, Glynn, Muckamore and White Abbey.
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  • Formerly the term was held to embrace not only all the islands off the Scottish western coast, including the islands in the Firth of Clyde, but also the peninsula of Kintyre, the Isle of Man and the Isle of Rathlin, off the coast of Antrim.
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  • Antrim, Ireland, on the 12th of September 1788, and was the son of Thomas Campbell (1763-1854), a schoolmaster and clergyman of the Presbyterian "Seceders."
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  • After some years of desultory fighting de Courci established his power over that part of Ulster comprised in the modern counties of Antrim and Down, throughout which he built a number of castles, where his vassals, known as "the barons of Ulster," held sway over the native tribes.
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  • Antrim, and have the advantage of being near the coast, so that the alumina can be transported by water-carriage.
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  • Antrim, Ireland, and, after teaching in various places in Vermont and Lower Canada, became a Baptist minister.
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  • The gaol, built on the site of the monastery above mentioned, was formerly the county of Antrim prison.
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  • In the civil wars, from 1641, Carrickfergus was one of the chief places of refuge for the Protestants of the county of Antrim; and on the 10th of June 1642, the first Presbytery held in Ireland met here.
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  • Carrickfergus was a parliamentary borough until 1885; and a county of a town till 1898, having previously (till 1850) been the county town of county Antrim.
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  • Antrim, Ireland, is undoubtedly of Triassic age.
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  • Antrim, Ireland, in the north parliamentary division, situated on a bay of the same name opposite Rathlin.
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  • Supported by several septs of Munster and Connaught, and assisted also by English contingents and by the MacDonnells of Antrim, O'Neill took the castle of Ballyshannon, and after devastating a large part of Tyrconnel he encamped at Knockavoe, near Strabane.
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  • Hugh, who in the family feud with Calvagh had allied himself with O'Neill, now turned round and combined with the English to crush the hereditary enemy of his family; and in 1567 he utterly routed Shane at Letterkenny with the loss of 1300 men, compelling him to seek refuge with the MacDonnells of Antrim, by whom he was treacherously put to death.
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  • Irish Dalriada was the district which now forms the northern part of county Antrim, and from which about A.D.
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  • There is nothing in the town specially worthy of notice, but the environs, including Shane's Castle and Antrim Castle, possess features of considerable interest.
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  • A battle was fought near Antrim between the English and Irish in the reign of Edward III.; and in 1642 a naval engagement took place on Lough Neagh, for Viscount Massereene and Ferrard (who founded Antrim Castle in 1662) had a right to maintain a.
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  • Before the Union Antrim returned two members to parliament by virtue of letters patent granted in 1666 by Charles II.
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  • Next year a movement against subscription was begun in the General Synod of Ulster, culminating (1725) in the placing of the advocates of non-subscription, headed by John Abernethy, D.D., of Antrim, into a presbytery by themselves.
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  • This Antrim presbytery was excluded (1726) from jurisdiction, though not from communion.
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  • The Antrim Presbytery gradually became Arian; the same type of theology affected more or less the Southern Association, known since 1806 as the Synod of Munster.
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  • Reaching county Antrim, green wooded hills plunge directly into the sea; the deep Belfast Lough strikes some 10 m.
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  • They come out as mica-schists under the Carboniferous sandstones of northern Antrim, and disappear southward under the basaltic plateaux.
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  • The Lower Carboniferous Sandstones are conspicuous in the region from Milltown near Inver Bay in southern Donegal to Ballycastle in county Antrim.
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  • In addition to these Brythonic colonies a number of Pictish tribes, who doubtless came over from Scotland, conquered for themselves parts of Antrim and Down where they maintained their independence till late in the historical period.
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  • This was Ulidia, consisting of Dalriada, Dal Fiatach, Dal Araide, including the present counties of Antrim and Down.
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  • They venerate as their founder William Edmundson (1627-1712), a Westmorland man who had borne arms for the Parliament, and who settled in Antrim in 1652.
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  • Bishop Hopkins and other prelates would have allowed ' Lord Antrim's Redshanks, ' a Roman Catholic regiment, to garrison the city.
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  • Antrim Hills also supplies a range of free standing water coolers.
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  • Lynda also teaches word processing on a part-time basis at East Antrim Institute of Further and Higher Education.
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  • Breen Wood Antrim Breen Wood is one of the best examples of old sessile oak woods in Northern Ireland.
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  • In the crannog of Lisnacroghera, county Antrim, iron swords, with sheaths of thin bronze ornamented with scrolls characteristic of the Late Celtic style, iron daggers, an iron spear-head 162 in.
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  • Antrim, was named Shane's Castle.
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