Anne sentence example

anne
  • My name is Elizabeth Anne Morganthaw Gustefson, called Betsy and I'm writing these horrifying remembrances at the request of my husband Ben.
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  • Anne Quincy Martin, after she married the minister fellow.
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  • Anne was my grandfather's favorite sister.
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  • For Anne Of Cleves see that article.
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  • From 1685 till his death he was principal of St Edmund's Hall; and in 1704 he was nominated by Queen Anne to a prebendal stall in Canterbury.
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  • With the accession of Anne, however, began an attempt apparently to make up for lost time.
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  • Walmer Castle was for long the official residence of the lord warden, but has, since the resignation of Lord Curzon in 1903, ceased to be so used, and those portions of it which are of historic interest are now open to the public. George, prince of Wales (lord warden, 1903-1907), was the first lord warden of royal blood since the office was held by George, prince of Denmark, consort of Queen Anne.
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  • One of his great-grandfathers was town clerk and at the same time secretary to Queen Anne of Neuberg, widow of Charles II.
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  • In Queen Anne's reign, in his old age, he is described as "a gentleman of admirable natural parts, great knowledge and experience in the affairs of his own country, but of no reputation with any party.
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  • He was commended to the hospitality of Anne Boleyn's father, the earl of Wiltshire, in whose house at Durham Place he resided for some time; the king appointed him archdeacon of Taunton and one of his chaplains; and he also held a parochial benefice, the name of which is unknown.
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  • The business of the divorce - or rather, of the legitimation of Anne Boleyn's expected issue - had now become very urgent, and in the new archbishop he had an agent who might be expected to forward it with the needful haste.
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  • Five days later he pronounced the marriage between Henry and Anne - which had been secretly celebrated about the 25th of January 1533 - to be valid.
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  • On the 1st of June he crowned Anne as queen, and on the 10th of September stood godfather to her child, the future Queen Elizabeth.
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  • Anne's sister, Mary Boleyn, had been Henry VIII.'s mistress; this by canon law was a bar to his marriage with Anne - a bar which had been removed by papal dispensation in 1527, but now the papal power to dispense in such cases had been repudiated, and the original objection revived.
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  • With Anne's condemnation by the House of Lords Cranmer had nothing to do.
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  • His share in the divorce of Anne of Cleves was less prominent than that of Gardiner, though he did preside over the Convocation in which nearly all the dignitaries of the church signified their approval of that measure.
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  • It was his advice which led the king to choose all his ministers from one political party, to adopt the modern system, and he managed to effect a reconciliation between William and his sister-in-law, the princess Anne.
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  • In December he was sent by the queen dowager to secure Stirling, and in 1560 was despatched on a mission to France, visiting Denmark on the way, where he either married or seduced Anne, daughter of Christopher Thorssen, whom he afterwards deserted, and who came to Scotland in 1563 to obtain redress.
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  • Here he was confronted by his first wife or victim, Anne Thorssen, whose claims he satisfied by the gift of a ship and promises of an annuity, and on his identity becoming known he was sent by the authorities to Copenhagen, where he arrived on the 30th of September.
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  • Longfellow - which was built in1785-1786by General Peleg Wadsworth (1748-1829), a soldier of the War of Independence, a representative in Congress from 1793 to 1807, and the grandfather of the poet; was given by Longfellow's sister, Mrs Anne Longfellow Pierce (1810-1901) to the Maine Historical Society; and contains interesting relics of the Wadsworth and Longfellow families, and especially of the poet himself.
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  • The last of the dukes of Norfolk had left a child heir, Anne Mowbray, married to the infant duke of York, the younger of the princes doomed by Richard in the Tower.
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  • He left his wife for a mistress, Elizabeth Holland, was in discord with his family, and lived to see his two nieces, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and his son Surrey, the fiery-tempered poet, go in turn to the block.
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  • It has three Evangelical churches, among them that of St Anne, built 1499-1525, a Roman Catholic church, several public monuments, among them those of Luther, of the famous arithmetician Adam Riese, and of Barbara Uttmann.
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  • Anne Boleyn, however, remained unmarried, and a series of grants and favours bestowed by Henry on her father between 1522 and 1525 have been taken, though very doubtfully, as a symptom of the king's affections.
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  • Unlike her sister Mary, who had fallen a victim to Henry's solicitations,' Anne had no intention of being the king's mistress; she meant to be his queen, and her conduct seems to have been governed entirely by motives of ambition.
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  • The exact period of the beginning of Anne's relations with Henry is not known.
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  • Henry meanwhile, however, had sent William Knight, his secretary, on a separate mission to Rome to obtain facilities for his marriage with Anne; and on the cardinal's return in August he found her installed as the king's companion and proposed successor to Catherine of Aragon.
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  • After the king's final separation from his wife in July 1531, Anne's position was still more marked, and in 1532 she accompanied Henry on the visit to Francis I., while Catherine was left at home neglected and practically a prisoner.
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  • Soon after their return Anne was found to be pregnant, and in consequence Henry married her about the 25th of January 15333 (the exact date is unknown), their union not being made public till the following Easter.
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  • Subsequently, on the 23rd of May, their marriage was declared valid and that with Catherine null, and in June Anne was crowned with great state in Westminster Abbey.
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  • Anne Boleyn had now reached the zenith of her hopes.
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  • Mary was to be forced into the position of a humble attendant upon Anne's infant, and her ears were to be boxed if she proved recalcitrant.
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  • A strange and mysterious fate had prepared for Anne the same domestic griefs that had vexed and ruined Catherine and caused her abandonment.
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  • In September 1533 the birth of a daughter, afterwards Queen Elizabeth, instead of the long-hoped-for son, was a heavy disappointment; next year Of this there is no direct proof, but the statement rests upon contemporary belief and chiefly upon the extraordinary terms of the dispensation granted to Henry to marry Anne Boleyn, which included the suspension of all canons relating to impediments created by "affinity rising ex illicito coitu in any degree even in the first."
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  • Froude rejects the whole story, Divorce of Catherine of Aragon, p. 54; and see Friedman's Anne Boleyn, ii.
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  • On the 2nd Anne herself was committed to the Tower on a charge of adultery with various persons, including her own brother, Lord Rochford.
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  • On the 12th Sir Francis Weston, Henry Norris, William Brereton and Mark Smeaton were declared guilty of high treason, while Anne herself and Lord Rochford were condemned unanimously by an assembly of twenty-six peers on the 15th.
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  • Amidst the vituperations of the adherents of the papacy and the later Elizabethan eulogies, and in the absence of the records on which her sentence was pronounced, Anne Boleyn's guilt remains unproved.
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  • The discovery of Anne's misdeeds coincided in an extraordinary manner with Henry's disappointment in not obtaining by her a male heir, while the king's despotic power and the universal unpopularity of Anne both tended to hinder the administration of pure justice.
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  • Nevertheless, though unproved, Anne's guilt is more than probable.
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  • Every year since her marriage Anne had given birth to a child, and Henry had no reason to despair of more; while, if Henry's state of health was such as was reported, the desire for children, which Anne shared with him, may be urged as an argument for her guilt.
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  • Sir Francis Weston in a letter to his family almost acknowledges his guilt in praying for pardon, especially for offences against his wife;' Anne's own conduct and character almost prepare us for some catastrophe.
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  • His grandfather was a man of ability, an enterprising merchant of London, one of the commissioners of customs under the Tory ministry during the last four years of Queen Anne, and, in the judgment of Lord Bolingbroke, as deeply versed in the " commerce and finances of England " as any man of his time.
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  • Louise became maid of honour to Anne of Austria, and Richelieu sought to attract the attention of Louis XIII.
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  • She refused, nevertheless, to become Louis's mistress, and after taking leave of the king in Anne of Austria's presence retired to the convent of the Filles de SainteMarie in 1637.
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  • The choice of the two names has some significance, when we consider his later literary life as the associate of the Queen Anne poets and as a collector of old Scots poetry.
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  • He was a zealous Hanoverian, and a favourite with Queen Anne in spite of his Whiggism.
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  • He had one daughter, Anne, who married John Damer, son of Lord Milton, and who inherited a life interest in Strawberry Hill under the will of Horace Walpole.
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  • The second earl's daughter Anne (1651-1732), who succeeded him as a countess in her own right, married in 1663 the famous duke of Monmouth, who was then created 1st duke of Buccleuch; and her grandson Francis became 2nd duke.
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  • He had come under the influence of the Cambridge reformers, and after Anne Boleyn's recognition as queen he was made her chaplain.
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  • In May 1533 he expressed approval of Henry VIII.'s marriage with Anne Boleyn in a sermon preached before the king.
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  • The great English writers of Queen Anne's reign seem to have been but little known in the colony, and the local literature, though changed somewhat in character, showed but scant improvement.
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  • Maclaurin was married in 1733 to Anne, daughter of Walter Stewart, solicitorgeneral for Scotland.
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  • She had thirteen children - Frederick Henry, drgwned at sea in 1629; Charles Louis, elector palatine, whose daughter married Philip, duke of Orleans, and became the ancestress of the elder and Roman Catholic branch of the royal family of England; Elizabeth, abbess and friend of Descartes; Prince Rupert and Prince Maurice, who died unmarried; Louisa, abbess; Edward, who married Anne de Gonzaga, "princesse palatine," and had children; Henrietta Maria, who married Count Sigismund Ragotzki but died childless; Philip and Charlotte, who died childless; Sophia, who married Ernest Augustus, elector of Hanover, and was mother of George I.
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  • It was paved with pantiles in the reign of Queen Anne.
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  • It was a favourite residence of the princess Anne previous to her accession to the throne, and from that time became one of the chief resorts of London fashionable society.
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  • His last work, The History of the Reign of Queen Anne (1880), is very inferior to his History of Scotland.
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  • Other connubial speculations foundered on the personal dislike of the princess for the various suitors proposed to her, so that on the death of her mother (May 1727) and the departure to Holstein of her beloved sister Anne, her only remaining near relation, the princess found herself at the age of eighteen practically her own mistress.
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  • While still in her teens, she made a lover of Alexius Shubin, a sergeant in the Semenovsky Guards, and after his banishment to Siberia, minus his tongue, by order of the empress Anne, consoled herself with a handsome young Cossack, Alexius Razumovski, who, there is good reason to believe, subsequently became her husband.
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  • During the reign of her cousin Anne (1730-1740), Elizabeth effaced herself as much as possible; but under the regency of Anne Leopoldovna the course of events compelled the indolent but by no means incapable beauty to overthrow the existing government.
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  • Among his charges was John Parke Custis, the step-son of George Washington, with whom he began a long and intimate friendship. Returning to England, he was ordained by the bishop of London in March 1762, and at once sailed again for America, where he remained until 1775 as rector of various Virginia and Maryland parishes, including Hanover, King George's county, Virginia, and St Anne's at Annapolis, Maryland.
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  • Two and a half miles north is Balcarres House, belonging to the earl of Crawford, where Lady Anne Barnard (1750-1825) was born.
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  • Hayes in 1877, and Varina Anne (1864-1898), better known as "Winnie" Davis, the "daughter of the Confederacy," who was the author of several books, including A Sketch of the Life of Robert Emmet (1888), a novel, The Veiled Doctor (1895), and A Romance of Summer Seas (1898).
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  • Cobden had married in 1840 Miss Catherine Anne Williams, a Welsh lady, and left five surviving daughters, of whom Mrs Cobden-Unwin (wife of the publisher Mr Fisher Unwin), Mrs Walter Sickert (wife of the painter) and Mrs Cobden-Sanderson (wife of the well-known artist in bookbinding), afterwards became prominent in various spheres, and inherited their father's political interest.
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  • Less reprehensible, though equally self-seeking, were his dealings with the emperor, which aimed at a family alliance between the Jagiellos and the Habsburgs on the basis of a double marriage between the son and daughter of Wladislaus, Louis and Anne, and an Austrian archduke and archduchess; this was concluded by the family congress at Vienna, July 22, 1515, to which Sigismund I.
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  • This was the archduke Ferdinand, who claimed the Hungarian crown by right of inheritance in the name of his wife, Anne, sister of the late king.
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  • After the States-general was dissolved he remained in Paris, and the next year he became almoner to Anne of Austria, the child-queen of Louis XIII.
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  • Returning to Mittau, he succeeded in gaining a footing at court there through one of his sisters, who was the fancy of the ruling minister, Peter Bestuzhev, whose established mistress was no less a person than the young duchess Anne Ivanovna.
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  • During his patron's absence, Biren, a handsome, insinuating fellow, succeeded in supplanting him in the favour of Anne, and procuring the disgrace and banishment of Bestuzhev and his family.
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  • On the elevation of Anne to the Russian throne in 1740, Biren, who had in the meantime married a Fraulein von Treiden, came to Moscow, and honours and riches were heaped upon him.
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  • During the latter years of Anne's reign, Biren increased enormously in power and riches.
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  • On her death-bed Anne, very unwillingly and only at his urgent entreaty, appointed him regent during the minority of the baby emperor, Ivan VI.
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  • But almost immediately after the king's death Anne of Austria appointed him to the coveted post on All Saints' Eve, 1643.
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  • His private record was not as good as his public. In December 1660 he admitted to having contracted, under discreditable circumstances, a secret marriage with Anne Hyde (1637-1671), daughter of Lord Clarendon, in the previous September.
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  • By Anne Hyde James had eight children, of whom two only, Mary and Anne, both queens of England, survived their father.
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  • An important academical position was, on the other hand, one of the reasons why a physician not very different in his way of thinking from the English physicians of the age of Queen Anne was able to take a far more predominant position in the medical world.
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  • Anne was a true daughter of Louis XI.
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  • He died in 1503, but Anne survived him twenty years.
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  • Anne's only daughter, Suzanne, had married in 1505 her cousin, Charles of Bourbon, count of Montpensier, the future constable; and the question of the succession of Suzanne, who died in 1521, was the determining factor of the treason of the constable de Bourbon (1523).
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  • Anne had died some months before, on the 14th of November 1522.
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  • Owing to the by-laws of the County Council, the method of raising commercial or residential buildings to an extreme height is not practised in London; the block known as Queen Anne's Mansions, Westminster, is an exception, though it cannot be called high in comparison with American high buildings.
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  • The act passed in the reign of Queen Anne for building fifty new churches (1710) for a time supplied the wants of large districts.
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  • Queen Anne and the first three Georges were all accommodated, on the occasions of their visits to the city to see the show, at the same house opposite Bow church.
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  • Ken's step-sister, Anne, was married to Izaak Walton in 1646, a connexion which brought Ken from his boyhood under the refining influence of this gentle and devout man.
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  • On his return to Russia he served for two years without any salary as chief gentleman of the Bedchamber at the court of Anne of Courland, and in 1721 succeeded Vasily Dolgoruki as Russian minister at Copenhagen.
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  • He rendered some important services, however, to the empress Anne, for which he was decorated and made a privy councillor.
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  • He assisted Biren to obtain the regency in the last days of the empress Anne, but when his patron fell three weeks later, his own position became extremely precarious.
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  • By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters - Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, earl of Richmond and afterwards duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., duke of Bourbon, in 1425.
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  • Besides holding several livings he became in 1704 chaplain to Archbishop Tenison, and shortly afterwards was made chaplain-in-ordinary to Queen Anne.
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  • He preached at the coronation of Queen Anne and became her almoner and confidential adviser in matters of church and state.
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  • The first settlements were made at Providence by Roger Williams in June 1636, and at Portsmouth on the island of Aquidneck by the Antinomians, William Coddington (1601-1678), John Clarke (1609-1676), and Anne Hutchinson (191-1643), in March - April 1638.
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  • During the differences that arose in 1485 between the regent, Anne of Beaujeu, and the dukes of Orleans, Brittany and Alengon, Imbert de Batarn y kept the inhabitants of Orleans faithful to the king.
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  • He married Anne, daughter of Andrew Robertson of Stornoway, sometime provost of Dingwall.
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  • John and Anne Gladstone had six children.
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  • She lived henceforth in fear lest Louis should have a son; and in consequence there was a secret rivalry between her and the queen, Anne of Brittany.
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  • From that time he was under the influence of two personages, who dominated him completely for the remainder of his life - Diane de Poitiers, his mistress, and Anne de Montmorency, his mentor.
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  • The royal favour then elevated Anne de Montmorency and Philippe de Chabot, and in the last years of the reign Marshal d'Annebaud and Cardinal de Tournon.
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  • Whatever the number of these, he had only two titular mistresses - at the beginning of the reign Francoise de Chateaubriant, and from about 1526 to his death Anne de Pisseleu, whom he created duchesse d'Etampes and who entirely dominated him.
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  • In the interior there is a fine organ and a quantity of statuary, and the vaults contain the remains of Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy, and Anne of Burgundy, daughter of John the Fearless.
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  • In company with her he established himself at St Anne's Hill near Chertsey in Surrey.
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  • Fox's time at St Anne's was largely spent in gardening, in the enjoyment of the country, and in correspondence on literary subjects with his nephew, the 3rd Lord Holland, and with Gilbert Wakefield, the editor of Euripides.
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  • He remained in prison until August 1704, and then owed his release to the intercession of Robert Harley, who represented his case to the queen, and obtained for him not only liberty but pecuniary relief and employment, which, of one kind or another, lasted until the termination of Anne's reign.
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  • He continued, however, to take the side of the dissenters in the questions affecting religious liberty, which played such a prominent part towards the close of Anne's reign.
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  • During the greater part of the reign of Anne South remained comparatively quiet, but in 1710 he ranked himself among the partisans of Sacheverell.
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  • After Anne's accession he supported the bills in 1702 and 1704 against occasional conformity, and took a leading part in the disputes which arose between the two Houses.
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  • Under Louis Savoy began to decline, for he was indolent, incapable, and entirely ruled by his wife, Anne of Lusignan, daughter of the king of Cyprus, an ambitious and intriguing woman; she induced him to fit out an expensive expedition to Cyprus, which brought him no advantage save the barren title of king of Cyprus, Jerusalem and Armenia.
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  • He married Anne of Orleans, daughter of Henrietta of England and niece of Louis XIV.
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  • After the first few weeks of Anne's reign, Shaftesbury, who had been deprived of the vice-admiralty of Dorset, returned to his retired life, but his letters to Furly show that he retained a keen interest in politics.
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  • Lynn to seat 3000 worshippers, occupying the site of the old St Anne's parish church, part of the fabric of which the new building incorporates.
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  • All benefices except those under the clear annual value of £50 pay their first fruits (one year's profits) and tenths (of yearly profits) to Queen Anne's Bounty for the augmentation of the maintenance of the poorer clergy.
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  • They may also be charged with the repayment of money laid out for their permanent advantage, and be augmented wholly by the medium of Queen Anne's Bounty.
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  • He assumed the reins of government at the age of sixteen, and married Princess Anne, daughter of Philip of Orleans and Henrietta of England, and niece of Louis XIV., king of France.
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  • The position of queen consort to a Scottish king was a difficult and perilous one, and Anne was attacked in connexion with various scandals and deeds of violence, her share in which, however, is supported by no evidence.
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  • Anne took advantage of his absence to demand possession of the prince, and, on the "flat refusal" of the countess of Mar, fell into a passion, the violence of which occasioned a miscarriage and endangered her life.
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  • On the 24th of July Anne was crowned with the king, when her refusal to take the sacrament according to the Anglican use created some sensation.
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  • Anne died after a long illness on the 2nd of March 1619, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
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  • His father, Louis XIII., had married Anne of Austria, daughter of Philip III., king of Spain, in 1615, but for twenty years the marriage had remained without issue.
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  • On the death of Anne (October 17th) he was proclaimed emperor, and on the following day Ernest Johann Biren, duke of Courland, was appointed regent.
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  • He was tired of her, and in love with the black-eyed Anne Boleyn, who refused to be his mistress.
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  • Acting on this, Cranmer tried the divorce case before his court, which declared the marriage with Catherine void and that with Anne Boleyn, which had been solemnized privately in January, valid.
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  • The pope replied by ordering Henry under pain of excommunication to put away Anne and restore Catherine, his legal wife, within ten days.
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  • The Act of Succession provided that, should the king have no sons, Elizabeth, Anne's daughter, should succeed to the crown.
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  • Then, with the assistance of her sister, she projected a more ambitious work, The Lives of the Queens of England, from Matilda of Flanders to Queen Anne.
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  • As late as 1704 provision was made for a regency after the death of Anne.
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  • See The Diary and Letters of Gouverneur Morris (2 vols., New York, '888), edited by Anne Cary Morris; Jared Sparks, Life of Gouverneur Morris (3 vols., Boston, 1832), the first volume being a biography and the second and third containing Morris's miscellaneous writings and addresses; and Theodore Roosevelt, Gouverneur Morris (Boston, 1888), in the "American Statesmen" series.
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  • John Arbuthnot, Queen Anne's physician and the friend of Swift and Pope, was a.
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  • The Vaudois, who had undergone all these vicissitudes, were naturally reduced to poverty, and their ministers were partially maintained by a subsidy from England, which was granted by Queen Anne.
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  • Before the cathedral is the pretty cloister garth, with the chapel of St Anne, erected in 1321 and restored in 1888.
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  • The parish church, rebuilt in 1808, contains a tablet to Charles James Fox, who resided at St Anne's Hill in the vicinity, and another to Lawrence Tomson, a translator of the New Testament in the 17th century.
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  • He married Marie Anne Francoise (called Fanny) Mouchard, a woman of letters who had a celebrated salon.
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  • Anne was a middle-aged married woman at the time of her coronation; she waddled The coro- aatioa.
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  • He died in London in February 1714 and was buried at St Anne's, Soho.
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  • Sir Francis Walsingham was born at Chislehurst, where his family had long flourished; Hever Castle was the seat of the Boleyns and the scene of the courtship of Anne Boleyn by Henry VIII.
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  • Louis was to marry Anne of Austria, daughter of the Spanish king, Philip III., and the Spanish prince, afterwards Philip IV., himself was to marry the Princess Elizabeth, the king's sister.
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  • Few more brilliant pieces of historical writing exist than his description of the coronation procession of Anne Boleyn through the streets of London, few more full of picturesque power than that in which he relates how the spire of St Paul's was struck by lightning; and to have once read is to remember for ever the touching and stately words in which he compares the monks of the London Charterhouse preparing for death with the Spartans at Thermopylae.
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  • On the 12th of December 1796, he received the ribbon of St Anne and a rich estate at Gruzina in the government of Novgorod, the only substantial gift ever accepted by him during the whole of his career.
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  • The faithful Batt had sought a pension for him from his own patroness, Anne of Borsselen, the Lady of Veere, who resided at the castle of Tournehem near Calais, and whose son Batt was now teaching.
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  • Richelieu was dead, and Anne of Austria was compassionate.
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  • In 1807 he had married Anne Louisa Emily, daughter of Sir George Cranfield Berkeley, under whom he had served on the North American station, and by her he had three daughters, the baronetcy becoming extinct.
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  • The great centre for vegetables and small fruits is in the counties bordering on the north-west shore of the Chesapeake, and in Howard, Frederick and Washington counties, directly west, Anne Arundel county producing the second largest quantity of strawberries of all the counties in the Union in 1899.
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  • Crabs are next in value and are caught chiefly along the East Shore and in Anne Arundel and Calvert counties on the West Shore.
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  • From 1722 until the War of Independence the iron-ore product of North and West Maryland was greater than that of any of the other colonies, but since then ores of superior quality have been discovered in other states and the output in Maryland, taken chiefly from the west border of the Coastal Plain in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties, has become comparatively of little importance-24,367 long tons in 1902 and only 8269 tons in 1905.
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  • Materials for porcelain, including flint, feldspar and kaolin, abound in the east portion of the Piedmont, the kaolin chiefly in Cecil county, and material for mineral paint in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties, as well as farther north-west.
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  • In the neighbourhood is the church of Sainte Anne d'Auray, one of the principal places of pilgrimage in Brittany.
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  • Elizabeth has been censured for having made no effort in later years to clear her mother's memory; but no vindication of Anne's character could have rehabilitated Elizabeth's legitimacy.
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  • Three years later he married (21st of December 1546) Mildred, daughter of Sir Anthony Cooke, who was ranked by Ascham with Lady Jane Grey as one of the two most learned ladies in the kingdom, and whose sister, Anne, became the wife of Sir Nicholas, and the mother of Sir Francis, Bacon.
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  • In 1J35 he was sent to Germany, in the hope of inducing Lutheran divines to approve of Henry's divorce from Catherine of Aragon, and four years later he was employed in negotiations connected with Anne of Cleves's marriage.
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  • In July, Cromwell was attainted, Anne of Cleves was divorced and Barnes was burnt (30th July 1540).
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  • Gertz first suggested the marriage between the duke of Holstein and the tsarevna Anne of Russia, and negotiations were begun in St Petersburg with that object.
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  • He married in January 1562 Anne, daughter of George Barnes, Lord Mayor of London and widow of Alexander Ca rleill, whose son-in-law Christopher Hod desdon was closely associated with maritime and commercial enterprise.
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  • The extensive additions and alterations made by Wren according to the taste of the King resulted in a severely plain edifice of brick; the orangery, added in Queen Anne's time, is a better example of the same architect's work.
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  • In the palace died Mary, William's consort, William himself, Anne and George II., whose wife Caroline did much to beautify Kensington Gardens, and formed the beautiful lake called the Serpentine (1733).
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  • The gardens (275 acres) were laid out in the time of Queen Anne, and have always been a popular and fashionable place of recreation.
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  • The Macdonald Institute at Guelph, Ontario, the buildings and equipment of which Sir William provided at a cost of $182,500, and the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue, 20 m.
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  • The property of the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue comprises 561 acres, of which 74 acres are devoted to campus and field-research plots, ioo acres to a petite culture farm and 387 acres to a live-stock and grain farm.
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  • Sir William Macdonald in 1908 built and endowed, at an expenditure of at least J;700,000, an agricultural college and normal school at St Anne's, near Montreal.
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  • He subsequently (about ?1590) became private secretary and Master of Requests to Anne of Denmark, wife of James VI., and was renominated to these offices when the queen went to England.
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  • One of the daughters, Anne Bellamy, was arrested and imprisoned in the gatehouse of Holborn.
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  • Under Anne he was a member of the first cabinet formed in Russia, but had less influence in affairs than Ostermann and Miinnich.
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  • After the Dissolution it was used as a private residence by Henry VIII., Anne of Cleves and Elizabeth.
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  • He crowned Queen Anne, but during her reign was not in much favour at court.
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  • A strong supporter of the Hanoverian succession, he was one of the three officers of state to whom on the death of Anne was entrusted the duty of appointing a regent till the arrival of George I., whom he crowned pn the 31st of October 1714.
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  • They left no issue, and the Act of Settlement passed in 1701, excluding Roman Catholics from the throne, secured the succession to Anne, second daughter of James II., and on her death without issue to the Protestant house of Hanover, descended from the princess Elizabeth, daughter of James I., wife of Frederick V., count palatine of the Rhine.
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  • On the death of Anne in 1714, George, elector of Hanover, eldest son of Sophia (youngest child of the princess Elizabeth), and Ernest, elector of Brunswick-Luneburg, or Hanover, consequently became sovereign of Great Britain and Ireland, and, notwithstanding somewhat formidable attempts in behalf of the elder Stuart line in 1715 and 1745, the Hanoverian succession has remained uninterrupted and has ultimately won universal assent.
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  • There are several old charities, including the hospital of St John the Baptist, founded in 1109 but modernized; the hospital of St Anne, founded probably in the reign of Henry VI.
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    0
  • And, as he saw that the marriage with Anne Boleyn was determined upon, he petitioned the king to be allowed to resign the Great Seal, alleging failing health.
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  • A special invitation was sent him by the king to attend the coronation of Anne Boleyn, accompanied with the gracious offer of 20 to buy a new suit for the occasiont More refused to attend, and from that moment was marked out for vengeance.
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  • At another time, having asked his daughter how the court went and how Queen Anne did, he received for answer, " Never better; there is nothing else but dancing and sporting."
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  • He crossed over to England with the royal bride, but, unlike Thomas Cromwell, he did not lose the royal favour when the king repudiated Anne, and in 1541, having already refused the bishopric of Hereford, he became dean of Canterbury and in 1544 dean of York.
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  • He obtained a considerable addition to his resources (Carlyle puts the amount at £10,000) on his marriage in 1767 to Betty Anne, sole child and heiress of John Dawson of Marly in Yorkshire.
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  • By Marie he left a daughter, Anne Marie, duchesse de Montpensier; and by Marguerite he left three daughters, Marguerite Louise (1645-1721), wife of Cosimo III., grand duke of Tuscany; Elizabeth (1646-1696), wife of Louis Joseph, duke of Guise; and Francoise Madeleine (1648-1664), wife of Charles Emmanuel II., duke of Savoy.
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  • He drew up a form of constitution which Anne of Courland, the newly elected Russian empress, was forced to sign at Mittau before being permitted to proceed to St Petersburg.
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  • Anne lost no time in repudiating this constitution, and never forgave its authors.
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  • This was modified by 13 Anne c. 26 (1713), still further by 17 George II.
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  • He was also appointed a member of the Privy Council, and entrusted with the education of the two princesses - Mary and Anne.
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  • During the reign of Anne he remained a member of the privy council, and was one of the commissioners appointed to arrange the terms of the union of England and Scotland; but, to his bitter disappointment, his claims to the primacy were twice passed over.
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  • His second marriage, with Anne Bulkeley, took place in 1700.
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  • On the 27th of November 1597 he married Anne Catherine, a daughter of Joachim Frederick, margrave of Brandenburg.
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  • In 1703 it was revived by Queen Anne, when it was ordained to consist of the sovereign and 12 knights companions, the number being increased to 16 by statute in 1827.
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  • The foundations of St Anne of Munich and of St Anne of Wiirzburg for ladies are not properly orders.
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  • It is the chief order of the empire, and admission carries with it according to the statutes of 1720 the orders of St Anne, Alexander Nevsky, and the White Eagle; there is only one class.
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  • The Order of St Anne was founded by Charles Frederick, duke of HolsteinGottorp in 1735 in honour of his wife, Anna Petrovna, daughter of Peter the Great.
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  • Educated as a Catholic by his mother, he was on the death of Stephen Bathory elected king of Poland (August 19, 1587) chiefly through the efforts of the Polish chancellor, Jan Zamoyski, and of his own aunt, Anne, queen-dowager of Poland, who lent the chancellor 10o,000 gulden to raise troops in defence of her nephew's cause.
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  • In 1592 Sigismund married the Austrian archduchess Anne, and the same year a reconciliation was patched up between the king and the chancellor to enable the former to secure possession of his Swedish throne vacant by the death of his father John III.
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  • He supported the king's divorce from Catherine and the marriage with Anne Boleyn; and presided at the trial of Fisher and More in 1535, at which his conduct and evident intention to secure a conviction has been generally censured.
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  • Next year he tried Anne Boleyn and her lovers, was present on the scaffold at the unfortunate queen's execution, and recommended to parliament the new act of succession.
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  • On the 24th of April 1540 he was made a knight of the Garter, and subsequently managed the attainder of Thomas Cromwell, earl of Essex, and the dissolution of Henry's marriage with Anne of Cleves.
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  • But his incurable corruption and unbridled temper so discredited the government that he was deprived of the post shortly after the accession of Anne.
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  • Biren thereupon forced Anne to order an inquiry into Voluinsky's past career, with the result that he was tried before a tribunal of Biren's creatures and condemned to be broken on the wheel and then beheaded.
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  • His first wife was Margaret of Baden, by whom he had six children; and his second was Anne of Saxony, by whom he had thirteen.
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  • William IV., though not a man of great ability, was sincerely anxious to do his utmost for securing the maintenance of peace, and the development of the resources and commercial prosperity of the country, and his powerful dynastic connexions (he had married Anne, eldest daughter of George II.) gave him weight in the councils of Europe.
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  • The princess Anne of England became regent, but she had a difficult part to play, and on the outbreak of the Seven Years' War in which the Provinces were determined to maintain neutrality, her English leanings brought much unpopularity upon her.
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  • Little can be said personal service, endeavouring to establish the legality of his of Lee's career as a commander-in-chief that is not an integral marriage with Anne, until May 1534, when he was appointed part of the history of the Civil War.
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  • He afterwards enjoyed the friendship of Lady Russell, and it was partly through her that he obtained so much influence with Princess Anne, who followed his advice in regard to the settlement of the crown on William of Orange.
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  • There are also a Protestant church, St Anne's, a school of arts, a polytechnic institution, a picture gallery in the former monastery of St Catherine, a museum, observatory, botanical gardens, an exchange, gymnasium, deafmute institution, orphan asylum, several remarkable fountains dating from the 16th century, &c. Augsburg is particularly well provided with special and technical schools.
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  • Richard, the son of Richard and Anne Mortimer, became third duke of York (1425), and was made protector of the realm 1 4541 455, being finally declared heir to the throne on the triumph of his side in 1460; but he was slain at the battle of Wakefield (Dec. 31, 1460).
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  • Simon Bradstreet (1603-1697), important among the early men of Massachusetts, was one of the founders; and his wife, Anne Dudley Bradstreet (1612-1672), was the first woman versifier of America; the Bradstreet house in North Andover, said to have been built about 1667, is still standing.
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  • By a treaty concluded by Philip at Amiens in April 1423 with the dukes of Brittany and Bedford, John, duke of Bedford, married Philip's sister Anne, and Arthur of Brittany, earl of Richmond, became the husband of Philip's sister Margaret.
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  • In his third year he was taken up to London, inspected by the court surgeon, prayed over by the court chaplains and stroked and presented with a piece of gold by Queen Anne.
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  • Marie's one attempt to interfere in politics, an effort to prevent the disgrace of the duke of Bourbon, was the beginning of her husband's alienation from her; and after the birth of her seventh child Louise, Marie was practically deserted by Louis, who openly avowed his liaison with Louise de Nesle, comtesse de Mailly, who was replaced in turn by her sisters Pauline marquise de Vintimille, and Marie Anne, duchess de Chateauroux, and these by Madame de Pompadour.
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  • He published Mourt's Relation, or Journal of the Beginning and Proceedings of the English Plantation at Plimoth (1622), apparently written by William Bradford and Edward Winslow, and went to Plymouth, Mass., in the "Anne" in 1623.
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  • Released when Mazarin went into exile, he wished to marry Mademoiselle de Chevreuse (1627-1652), daughter of the famous confidante of Anne of Austria, but was prevented by his brother, who was now supreme in the state.
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  • He was concerned in the Fronde of 1651, but soon afterwards became reconciled with Mazarin, and in 16J4 married the cardinal's niece, Anne Marie Martinozzi (1639-1672), and secured the government of Guienne.
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  • No formal acknowledgment of his relation to the king was made until his betrothal to Anne Scott, countess of Buccleuch, the wealthiest heiress of Scotland, whom he married in 1665.
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  • Sir Nicholas married Anne Carew, and his daughter Elizabeth became the wife of Sir Walter Raleigh.
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  • All these considerations were magnified by Henry's passion for Anne Boleyn, though she certainly was not the sole or the main cause of the divorce.
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  • The abolition of the papal jurisdiction removed all obstacles to the divorce from Catherine and to the legalization of Henry's marriage with Anne Boleyn (1533).
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  • Anne Boleyn fared no better than the Catholic martyrs; she failed to produce a male heir to the throne, and her conduct afforded a jury of peers, over which her uncle, the duke of Norfolk, presided, sufficient excuse for condemning her to death on a charge of adultery (1536).
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  • By the statute of Six Articles (1539) he took his stand on Catholic doctrine; and when the Lutherans had rejected his alliance, and Cromwell's nominee, Anne of Cleves, had proved both distasteful on personal grounds and unnecessary because Charles and Francis were not really projecting a Catholic crusade against England, Anne was divorced and Cromwell beheaded.
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  • Anne, from the beginning of her reign, advocated union, which, with the question of the succession, was the subject of constant and furious debates in the Scots parliament, till, on the 4th of March 1707,the act received the 4 royal assent.
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  • The negotiations were constantly disturbed by Jacobite intrigues with France in favour of James VIII.; by Scottish adherence to the Act of Security, which might give Scotland a king other than a Hanoverian in succession to Anne; and by the hanging of an Englishman, Captain Green, for piracy on a lost Scottish vessel (1705).
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  • The fatal duel in which Hamilton was slain by Mohun, when on the eve of going as ambassador to France, with the interests of James in his eye, was a blow to the Jacobites; as were the death of Anne, the fall of Bolingbroke and the unopposed succession of George I.
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  • It is reached through a small chapel dedicated to St Anne.
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  • In 1806 he married Anne Phebe Key, sister of Francis Scott Key.
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  • The almshouse called Queen Anne's Hospital is named from Anne of Denmark, queen of James I., who reconstituted a foundation of the time of Edward I., dedicated to St John the Baptist and St John the Evangelist.
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  • His father Patrick Sarsfield married Anne, daughter of Rory (Roger) O'Moore, who organized the Irish rebellion of 1641.
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  • On his return he preached successively at Pultusk, Jaroslaw and Plock under the powerful protection of Queen Anne Jagielonika.
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  • It thus became synonymous with robber or freebooter, and in 1707 appears in the title of an act (6 Anne, cap. 11) "for the more effectual suppression of.
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  • Lockhart was the author of Memoirs of the Affairs of Scotland, dealing with the reign of Queen Anne till the union with England, first published in 1714.
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  • Soon afterwards Queen Anne appointed him one of her chaplains in ordinary, and in 170 9 presented him to the rectory of St James's, Westminster.
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  • Her elder sister, Martha, was betrothed by her parents to Thomas Kyme, a Lincolnshire justice of the peace, but she died before marriage, and Anne was induced or compelled to take her place.
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  • Kyme was apparently an unimaginative man of the world, while Anne took to Biblereading with zeal, became convinced of the falsity of the doctrine of transubstantiation, and created some stir in Lincoln by her disputations.
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  • The reactionary party, which, owing to the absence of Hertford and Lisle and to the presence of Gardiner, gained the upper hand in the council in the summer of 1546, were not satisfied with this repulse; they probably aimed at the leaders of the reforming party, such as Hertford and possibly Queen Catherine Parr, who were suspected of favouring Anne, and on the 18th of June 1546 Anne was again arraigned before a commission including the lord mayor, the duke of Norfolk, St John, Bonner and Heath.
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  • Kyme was sent home into Lincolnshire, but Anne was committed to Newgate, "for that she was very obstinate and heady in reasoning of matters of religion."
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  • In 1898 he married Lady Anne Coventry, youngest daughter of the earl of Coventry.
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  • In 1687 a project of settling the crown on the princess, to the exclusion of Mary, on the condition of Anne's embracing Roman Catholicism, was rendered futile by her pronounced attachment to the Church of England, and beyond sending her books and papers James appears to have made no attempt to coerce his daughter into a change of faith,' and to have treated her with kindness, while the birth of his son on the 10th of June 1688 made the religion of his daughters a matter of less political importance.
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  • Anne was not present on the occasion, having gone to Bath, and this gave rise to a belief that the child was spurious; but it is most probable that James's desire to exclude all Protestants from affairs of state was the real cause.
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  • During the events immediately.preceding the Revolution Anne kept in seclusion.
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  • Meanwhile Anne had suffered a series of maternal disappointments.
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  • But Anne's happiness was soon troubled by quarrels with the king and queen.
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  • Mary talked too much for Anne's comfort, and Anne too little for Mary's satisfaction.
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  • At the close of 1691 Anne had declared her approval of the naval expedition in favour of her father, and expressed grief at its failure.
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  • Anne took the part of her favourites with great zeal against the court, though in all probability unaware of Marlborough's treason; and on the dismissal of the countess from her household by the king and queen she refused to part with her, and retired with Lady Marlborough to the duke of Somerset's residence at Sion House.
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  • Anne was now in disgrace.
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  • In May, Marlborough was arrested on a charge of high treason which subsequently broke down, and Anne persisted in regarding his disgrace as a personal injury to herself.
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  • The letter, which is only printed in fragments, is not in Anne's style, and if genuine was probably dictated by the Churchills.
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  • In return Anne gave her support to William's government, though about this time, in 1696 - according to James, in consequence of the near prospect of the throne - she wrote to her father asking for his leave to wear the crown at William's death, and promising its restoration at a convenient opportunity.'
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  • In default of her own issue, Anne's personal choice would probably have inclined at this time to her own family at St Germains, but the necessity of maintaining the Protestant succession caused the enactment of the Act of Settlement in 1701, and the substitution of the Hanoverian branch.
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  • On the 8th of March 1702 Anne became, by King William's death, queen of Great Britain, being crowned on the 23rd of April.
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  • In 1704 she announced to the Commons her intention of granting to the church the crown revenues, amounting to about 16,000 or f;r7,000 a year, from tenths and first-fruits (paid originally by the clergy to the pope, but appropriated by the crown in 1534), for the increase of poor livings; her gift, under the name of "Queen Anne's Bounty," still remaining as a testimony of her piety.
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  • This devotion to the church, the strongest of all motives in Anne's conduct, dictated her hesitating attitude towards the two great parties in the state.
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  • In December, the archduke Charles visited Anne at Windsor and was welcomed as the king of Spain.
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  • In 1704 Anne acquiesced in the resignation of Lord Nottingham, the leader of the high Tory party.
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  • In the same year the great victory of Blenheim further consolidated the power of the Whigs and increased the influence of Marlborough, upon whom Anne now conferred the manor of Woodstock.
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  • Marlborough's successive victories, and especially the factious conduct of the Tories, who in November 1705 moved in parliament that the electress Sophia should be invited to England, drove Anne farther to the side of the Whigs.
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  • Abigail Hill, Mrs Masham, a cousin of the duchess of Marlborough, had been introduced by the latter as a poor relation into Anne's service, while still princess of Denmark.
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  • The strength of the Whigs at this time and the necessities of the war caused the retirement of Harley, but he remained Anne's secret adviser and supporter against the faction, urging upon her "the dangers to the crown as well as to the church and monarchy itself from their counsels and actions," 3 while the duchess never regained her former influence.
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  • To break down this opposition Marlborough was dismissed on the 31st from all his employments, while the House of Lords was "swamped" by Anne's creation of twelve peers,' including Mrs Masham's husband.
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  • Anne herself had a natural feeling for her brother, and had shown great solicitude concerning his treatment when a price had been set on his head at the time of the Scottish expedition in 1708.
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  • On the 3rd of March 1714 James wrote to Anne, Oxford and Bolingbroke, urging the necessity of taking steps to secure his succession, and promising, on the condition of his recognition, to make no further attempts against the queen's government; and in April a report was circulated in Holland that Anne had secretly determined to associate James with her in the government.
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  • The wish expressed by the Whigs, that a member of the electoral family should be invited to England, had already aroused the queen's indignation in 1708; and now, in 1714, a writ of summons for the electoral prince as duke of Cambridge having been obtained, Anne forbade the Hanoverian envoy, Baron Schutz, her presence, and declared all who supported the project her enemies; while to a memorial on the same subject from the electress Sophia and her grandson in May, Anne replied in an angry letter, which is said to have caused the death of the electress on the 8th of June, requesting them not to trouble the peace of her realm or diminish her authority.
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  • These demonstrations, however, were the outcome not of any returning partiality for her own family, but of her intense dislike, in which she resembled Queen Elizabeth, of any "successor," "it being a thing I cannot bear to have any successor here though but for a week"; and in spite of some appearances to the contrary, it is certain that religion and political wisdom kept Anne firm to the Protestant succession.
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  • On the 27th of April Anne gave a solemn assurance of her fidelity to the Hanoverian succession to Sir William Dawes, archbishop of York; in June she sent Lord Clarendon to Hanover to satisfy the elector.
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  • On the 27th, the day of Oxford's resignation, the discussions concerning his successor detained the council sitting in the queen's presence till two o'clock in the morning, and on retiring Anne was instantly seized with fatal illness.
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  • According to her physician Arbuthnot, Anne's life was shortened by the "scene of contention among her servants.
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    0
  • The modern theory of the relations between the sovereign and the parties, by which the former identifies himself with the faction for the time in power while maintaining his detachment from all, had not then been invented; and Anne, like her Hanoverian successors, maintained the struggle, though without success, to rule independently, finding support in Harley.
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  • Anne was a women of small ability, of dull mind, and of that kind of obstinacy which accompanies weakness of character.
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  • She deserves her appellation of "Good Queen Anne," and notwithstanding her failings must be included among the chief authors and upholders of the great Revolution settlement.
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  • Anne's husband, Prince George (1653-1708), was the second son of Frederick III., king of Denmark.
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  • Before marrying Anne he had been a candidate for the throne of Poland.
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  • The splendid tombs of the Frisian stadtholders buried here (Louis of Nassau, Anne of Orange, and others) were destroyed in the revolution 1795.
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  • In 1521 Francois (2) acquired a claim on the kingdom of Naples by his marriage with Anne de Laval, daughter of Charlotte of Aragon.
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  • The principal Scottish act was 1700, c. 3; the principal Irish act, 2 Anne c. 3.
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  • Anne Hutchinson was, in fact, voicing a protest against the legalism of the Massachusetts Puritans, and was also striking at the authority of the clergy in an intensely theocratic community.
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  • Anne Hutchinson and her followers were called "Antinomians," probably more as a term of reproach than with any special reference to her doctrinal theories; and the controversy in which she was involved is known as the "Antinomian Controversy."
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  • The difficulties which threatened to arise about the union were skilfully avoided; the Act of Security provided that the Confession of Faith and the Presbyterian government should " continue without any alteration to the people of this land in all succeeding ages," and the first oath taken by Queen Anne at her accession was to preserve it.
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  • The agitation on the subject went on in the tion of II" assembly from 1857 to 1869, when the assembly by a large majority condemned patronage as restored by the Act of Queen Anne, and resolved to petition parliament for its removal.
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  • The old ecclesiastical policy of Elizabeth, which had hitherto borne such good fruit in Wales, was now gradually relaxed under the later Stuarts and definitely abandoned under Anne, during whose reign only Englishmen were appointed to the vacant Welsh sees.
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  • Voltaire, in his Siècle de Louis XIV (1751), told the story of the mysterious masked prisoner with many graphic details; and, under the heading of "Ana" in the Questions sur l'encyclopedie (Geneva, 1771), he asserted that he was a bastard brother of Louis XIV., son of Mazarin and Anne of Austria.
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  • There is also a chalybeate spring known as St Anne's well, situated at the S.W.
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  • In 1894 the duke of Devonshire erected a handsome pump-room at St Anne's well.
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  • After the departure of the Romans the baths seem to have been long neglected, but were again frequented in the 16th century, when the chapel of St Anne was hung round with the crutches of those who were supposed to owe their cure to her healing powers; these interesting relics were destroyed at the Reformation.
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  • He married Anne Penrose, daughter of a rector of Newbury.
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  • He held aloof till the empress Anne was firmly established on the throne as autocrat.
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  • Accused, among other things, of contributing to the elevation of the empress Anne by his cabals and of suppressing a supposed will of Catherine I.
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  • Filippov, "Documents relating to the Cabinet Ministers of the Empress Anne" (Rus.) (St Petersburg, 1898) in the collections of the Russ.
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  • Drama has rarely flourished in Sweden, but several of the poets mentioned above have written important plays, and, somewhat earlier, the socialistic problempieces of Anne Charlotte Edgren-Leffler, duchess of Cajanello (1849-1893), possessed considerable dramatic talent, working under a direct impulse from Ibsen; but her greatest gift was as a novelist.
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  • On the death of Scarron, in 1660, Anne of Austria continued his pension to his widow, and even increased it to 2000 livres a year, which enabled her to entertain and frequent the literary society her husband had made her acquainted with; but on the queen-mother's death in 1666 the king refused to continue her pension, and she prepared to leave Paris for Lisbon as lady attendant to the queen of Portugal.
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  • During the age of Anne various Augustan poets in whom the lyrical faculty was slight, from Congreve and Richard Duke down to Ambrose Philips and William Somerville, essayed the epistle with more or less success, and it was employed by Gay for several exercises in his elegant persiflage.
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  • Essays, Historical and Theological, appeared in 1878 (2 vols.), with a biographical preface by his sister Anne, who also edited some of his Letters (1884).
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  • His intelligence was mediocre, his character weak, and he allowed himself to be dominated by his wife, Anne of Brittany, and his favourite the Cardinal d'Amboise.
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  • After his accession he had divorced his virtuous and ill-favoured queen, Joan, and had married, in 1499, Anne of Brittany, the widow of Charles VIII.
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  • The borough was incorporated by Anne in 1706, and the corporation was reformed by the act of 1835.
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  • By Barbara Villiers, Mrs Palmer, afterwards countess of Castlemaine and duchess of Cleveland, mistress en titre till she was superseded by the duchess of Portsmouth, he had Charles Fitzroy, duke of Southampton and Cleveland, Henry Fitzroy, duke of Grafton, George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, Anne, countess of Sussex, Charlotte, countess of Lichfield, and Barbara, a nun; by Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, Charles Lennox, duke of Richmond; by Lucy Walter, James, duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch, and a daughter; by Nell Gwyn, Charles Beauclerk, duke of St Albans, and James Beauclerk; by Catherine Peg, Charles Fitz Charles, earl of Plymouth; by Lady Shannon, Charlotte, countess of Yarmouth; by Mary Davis, Mary Tudor, countess of Derwentwater.
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  • Rochford Hall, a picturesque gabled mansion of various dates, belonged once to the Boleyns, and it has been stated that Anne Boleyn, the unfortunate queen of Henry VIII., was born here, but this is in no way proved.
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  • It was captured by the British in 1710, and ceded to them by the treaty of Utrecht in 1713, when the name was changed in honour of Queen Anne.
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  • On first hearing of the king's intentions, Anne swooned away, but on recovering, while declaring her case a very hard and sorrowful one from the great love which she bore to the king, acquiesced quietly in the arrangements made for her by Henry, by which she received lands to the value of £4000 a year, renounced the title of queen for that of the king's sister, and undertook not to leave the kingdom.
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  • Anne spent the rest of her life happily in England at Richmond or Bletchingley, occasionally visiting the court, and being described as joyous as ever, and wearing new dresses every day!
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  • Goldsmid (1886); for the pseudo Anne of Cleves see Allgemeine deutsche Biographie, i.
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  • The list of his works of fiction includes The Stolen Bacillus and other Stories (1895), The Wonderful Visit (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Plattner Story and Others (1897), When the Sleeper Wakes (1899), The First Men in the Moon (1901), The Food of the Gods (1904), In the Days of the Comet (1906), The War in the Air (1908), Anne Veronica (1909), The History of Mr Polly (191 0).
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  • Anne married Louis XII.
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  • In 1700 the young duke of Gloucester, son of Queen Anne, died here.
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  • At Warsaw he met Anne Poniatowski, Countess Potocka, with whom he rapidly became intimate.
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  • Her best-known story, Mrs Keith's Crime (1885), was followed by several other volumes, the best of which is Aunt Anne (1893); and the literary talent in the family was inherited by her daughter Ethel (Mrs Fisher Dilke), a writer of some charming verse.
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  • The duchess of Vendome's grandson, Louis Joseph, inherited Penthievre in 1669, but it was taken from him by decree in 1687 and adjudged to Anne Marie de Bourbon, princess of Conti.
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  • In order to protect her independence, Anne concluded an alliance with Maximilian of Austria, and soon married him by proxy (December 1489).
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  • The two sovereigns made a reciprocal arrangement as to their rights and pretensions to the crown of Brittany, but in the event of Charles predeceasing her, Anne undertook to marry the heir to the throne.
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  • Until her death Anne occupied herself personally with the administration of the duchy.
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  • There he married Anne de Tserclaes, and later on he proceeded by way of Basle to Zurich, where his Zwinglian convictions were confirmed by constant intercourse with Zwingli's successor, Bullinger.
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  • By the marriage of Anne of Lorraine with the duke of Nemours in 1618 the duchy of Aumale passed to the house of Savoy-Nemours.
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  • In 1051 Henry married the Russian princess Anne, daughter of Yaroslav I., grand duke of Kiev.
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  • On the 9th of January 1684 he married Praskovia Saltuikova, who bore him five daughters, one of whom, Anne, ultimately ascended the Russian throne.
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  • In the old St Mary's church (Protestant Episcopal), which was built in 1703 and has been called St Anne's as well as St Mary's, Daniel Coxe (1674-1739), first provincial grand master of the lodge of Masons in America, was buried; a commemorative bronze tablet was erected in 1907.
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  • In 1759 he married Anne, daughter of Barton Gutterridge.
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  • In the same year the changes which had occurred in the policy, or rather the caprice, of Queen Anne, brought about an approximation between England and France, and put an end to the influence which Marlborough had hitherto possessed.
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  • In the same year he married Arabella, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd duke of Newcastle; she died in 1698 and in 1700 he married Anne Churchill, daughter of the famous duke of Marlborough.
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  • Although he was tinged with republican ideas and had rendered himself obnoxious to Queen Anne by opposing the grant to her husband, Prince George, through the influence of Marlborough he was foisted into the ministry as secretary of state for the southern department, taking office in December 1706.
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  • Anne offered him a pension of 3000 a year, but this he refused, saying "if he could not have the honour to serve his country he would not plunder it."
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  • By Lady Anne Churchill he had three sons and two daughters.
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  • He also left several illegitimate children, two of whom were by Anne, countess of Macclesfield.
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  • The last Kettler, William, titular duke of Courland, died in 1737, and the empress Anne now bestowed the dignity on her favourite Biren, who held it from 1737 to 1740 and again from 1763 till his death in 1772.
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  • In 1600 he found himself in love with his master's niece, Anne More, whom he married secretly in December 1601.
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  • The subject was the Virgin seated in the lap of St Anne, bending forward to hold her child who had half escaped from her embrace to play with a lamb upon the ground.
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  • In this incomparable work St Anne, pointing upward with her left hand, smiles with an intense look of wondering, questioning, inward sweetness into the face of the Virgin, who in her turn smiles down upon her child as He leans from her lap to give the blessing to the little St John standing beside her.
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  • One was no doubt that just mentioned; can the other have been the Louvre "Virgin with St Anne and St John," now at last completed from the cartoon exhibited in 1501?
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  • But he showed the cardinal three pictures, the portrait of a Florentine lady done for Giuliano de' Medici (the Gioconda ?), the Virgin in the lap of St Anne (the Louvre picture; finished at Florence or Milan 1507-1513?), and a youthful John the Baptist.
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  • The last, which may have been done since he settled in France, is the darkened and partly repainted, but still powerful and haunting half-length figure in the Louvre, with the smile of inward ravishment and the prophetic finger beckoning skyward like that of St Anne in the Academy cartoon.
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  • Leeds is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop, with a pro-cathedral dedicated to St Anne.
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  • From February 1708 to April 1709 Swift was in London, urging upon the Godolphin administration the claims of the Irish clergy to the first-fruits and twentieths ("Queen Anne's Bounty"), which brought in about £2500 a year, already granted to their brethren in England.
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  • Anne was particularly amenable to the influence of priestly and female favourites, and it must be considered a proof of the strong interest made for Swift that she was eventually persuaded to appoint him to the deanery of St Patrick's, Dublin, vacant by the removal of Bishop Sterne to Dromore.
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  • Bolingbroke's daring spirit, however, recoiled from no extreme, and, fortunately for Swift, he added so much of his own to the latter's MS. that the production was first delayed and then, upon the news of Anne's death, immediately suppressed.
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  • His History of the Four Last Years of the Reign of Queen Anne is not on a level with his other political writings.
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  • His influence, which grew during the 18th century in spite of the depreciation of Dr Johnson, has shared in the eclipse of the Queen Anne wits which began about the time of Jeffrey.
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  • Edward I., however, denied the bishop's rights and granted the castle and town to Guy Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, whose descendants continued to hold them until they passed to the crown by the marriage of Anne Nevill with Richard III., then duke of Gloucester.
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  • Of the sisters of Edward IV., the eldest, Anne, who married the duke of Exeter, left only one daughter by her second husband, Sir Thomas St Leger; but the second, Elizabeth, married John de la Pole, duke of Suffolk, and had several children.
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  • Of the small islands close to Mahe the chief are St Anne and Cerf, off the east, and Conception and Therese off the west coast.
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  • The church of St Anne, Limehouse (1730) is by Nicholas Hawksmoor.
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  • Anne; and the same year he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.
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  • An instance of tiresome, elaborate labour - good enough, no doubt, as groundwork, and not out of keeping with what at least was the popular taste of that day - is his "Pardon of Sainte Anne de la Palud," a Breton scene, of 1858, in which he introduced the young Breton woman who was immediately to become his wife.
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  • At a later date it was the abode of Anne, duchess of Buccleuch and Monmouth, after the execution of her husband, James, duke of Monmouth in 1585, and finally became the Tower Hotel.
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