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amount

amount

amount Sentence Examples

  • In fact, at the party he had spent an unnecessary amount of time with the woman he almost married – and hadn't even introduced her.

  • Besides, Destiny would be there to assist with creating the required amount of restraint.

  • The latest entry was to a Sharon Dobson in the amount of twenty-five thousand.

  • Best of all, she could save a substantial amount of money for a down payment on her own place.

  • Unfortunately, life gets in the way a fair amount of the time.

  • After a fair amount of fumbling with the lock I was in.

  • She watched him, tempted to run away, before realizing the amount of activity in the halls behind her guaranteed her capture.

  • The amount of distaste in the Watcher's voice amused him.

  • They remained in the foyer, uneasy with the amount of activity and weapons, until approached.

  • As my mate, you are able to use a limited amount of my power, he explained.

  • She couldn't fathom the amount of pain he had caused over his lifetime.

  • Uncertain how to respond, Deidre laughed uncomfortably at the amount of bewilderment his question contained.

  • Deidre wasn't vindictive, but she still didn't fathom the amount of evil in one's heart it took to kill them.

  • At year's end, the bills, totaling a substantial amount, would be culled and donated to charity.

  • "For once, I agree with Darkyn," Gabriel said, staring at the Dark One with no small amount of surprise.

  • I've been watching the events unfold with no small amount of entertainment.

  • He was burning through the limited amount of demons qualified to shape-shift.

  • "The amount of blood loss and direction and force of the spray looks like his jugular was …" She gasped.

  • I thought it fitting, given the amount of misery she caused men like us.

  • She understood why he liked the spot; the scent of honeysuckle and herbs was thick in the air, the manicured gardens pleasant to look at and the awning providing the right amount of cool shade from the midmorning Georgia sun.

  • He knew he wasn't collecting fast enough, but the amount left him horrified to imagine how many he was missing.

  • The souls were barely glimmering; there was no way he'd be able to pull the amount of power he needed to save Deidre.

  • She stared, knowing no amount of counseling would fix her when this was over.

  • His words were spoken with an unusual amount of venom.

  • He recognized the healer by the amount of bands winding around his arm.

  • That he came from the mortal world rather than the Immortal one had left a taint on him that no amount of success could get rid of.

  • Kiera would never agree to marry someone in so short of a time, but to agree in any amount of time to a man as lethal in appearance as this?

  • We only paid— Claire cut her off and repeated the amount.

  • Dean managed to whistle down a young boy who agreed to use his snow blower on Dean's unfinished sidewalk, for an amount Dean considered ridiculous, but he knew he needed to get up to snuff on Shipton's fall before he was totally on the defensive.

  • They are yet to assess the amount of damage to the heart.

  • Dean didn't respond but in his mind agreed the answer made a certain amount of sense, giving the situation.

  • The check was for a substantial amount.

  • It wasn't the amount of the check Shipton gave you that caught my attention, it was the ink.

  • A certain amount of planning and calculation went into all of her actions.

  • Brady stepped from the greencar, not expecting the amount of brass and rank on the secluded mountaintop.

  • She didn't expect to sleep, not with the amount of anti-sleepers in her system.

  • A cool breeze swept over the river, and Lana shivered until they neared one of the spits, the one with the least amount of people there.

  • Lana rushed to him, horrified by the amount of blood soaking his uniform.

  • "Ow," Toby muttered.  Ully's fingers dug into his shoulder.  The Immortal didn't look as if he had that amount of strength in him.

  • We need to get to safety, and I don't have enough food to blow up the amount of trees it'll take to stop a herd of demons.

  • No amount of make-up could ever cover it up either.

  • She named a salary figure close to the small amount Dean drew from the Parkside Police Department.

  • I'd guess it's been there a spell—there was a fair amount of dust on it.

  • There was also a small sheet of white paper listing 11.2 gallons of gas purchased in Aberdeen, Maryland, a mileage figure and the amount of the purchase.

  • Dean looked at the bottom half of a small register receipt showing the amount of $59.95.

  • It makes a certain amount of sense.

  • But the old man, finally, with much reluctance, agreed to re-figure the amount stolen when Dean began to ask how fre­quently deposits were made and offered to check bank records.

  • His note pad was ever present and he spent a considerable amount of time on the phone.

  • If any clothing was missing, the amount was small.

  • In that amount of time she shoved it to the back of her mind again.

  • One morning, while Carmen was cleaning the house, he caught her standing in the living room, confronting the recliner with a questionable amount of courage.

  • We cannot track them in the mortal world until they use a substantial amount of magic.

  • Fear trickled through her as she recalled the amount of pain trusting someone could cause.

  • Alex was the reluctant heir to an enormous amount of land and money.

  • For that amount of time, they would fall back into their old roles, with Alex in control.

  • Alfonso lost the use of his cell phone for a month and Alex grounded Jonathan for the same amount of time.

  • Sam eyed her with a fair amount of discomfort, which wasn't surprising because Carmen was close to tears.

  • She watched him go in and then left with a certain amount of concern.

  • An unbelievable amount of blood was pumping from a tiny cut on her hand.

  • Even the lawn contained a surprising amount of herbs, and edible plantains grew everywhere.

  • She couldn't get over the amount of chicken houses.

  • He slowed as he neared the tavern, taking in the amount of armed men gathered outside at such an early time.

  • Your life is important to me, more so than the amount of pain I must put you through to sustain it, she replied.

  • It receives from the north several intermittent streams, the chief, usually carrying a fair amount of water, being the Khulu or Kolimbine, coming from the Kaarta plateau.

  • possess a large amount of ep ., Proboscis.

  • The higher alcohols such as propyl, isobutyl, amyl, capryl, oenanthyl and caproyl, have been identified; and the amount of these vary according to the different conditions of the fermentation.

  • Another fact of considerable technical importance is, that the various races of yeast show considerable differences in the amount and proportion of fermentation products other than ethyl alcohol and carbonic acid which they produce.

  • Hence the Mediterranean region is characteristically one of winter rains, the distinctive feature becoming less sharply defined from south to north, and the amount of total annual fall increasing in the same direction.

  • If an air-tight receptacle is not available, a small percentage of powdered carbon is added to the zinc-dust, to prevent increase in the amount of oxide, which, if present in excess, tends to make the deposit dull.

  • The anchorage is safe, and the bay full of fish; the harbour has a certain amount of trade.

  • Whilst no small amount of observational work has been done in these new branches of atmospheric electricity, the science has still not developed to a considerable extent beyond preliminary stages.

  • The bituminous coal of West Virginia is a particularly good coking coal, and in 1905, 1906, 1907 and 1908 West Virginia ranked second (to Pennsylvania) among the states of the Union in the amount of coke manufactured; the Flat Top district is the principal cokemaking region.

  • The legislature of the latter state in 1873 adopted a report declaring that between 1822 and 1861, during which period the debt had been incurred, the western counties had paid an excess of taxes, more than equal to the amount which had been expended in the west for the purposes for which the debt had been incurred, and concluded with the statement: " West Virginia owes no debt, has no bonds for sale and asks no credit."

  • On the 5th of March 1440-1441, the king endowed the college out of alien priories with some scpc, a year, almost exactly the amount of the original endowment of Winchester.

  • Thus the smallest rotation of either head communicates to the corresponding slide motion, which, if the screws are accurate, is proportional to the amount through which the head is turned.

  • The amount of this pressure is regulated by the screw z'.

  • The yield of corn varies from six to ten times the amount sown.

  • A considerable amount of cheese is manufactured, but largely by Italian capitalists.

  • The greater part of the district consists of state land, the cultivators being tenants of government, but there is a certain amount of hereditary freehold.

  • ornata), with a certain amount of crossing from other species.

  • The difficulties of the harbour were increased by the continued silting up, produced by the enormous amount of solid material brought down by the river.

  • Ostia thus lost a considerable amount of its trade, but its importance still continued to be great.

  • a considerable amount was done (the objects are now in the Lateran museum).

  • The crown has a fall which may amount to as much as 18 in.

  • The gas contains a certain amount of hydrogen and oxides of carbon, also traces of nitrogen.

  • Burton is the seat of an enormous brewing trade, representing nearly one-tenth of the total amount of this trade in the United Kingdom.

  • Practically all the company's servants were traders in their private capacity, and as they claimed various privileges and exemptions this system was detrimental to the interests of the native princes and gave rise to an enormous amount of corruption.

  • On the other hand, these stoves need a considerable amount of attention in filling, trimming and cleaning, and there is some risk of explosion and damage by accidental leaking and smoking.

  • All these methods warm chiefly by means of convected heat, the amount of true radiation from the pipes being small.

  • The tank should be of a size to hold not less than a twentieth part of the total amount of water held in the system.

  • an amount p 2 which seems small but which would be quite sufficient to destroy one or more of the joints if provision were not made to prevent damage.

  • This is not so, for his will (Memoirs, p. 427) shows that besides his large estates he left a considerable amount of personal property.

  • the amount was considerably increased, It was continued till 1869.

  • The existing system of taxation also presses heavily upon the provinces, as may be seen from the fact that the national, provincial and municipal exactions together amount to £7 per head of population, while the total value of the exports in 1898 was only L6 in round numbers.

  • During the era of so-called " prosperity " between 1881 and 1890 an enormous amount of bank notes were issued under various authorizations, especially that of the " free banking law " of 1887.

  • whether run by steam, water-power or other motive forces, has played a great part in the promotion of industry; the increase in the amount of steam horse-power employed in industrial establishments is, to a certain degree, an index to the activity of the country as regards manufactures.

  • Where the amount exceeds 12 but not 24 an appeal lies from his decision to the court of first instance.

  • The discharge of the Darling river at Bourke does not amount to more than 10% of the rainfall over the country which it drains.

  • The letters carried amount to about 80 per head, the newspapers to 32 per head and the packets to 15 per head.

  • 2,824,182 Other revenue 55,676 £11,879,343 The return made to the states was £7,385,731, so that the actual revenue disposed of by the Commonwealth was less by that amount, or £4,493,612.

  • These were due to an enormous amount of exceedingly fine dust blown to a great height by that terrific explosion, and then universally diffused by the high atmospheric currents.

  • Straw-plaiting is a considerable industry at Lacco; and a certain amount of fishing is also done.

  • Tuition in the institute is free; board and living cost $8.50 a month; day students are allowed to "work-out" $1.50-$3.00 a month of this amount, and night students may thus pay all their expenses.

  • The shafts are placed so close together that in many instances they are divided by only a couple of feet of solid ground, but at their bases a considerable amount of gallery work has been excavated, though it is possible that this was done by miners who came after the people who originally sank the shafts.

  • The principal mineral resource of Vermont is its building and monumental stone, including marble and granite and a small amount of limestone.

  • The value of the total amount of stone produced in 1908 in Vermont was $7,152,624.

  • The value of oak bark depends upon the amount of tannin contained in it, which varies much, depending not only on the growth of the tree but on the care bestowed on the preparation of the bark itself, as it soon ferments and spoils by exposure to wet, while too much sun-heat is injurious.

  • Murray's calculations give the amount of precipitation received on this area at 15,800 cub.

  • The terrigenous deposits consist of blue muds, red muds (abundant along the coast of Brazil, where the amount of organic matter present is insufficient to reduce the iron in the matter brought down by the great rivers to produce blue muds), green muds and sands, and volcanic and coral detritus.

  • When a debtor tenders the amount due to his creditor and the creditor refuses to accept, the debt is not discharged, but if the debtor is subsequently sued for the debt and continues willing and ready to pay, and pays the amount tendered into court, he can recover his costs in the action.

  • A creditor is not bound to give change to the debtor, whose duty it is to make tender in lawful money the whole amount due, or more, without asking for change.

  • Albert never visited the Holy Land, but he appears to have had a considerable amount of intercourse with returned crusaders, and to have had access to valuable correspondence.

  • If we raise i lb of matter through a foot we do a certain amount of work against the earth's attraction; if we raise 2 lb through the same height we do twice this amount of work, and so on.

  • Hence it is not surprising that, in those more subtle forms in which energy cannot be readily or completely converted into work, the universality of the principle of energy, its conservation, as regards amount, should for a long while have escaped recognition after it had become familiar in pure dynamics.

  • The smoother we make the pulley the more nearly does the amount of useful work which the weight is capable of doing approach ro foot-pounds, and if we take into account the work done against the friction of the pulley, we may say that the work done by the descending weight is ro foot-pounds, and hence when the weight is in its elevated position we have at disposal r o foot-pounds more energy than when it is in the lower position.

  • The system consisting of the earth and the pound therefore possesses an amount of energy which depends on the relative positions of its two parts, on account of the latent physical connexion existing between them.

  • Rumford was engaged in superintending the boring of cannon in the military arsenal at Munich, and was struck by the amount of heat produced by the action of the boring bar upon the brass castings.

  • By this means the mean temperature of the brass was raised through about 70° Fahr., while the amount of metal abraded was only 837 grains.

  • P. Joule to achieve; his experiments conclusively prove that heat and energy are of the same nature, and that all other forms of energy can be transformed into an equivalent amount of heat.

  • Hence he inferred that the amount of heat given up to the condenser of an engine when the engine is doing work must be less than when the same amount of steam is blown through the engine without doing any work.

  • In this experiment a great noise was produced, corresponding to a loss of energy, and Joule endeavoured to determine the amount of energy necessary to produce an equal amount of sound from the string of a violoncello and to apply a corresponding correction.

  • The close agreement between the results at least indicates that "the amount of heat produced by friction is proportional to the work done and independent of the nature of the rubbing surfaces."

  • Now, we know that the number of electrochemical equivalents electrolysed is proportional to the whole amount of electricity which passed through the circuit, and the product of this by the electromotive force of the battery is the work done by the latter, so that in this case also Joule showed that the heat generated was proportional to the work done.

  • A metal vessel was placed in a calorimeter and air forced into it, the amount of energy expended in compressing the air being measured.

  • The amount of heat absorbed by the air could thus be measured, while the work done by it in expanding could be readily calculated.

  • Trans., 18 53, p. 357, 18 54, p. 321, and 1862, p. 579) showed that the statement that no internal work is done when a gas expands or contracts is not quite true, but the amount is very small in the cases of those gases which, like oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen, can only be liquefied by intense cold and pressure.

  • The ratio of the portion of the energy of a system which can under given conditions be converted into mechanical work to the whole amount of energy operated upon may be called the "availability" of the energy.

  • If a system be removed from all communication with anything outside of itself, the whole amount of energy possessed by it will remain constant, but will of its own accord tend to undergo such transformations as will diminish its availability.

  • All we can do in such cases is to place the system under certain conditions of transformation, and be content with the amount of work which it is, as it were, willing to render up under those conditions.

  • He shows that the amount of work obtainable is equal to that which can be done by the first gas in expanding into the space occupied by the second (supposed vacuous) together with that done by the second in expanding into the space occupied by the first.

  • The availability of the energy of electrical separation in a charged Leyden jar is also limited only by the resistance of conductors, in virtue of which an amount of heat is necessarily produced, which is greater the less the time occupied in discharging the jar.

  • It generally happens that to obtain the greatest possible amount of work from a given supply of energy, and to obtain it at the greatest rate, are conflicting interests.

  • A similar condition obtains in the steamengine, in which a great rate of working necessitates the dissipation of a large amount of energy.

  • Two parts must not move in consecutive octaves or fifths, because by so doing they unaccountably reinforce each other by an amount by which they impoverish the rest of the harmony.

  • An attempt to hold a public procession of the Host in connexion with the Eucharistic Congress at Westminster in 1908, however, was the signal for the outburst of a considerable amount of opposition, and was eventually abandoned owing to the personal intervention of the prime minister.

  • is equivalent to an amount of heat sufficient to raise nearly 6 gallons of water from 60° F.

  • Pledges were often made where the intrinsic value of the article was equivalent to the amount of the debt; but antichretic pledge was more common, where the profit of the pledge was a set-off against the interest of the debt.

  • A considerable amount of forwarding was done by the caravans.

  • Ships, whose tonnage was estimated at the amount of grain they could carry, were continually hired for the transport of all kinds of goods.

  • This was a very important position owing to the amount of information concerning European affairs which passed through the hands of the representative of Spain.

  • If, however, there is leakage, the current received on the galvanometer will be less than the current sent out, and the result will be a deflection of the needle proportional to the amount of leakage.

  • The galvanometer being so adjusted that a current of definite strength through one of the coils gives a definite deflection of the needle, the amount of leakage expressed in terms of the insulation resistance of the wires is given by the formula.

  • The average speed is obtained very accurately from solar and stellar observations for the position of the ship. The difference between the speed of the ship and the rate of paying out gives the amount of.

  • It is important to observe that the risk is in no way obviated by the increasing slack paid out, except in so far as the amount of sliding which the strength of the cable is able to produce at the points of contact with the ground may be thereby increased.

  • The submarine telegraphs are mainly controlled by companies, the amount of issued capital of the existing British telegraph companies (twenty-four in number) being £3 0, 447, 1 9 1, but a certain number of lines are in government hands.

  • If, however, the antenna is inductively or directly coupled to a condenser circuit of large capacity then the amount of energy which can be stored up before discharge takes place is very much greater, and hence can be drawn upon to create prolonged or slightly damped trains of waves.

  • Soc., 1905, 27, p. 222), by determinations of the ratio of cadmium chloride to silver chloride, and of the amount of silver required to precipitate cadmium chloride.

  • The pitch of a musical sound depends on the number of cycles passed through by the fluctuations of the pressure per unit of time; the loudness depends on the amount or the amplitude of the fluctuation in each cycle; the quality depends on the form or the nature of the fluctuation in each cycle.

  • The original method of charging adopted in Great Britain took the telephone instrument as the unit, charging a fixed annual rental independent of the amount of use to which the instrument was put.

  • In each case the minimum annual amount for message fees is £1,.

  • As the cost of the service varies in proportion to the amount of use, the toll rate is more scientific, and it has the further advantage of discouraging the unnecessary use of the instrument, which causes congestion of traffic at busy hours and also results in lines being " engaged " when serious business calls are made.

  • The years' working of the whole telephone system of the Post Office showed a balance of £451,787 after payment of the working expenses, while the estimated amount required to provide for depreciation of plant and interest at 3 per cent.

  • There are now four circuits between London and Paris, one between London and Lille, and two between Londofi and Brussels, the last carrying an increasing amount of traffic. Experiments have been made in telephonic communication between London and Rome by way of Paris.

  • Leo, the saint's favourite disciple and companion on Mount Alverno at the time, which describes the circumstances of the stigmatization; Elias of Cortona, the acting superior, wrote on the day after his death a circular letter wherein he uses language clearly implying that he had himself seen the Stigmata, and there is a considerable amount of contemporary authentic second hand evidence.

  • The production of maize is, however, insufficient, and 208,719 tons were imported in 1902about double the amount imported in 1882.

  • The exportation in I902 only reached about 45 million gallons (and even that is double the average), while an equally abundant vintage in France and Spain rendered the exportation of the balance of 1907 impossible, and fiscal regulations rendered the distillation of the superfluous amount difficult.

  • A certain amount of linseed-oil is made in Lombardy, Sicily, Apulia and Calabria; colza in Piedmont, Lombardy, Venetia and Emilia; and castor-oil in Venetia and Sicily.

  • The product is principally used for industrial purposes, and partly in the preparation of food, but the amount is decreasing.

  • Owing to the comnaratively small amount of letters, it is found possible to have a travelling post office on all principal trains (while almost every train has a travelling sorter, for whom a compartment is reserved) without a late fee being exacted in either case.

  • Most large towns contain important state or communal archives, iii which a considerable amount of research is being done by local investigators; the various societies for local history (Societd di Storia Patria) do very good work and issue valuable publications; the treasures which the archives contain are by no means exhausted.

  • The amount lent on security was 4,153,229.

  • As yet the Cassa Ecclesiastica had no right to dispose of the property thus entrusted to it; but in 1862 an act was passed by which it transferred all its real property to the national domain, and was credited with a corresponding amount by the exchequer.

  • For minor civil cases involving sums up to 100 lire (~4), giudici conciliator-i have also jurisdiction, while they may act as arbitrators up to any amount by request.

  • It is proportional, and is collected by deduction from salaries and pensions paid to servants of the state, where it is assessed on three-eighths of the income, and from interest on consolidated stock, where it is assessed on the whole amount; and by register in the cases of private individuals, who pay on three-fourths of their income, professional men, capitalists or manufacturers, who pay on one-half or nine-twentieths of their income.

  • Of the expenditure a large amount is absorbed by interest on debt.

  • Grand Livre Amount.

  • In July 1906 the 5% gross (4% net), and 4% net rente were successfully converted into 33/4% stock (to be reduced to 33/4% after five years), to a total amount of 324,017,393.

  • The demands for reimbursement at par represented a sum of only 187,588 and the market value of the stock was hardly affected; while the saving to the Treasury was to be 800,000 per annum for the first five years and about double the amount afterwards.

  • Loans are repayable by Agrarian instalments, and are guaranteed by first mortgages not Credit greater in amount than half the value of the hypothecated flanks property.

  • The value of their land certificates or cartetle fondiarie (representing capital in circulation) rose from 10,420,000 in 1881 to 15,560,000 in 1886, and to 30,720,000 in 1891, but fell to 29,320,000 in 1896, to 27,360,000 in 1898, and to 24,360,000 in 1907; the amount of money lent increased from 1/2Io,44o,000 in 1881 to 15,600,000 in 1886, and 30,800,000 in 1891, but fell to 29,320,000 in 1896, to 27,360,000 in 1899, and to f2I,72o,000 in 1907.

  • A considerable amount of local autonomy was allowed, and dependence cn Vienna was very slight and not irksome.

  • All the while a vast amount of revolutionary literature was being printed in Switzerland, France and England, and smuggled into Italy; the poet Giusti satirized the Italian princes, the dramatist G.

  • A vast amount of material on the Risorgimenti has been published both in Italy and abroad as well as numeron works of a literary and critical nature.

  • (Turin, 1888-1897), based on a diligent stud of the original authorities and containing a large amount of informa tion; the author is a Mazzinian, which fact should be taken mt account, but he generally quotes the opinions of those who disagree with him as well.

  • It established that all Italian cabinets since 1880 had grossly neglected the state banks; that the two preceding cabinets had been aware of the irregularities committed by Tanlongo; that Tanlongo had heavily subsidized the press, paying as much as 20,000 for that purpose in 1888 alone; that a number of deputies, including several ex-ministers, had received from him loans of a considerable amount, which they had apparently made no effort to refund; that Giolitti had deceived the Chamber with regard to the state banks, and was open tosuspicion of having,after the arrest of Tanlongo, abstracted a number of documents from the latters papers before placing the remainder in the hands of the judicial authorities.

  • The agitation ceased in June with the defeat of the strikers, but not until a vast amount of damage had been done to the crops and all had suffered heavy losses, including the government, whose expenses for the maintenance of public order ran into tens of millions of lire.

  • The older, which extends to 150 B.C., set forth, in bald, unattractive language, without any pretensions to style, but with a certain amount of trustworthiness, the most important events of each successive year.

  • For some time all appeals to the king, to parliament, and to the courts of justice were unavailing; but on the 12th of February 1684 his application to Chief Justice Jeffreys was at last successful, and he was set at liberty on finding bail to the amount of X40,000, to appear in the House of Lords in the following session.

  • Chester Waters's Chesters of Chicheley (1877) contains a vast amount of genealogical information about Cranmer which has only been used by one of his biographers.

  • As regards the Brahmanas of the Rigveda, two of such works have been handed down, the Aitareya and the Kaushitaki (or Sankhayana)-Brahmanas, which have a large amount of their material in common.

  • Of a far more complicated nature than these offerings are the Soma-sacrifices, which, besides the simpler ceremonies of this class, such as the Agnishtoma or "Praise of Agni," also include great state functions, such as the Rajasuya or consecration of a king, and the Asvamedha or horse-sacrifice, which, in addition to the sacrificial rites, have a considerable amount of extraneous, often highly interesting, ceremonial connected with them, which makes them seem to partake largely of the nature of public festivals.

  • fixes the amount of the relief to be paid to the king by the heir of any of his vassals.

  • The guardian or his servant must not take from the ward's property more than a reasonable amount for his expenses and the like; on the contrary he must maintain the houses, estates and other belongings in a proper state of efficiency.

  • declares that those who owe military service for their lands shall not be called upon to perform more than the due amount of such service.

  • It prevents the king from increasing by their agency the amount of money annually due to him from the various counties and hundreds.

  • Henceforward this amount must not be raised.

  • It required for its formation an amount of scientific knowledge which could only be very gradually acquired.

  • The period of the revival of learning, which was also that of a renewed study of nature, is marked by a considerable amount of speculation respecting the origin of the universe.

  • A certain amount of progress has been made in the historical criticism of these books.

  • show the amount of fish supplied to the king.

  • The administration of the act was entrusted to the pharmaceutical society, and the duty of prosecuting unauthorized practitioners has been performed by the society ever since, without any pecuniary assistance from the state, although the legal expenses involved in prosecution amount to a considerable portion of its income.

  • In that case either very little secondary tissue is formed, as in the gourds, some Ranunculaceae, &c., or a considerable amount may be produced (clematis, barberry, ivy).

  • In the former case the formation of phelloderm is trivial in amount; in the latter, considerable, since this tissue has to replace the cast-off cortex, as a metabolic and particularly a storage tissue.

  • Brown and Escombe have shown that the amount of solar energy taken up by a green leaf may often be fifty times as much as it can utilize in the constructive processes of which it is the seat.

  • The latter ultimately reaches the external air by diffusion through the stomata, whose dimensions vary in proportion as the amount of water in the epidermal cells becomes greater or less.

  • The amount of watery vapour in the air passing through a stoma has no effect upon it, as the surfaces of the guard cells abutting on the air chamber are strongly cuticularized, and therefore impermeable.

  • This pressure of the turgid cortex on the central stele is known as root pressure, and is of very considerable amount.

  • But it is certain that it can only be present in a cell in very small amount at any moment, for an extremely dilute solution acts as a poison to protoplasm.

  • There is a certain amount of evidence that at any rate in some cases light is necessary, and that the violet rays of the spectrum are chiefly concerned.

  • From the outer cortical myceliuni, again, branches pass through the epidermis and grow out in the soil, In stich cases the roots of the plants are usuall) found spreading in soils which contain a large amount of humus, or decaying vegetable matter.

  • The decomposition of the complex molecule of the sugar liberates a certain amount of energy, as can be seen from the study of the fermentation set tig by yeast, which is a process of this kind, in that it is intensified by the absence of oxygen.

  • Submerged leaves are usually filamentous or narrowly ribbonshaped, thus exposing a large amount of surface to the water, some of the dissolved gases of which they must absorb, and into which they must also excrete certain gases.

  • These adaptations tend to lessen the amount of transpiration by protecting the stomata from the movements of the air.

  • Similarly, the small amount of cuticular and of epidermal protection, and of lignification in succulent halophytes may also be related to the same circumstance.

  • He showed further, that the increase of common salt in the soil is correlated with a reduction in the number and size of the chlo,-oplastids, and therefore in the amount of chlorophyll.

  • Schimper (1903: 102) thinks that in the case of aquatic plants, the difference must depend on the amount of lime in the water, for the physical nature of the substratum is the same in each case.

  • The chromatin substance increases in amount; the thread stains moie deeply, and in most cases presents a homogeneous appearance.

  • In order to effect this the individual chromosomes must become associated in some way, for there is no diminution in the actual amount of nuclear substance, and this leads to certain modifications in the division which are not seen in the vegetative nuclei.

  • The Dutch nation, as soon as it was emancipated from Spanish tyranny, displayed an amount of enterprise, which, for a long time, was fully equal to that of the British.

  • These basins of internal drainage are calculated to amount to 22% of the land surface.

  • Hantzsch (Ber., 1901, 34, p. 3337) has shown that in the action of alcohols on diazonium salts an increase in the molecular weight of the alcohol and an accumulation of negative groups in the aromatic nucleus lead to a diminution in the yield of the ether produced and to the production of a secondary reaction, resulting in the formation of a certain amount of an aromatic hydrocarbon.

  • This and some of the other clauses amount practically to censures on the policy of William III.

  • The muscles of the limbs show a great amount of specialization, away from the fundamental reptilian and mammalian conditions.

  • Thus it has come to pass that the muscles of the hind limbs are, like their framework, more easily compared with those of reptiles and mammals than are the wings, whilst within the class of birds they show an enormous amount of variation in direct correlation with their manifold requirements.

  • In all, there is a wonderful amount of specialization, though perhaps in a very straight line from generalized forms; but the affinity to Australian or Polynesian types is in many cases clearly traceable, and it cannot be supposed but that these last are of cognate origin with those of New Zealand.

  • Taken internally, colchicum or colchicine markedly increases the amount of bile poured into the alimentary canal, being amongst the most powerful of known cholagogues.

  • From Australia, where we have the best chance of studying rudimentary religion in some bulk, comes a certain amount of evidence showing that in the two ways just mentioned some inchoate prayer is being evolved.

  • Under Arnold's superintendence the school became not merely a place where a certain amount of classical or general learning was to be obtained, but a sphere of intellectual, moral and religious discipline, where healthy characters were formed, and men were trained for the duties, and struggles and responsibilities of life.

  • to determine the amount of work done.

  • The wheels, called naoura, are of the most primitive construction, made of rough branches of trees, with palm leaf paddles, rude clay vessels being slung on the outer edge to catch the water, of which they raise a prodigious amount, only a comparatively small part of which, however, is poured into the aqueducts on top of the dams. These latter are exceedingly picturesque, often consisting of a series of well-built Gothic arches, and give a peculiar character to the scenery; but they are also great impediments to navigation.

  • There is, however, little travel of this sort on the Euphrates in comparison with the amount on the Tigris.

  • In this mode of treating the question the order of the terms is numerical, and though the amount of labour is such as might well have deterred a younger man, yet the details were easy, and a great part of it might be entrusted to a mere computer.

  • In each of the three cases there is adaptation, but the amount of adaptation differs in each case according to local circumstances.

  • Service is nominally voluntary, though it appears that a certain amount of compulsion is exercised.

  • They have differed widely in the origin of the noble class and in the amount of privilege implied in membership of it; but they all agree in the transmission of some privilege or other to all the descendants, or to all the male descendants, of the first noble.

  • The urban population, divided into two categories according to their taxable wealth, elects delegates direct to the college of the government (Guberniya), and is thus represented in the second degree; but the system of division into categories, according not to the number of taxpayers but to the amount they pay, gives a great preponderance to the richer classes.

  • Boats could be conveyed over flat and easy portages from one river-basin to another, and these portages were subsequently transformed with a relatively small amount of labour into navigable canals, and even at the present day the canals have more importance for the traffic of the country than have most of the railways.

  • The average amount of cloud is 73 to 75% on the White Sea and in Lithuania, 68 to 64 in central Russia, and only 59 to 53 in the S.

  • The amount of rainfall is shown in the Table on next page.'

  • Many peasants took the " gratuitous allotments," whose amount was about one-eighth of the normal allotments.

  • As illustrating the general impoverishment of the Russian peasantry, it may be stated that the arrears of taxation owed by them have increased enormously since 1882, when they a, ounted to £2,854,000, until in 1900 the total amount was put k £15,222,000.

  • The amount of iron and steel produced in the Urals is not quite 20% of the total in all European Russia and Poland.

  • This question has given rise to an enormous amount of discussion among learned men, and some of the disputants have not yet laid down their arms; but for impartial outsiders who have carefully studied the evidence there can be little doubt that 1 See Researches into the State of Fisheries in Russia (9 vols.), edited by Minister of Finance (1896, Russian); Kusnetzow's Fischerei and Thiererbeutung in den Gewassern Russlands (1898).

  • These invasions were fortunately not frequent, but when they occurred they caused an incalculable amount of devastation and suffering.

  • Even when the visit to the Horde did not end so tragically, it involved a great deal of anxiety and expense, for the Mongol dignitaries had to be conciliated very liberally, and it was commonly believed that the judges were more influenced by the amount of the bribes than by the force of the arguments.

  • Ivan did not display much military talent, but he showed a remarkable amount of tenacity.

  • A certain amount of local self-government was entrusted to the nobles and the burghers, and the judicial administration was thoroughly reorganized in an enlightened and humane spirit.

  • About education a great deal was spoken and written, and a certain amount of progress was effected.

  • The reformers of the previous reign had endeavoured to make the emancipated peasantry administratively and economically independent of the landed proprietors; the conservatives of this later era, proceeding on the assumption that the peasants did not know how to make a proper use of the liberty prematurely conferred upon them, endeavoured to re-establish the influence of the landed proprietors by appointing from amongst them " land-chiefs," who were to exercise over the peasants of their district a certain amount of patriarchal jurisdiction.

  • In this process some of the local officials displayed probably an amount of zeal beyond the intentions of the government, but any attempt to oppose the movement was rigorously punished.

  • he ordered the rules to be strictly carried out, without considering what an enormous amount of hardship and suffering such an order entailed.

  • His property was confiscated - his jewels, furniture and ready money were estimated to amount to £120,000 - he was degraded from the grandeeship and exiled to the Philippines.

  • The amount of capital which parliament authorized railway companies to raise was about 42 millions on the average of the two years 1842-1843, 174 millions in 1844, 60 millions in 1845, and 132 millions in 1846, though this last sum was less than a quarter of the capital proposed in the schemes submitted to the Board of Trade; and the wild speculation which occurred in railway shares in 1845 contributed largely to the financial crisis of 1847.

  • 2,763 Spain 9,228 having nearly the same amount of railway mileage.

  • Of this character are the expenditures necessary for maintenance of way, for general administration and for interest on capital borrowed, which are almost independent of the total amount of business done, and quite independent of any individual piece of business.

  • The debt in that country is relatively small in amount, and is not represented by securities based upon hypothecation of the company's real property, as with the American railway bond, resting on a first, second or third mortgage.

  • This is in line with the provisions in the Constitution of the United States regarding the protection of property, but the difficulty in applying the principle to the railway situation lies in the fact that costs have to be met by averaging the returns on the total amount cf business done, and it is often impossible, in specific instances, to secure a rate which can be considered to yield a fair return on the specific service rendered.

  • The slopes of the sides vary according to the nature of the ground, the amount of moisture present, &c. In solid rock they may be vertical; in gravel, sand or common earth they must, to prevent slipping, rise r ft.

  • Except in hard rock, the top width of a cutting, and therefore the amount of material to be excavated, increases rapidly with the depth; hence if a cutting exceeds a certain depth, which varies with the particular circumstances, it may be more economical, instead of forming the sides at the slope at which the material of which they are composed will stand, to make them nearly vertical and support the soil with a retaining wall, or to bore a tunnel.

  • The gradient or grade of a line is the rate at which it rises or falls, above or below the horizontal, and is expressed by stating either the horizontal distance in which the change of level amounts to r ft., or the amount of change that would occur in some selected distance, such as roo ft., r000 ft.

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