Anglo-saxon sentence example

anglo-saxon
  • As the 18th century progressed the use of tea in England rapidly increased, and by the close of the century the rate of consumption exceeded an average of 2 lb per person per annum, a rate in excess of that of to-day of all people except those of Mongol and Anglo-Saxon origin.
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  • Happily for the future of the world, the government of the United States felt itself able to accept the despatch which had been thus addressed to it, and to give the reparation which was demanded; and the danger of war between the two great branches of the Anglo-Saxon race was averted.
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  • We are also quite uncertain as to the extent to which the Jutes and Saxons may in their turn have again introduced a new breed of horses into England; and even to the close of the Anglo-Saxon period of English history allusions to the horse are still very infrequent.
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  • More than half the nomenclature of the map is derived from Orosius, an annotated Anglo-Saxon version of which had been produced by King Alfred (871-901).
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  • On the other hand, the tendency to maintain peace naturally takes its course towards the strongest ruler, the king, and we witness in Anglo-Saxon law the gradual evolution of more and more stringent and complete rules in respect of the king's peace and its infringements.
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  • See Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, ed.
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  • Alfred translated it into Anglo-Saxon.
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  • Towards the end of the reign of lEthelberht, who died about 616, Radwald of East Anglia, who had apparently spent some time at the court of Kent, began to win for himself the chief position among the Anglo-Saxon kings of his day.
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  • In Anglo-Saxon England in the 7th and 8th centuries it seems certain that each of the larger kingdoms, Kent, Wessex, Mercia and Northumbria, had its separate witan, or council, but there is a difference of opinion as to whether this was identical with, or distinct from, the folkmoot, in which, theoretically at least, all freemen had the right to appear.
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  • Evidence in support of this view is sought for in the accounts in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and elsewhere, where the decisions of the witan were received with loud expressions of approval or of disapproval by an assembled crowd, and it is argued that this is a survival from an earlier age, when all the freemen attended the witan.
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  • The legend is found also in Ethiopic, Syriac and Anglo-Saxon.
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  • A writer with the (perhaps assumed) name of Apuleius Platonicus produced a herbal which held its ground till the 15th century at least, and was in the 9th translated into Anglo-Saxon.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon Leechdoms 1 of the 11th century, published in the Rolls series of medieval chronicles and memorials, admirably illustrate the mixture of magic and superstition with the relics of ancient science which constituted monastic medicine.
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  • 1 Derived from the Anglo-Saxon laece, a physician, and dom, a law.
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  • Gomme finds important evidence of the independence of London in the existence of a merchant law which was opposed to Anglo-Saxon law.
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  • In Anglo-Saxon and Norman times it possessed a mint, and it is called a borough in the Pipe Rolls of Henry II., but it was not then in a flourishing condition.
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  • It is probable that the glass drinking-vessels, which have been found in pre-Christian Anglo-Saxon tombs, were introduced from Germany.
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  • While the so-called "barbaric laws" (leges barbarorum) of the continent, not excepting those compiled in the territory now called Germany, were largely the product of Roman influence, the continuity of Roman life was almost completely broken in the island, and even the Church, the direct heir of Roman tradition, did not carry on a continuous existence: Canterbury was not a see formed in a Roman province in the same sense as Tours or Reims. One of the striking expressions of this Teutonism is presented by the language in which the Anglo-Saxon laws were written.
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  • The English dialect in which the Anglo-Saxon laws have been handed down to us is in most cases a common speech derived from West Saxon - naturally enough as Wessex became the predominant English state, and the court of its kings the principal literary centre from which most of the compilers and scribes derived their dialect and spelling.
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  • Traces of Kentish speech may be detected, however, in the Textus Roffensis, the MS. of the Kentish laws, and Northumbrian dialectical peculiarities are also noticeable on some occasions, while Danish words occur only as technical terms. At the conquest, Latin takes the place of English in the compilations made to meet the demand for Anglo-Saxon law texts as still applied in practice.
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  • It is easy to group the Anglo-Saxon laws according to the manner of their publication.
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  • Matters which seem to us of primary importance and occupy a wide place in our law-books are almost entirely absent in Anglo-Saxon laws or relegated to the background.
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  • The next question to be approached concerns the pedigree of Anglo-Saxon law and the latter's natural affinities.
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  • The oldest Anglo-Saxon codes, especially the Kentish and the West Saxon ones, disclose a close relationship to the barbaric laws of Lower Germany - those of Saxons, Frisians, Thuringians.
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  • It would be useless to attempt to trace in a brief sketch the history of the legal principles embodied in the documents of Anglo-Saxon law.
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  • (a) The Anglo-Saxon legal system cannot be understood unless one realizes the fundamental opposition between folk-right and privilege.
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  • (b) Another feature of vital importance in the history of Anglo-Saxon law is its tendency towards the preservation of peace.
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  • (d) In course of time the natural associations get loosened and intermixed, and this calls forth the elaborate police legislation of the later Anglo-Saxon kings.
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  • Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Hengest and Horsa were at first given the island of Thanet as a home, but soon quarrelled with their British allies, and gradually possessed themselves of what became the kingdom of Kent.
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  • Prayers for the dead, attendance at funerals of gildsmen, periodical banquets, the solemn entrance oath, fines for neglect of duty and for improper conduct, contributions to a common purse, mutual assistance in distress, periodical meetings in the gildhall, - in short, all the characteristic features of the later gilds already appear in the statutes of these Anglo-Saxon fraternities.
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  • Some continental writers, in dealing with the origin of municipal government throughout western Europe, have, however, ascribed too much importance to the Anglo-Saxon gilds, exaggerating their prevalence and contending that they form the germ of medieval municipal government.
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  • Their ordinances are similar to those of the above-mentioned Anglo-Saxon fraternities.
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  • The same may be said of the Anglo-Saxon ploughs.
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  • A mattock with which to break the clods is often found represented in Anglo-Saxon drawings as subsidiary to the plough.
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  • When we turn to Anglo-Saxon England we find a different situation and a different result.
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  • Thus for instance when any feudal institution (be it Gothic, Norman, or Anglo-Saxon) eludes our deciphering faculty from the imperfect records of its use and operation, then we endeavour conjecturally to amend our knowledge by watching the circumstances in which that institution arose."
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  • Stubbs (London, 1874) Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, edited by C. Plummer (Oxford, 1892-1899).
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  • In Anglo-Saxon c was adopted to represent the hard stop. After the Norman conquest many English words were re-spelt under Norman influence.
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  • The white lie of the Anglo-Saxon and the hoben no uso of The Japanese are twins.
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  • Pictorial representations in early manuscripts, and the rude effigies on their coins, are not very helpful in deciding as to the form of crown worn by the Anglo-Saxon and Danish kings of England before the Norman Conquest.
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  • The conflict of idealism with these two lines of criticism - the accusation of subjectivism on the one side of intellectualism and rigid objectivism on the other - may be said to have constituted the history of Anglo-Saxon philosophy during the first decade of the 20th century.
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  • Thus we find Alfred the Great translating the homilies of Bede; and in a similar manner arose iElfric's Anglo-Saxon Homilies and the German Homiliarium of Ottfried of Weissenburg.
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  • 4 In Anglo-Saxon times Athelstan appears to have been the first monarch who enacted regulations for the mints.'
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  • See Earle and Plummer's edition of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
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  • In 1888 Lord Selborne published a second work on the Church question, entitled Ancient Facts and Fallacies concerning Churches and Tithes, in which he examined more critically than in his earlier book the developments of early ecclesiastical institutions, both on the continent of Europe and in Anglo-Saxon England, which resulted in the formation of the modern parochial system and its general endowment with tithes.
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  • The keynote of his History is contained in his assertion that the Reformation was "the root and source of the expansive force which has spread the Anglo-Saxon race over the globe."
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  • He became bishop of Sherborne before 900, and his death is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 910, although it is possible that it occurred a year or two earlier.
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  • A Frankish bishop, Liudhard, had laboured there before his time; but the mission of Augustine and his ordination as a bishop were decisive in the conversion of the country and the establishment of the Anglo-Saxon church.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon name of the Parret, a river in Somerset, is Pedreda or Pedrida, which at first sight looks as if it had to do with the proper name, Petrus; but Skeat believes there is no connexion between them - the latter portion of the word being rio, a stream.
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  • The parish church of All Saints, occupying the site of a building dating from Anglo-Saxon times, was erected in the reign of Edward IV., and is among the best specimens of Perpendicular in the north of England.
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  • The town was of some importance in Anglo-Saxon times, and at Templeborough, on the S.E.
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  • The term "Anglo-Saxon" is commonly applied to that period of English history, language and literature which preceded the Norman Conquest.
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  • Educated at Repton, whence he proceeded to Aberdeen University, he became in 1817 vicar of Little Horwood, Buckinghamshire, and devoted his spare time to literature and particularly to the study of Anglo-Saxon.
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  • In 1823 appeared his Elements of Anglo-Saxon Grammar.
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  • He remained in Holland until 1840, working there on his Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language (1838), his best-known work.
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  • In 1857 he became rector of Water Shelford, Buckinghamshire, and in the following year was appointed Rawlinson professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford.
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  • He gave to the university of Cambridge in 1867 £Io,000 for the establishment of a professorship of Anglo-Saxon.
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  • He died on the 27th of May 1876, leaving behind him a mass of annotations on the Anglo-Saxon charters.
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  • The plan was devised as a means of rivalling Anglo-Saxon supremacy, but was rejected through fear of the mixed races predominating over the whites.
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  • Bury, of which the name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon burhg, birig or byrig (town, castle or fortified place), was the site of a Saxon station, and an old English castle stood in Castle Croft close to the town.
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  • Bright, The Gospel of Saint Luke in Anglo-Saxon (Oxford, 1893); for earlier editions see Cook, op. cit, p. lx.
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  • More familiar to the Anglo-Saxon race is the connexion between the soul and the breath; this identification is found both in Aryan and Semitic languages; in Latin we have spiritus, in Greek pneuma, in Hebrew ruach; and the idea is found extending downwards to the lowest planes of culture in Australia, America and Asia.
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  • Yeovil (Gyoele, Evill, Ivle, Yeoele) before the Conquest was part of the private domains of the Anglo-Saxon kings.
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  • The area of the United States, as here considered, exclusive of Alaska and outlying possessions, occupies a belt nearly twenty degrees of middle latitude in width, and crosses Boundaries sad Area, North America from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The southern boundary is naturally defined on the east by the Gulf of Mexico; its western extension crosses obliquely over the western highlands, along an irregular line determined by aggressive Americans of Anglo-Saxon stock against Americans of Spanish stock.
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  • Except in Kent his wergild was fixed at two hundred shillings, or one-sixth of that of a thegn, and he is undoubtedly the twyhynde man of Anglo-Saxon law.
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  • Taking a less technical sense than the ceorl of Anglo-Saxon law, churl, or cherl was used in general to mean a "man," and more particularly a "husband."
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  • Lingard wrote The Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church (1806), of which a third and greatly enlarged addition appeared in 1845 under the title The History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church; containing an account of its origin, government, doctrines, worship, revenues, and clerical and monastic institutions; but the work with which his name is chiefly associated is A History of England, from the first invasion by the Romans to the commencement of the reign of William III., which appeared originally in 8 vols.
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  • Just as in Anglo-Saxon lands a national ideal is gradually materializing in the principle of the equalization of chances for all citizens, so in continental Europe, along with this equalization of chances, has still more rapidly developed the ideal of an equalization of obligations, which in turn leads to the claim for an enlargement of political rights co-extensive with the obligations.
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  • An Anglo-Saxon derivation, signifying "forest clearing," is indicated for the name.
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  • In what follows, the archaeological interest of early Britain is dealt with, in connexion with the history of Britain in PreRoman, Roman, and Anglo-Saxon days; this account being supplementary to the articles England; English History; Scotland, &C.
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  • According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle the kingdom of Sussex was founded by a certain Ella or /Elie, who landed in 477, while Wessex owed its origin to Cerdic, who arrived some eighteen years later.
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  • The nature of this supremacy has been much discussed, but the true explanation seems to be furnished by that principle of personal allegiance which formed such an important element in Anglo-Saxon society.
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  • The terms used for the two classes by Bede are milites (ministri) and comites, for which the Anglo-Saxon version has Pegnas and gesi 5as respectively.
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  • In Anglo-Saxon society, as in that of all Teutonic nations in early times, the two most important principles were those of kinship and personal allegiance.
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  • Hence, since the ceorls doubtless formed the bulk of the population, it has been thought that the Anglo-Saxon armies of early times were essentially peasant forces.
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  • There is no evidence that it was still practised when the Roman and Celtic missionaries arrived, but it is worth noting that according to the tradition given in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Oxfordshire, where the custom seems to have been fairly common, was not conquered before the latter part of the 6th century.
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  • Reference must also be made to the articles on Anglo-Saxon antiquities in the Victoria County Histories, and to various papers in Archaeologia, the Archaeological Journal, the Journal of the British Archaeological Society, the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, the Associated Architectural Societies' Reports, and other antiquarian journals.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon homilist 1Elfric, in his Lives of the Saints (996 or 997), refers to it as in common use; but the earliest evidence of its authoritative prescription is a decree of the synod of Beneventum in 1091.
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  • It is quite in harmony with these statements that many Northern and probably all the Anglo-Saxon kingly families traced their origin to the gods.
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  • It came into Britain with the Anglo-Saxon invaders and continued in use in certain districts perhaps until nearly the close of the 6th century.
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  • For further references see Britain (Anglo-Saxon), Germany (Ethnography and Early History), and Scandinavian Civilization.
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  • (6) The increasing estrangement of German and Anglo-Saxon feeling.
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  • It is first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 605.The ealdorman, or sheriff, of the shire was probably charged with the duty of calling out and leading the fyrd, which appears always to have retained a local character, as during the time of the Danish invasions we read of the fyrd of Kent, of Somerset and of Devon.
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  • The words knight and knighthood are merely the modern forms of the Anglo-Saxon or Old English cniht and cnihthdd.
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  • In a secondary sense cniht meant a servant or attendant answering to the German Knecht, and in the Anglo-Saxon Gospels a disciple is described as a leorning cniht.
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  • Around the Anglo-Saxon magnates were collected a crowd of retainers and dependants of all ranks and conditions; and there is evidence enough to show that among them were some called cnihtas who were not always the humblest or least considerable of their number.'
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  • And at first chevalier in its general and honorary signification seems to have been rendered not by knight but by rider, as may be inferred from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, wherein it is recorded under the year 1085 that William the Conqueror " dubbade his sunu Henric to ridere."
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  • In 1851 an English and in 1852 an Anglo-Saxon lectureship were established.
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  • Although Wimborne (Wimburn) has been identified with the Vindogladia of the Antonine Itinerary, the first undoubted evidence of settlement is the entry of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, under the date 718, that Cuthburh, sister of King Ine, founded the abbey here and became the first abbess; the house is also mentioned in a somewhat doubtful epistle of St Aldhelm in 705.
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  • See Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, edited by Earle and Plummer (Oxford, 1892-1899); Bede, Hist.
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  • Probably Corfe Castle (Corfes geat, Corf geat, Corve, Corph) was an early Anglo-Saxon settlement.
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  • In so far as these had other causes than the Anglo-Saxon love of faction, they were due to the formation by the loyalists, their descendants and hangers-on of a clique who more and more engrossed political and social power.
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  • It is usual to speak of "the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle"; it would be more correct to say that there are four Anglo-Saxon Chronicles.
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  • The editio princeps of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was by Abraham Wheloc, professor of Arabic at Cambridge, where the work was printed (1643-1644).
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  • His story is told in one of the oldest songs of the Edda, the V OlundarkiOda and, with considerable variations, in the prose P13rekssaga (Thidrek's sage), while the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf and Deor's Lament contain allusions to it.
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  • Under the name of Rowlands, Richard went to Christ Church, Oxford, in 1565, where he studied early English history and the Anglo-Saxon language.
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  • It was under the Anglo-Saxon kings that the distinction between the higher and lower chase first came to be made - the former being expressly for the king or those on whom he had bestowed the pleasure of sharing in it, while only the latter was allowed to the proprietors of the land.
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  • In the 8th century one of the most famous is the Anglo-Saxon Willibald, who died in 781 as bishop of the Frankish diocese of Eichstatt.
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  • He graduated in 1845 at Amherst, where his attention was turned to the study of Anglo-Saxon by Noah Webster.
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  • At Lafayette he introduced the first carefully scientific study of English in any American college, and in 1870 published A Comparative Grammar of the AngloSaxon Language, in which its Forms are Illustrated by Those of the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Friesic, Old Norse and Old High German, and An Anglo-Saxon Reader; he was editor of the "Douglass Series of Christian Greek and Latin Classics," to which he contributed Latin Hymns (1874); he was chairman of the Commission of the State of Pennsylvania on Amended Orthography; and was consulting editor of the Standard Dictionary, and in 1879-1882 was director of the American readers for the Philological Society's (New Oxford) Dictionary.
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  • 789 by the appearance in England on our Dorset coast of three pirate ships " from Haerethaland " (Hardeland or Hardyssel in Denmark or Hdrdeland in Norway), which are said in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle to be " the first ships of the Danish men " who sought the land of England.
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  • According to the traditional account given in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, it was in 477 that a certain Ella (IElle) led the invaders ashore at a place called Cymenes ora and defeated the inhabitants.
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  • It signed Wolvinivs Magister Phaber; nothing is known of the artist, but he probably belonged to the semiByzantine school of the Rhine provinces; according to Dr Rock he was an Anglo-Saxon goldsmith.
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  • Jefferson carried with him from the college of William and Mary at Williamsburg, in his twentieth year, a good knowledge of Latin, Greek and French (to which he soon added Spanish, Italian and Anglo-Saxon), and a familiarity with the higher mathematics and natural sciences only possessed, at his age, by men who have a rare natural taste and ability for those studies.
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  • The materials for the formation of the villein class were already in existence in the Anglo-Saxon period.
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  • A material point for the application of the privilege consists in the fact that ancient demesne has to be proved from the time before the Conquest, and this shows clearly that the theory was partly derived from the recognition of tenant right in villeins of the Anglo-Saxon period who, as we have said above, were mostly ceorls, that is, freeborn men.
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  • These districts, or at all events the southern portion of them, were according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, s.a.
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  • To say that it displaced the centre of gravity in politics and commerce, substituting the ocean for the Mediterranean, dethroning Italy from her seat of central importance in traffic, depressing the eastern and elevating the western powers of Europe, opening a path for Anglo-Saxon expansiveness, forcing philosophers and statesmen to regard the Occidental nations as a single group in counterpoise to other groups of nations, the European community as one unit correlated to other units of humanity upon this planet, is truth enough to vindicate the vast significance of these discoveries.
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  • How wide-spread and enthusiastic is this true spirit of nationalism amongst all classes and sects of Welsh society to-day may be observed at the great meetings of the National Eisteddfod, which is held on alternate years in North and South Wales at some important centre, and at which the immense crowds collected and the interest displayed make a deep impression on the Anglo-Saxon or foreign visitors.
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  • Perhaps owing to a confusion between Glasberg or Ynysvitrin and the Anglo-Saxon Glaestinga-burh, Glastonbury, the name "Isle of Avalon" was given to the low ridge in central Somersetshire which culminates in Glastonbury Tor, while Glastonbury itself came to be called Avalon.
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  • From Woden also most of the anglo-Saxon royal families traced their descent.
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  • For the same period we derive a considerable amount of information with regard to Swedish affairs from the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon church of Steyning (Stoeningas, Stoeningum, Staninges, Stenyges, Stenyng) mentioned in Domesday is attributed to St Cuthman, who is said to have settled here before the 9 th century, and whose shrine became a resort for pilgrims. The later prosperity of the town was due to its harbour.
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  • It is likely that both these settlements were colonies from the Suebi of whom we hear in the Anglo-Saxon poem Widsith as neighbours of the Angli, and whose name may possibly be preserved in Schwabstedt on the Treene.
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  • The occurrence of the Anglo-Saxon compounds ymbren-tid, ymbren-wucan, ymbren fcestan, ymbren-dagas for Ember tide, weeks, fasts, days, favours the former derivation, which is also confirmed by the use of the word imbren in the acts of the council of iEnham, A.D.
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  • The name of Kiel appears as early as the 10th century in the form Kyl (probably from the Anglo-Saxon Kille = a safe place for ships).
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  • Thence they invaded the territories of the Ulmerugi (the Holmryge of Anglo-Saxon tradition), probably in the neighbourhood of Riigenwalde in eastern Pomerania, and conquered both them and the neighbouring Vandals.
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  • From Anglo-Saxon sources it seems probable that his supremacy reached westwards as far as Holstein.
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  • Besides the two royal seals of Anglo-Saxon kings noticed above there are extant a few other seals, and there is documentary evidence of yet others, which were Anglo- used in England before the Norman Conquest; but Saxon the rarity of such examples is an indication that the private employment of seals could not have been very seals.
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  • The name appears in the early forms of Hermodewode and Hamersmith; the derivation is probably from the Anglo-Saxon, signifying the place with a haven (hythe).
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  • In Anglo-Saxon times the property of the king consisted of (a) his private estate, (b) the demesne of the crown, comprising palaces, &c., and (c) rights over the folkland of the kingdom.
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  • He was definitely recognized as overlord by all the other Anglo-Saxon kings of his day except Eadbald of Kent.
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  • At the close of the Anglo-Saxon epoch we find a group of freemen differentiated from the ordinary ceorls because of their greater independence and better personal standing.
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  • They are all of Anglo-Saxon or tials.
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  • Nor again do these British sources - ~ ANGLO-SAXON BRITAIN
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  • How he gathered, scholars from the continent, Wales and Ireland; how he collected the old heroic poems of the nation, how he himself translated books from the Latin tongue, started schools, and set his scribes to write up the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is told elsewhere, as are his mechanical inventions, his buildings, and his dealings with missionaries and explorers (see ALFRED).
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  • For the period was one of foreign unrest, and the wars which were then waged have left an enduring mark on the map of the world, and have affected the position of the Anglo-Saxon race for all time.
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  • The jubilee showed conclusively that, whatever politicians might say, the ties of blood and kinship, which united the two peoples, were too close to be severed by either for some trifling cause; that the wisest heads in both nations were aware of the advantages which must arise from the closer union of the Anglo-Saxon races; and that the true interests of both countries lay in their mutual friendship. A war in which the United States was subsequently engaged with Spain cemented this feeling.
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  • But the scientific accuracy of Tacitus Germania is not beyond dispute, and that light fails centuries before the Anglo-Saxon conquest of Great Britain.
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  • It was first used to compile written statements of customs and dooms which were their nearest approach to law, and these codes and charters are the earliest written materials for Anglo-Saxon history.
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  • The famous Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was probably started under the influence of Alfred the Great towards the end of the 9th century.
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  • One version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle goes down to 1079 and another to 1154, but their notices of current events are brief and meagre.
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  • In the middle ages the stimulus to write was mainly of a moral or ecclesiastical nature, though the patriotic impulse which had suggested the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was perhaps never entirely absent, and the ecclesiastical motive often degenerated into a desire to glorify, sometimes even by forgery, not merely the church as a whole, but the particular monastery to which the writer belonged.
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  • According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle he was eighty years old at his death, but the energy of his administration and the evidence with regard to the ages of his children and relatives render it almost impossible.
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  • About this time these societies, each having its headman, were called frithborhs, or peace-borhs, and the Normans translated the Anglo-Saxon word by frankpledge.
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  • He has not bequeathed an imposing system, hardly even a striking discovery in metaphysics, but he is a signal example in the Anglo-Saxon world of the love of attainable truth for the sake of truth and goodness.
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  • His original and suggestive books on the English language, which are valuable in spite of their eccentricities, include: - Se Gefylsta: an Anglo-Saxon Delectus (1849); A Grammar and Glossary of the Dorset Dialect (1864); An Outline of English Speech-Craft (1878); and A Glossary of the Dorset Dialect (Dorchester, 1886).
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  • In German legend Ermanaric became the typical cruel tyrant, and references to his crimes abound in German epic and in Anglo-Saxon poetry.
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  • During the earliest years of the Anglo-Saxon rule in England the word was probably used to denote any person of noble birth.
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  • Its use was, however, soon restricted to members of a royal family, and in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle it is used almost exclusively for members of the royal house of Wessex.
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  • The earlier part of the word formed part of the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, e.g.
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  • He was the only survivor of the Anglo-Saxon bishops when he died on the 18th of January 1095.
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  • Thus, when the Anglo-Saxon, Winfrid, surnamed Boniface, appeared in the kingdom of the Franks as papal legate in 723, to romanize the existing church of the time, neither the Franks, the Thuringians, the Alemanni nor the Bavarians could be considered as pagans.
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  • In Anglo-Saxon poetry mention is frequently made of a Frisian king named Finn, the son of Folcwalda, who came into conflict with a certain Hnaef, a vassal of the Danish king Healfdene, about the middle of the 5th century.
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  • It is an interesting fact that both Wilfrid and Willibrord appear to have found no difficulty from the first in preaching to the Frisians in their native dialect, which was so nearly allied to their own Anglo-Saxon tongue.
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  • 9; the Anglo-Saxon poems, Finn, Beowulf and Widsith; Fredegarii Chronici continuatio and various German Annals; Gesta regum Francorum; Eddius, Vita Wilfridi, cap. 25 f.; Bede, Hist.
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  • Aldhelm wrote poetry in Anglo-Saxon also, and set his own compositions to music, but none of his songs, which were still popular in the time of Alfred, have come down to us.
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  • In England the custom is as old as Anglo-Saxon days, as it is mentioned in laws of Alfred and lEthelstan.
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  • The royal family, according to Felix, Life of St Guthlac (Anglo-Saxon version), were called Iclingas.
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  • And now there's more aggro after Gallas sends Dani flying - Lampard rushing in in full Anglo-Saxon mode.
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  • The Nation is white, overwhelmingly Anglo-Saxon and ruled by the fathers of God's Children.
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  • Read more... Anglo Saxon brooches 10:00 am, Saturday, 13 May, 2006 An opportunity to make an Anglo-Saxon style plate brooch.
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  • Of particular interest were the Anglo-Saxon burials, including a number of cremations -- a rite almost unknown in east Kent.
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  • Anglo-Saxon cathedral By far the most important find was the remains of the Anglo-Saxon cathedral, just 0.20m below the 1786 floor.
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  • Based on remains found in a grave at Buckland Anglo-Saxon cemetery.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon charters are also a rich source (yet to be extracted ).
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  • Bath still existed in 577 AD, according to the Anglo-Saxon chronicle.
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  • Monks in England at the time wrote the " Anglo-Saxon Chronicles " - a history of England at the time.
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  • The word Easter is thought to have derived from the goddess Eostre, an Anglo-Saxon Goddess.
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  • However, in the earliest period of Anglo-Saxon history it is very much a case of history's gradual emergence from darkness.
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  • This boundary may also be the same as the Anglo-Saxon fortification, at least for part of its length.
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  • The three best known runic alphabets are the elder futhark, the younger futhark, and the Anglo-Saxon futhorc.
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  • Includes details of Anglo-Saxon weapons and armor, including an Anglo-Saxon helmet and other items found in a grave in Northamptonshire.
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  • The kingdom was soon acknowledged as the most important of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, (the 7 English kingdom's of that time ).
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  • They are quite common and are often found with silver ingots, fragments and Anglo-Saxon pennies.
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  • Discussion: The head is a fine piece of the Anglo-Saxon metalsmith 's art.
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  • But the fires burn out of control, destroying the Anglo-Saxon minster and killing many Normans.
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  • This was the church of a great Benedictine nunnery founded in Anglo-Saxon times on the river Test.
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  • The gold Anglo-Saxon pendent excites the local Finds Liaison Officers.
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  • It gives a new perspective on the archeology of this part of Yorkshire from the early prehistoric to Anglo-Saxon periods.
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  • It was common Anglo-Saxon practice to form a quire from four sheets of parchment - folded to make eight leaves.
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  • The first viking raid was on Lindisfarne, recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
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  • The animal is rendered freely in a style reminiscent of the chip carving of the early Anglo-Saxon period.
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  • A forthcoming research project aims to reveal an Anglo-Saxon rotunda, possibly that founded by Earl Leofric, the husband of Lady Godiva.
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  • The archeological evidence for Anglo-Saxon Herefordshire is disappointingly sparse.
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  • Darlington began as an Anglo-Saxon settlement on the River Skerne which is a northern tributary of the Tees.
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  • The westerly Atlantic gales which assist rare North American vagrants to England now were also blowing in the Anglo-Saxon centuries.
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  • The word wassail is from the Anglo Saxon word " wes hal " meaning " good health " or " be whole " .
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  • This is in contrast to the Anglo-Saxon tradition of emphasizing the literal wording of legal provisions in the present sense.
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  • See Bede, Historia Ecclesiastica, ii., iii., iv., v., edited by C. Plummer (Oxford, 1896); Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, edited by Earle and Plummer (Oxford, 1899).
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  • Some Anglo-Saxon metrical fragments are to be found in Grein's Bibliothek, vol.
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  • Reginald de Mohun granted the first charter between 1245 and 1247, which diminished fines and tolls, limited the lord's "mercy," and provided that the burgesses should not against their will 1 The date of Dunstan's birth here given is that given in the Anglo-Saxon chronicle and hitherto accepted.
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  • Long after Edwin's conquest the lowland continued to be debatable territory held by uncertain tenure, but at length it was to a large extent settled anew by Anglo-Saxon and Norman colonists under Malcolm Canmore and his sons.
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  • (8)Walther of Aquitaine, chiefly known from the Latin poem Waltharius, written by Ekkehard of St Gall at the beginning of the 10th century, and fragments of an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon Epic Waldere.
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  • In England it had not been possible to bring the old British and the young Anglo-Saxon churches into friendly union; but in spite of this the Celts did not abstain from working at the common tasks of Christendom, and the continent has much to thank them for.
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  • The spirit of courage and endurance which had enabled the Czechoslovaks to achieve their independence was now to inspire a further work of no mean significance - the consolidation of a free, democratic and enlightened republic in the heart of Europe, the most westerly outpost of the great Slavonic world stretching from the banks of the Elbe and the Danube to the Pacific Ocean, and at the same time a nation bound by ties of gratitude and common interest to the Anglo-Saxon and Latin races.
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  • Ing, who is connected with Denmark in Anglo-Saxon tradition, was in all probability the eponymous ancestor of the Inguaeones (see above).
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  • So curiously alike in their general features were the sepulchral usages connected with barrow-burial over the whole of Europe, that we find the Anglo-Saxon Saga of Beowulf describing the chambered tumulus with its gigantic masonry "held fast on props, with vaults of stone," and the passage under the mound haunted by a dragon, the guardian of the treasures of heathen gold which it contained.
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  • From the pages of his teeming note-books he took the material for his lectures, arranging and rearranging it under such titles as Nature, School, Home, Genius, Beauty and Manners, Self-Possession, Duty, The Superlative, Truth, The Anglo-Saxon, The Young American.
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  • The kingdom was in the desperate state described in the last melancholy pages of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, when life and property were nowhere safe from the objectless ferocity of feudal tyrants when every shire was full of castles and every castle filled with devils and evil men, and the people murmured that Christ and his saints slept.
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  • The first Viking raid was on Lindisfarne, recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
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  • An early medieval reliquary from Littondale would have once been the precious possession of an Anglo-Saxon Christian.
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  • Although mostly Bronze Age, round barrows were also built in the Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods.
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  • Anglo-Saxon (the parent language of English) was a rolling, sonorous, thunderous language well-suited to poetry and oration.
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  • An Anglo-Saxon sword had a broad two-edged iron blade typically 90cm long and 5cm wide.
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  • For anyone unfamiliar with the term, wyrd is an Anglo-Saxon word meaning something like fate.
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  • The word wassail is from the Anglo Saxon word " wes hal " meaning " good health " or " be whole ".
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  • And the Directory of Public Worship has shaped and coloured, perhaps too thoroughly, the ritual and atmosphere of every group of Protestant Anglo-Saxon worshippers throughout the world, except Episcopalians.
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  • Beads of'amber occur with Anglo-Saxon relics in the south of England; and up to a comparatively recent period the material was valued as an amulet.
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  • Beads of amethyst are found in Anglo-Saxon graves in England.
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  • At any rate it was a notable trading-place and emporium as early as the Stone Age, and continued to enjoy its importance as such through the Bronze and Iron Ages, as is proved, inter alia, by the large number of Arabic, Anglo-Saxon and other coins which have been found on the island..
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  • Great confusion prevailed in the first years of American dominion owing to the diversities of languages and the grafting of such Anglo-Saxon institutions as the jury upon the older system.
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  • The name is used in Anglo-Saxon glossaries to translate various Latin terms for "War-goddess" or "Fury" (Bellona, Erinys, &c.).
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  • (c) The more ancient documents of Anglo-Saxon law show us the individual not merely as the subject and citizen of a certain commonwealth, but also as a member of some group, all the fellows of which are closely allied in claims and responsibilities.
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  • It is noteworthy that these early versions from Anglo-Saxon times onwards were perfectly orthodox, executed by and for good and faithful sons of the church, and, generally speaking, with the object of assisting those whose knowledge of Latin proved too scanty for a proper interpretation and understanding of the holy text.
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  • I£ consequently the former were called cnihtas under the Anglo-Saxon regime, it seems sufficiently probable that the appellation should have been continued to the latter - practically their successors - under the Anglo-Norman regime.
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  • Speaking in 1886, he referred to his "standing by the side of John Bright against the dismemberment of the great Anglo-Saxon community of the West, as I now stand against the dismemberment of the great Anglo-Saxon community of the East."
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  • For though Wessex had its full share of Danish attacks it met them with a vigour that was not seen in the other realms. The defence was often, if not always, successful; and once at least (at Aclea in 851) -~lthelwu1f exterminated a whole Danish army with the greatest slaughter among the heathen host that had been heard of down to that day, as the Anglo-Saxon chronicler is careful to record.
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  • If we consider that the Church of Africa, which had already suffered considerably from the Vandal invasion, was at this period almost entirely destroyed by the Arabs, while the fate of Spain was but little better, it is easy to see why the collection of Dionysius became the code of almost the whole of the Western Church, with the exception of the Anglo-Saxon countries; though here too it was known.
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