Antennae sentence example

antennae
  • Arms, tentacles, and antennae stretched for it.
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  • The first antennae are exceptional in branching, if at all, at the third joint.
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  • The antennae are long and thread-like, composed at first of few joints, but the number of these latter apparently increases at each moult.
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  • They are small insects, having straight antennae, and a compressed, usually very short abdomen with the second or second and third segments greatly developed, and the rest imbricated, and concealing the partially coiled ovipositor.
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  • Spiders on the contrary have no antennae, no separate head," an unsegmented abdomen and an additional pair of legs.
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  • In 1892 he distinguished the former as those in which the first antennae of the male have both members modified for holding the female, and the genital openings of the female have a ventral position, sometimes in close proximity, sometimes strongly lateral; the latter as those in which the first antennae of the male are similar to those of the female, the function of holding her being transferred to the male maxillipeds, while the genital openings of the female are dorsal, though at times strongly lateral.
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  • The limbs, including antennae and mouth organs, never exceed seven definite pairs.
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  • Mayflies and dragon-flies danced in the sunlight; lizards darted across the paths; and legions of spiders pervaded the grass, many very beautiful - frosted - silver backs, or curious, like the saltigrades, who took a few steps and then gave a leap. There were crickets in infinite numbers; and flies innumerable, from slim daddy-long-legs to ponderous, black, hairy fellows known to science as Dejeaniae; hymenopterous insects in profusion, including our old friend the bishop of Ambato (possibly Dielis), in company with another formidable stinger, with chrome antennae, called by the natives ` the Devil '; and occasional Phasmas (caballo de palo) crawling painfully about, like animated twigs."
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  • It was then proposed to arrange a detector so that it was affected by the algebraic sum of the two oscillations, and by swivelling round the double receiving antennae to locate the direction of the sending station by finding out when the detector gave the best signal.
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  • Other inventors had professed to find a solution of the problem by the use of looped receiving antennae or antennae inclined in various directions.
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  • The antennae of Diptera, which are also extremely important in classification, are thread-like in the more primitive families, such as the Tipulidae (daddy-long-legs), where they consist of a considerable number of joints, all of which except the first two, and sometimes also the last two, are similar in shape; in the more specialized families, such as the Tabanidae (horse-flies), Syrphidae (hover-flies) or Muscidae (house-flies, blue-bottles and their allies), the number of antennal joints is greatly reduced by coalescence, so that the antennae appear to consist of only three joints.
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  • It is customary to divide the Orthorrhapha into the two divisions Nematocera and Brachycera, in the former of which the antennae are elongate and in a more or less primitive condition, as described above, while in the latter these organs are short, and, as already explained, apparently composed of only three joints.
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  • The fact that the single pair of prae-oral appendages of trilobites, known only as yet in one genus, is in that particular case a pair of uni-ramose antennae - does not render the association of trilobites and Arachnids improbable.
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  • About twenty-seven species are now known, all characterized by length not excee 4 ding 06 of an inch, flat wings, three articulations in the antennae, one or two articulations in the tarses, with digitules, but without cornicles on the abdomen.
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  • The first antennae have a lamellar appendage at the end of the peduncle, a decidedly non-entomostracan feature.
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  • The second antennae, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae may also be claimed as of malacostracan type.
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  • In this tribe the males have both antennae of the first pair as sensory organs.
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  • Here the males have one or the other of the first pair of antennae modified into a grasping organ for holding the female.
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  • In his method three vertical antennae are employed, placed at equidistant distances, and oscillations are created in the three with a certain relative difference of phase.
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  • Very valuable work in devising forms of antennae for directive radio-telegraphy has been done by MM.
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  • It is said that 13,000 such olfactory organs are present on the feeler of a wasp, and 40,000 on the complex antennae of a male cockchafer.
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  • Little is known of the form of the appendages in the lowest archaic Arachnida, but the tendency of those of the prosomatic somites has been (as in the Crustacea) to pass from a generalized bi-ramose or multi-ramose form to, that of uni-ramose antennae, chelae and walking legs.
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  • In the latter the single pair of antennae springing up from each side of the camerostome or hypostome or upper lip-lobe are seen.
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  • The antennae, usually bottle-brush shaped (plumose) in the male sex, are less hairy in the female.
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  • First antennae of male and female almost always articulated alike."
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  • The second antennae are usually the chief motororgans for swimming, walking and climbing.
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  • The antennal segment apparently entirely disappears, with the exception of a pair of appendages it bears; these become the antennae; it is possible that the original segment, or some part of it, may even become a portion of the actual antennae.
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  • The title " branching horns " alludes to the second antennae, which are two-branched except in the females of Holopedium, with each branch setiferous, composed of only two to four joints.
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  • The sense organs are eyes, antennae, sensory styles and a statocyst in a few species.
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  • The antennae are short tubular extensions of the body wall, sometimes retractile with a depressed tip from which protrudes a tuft of fine stiff bristles.
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  • The head is large, the neck slender, the antennae short and the legs longish, and the appearance of the long stalk-like waist of the ant is produced by a patch of whitish hair on each side of the forepart of the abdomen which has the effect of cutting away the parts of the segments so covered, leaving a narrow dark-coloured median area to represent the waist.
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  • The antennae of these weevils are short and end in a knob; those of the Longicorns are very much larger, but the weevil-like look is produced by the presence of a knob-like swelling upon the third joint, the terminal portion of the antenna being so extremely fine as to be almost invisible.
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  • Marconi, however, gave in 1906 the first really practical solution of the problem by the use of bent transmitting and receiving antennae.
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  • The sexes in Diptera are usually alike, though in a number of families with short antennae the males are distinguished by the fact that their eyes meet together (or nearly so) on the forehead.
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  • The eyes are well developed, with numerous facets; the antennae minal one shaped like that of the are transparent, with few nervures, flight.
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  • The female is larger than the male and differs from it and the other forms in the last joint of the antennae.
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  • A third genus, Chonopeltis (Thiele, 1900), has suckers, but has lost its first antennae, at least in the female.
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  • The first antennae never have more than eight joints.
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  • The Dichelestiidae, on account of their sometimes many-jointed first antennae, are referred also to this tribe by Giesbrecht.
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  • Additional paired antennae may occur within the coronal surface, which is the seat of the sensory styles, of less complex structure, which occur in many genera.
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  • There are also two pairs of distal antennae.
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  • As in all Arachnida there is only a single pair of appendages in front of the mouth, and these were onebranched, long and filiform and acted as antennae.
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  • The resemblance also extends to the general form of the body and to the length and thickness of the wings and antennae.
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  • Similar modification of the antennae in the Longicorn Estigmenida variabilis brings about the resemblance between this beetle and a beetle, Estigmena chinensis, one of the Phytophaga of the family Hispidae.
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  • All insects have the same regional division of the body into head, thorax and abdomen, the same number of legs, a pair of antennae and a segmented abdomen.
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  • Of the corresponding pairs of appendages thirteen belong to the head and trunk, two pairs of antennae, one pair of mandibles, two pairs of maxillae, followed by three which may be all maxillipeds or may help to swell the number of trunk-legs to which the next five pairs belong.
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  • Willemoes Suhm, which makes up for its vanished eyes by its extraordinarily elongate and dentated claws; in Psalidopus huxleyi, Wood-Mason and Alcock (1892), bristling with spikes from head to tail; in the Nematocarcinidae, with their long thread-like limbs and longer antennae; in species of Aristaeopsis reported by Chun from deep water off the east coast of Africa, bright red prawns nearly a foot long, with antennae about five times the length of the body.
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  • Only in the male do the second antennae attain considerable length, with strong resemblance to what is found in some of the Amphipoda.
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  • All the known forms of plant-life are either fungi or allied to them, and many are only microscopic. The most interesting inhabitants of Mammoth Cave are the blind, wingless grasshoppers, with extremely long antennae; blind, colourless crayfish (Cambarus pellucidus, Telk.); and the blind fish, Amblyopsis spelaeus, colourless and viviparous, from 1 in.
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  • The antennules (or first antennae) are almost universally regarded as true appendages, though they differ from all the other appendages in the fact that they are always innervated from the " brain " (or preoral ganglia), and that they are uniramous in the nauplius larva and in all the Entomostracan orders.
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  • The antennae (second antennae) are of special interest on account of the clear evidence that, although preoral in position in all adult Crustacea, they were originally postoral appendages.
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  • The functions of the antennae are more varied than is the case with the antennules.
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  • A very curious function sometimes discharged by the antennules or antennae of Decapods is that of forming a respiratory siphon in sand-burrowing species.
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  • The mandibles, like the antennae, have, in the nauplius, the form of biramous swimming limbs, with a masticatory process originating from the proximal part of the protopodite.
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  • The most important excretory or renal organs of the Crustacea are two pairs of glands lying at the base of the antennae and of the second maxillae respectively.
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  • In nearly all Crustacea the antennules and often also the antennae bear groups of hair-like filaments in which the chitinous cuticle is extremely delicate and which do not taper to a point but end bluntly.
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  • These may be formed by the modification of almost any of the appendages, often the antennules or antennae or some of the thoracic limbs, or even the mandibular palps (some Ostracoda).
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  • In those Copepods in which the palps of the mandibles as well as the antennae are biramous and natatory, the first three pairs of appendages retain throughout life, with little modification, the shape and function which they have in the nauplius stage, and must, in all likelihood, be regarded as approximating to those of the primitive Crustacea.
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  • The eyes were probably stalked, the antennae and mandibles biramous and natatory, and both armed with masticatory processes.
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  • The barnacles and their allies, forming the group Cirripedia or Thyrostraca, sometimes treated as a separate sub-class, are distinguished by being sessile in the adult state, the larval antennules serving as organs of attachment, and the antennae being lost.
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  • The antennae are usually elbowed, and often end in a club-shaped swelling.
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  • The basal portion of the antennae frequently lies in a depression at the side of the rostrum, and this gives the antennae the appearance of emerging half-way along the rostrum.
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  • The antennae are elbowed, and clavate, with the basal portion inserted in a groove.
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  • The antennae are 7-jointed.
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  • The antennae are straight, and inserted upon the head just in front of the eyes; they are 11-jointed, and serrated or toothed in the inside.
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  • The females are always wingless, but are provided with antennae, legs and well-developed mouth-parts.
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  • Like the antennae of insects, they act as feelers.
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  • The same parts of the male, magnified, to show arrangement of antennae.
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  • The brain no longer consists solely of the nerve-ganglion-mass proper to the prostomial lobe, as in Chaetopoda, but is a composite (syncerebrum) produced by the fusion of this and the nerve-ganglion-masses proper to the prosthomeres or segments which pass forwards, whilst their parapodia (= appendages) become converted into eye-stalks, and antennae, or more rarely grasping organs.
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  • The second prosthomere carries the first pair of antennae and the third the second pair of antennae.
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  • The rami may be flattened for swimming, when it is " a bi-ramose swimmeret," or both or only one may be filiform and finely annulate; this is the form often presented by the antennae of Crustacea, and rarely by prae-oral appendages in other Arthropods.
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  • This carries short-jointed antennae (in one case bi-ramose) and eyes, the structure and development of which require further elucidation.
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  • The first prosthomere has its appendages represented by the compound eyes and a protocerebrum, the second has the antennae for its appendages and a deutocerebral neuromere, the third has suffered suppression of its appendages (which corresponded to the second pair of antennae of Crustacea), but has a tritocerebrum and coelomic chamber.
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  • It appears from observation of the embryo that whilst the first prosthomere of Centipedes has its appendages reduced and represented only by eye-patches (as in Arachnida, Crustacea and Hexapoda), the second has a rudimentary antenna, which disappears, whilst the third carries the permanent antennae, which accordingly correspond to the second antennae of Crustacea, and are absent in Hexapoda.
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  • The first somite has become a prosthomere, and carries a pair of extensile antennae.
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  • The third somite as well as the second develops a pair of parapodial jaws; the first somite is a prosthomere carrying jointed antennae.
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  • Upon hatching, the young, which differ from the adult in possessing long antennae and a pair of powerful fossorial anterior legs, fall to the ground, burrow below the surface, and spend a prolonged subterranean larval existence feeding upon the roots of vegetation.
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  • After many years the larva is transformed into the pupa or nymph, which is distinguishable principally by the shortness of its antennae and the presence of wing pads.
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  • They move slowly, picking their course by means of their antennae.
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  • The appendages of the head are the antennae, the jaws and the oral papillae.
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  • They are almost colourless at birth, excepting the antennae, which are green, and their length is To to 15 mm.
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  • The first to appear are the antennae, into which the praeoral somites are prolonged.
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  • He regarded it as a mollusc, being no doubt deceived by the slug-like appearance given by the antennae.
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  • The anterior antennae are fused with the anchoring attachment, whilst the posterior pair is vestigial, and the appendages of the mouth and body present various degrees of degeneration and specialization.
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  • Most come with a telescopic antennae which offers fair reception.
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  • The head of the male insect has strongly protruding eyes, branched antennae and degenerate, biting mouthparts.
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  • Head The head holds the eyes and the antennae and the nectar sipping tongue called the proboscis.
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  • Such antennae doubtless looked modern and technical at the time but feel decisively quaint at the turn of the millenium.
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  • Most conspicuous among the appendages of the head are the feelers or antennae, which correspond to the anterior feelers A (antennules) of Crustacea.
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  • The head is smaller, often occupied almost entirely above in the male by the very large eyes, which in some species are curiously double in that sex, one portion being pillared, and forming what is termed a "turban," the mouth parts are aborted, for the creature is now incapable of taking nutriment either solid or fluid; the antennae are mere short bristles, consisting of two rather large basal joints and a multi-articulate thread.
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  • The first antennae, according to the family, may assist in walking, swimming, burrowing, climbing, grasping, and besides they carry sensory setae, and sometimes they have suckers on their setae (see Brady and Norman on Cypridina norvegica).
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  • The simple nerve-ganglion or brain (g) lies on the anterodorsal side of the pharynx, and by its position determines the orientation of the animal, the cloacal opening lying on the same side, and the course of the gut being" neural."The sense organs are a pair of pigmented eyes (oc), and two pairs of antennae, one anterior proximal and near the wreath, the other distal and usually more or less lateral.
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  • The legs become slender and those of the first or of the second pairs are held up and carried in front of the head to simulate the antennae of the ant.
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  • In the primitive Phyllopoda, and less distinctly in some other orders, the nerves supplying the antennae arise, not from the brain, but from the circum-oesophageal commissures, and even in those cases where the nerves and the ganglia in which they are rooted have been moved forwards to the brain, the transverse commissure of the ganglia can still be traced, running behind the oesophagus.
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  • The males, on the contrary, although sometimes wingless, are, as a rule, provided with a pair of large forewings and greatly reduced hindwings; their antennae and legs are longer than in the other sex, but the mouth-parts are reduced and functionless (see Economic Entomology).
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  • The tower was one of four similar towers at Bawdsey that supported the transmitter antennae for the " Chain Home " radar system.
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  • The network type 802.11n adds multiple input/output antennae to boost the laptop's broadcast and receiving signals.
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  • This technology is called Multiple Input/Multiple Output, or MIMO; essentially, because of the multiple antennae involved, more streams of data can be resolved simultaneously, improving download and streaming speed significantly.
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  • In the past, wireless adapters used a single antenna for input and a single antenna for output, resolving only one stream of each at a time, and improvements involved more powerful antennae for more efficient processing.
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  • At one end of the line, add two black ovals for eyes as well as two black antennae.
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  • You'll need a flat spatula; a sturdy zip-top bag or pastry bag and round decorating tip; two pieces of string-like licorice to use as antennae; and red, black, and white buttercream frosting.
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  • Stick the licorice antennae above the ladybug's eyes before serving.
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  • Eyeshadow, antennae, perhaps a wand - match these with any pretty dress or dance outfit, or even just a blouse and leggings, and you are a fairy.
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  • Be sure to make yourself some pipe cleaner antennae.
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  • For example, imagine parting the petals of a lily into four butterfly wings, and creating the butterfly body and antennae from the pollen stamens.
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  • The wings can be drawn as a series of loops, with smaller scrolls for antennae.
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  • Push the antennae and the wings open to reveal the watch.
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  • Fleas are wingless insects, with a laterally compressed body, small and indistinctly separated head, and short thick antennae situated in cavities somewhat behind and above the simple eyes, which are always minute and sometimes absent.
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  • In many cases additional condensers or inductance coils are inserted in various places so that the arrangement is somewhat disguised, but by far the larger part of the electric wave wireless telegraphy in 1907 was effected by transmitters having antennae either inductively or directly coupled to a closed condenser circuit containing a spark gap.
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