Antlers sentence examples

  • high, with spreading antlers nearly 3 ft.

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  • The antlers of females are simple and generally smaller.

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  • (6) Stalagmite with a few bones and antlers of reindeer, the thickness varying from one to fifteen inches.

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  • Development of horns or antlers on the frontal bones, and gradual complication of form of antlers.

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  • It has been noticed at Woburn Abbey that the antlers are shed and replaced twice a year.

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  • This skin, with the skull and antlers, was sent to Paris, where it was described in 1866 by Professor Milne-Edwards.

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  • With the exception of the reindeer, antlers are confined to the males.

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  • The antlers are smooth, and brownish white in colour, but the hoofs jet black.

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  • As regards their distinctive features, the antlers are of a complex type and situated close to the occipital ridge of the skull, and thus far away from the sockets of the eyes, with the brow-tines in adult males palmated, laterally compressed, deflected towards the middle of the face, and often unsymmetrically developed.

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  • - Lateral metacarpal bones represented only by their lower extremities; antlers present in both sexes, complex.

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  • A stag dragged him from his horse by fixing its antlers in his belt.

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  • The Manchurian roe (Capreolus manchuricus) is about the size of the European species, with antlers of the type of those of the Siberian roe, but more slender, and the coat shorter.

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  • From the fact that the bony horn-core of the hollow-horned ruminants first develops as a separate ossification, as do the horns of the giraffe, while the pedicle of the antlers of the deer grow direct from the frontal bone, it has been proposed to place the hollow-horned ruminants (inclusive of the prongbuck) and the giraffes in one group and the deer in another.

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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Cervus; antlers small, with a brow-tine and an unbranched beam, supported on long bony pedicles, continued downwards as convergent ridges on the forehead; upper canines of male large and tusk-like.

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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in preceding; antlers (as in the following genera) present only in the male, arising at right angles to the median longitudinal line of the skull, and extending at first in the plane of the forehead, after which, when in their fullest development, they expand into a broad palmation margined with snags.

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  • caribou), which is a larger animal with shorter and more massive antlers, in which the great terminal expansions are in approximation to the brow-tine owing to the shortness of the beam.

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  • - Antlers rounded, usually with five or more tines, generally including a bez (second), and always a trez (third); coat of adult generally unspotted, with a large lightcoloured disk surrounding the tail; young, spotted.

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  • In stature they range from the size of a hare to that of a rhinoceros; and their horns vary in size and shape from the small and simple spikes of the oribi and duiker antlers to the enormous and variously shaped structures borne respectively by buffaloes, wild sheep and kudu and other large antelopes.

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  • From the presence of these well-marked antlers the skeleton would at first sight be set down as that of a small and primitive deer, conforming in regard to the structure of these appendages to the American type of the group. Mr W.

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  • Whatever be the ultimate verdict, the association of antlers - and these, be it noticed, conforming almost exactly with the forked type characteristic of American deer - with an antilopine type of skull, skeleton and teeth in Merycodus is a most interesting and unexpected feature.

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  • WATER-DEER, a small member of the deer-tribe from northern China differing from all other Cervidae except the muskdeer (with which it has no affinity) by the absence of antlers in both sexes.

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  • Horns or antlers usually present, at least in the male sex.

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  • - Skull of Chinese Water-Deer, Hydrelaphus inermis (adult male), a Deer without Antlers, but with largely developed upper canine teeth.

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  • Either we must regard Merycodus as a deer which parallels the antelopes and the prongbuck in every detail of skeletal structure, or else, like the prongbuck, an antelope separated from the main stock at a date sufficiently early to have permitted the development of a distinct type of cranial appendages, namely, antlers in place of true horns.

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  • The antlers make their appearance at an unusually early age.

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  • " When the antlers are freed from the velvet - a process usually assisted by the animal rubbing them against tree stems or boughs - they have a more or less rugose surface, owing to the grooves formed in them by the nutrient blood-vessels.

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  • - Antlers, with one exception, present in the male; liver without a gall-bladder; a face-gland, and a gland-pit in the skull.

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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Cervus; antlers large, without a brow-tine or sub-basal snag, dichotomously forked, with the upper prong of the fork curving forwards and dividing, and the lower prong long, simple, and projected backwards, the beam making a very marked angle with the plane of the face; tail very long; vomer as in Capreolus.

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  • - Antlers smaller and simpler, four-tined, with a trez (third), but no bez (second); coat of adult spotted, at least in summer, with a white area bordered by black in the region of the tail, which is also black and white.

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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Rangifer; antlers wanting; upper canines of males tusk-like and growing from semi-persistent pulps; cheek-teeth tall-crowned (hypsodont); tail moderate.

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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Rangifer; antlers rather small, without a brow-tine or sub-basal snag, dichotomously forked, with the upper or posterior prong again forking; tail rudimentary; vomer not dividing posterior nasal aperture of skull.

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  • Gadow is of opinion that the antlers of the deer, the hornlike protuberances on the skull of the giraffe, and the true horns of the prongbuck and other hollow-horned ruminants (Bovidae) are all different stages of evolution from a single common type: the antlers of the deer being the most primitive, and the horns of the Bovidae the most specialized.

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  • Although a few living species have the antlers in the form of simple spikes in the adult male, in the great majority of species they are more or less branched; while in some, like the elk and fallow-deer, they expand into broad palmated plates, with tines, or snags, on one or both margins.

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  • The antlers have the trez-tine near the small brow-tine, and the palmation beginning near the former.

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  • And it is fair to remember in her defence that Pirkheimer when he denounced her was old, gouty and peevish, and that the immediate occasion of his outbreak against his friend's widow was a fit of anger because she had not let him have a pair of antlers - a household ornament much prized in those days - to which he fancied himself entitled out of the property left by Darer.

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  • Owing to liability to necrosis, the permanent retention of such a mass of dead bone would be dangerous; and the antlers are consequently shed annually (or every few years), to be renewed the following year, when, till the animal becomes past its prime, they are larger than their predecessors.

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  • Some of these forms are, however, more or less intermediate between the two main types, as is a pair of antlers from Novaia Zemlia described by the present writer as R.

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  • In the antlers of the red-deer group, which form the type of the whole series, the following names have been applied to their different component parts and branches.

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  • "The antlers of young deer are in the form of simple spikes; and this form is retained in the South American brockets, although the simple antlers of these deer appear due to degeneration, and are not primitive types.

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  • - Nearly related to the last, but the antlers still smaller, with shorter pedicles and divergent frontal ridges; upper canines of male not everted at the tips.

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  • A very beautiful stag (shika), with eight-branched antlers, inhabits the remote woodlands, and there are five species of antelope (kamo-shika) which are found in the highest and least accessible parts of the mountains.

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  • The antlers are greatly palmated and of enormous size, fine specimens measuring as much as 11 ft.

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  • In the deer of the sambar group, where the antlers never advance beyond a three-tined type, the shedding is frequently, if not invariably, very irregular; but in the majority at least of the species with complex antlers the replacement is annual, the new appendages attaining their full development immediately before the pairing-season.

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  • In such species there is a more or less regular annual increase in the complexity of the antlers up to a certain period of life, after which they begin to degenerate."

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  • - Antlers without a bez, but with a trez-tine, above which the beam is more or less palmated, and generally furnished with numerous snags; coat of adult spotted in summer, uniform in winter, with black and white markings in the region of the tail similar to those of Pseudaxis; young, spotted.

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  • - Antlers rounded, threetined, with the bezand trez-tines wanting, and the beam simply forked at the summit; coat either uniform or spotted at all seasons.

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  • - Antlers flattened or rounded, without bezor trez-tine, the beam dichotomously forking, and one or both branches again forked, so that the number of tines is at least four; brow-tine forming a right angle or a continuous curve with the beam; coat of adult generally more or less uniform, of young spotted.

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  • The antlers are short, upright and deeply furrowed, the beam forking at about two-thirds of its length, and the upper prong again dividing, thus making three points.

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  • It is a smaller animal than the American woodland race, with antlers approximating to those of the barren-ground race, but less elongated, and with a distinct back-tine in the male, the brow-tines moderately palmated and frequently nearly symmetrical, and the bez-tine not excessively expanded..

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  • Female antlers are generally much smaller than those of males, although occasionally as large, but with much fewer points.

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  • tarandus arcticus, which is a small animal with immense antlers characterized by the length of the beam, and the consequent wide separation of the terminal palmation from the brow-tine; and the other by the woodland-caribou (R.

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  • The leading characters of antlers are described under Pecora, but these structures may be defined somewhat more fully in the following passage from the present writer's Deer of all Lands:- " Antlers are supported on a pair of solid bony processes, or pedicles, arising from the frontal bones of the skull, of which they form an inseparable portion; and if in a fully adult deer these pedicles be sawn through, they will generally be found to consist of solid, ivory-like bone, devoid of perceptible channels for the passage of blood-vessels.

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  • The pedicles are always covered with skin well supplied with blood-vessels; and in young deer, or those in which the antlers have been comparatively recently shed, the covering of skin extends over their summits, when they appear as longer or shorter projections on the forehead, according to the species.

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  • But the antlers of all deer by no means conform to this type; and in certain groups other names have to be adopted for the branches.

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  • Indeed, no living deer shows such primitive spikelike antlers in the adult, and it is doubtful whether such a type is displayed by any known extinct form, although many have a simple fork.

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  • Antlers arising at acute angles to the median line of the skull (as in the following genera), at first projecting from the plane of the forehead, and then continued upwards nearly in that plane, supported on short pedicles, and furnished with a brow-tine, never regularly forked at first division, but generally of large size, and with not less than three tines; the skull without ridges on the frontals forming the bases of the pedicles of the antlers.

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  • The head is long and narrow, with a prominent ridge for the support of the antlers, moderate-sized ears, and a narrow and pointed muzzle.

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  • FALLOW-DEER (that is, DUN Deer, in contradistinction to the red deer, Cervus [Dama] dama), a medium-sized representative of the family Cervidae, characterized by its expanded or palmated antlers, which generally have no bez-tine, rather long tail (black above and white below), and a coat spotted with white in summer but uniformly coloured in winter.

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  • The frontal appendages, when present, are confined (except in the case of the reindeer) to the males, and take the form of antlers, that is to say of type No.

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  • As we descend in the geological series the deer have simpler antlers, as in the European Miocene Dicrocerus; while in the Oligocene Amphitragulus, Dremotherium and Palaeomeryx, constituting the family Palaeomerycidae, antlers were absent, and the crowns of the molars so low that the whole depth of the hollows between the crescentic columns is completely visible.

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  • Towards the completion of its growth a more or less prominent ring of bone, termed the burr or coronet, is deposited at its base just above the junction with the pedicle; this ring tending to constrict the blood-vessels, and thus cut off the supply of blood from the antlers...

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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Rangifer; antlers very variable in size, forming a marked angle with the plane of the face, without a brow-tine; when consisting of more than a simple prong, dichotomously forked, frequently with a subbasal snag, and always with the lower prong of the fork projected from the front edge of the beam, in @ome cases the lower, in others the upper, and in others both prongs again dividing; tail long; tarsal gland generally present; metatarsal gland very variable, both as regards presence and position; vomer dividing the inner aperture of the nostrils in the skull into two distinct chambers.

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  • - Antlers large and complex, without a sub-basal snag, and the upper prong more developed than the lower one; metatarsal gland absent; tail short; face moderately long; face-gland and gland-pit well developed; upper canines usually present in male.

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  • - Antlers small and simple, forming a single dichotomous fork; metatarsal gland absent; tail short; face moderately long; face-gland and gland-pit well developed; upper canines present in both sexes.

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  • - Skull and metacarpals generally as in Mazama; size very small; hair coarse and brittle; antlers in the form of short, simple spikes; cannon-bones very short; tail very short or wanting; no whorls in the hair of the face; face-gland moderately large, and gland-pit deep and oval; tarsal and metatarsal glands wanting; ectocuneiform bone of tarsus united with the naviculocuboid.

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  • - Antlers wanting in both sexes; liver furnished with a gall-bladder; no face-gland or gland-pit.

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  • In all red-deer the antlers are rounded, and show a more or less marked tendency to form a cup at the summit.

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  • Wapiti, on the other hand, show a marked tendency to the flattening of the antlers, with a great development of the fourth tine, which is larger than all the others, and the whole of the tines above this in the same plane, or nearly so, this plane being the same as the long axis of the animal.

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  • The hangul (C. cashmirianus) of Kashmir is a distinct dark-coloured species, in which the antlers tend to turn in at the summit; while C. yarcandensis, of the Tarim Valley, Turkestan, is a redder animal, with a wholly rufous tail, and antlers usually terminating in a simple fork placed in a transverse plane.

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  • Another Asiatic species is the great shou (C. affinis) of the Chumbi Valley, in which the antlers curve forwards in a remarkable manner.

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  • Lastly C. albirostris, of Tibet, is easily recognized by its white muzzle, and smooth, whitish, flattened antlers, which have fewer tines than those of the other members of the group, all placed in one plane.

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  • The rusine or sambar group of Cervus, of which the characteristics are given above, comprises a considerable number of longtailed species with three-tined antlers from the Indo-Malay countries and some parts of China.

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  • The largest and handsomest is the sambar of India (Cervus [Rosa] unicolor), characterized by its massive and rugged antlers.

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  • The rusa, or Javan sambar, C. (R.) hippelaphus, is a lighter-coloured and smaller deer than the Indian sambar, with longer, slenderer and less rugged antlers.

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  • On the other hand, the larger and handsomer chital, or spotted deer (C. axis), stands apart by its white-spotted fawn-red coat and differently formed antlers.

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  • In Siam it is replaced by C. (R.) schomburgki, in which the antlers are of a still more complex type.

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  • Finally, we have the thamin, or Eld's deer, C. (R.) eldi, ranging from Burma to Siam, and characterized by the continuous curve formed by the beam and the brow-tine of the antlers.

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  • All these differ from the members of the genus Cervus in having no brow-tine to the antlers, which, in common with those of the roe-deer, belong to what is called the forked type.

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  • The antlers are large and curve forwards, giving off an upright snag near the base, and several vertical tines from the upper surface of the horizontal portion.

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  • The large ears, brownand-white face, short, black-tipped tail, and antlers without large basal snag serve to distinguish the mule-deer M.

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  • They are about the size of fallowdeer, and have simply forked antlers.

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  • nemorivaga, are Central and South American deer of the size of roe-bucks or smaller, with simple spike-like antlers, tufted heads and the hair of the face radiating from two whorls on the forehead so that on the nose the direction is downwards.

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  • The smallest of all deer is the Chilian pudu (Padua pudu), a creature not much larger than a hare, with almost rudimentary antlers.

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  • The antlers of the bucks are small and simple; The Indian Muntjac (Cervulus muntjac).

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  • the main stem or beam, after giving off a short brow-tine, inclining backwards and upwards, being unbranched and pointed, and when fully developed curving inwards and somewhat downwards at the tip. These small antlers are supported upon pedicles, or processes of the frontal bones, longer than in any other deer, the front edges of these being continued downwards as strong ridges passing along the sides of the face above the eyes.

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  • Among these, the Burmese C. muntjac grandicornis is noteworthy on account of its large antlers.

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  • The last-mentioned species, by its frontal tuft, small rounded ears, general brown coloration, and minute antlers, connects the typical muntjacs with the small tufted deer or tufted muntjacs of the genus Elaphodus of eastern China and Tibet.

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  • These last have coarse bristly hair of a purplish-brown colour with light markings, very large head-tufts, almost concealing the minute antlers, of which the pedicles do not extend as ribs down the face.

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  • The characters of the bones preserved, and certain rude but graphic representations carved on bones or reindeers' antlers, enable us to know that they were rather small in size and heavy in build, with large heads and rough shaggy manes and tails, much like, in fact, the recently extinct tarpans or wild horses of the steppes of the south of Russia, and the still-surviving Mongolian wild pony or " Przewalski's horse."

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  • accelerate, accelerating down the fireroad, riders banging into each other and handlebars clashing like deer antlers in battle.

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  • If I find shed antlers can I collect them?

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  • In wide open fields we saw a herd of deer some with huge antlers.

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  • Hundreds of pairs of reindeer antlers were also found, dating from 8000 years ago.

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  • A ditch about 2m deep was dug, with picks made of deer antlers.

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  • He appears as a great man with stag antlers crowning his head, sometimes leading a pack of spectral hounds.

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  • The red arrow, between the stag's antlers, alludes to the famous tradition of William Rufus ' death.

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  • antlers of a reindeer stag on a stick, three painted white and three painted red or black.

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  • antlers of the deer.

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  • Popular items for the stags include stag antlers, blow up dolls, handcuffs, inflatable sheep, rubber boobs & bare bum shorts.

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  • Ken and Kris discover poachers who are shooting elk with a crossbow to cut off the antlers.

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  • Some carried greenery including mistletoe, others bells and/or ceremonial staves of antlers ' horns.

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  • moose antlers were often six feet wide.

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  • palmate antlers of the fallow bucks.

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  • The stags, (male red deer) are in the process of growing their new antlers.

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  • While both male and female reindeer grow antlers, MOST males will drop their antler by early December.. .

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  • reindeer antlers were also found, dating from 8000 years ago.

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  • stag antlers crowning his head, sometimes leading a pack of spectral hounds.

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  • When hunting stags, the hunters will choose a deer with a fine set of antlers for trophies, whereas any hind will suffice.

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  • stags ' antlers as souvenirs of the chase.

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  • stags with the golden antlers come from the crest of Erith where they were a connection with Lord Eardley of Belvedere House.

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  • In lacking a browtine, and dividing in a regular fork-like manner some distance above the burr, the large and cylindrical antlers of this species conform to the general structural type characteristic of the American deer.

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  • high at the shoulder), the typical representative of a genus (Capreolus) in which the antlers lack a brow-tine and belong to what is characterized as the forked type, while the tail is rudimentary (see DEER).

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  • Red deer (Cervus elaphus barbarus), which differ from the typical European species only in the fact that the second tine is absent from their antlers, a peculiarity which they share with the red deer of Spain and Corsica, are still found in the forest of Beni Saleh in the department of Constantine, but are being exterminated by forest fires and poaching Arabs.

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  • REINDEER, in its strict sense the title of a European deer distinguished from all other members of the family Cervidae (see Deer), save those of the same genus, by the presence of antlers in both sexes; but, in the wider sense, including Asiatic and North American deer of the same general type, the latter of which are locally designated caribou.

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  • The Siberian roe (C. pygargus), which is common in the Altai, is larger and paler than the type species, with shorter and more hairy ears, a larger white rump-patch, and small irregular snags on the inner border of the antlers.

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  • These deer are particularly fond of horsechestnuts, which the stags are said to endeavour to procure by striking at the branches with their antlers.

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  • No horns or antlers.

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  • - Head of Siamese Deer (Cervus schomburgkii), showing antlers.

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  • There are no horns or antlers.

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  • - Antlers in the form of simple unbranched spikes; metatarsal, and in one case also the tarsal gland absent; tail very short; face elongated; face-gland small and gland-pit deep and triangular; hair of face radiating from two whorls; upper canines sometimes present in old males.

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  • (See Pecora; Artjodactyla and Ungulata.) Briefly, deer may be defined as Pecora presenting the following characteristics: - either antlers present in the male, or when these are absent, the upper canines large and sabre-like, and the lateral metacarpal bones represented only by their lower extremities.

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  • White-tailed Group, Subgenus Dorcelaphus or Odocoileus.- Antlers large and complex, with a sub-basal snag, and the lower prong more or less developed at the expense of the upper one; metatarsal gland usually present; tail long or moderate, and hairy below; face very long and narrow; the face-gland small, and the gland-pit in the skull of moderate extent; no upper canines; size generally large.

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  • The second group of the genus Cervus, forming the subgenus Pseudaxis, is typified by the handsome little Japanese deer, or sika, C. (P.) sica, in which the antlers are four-tined, and covered with red "velvet" when first grown, while the coat is fully spotted in summer, but more or less uniformly brown in winter.

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  • Nearly allied to the preceding is the barasingha or rucervine group (subgenus Rucervus), in which the antlers are of a different and generally more complex character.

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  • (Blastoceros) dichotoma, representing a subgenus in which the complex antlers lack a basal snag, while the hair of the back is reversed.

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  • (B.) bezoartica, of the Argentine pampas is a much smaller animal, of paler colour, with three-tined antlers.

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  • The stags, ( male red deer) are in the process of growing their new antlers.

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  • While both male and female reindeer grow antlers, MOST males will drop their antler by early December...

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  • When she came back to England she brought from Europe scores of stags ' antlers as souvenirs of the chase.

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  • The red stags with the golden antlers come from the crest of Erith where they were a connection with Lord Eardley of Belvedere House.

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  • A First Christmas onesie with reindeer antlers on the tush probably will be a wardrobe choice you (and someday your child) may learn to regret.

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  • Accents include colorful blankets, ironware lamps and tables, antlers (either alone or crafted into items such as chandeliers or tables) and hide or skin rugs and throws.

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  • Antlers can also be used to make table and floor lamps.

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  • Another common natural element found in lodge style decor are furnishings made from deer and elk antlers.

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  • Male deer and elk shed their antlers every year.

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  • Rustic furniture makers create stunning lamps and chandeliers from these antlers.

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  • Add a couple of rustic nightstands featuring antlers or twigs to complete the bed ensemble before moving to the other pieces.

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  • Just like the Indian pottery lamps which are made with the earth found in the Southwestern deserts, antler lamps are very attractive, rustic lamps that are made from deer or elk antlers.

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  • The animals shed their antlers every year, which makes this material very plentiful, as the animals don't have to be hunted in order to attain the antlers.

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  • Their ready-made mirrors include frames made from reclaimed wood, frames adorned with antlers and twigs, and even frames made with rough wood bark.

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  • Try hunting down a pair of moose, elk or deer antlers at a flea market or online mercantile, or hang up a pair of horseshoes over the door for good luck.

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  • Other items for the walls include old-fashioned wrought iron wall sconces, mounted antlers, and vintage western signs.

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  • The antlers can be done out of fondant or even white pipe cleaners.

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  • Place feathers or antlers around the table, too.

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  • Popular choices include a Santa's hat, reindeer antlers, ornament, or small box of holiday goodies.

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  • Other games can involve Santa hats, reindeer antlers, Christmas cookies-your imagination is not limited.

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  • Reindeer antlers, Santa hats and jingle bell elf hats and shoes make fabulous choices for caroling.

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  • In addition, be sure to avoid midriff bearing tops, baggy pants and any head coverings besides festive hats and antlers.

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  • Dressing up as a reindeer can be as simple as just wearing small reindeer antlers on your head.

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  • Reindeer antlers are an easy way to add some holiday cheer to your child's costume wardrobe with little investment.

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  • The rustic ambience is magical, with cattle antlers on the rafters, cowboy saddles on the walls, and an enormous deer horn chandelier towering above it all.

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  • To drive down a Sussex valley With the red antlers to be seen at the rear.

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  • Deer who live in forests have larger antlers than those who live on moor land.

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