Annuals sentence example

annuals
  • These will now be occupied with tender greenhouse plants and annuals, and the more hardy plants from the stove.
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  • Aira is a genus of delicate annuals with slender hair-like branches of the panicle.
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  • Many of the plants are annuals; among these are some of the commonest weeds of cultivation, shepherd's purse (Capsella Bursa-pastoris), charlock (Brassica Sinapis), and such common FIG.
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  • The Evlapok uj folyama, or " New Series of Annuals," from 1860 (Budapest, 1868, &c.), is a chrestomathy of prize orations, and translations and original pieces, both in poetry and prose.
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  • Still sow tender annuals if required; also cinerarias and primulas.
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  • Hardier kinds of annuals may be sown; it is best done in shallow boxes, say 2 in.
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  • Flowering annuals are mainly aquatic. Water lilies, water hyacinths, which are an obstruction in many streams, and irises in rich variety give colour to the coast wastes and sombre bayous.
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  • Among the regular organs of the academy are the Transactions (from 1840), in some 60 vols., and the Annuals.
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  • Some of the more popular annuals, hardy and half-hardy, have been very much varied as regards habit and the colour of the flowers, and purchases may be made in the seed shops of such things as China asters, stocks, Chinese and Indian pinks, larkspurs, phloxes and others, amongst which some of the most beautiful of the summer flowers may be found.
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  • The hardy annuals may be sown in the open ground during the latter part of March or beginning of April, as the season may determine, for the weather should be dry and open, and the soil in a free-working condition before sowing is attempted.
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  • The class of tender annuals, being chiefly grown for greenhouse decoration, should be treated much the same as soft-wooded plants, being sown in spring, and grown on rapidly in brisk heat, near the glass, and finally hardened off to stand in the greenhouse when in flower.
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  • Sow seeds of greenhouse and hothouse plants; also the different sorts of tender annuals; pot off those sown last month; sow cineraria for the earliest bloom; also Chinese primulas.
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  • In the last week, sow hardy annuals in the borders, with biennials that flower the first season, as also perennials.
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  • Transplant from the nursery to their final sites annuals sown in autumn, with biennials and herbaceous plants.
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  • Pot off tender annuals, and cuttings of half-hardy greenhouse plants put in during February to get them well established for use in the flower garden.
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  • Sow tender annuals for succession, potting and shifting those sown at an earlier period; sow cinerarias for succession; and a few hardy annuals and tenweek stock, &c., for late crops.
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  • Sow annuals for succession in the last week, also biennials and perennials in the nursery compartment, for planting out next year.
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  • Fill up with annuals and greenhouse plants those beds from which the bulbs and roots have been raised.
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  • After this season, keep always a reserve of annuals in pots, or planted on beds of thin layers of fibrous matter, so as to be readily transplanted.
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  • Take up the remaining tuberous roots, such as anemones, ranunculuses, &c., by the end of the first week; fill up their places, and any vacancies that may have occurred, with annuals or bedding plants from the reserve ground.
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  • Sow half-hardy annuals, as Nemophila, Collinsia, Schizanthus, Rhodanthe, &c., to flower during winter.
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  • Sow in the second and the last week, on a warm border of a light sandy soil, with an east aspect, any free-flowering hardy annuals as Silene pendula, Nemophila, &c., for planting in spring; and auricula and primula seeds in pots and boxes.
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  • Flower Garden, &c. - Sow in the beginning of this month all halfhardy annuals required for early flowering; also mignonette in pots, thinning the plants at an early stage; the different species of primula; and the seeds of such plants as, if sown in spring, seldom come up the same season, but if sown in September and October, vegetate readily the succeeding spring.
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  • Fill the pits with pots of stocks, mignonette and hardy annuals for planting out in spring, along with many of the hardy sorts of greenhouse plants; the whole ought to be thoroughly ventilated, except in frosty weather.
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  • Sow a few pots of hardy annuals in a frame, or on a sheltered border, for successional spring use if required.
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  • Dig and dress such flower borders and shrubberies as may now be cleared of annuals and the stems of herbaceous plants.
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  • Annuals that have been sown in the greenhouse or hotbed may be planted out, and seeds of such sorts as mignonette, sweet alyssum, Phlox Drummondii, portulaca, &c., may be sown in the beds or borders.
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  • The hills are very fertile when irrigated, and the wet season develops a variety of perennial herbs, shrubs and annuals.
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  • Arago was elected a member of the Board of Longitude immediately afterwards, and contributed to each of its Annuals, for about twenty-two years, important scientific notices on astronomy and meteorology and occasionally on civil engineering, as well as interesting memoirs of members of the Academy.
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  • Remove annuals and second year biennials that have finished flowering.
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  • Children loved his annuals and adults were charmed by his amusing cartoons.
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  • Spring annuals such as the interestingly named subterranean clover are common.
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  • Coriander (cilantro ), garden cress, and dill are short-lived annuals that, when cut for harvest, do not regrow.
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  • Annuals, and easy to grow perennials such as ox-eye daisy are not worth growing in pots, but should be sown direct.
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  • It represents Salicornia and other annuals colonizing mud and sand in northwest England and southwest Scotland.
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  • Continue to feed established plants such as zonal and regal pelargoniums, annuals in pots, fuschias and other summer-flowering plants.
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  • These can be filled with summer bulbs, tender perennials or annuals.
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  • The showy cornfield annuals are now a relative rarity in the wild due to ' advances ' in crop weed control.
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  • Many of us have already started by sowing annuals, chili peppers, brussel sprouts etc indoors.
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  • Under normal conditions in warm climates many of the species are perennials, but, in the United States for example, climatic conditions necessitate the plants being renewed annually, and even in the tropics it is often found advisable to treat them as annuals to ensure the production of cotton of the best quality, to facilitate cultural operations, and to keep insect and fungoid pests in check.
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  • The culinary herbs used for flavouring and garnishing are for the most part dwarf perennial plants requiring to be grown on a rich soil in an open sunny aspect, or annuals for which a warm sheltered border is the most suitable place; and they may therefore be conveniently grown together in the same compartment - a herb garden.
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  • Tomatoes, although technically short-lived perennials, are treated as annuals and raised from seed each year.
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  • Hardy annuals can be sown in pots or modules to provide color in the garden.
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  • There is no shortage of plants to choose from among hardy and half-hardy annuals or hardy and tender perennials.
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  • Most tulips are treated as annuals in the United States because their ability to rebloom is unpredictable.
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  • The cheapest outdoor plants tend to be annuals, which means they live and flower for one season, then die back in the winter and do not return in the spring.
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  • Cyndi's List- This mega-site lists a variety of genealogy websites, including alumni organizations, list of faculty and classmates, and a section on yearbooks and annuals.
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  • They may be sown at all seasons, but, as in the case of most other hardy annuals, the finest flowers are from autumn-sown plants, which flower from May to July.
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  • They are naturally perennial, but in the open air must be treated as half-hardy annuals.
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  • Heliotropes may be raised from seed and flowered the same year; in fact, treated as annuals.
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  • Charming little Californian half-hardy annuals, generally known as Clintonia.
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  • Pretty hardy annuals of the Evening Primrose family, thriving under the same treatment as all annuals from California.
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  • These species are of secondary importance in the flower garden, and like many other annuals, they suffer through being judged by spring-sown plants of short-lived bloom.
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  • Charming half-hardy annuals from Australia, valuable as border flowers and for winter bouquets.
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  • Pretty annuals of elegant growth, which bear in summer many showy and curiously-shaped blossoms.
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  • If treated as half-hardy annuals, the seed should be sown in heat in spring, but if treated as biennials, the seed should be sown in August, the plants preserved in the greenhouse till May, and then planted out in rich, sandy loam.
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  • It is a hardy Italian annual, bearing pretty pink flowers about the size and form of the Dandelion, and should be sown in spring or autumn like other hardy annuals in any ordinary garden soil.
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  • Its merits are not remarkable, and the short season of bloom of spring-raised everlasting annuals leads to a poor result.
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  • They are half-hardy annuals, and should be sown in early spring on warm borders or in frames, and afterwards planted out in good soil.
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  • Like other annuals, it looks best in broad tufts, but care must be taken that the plants are properly thinned.
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  • Of the numerous kinds in cultivation the best is L. roseus, which is one of the most charming of hardy annuals, forming dense tufts, studded with rosy-carmine flowers.
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  • Treated as half-hardy annuals, and grown in a light fertile soil, they are interesting for open borders; the climbing species, such as lateritia, require branches to twine among.
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  • E. aegyptiaca, with silvery-white plumes, maxima, elegans, pilosa, amabilis, pellucida, capillaris, plumose, are all elegant annuals.
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  • M. grandiflora is one of the most showy of hardy annuals, and effective where a bold crimson flower is desired.
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  • These bold annuals are rarely used with good effect.
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  • If from any cause the beds or borders get worn out, it is worth while to try the effect of a crop of the best annuals.
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  • The plants may be treated as half-hardy annuals, raised from seed in a warm frame, potted on, and planted out in May.
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  • Mina - Fast-growing climbers from Mexico, and, while perennials in their own country, mostly grown as tender annuals with us.
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  • Other showy annuals are Ce. sinuata and its variety maxima, Ce. macrantha, odorata, bistorta, Veitchiana, and Drummondi.
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  • These are all worthy of culture, requiring the treatment of half-hardy annuals, and ordinary garden soil.
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  • S. Speculum, with numerous open bell-like bright violet-purple flowers, is one of the showiest of our annuals.
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  • The Virginian Stock, like many other annuals, does not show its full beauty from spring-sown seedlings, and where it sows itself in the gravel it is often welcome.
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  • All grow about 1 foot high, and should be treated like other tender annuals, such as Rhodanthe.
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  • These are hardy annuals, and may be sown either in autumn or in spring in the open border, in good friable soil.
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  • Some hybrids will not "come true" from seed, but species annuals and biennials will.
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  • If you save seeds, you may never have to buy many of your favorite annuals again!
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  • Plant containers can be works of art all on their own, or fill them with colorful annuals as a moveable color spot.
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  • Pull up any annuals that have been damaged by the frost, and cut back foliage that is damaged or will start looking ugly when it gets really cold.
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  • It also includes access to many articles on topics such as annuals, bulbs, weeds, landscaping, roses and how-to projects.
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  • Don't limit your garden to annuals and perennials, feel free to try out new things.
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  • Spring is the time when many trees, shrubs, annuals and perennials burst forth in blossom.
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  • Most gardeners, when speaking of spring flowers, refer to annuals and perennials that bloom March through May.
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  • With their nodding faces and velvety colors, the lightly scented annuals thrive in shivering cold, resist sudden frosts, and provide a welcome burst of color.
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  • In most gardening zones, pansies should be treated as annuals.
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  • Annuals may be the easiest for a novice container gardener to try.
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  • Adding these to other annuals creates vivid and colorful home container gardens.
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  • Many gardeners in hot climates prefer to treat strawberries as annuals and replant them year after year.
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  • In addition to a vast collection of unique hydrangea varieties, visitors will have an opportunity to preview a wide selection of annuals, perennials, grasses, trees and other shrubs.
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  • In addition, some annuals will give you another great run of color until the hard frost hits.Most perennials available in the garden center can be planted now.
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  • Pansies and violas are lovely annuals that love cool temperatures.
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  • If you do this, treat the flowers as annuals.
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  • Keep in mind some very tender annuals, especially tropical flowers, suffer even when temperatures dip into the 50s without a frost.
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  • Use your cold frame after the first frost to maintain tender herbs, annuals, or house plants.
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  • The fall flower garden includes late-season blooming annuals and perennials.
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  • Other annuals you may not think of as fall flowers include pansies.
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  • Most gardeners simply allow annuals to die, collecting seeds if possible for next year.
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  • Even with the best care, many summer flowering annuals just don't like to be indoors, but you can easily replace them next year.
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  • Among the categories above, flower fanciers specifically will want to peruse the New Features, Customer Favorites, Garden-Ready Plants, Container Gardens, Annuals, Summer Bulbs, and Perennials Section.
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  • Annuals are flowers that last for one year, usually dying with the first frost of autumn.
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  • Some herbs are annuals, biennials or perennials.
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  • With that being said, it isn't too surprising that a hard working staff plants 3 million annuals, prunes 4 million shrubs, and maintains 13,000 roses each and every year.
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  • For quick growing plants, however, as for example most annuals cultivated in pots, such as balsams, cockscombs, globe-amaranths and the like, for cucumbers, and for young soft-wooded plants generally, it is exceedingly useful, both by preventing the consolidation of the soil and as a manure.
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  • Sow fragrant or showy annuals to flower in pots during winter; and grow on a set of decorative plants for the same object.
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  • Year-books, almanacs, directories and other annuals belong to a distinct type of publication, and are not referred to here.
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