Alsace-lorraine sentence example

alsace-lorraine
  • It remains, however, partly in force for Belgium and Alsace-Lorraine, which formed part of French territory in 1801.
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  • I've also moved towns in North Schleswig and Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • That of the Vosges, which has experienced a great extension since the loss of Alsace-Lorraine, comprises Epinal, St Die, Remiremont and Belfort.
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  • In 1871 it fell, with the rest of Alsace-Lorraine, into the possession of Germany.
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  • In case of conquest the conquered nationality takes to emigration on an extensive scale, as after the absorption of Alsace-Lorraine by Germany in 1871.
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  • This category contains places located in the Kingdom of Württemberg, the Grand Duchy of Baden, the Prussian province of Hohenzollern, and the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • In respect of its physical features, Alsace-Lorraine falls into three parts - mountain land, plain and plateau.
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  • Alsace-Lorraine is represented in the Bundesrat by two commissioners, who have, however, but one voice; and the territory returns 15 members to the Reichstag.
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  • In Alsace-Lorraine about half of those entitled to vote appear at the polls; but in other districts of Germany very little interest is shown in the elections to the parish councils.
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  • Customs vary in different states; thus in Schleswig-Holstein the state nominates but the parish elects; in Alsace-Lorraine the directorium or supreme consistory appoints, but the appointment must be confirmed by the viceroy; in Baden the state offers the parish a selection from six names and then appoints the one chosen.
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  • Some lands were granted in particular to natives of Alsace-Lorraine, who preferred to retain French nationality after the war.
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  • But Germany, or the German empire, as it is now understood, was formed in 1871 by virtue of treaties between the North German Confederation and the South German states, and by the acquisition, in the peace of Frankfort (May 10, 1871), of Alsace-Lorraine, and embraces all the countries of the former German Confederation, with the exception of Austria, Luxemburg, Limburg and Liechtenstein.
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  • In Alsace-Lorraine the Vosges and the plateau of Lorraine are also remarkable for low temperatures.
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  • Chestnuts and walnuts Hamburg appear on the terraces of the Imperial Territory Alsace-Lorraine .
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  • Apart from the foreigners above mentioned, German subjects speaking a tongue other than German are found only in Prussia, Saxony and Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • With respect to Alsace-Lorraine, detailed estimates (but no census) gave the number of French in the territory of Lorraine at about f 70,000, and in that of Alsace at about 46,000.
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  • The total production of hops was 29,000 tons in 1905, and of this over 25,000 were grown in Bavaria, Wurttemberg, Baden and Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • The total amount produced in Germany is estimated at 1000 million gallons, of a value of 4,000,000; Alsace-Lorraine turning out 400 millions; Baden, 175; Bavaria, Wrttemberg and Hesse together, 300; while the remainder, which though small in quantity is in quality the best, is produced by Prussia.
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  • Prussia, Alsace-Lorraine, Bavaria and Saxony are the chief seats of the iron manufacture.
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  • Cotton goods are largely produced in Baden, Bavaria, Alsace-Lorraine and Wurttemberg, woollens and worsteds in Saxony and the Rhine province, silk in Rhen.ish Prussia (Elberfeld), Alsace and Baden.
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  • Zoliverein, with the exception of Bavaria, Wflrttemberg Baden and Alsace-Lorraine, in which countries the excise duties arc separately collected.
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  • The total number of breweries in the beer excise district was, in 1905-1906, 5995, which produced I017 millior gallons; in Bavaria nearly 6000 breweries with 392 million gallons in Baden over 700 breweries with 68 million gallons; in WUrttem berg over 5000 breweries with 87 million gallons; and in Alsace Lorraine 95 breweries with about 29 million gallons.
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  • The amoun brewed per head of the population amounted, in 1905, roughly t 160 imperial pints in the excise district; to 450 in Bavaria; 280 jI Wurttemberg; 260 in Baden; and 122 in Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • The board responsible for the imperial control over the whole railway system in Germany is the Reichseisenbahnamt in Berlin, the administration of the various state systems residing, in Prussia, in the ministry of public works; in Bavaria in the ministry of the royal house and of the exterior; in Wurttemberg in the ministry of the exterior; in Saxony in the ministry of the interior; in Baden and- Hesse-Darmstadt in commissions of the ministry of finance; and in Alsace-Lorraine in the imperial ministry of railways.
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  • Alsace-Lorraine has a separate system of 1085 m., which is worked by the imperial general direction in Strassburg.
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  • In South Germany the Ludwigs canal was, until the annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the n.nly one of importance.
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  • Alsace-Lorraine had canals for connecting the Rhine with the Rhone and the Marne, a branch serving the collieries of the Saar valley.
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  • Alsace-Lorraine is represented in the Bundesrat by four commissioners (Kommi.ssare), without votes, who are nominated by the Statthalter (imperial lieutenant).
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  • All the German states have separate representative assemblies, except Alsace-Lorraine and the two grand-duchies of Mecklenburg.
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  • The imperial office for the administration of the imperial railways in Alsace-Lorraine, the chief of which is the Prussian minister of public works.
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  • Poor Law.A law passed by the North German Confederation of the 6th of June 1870, and subsequently amended by an imperial law of the 12th of March 1894, laid down rules for the relief of the destitute in all the states composing the empire, with the exception of Bavaria and Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • Generally speaking, South Germany is predominantly Roman Catholic. Sothe districts along the Danube (province of Bavaria, Upper Palatinate, Swabia), southern \Vurttemberg and Baden, and in Alsace-Lorraine are entirely so.
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  • The attempt to reconcile the inhabitants of Alsace-Lorraine to their condition proved equally difficult.
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  • The only imperial railways are those in Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • The cession of Alsace-Lorraine to Germany by France, although brought about by the war of i r870, was for the purposes of international law a voluntary cession.
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  • It is the seat of the government for Upper Alsace, and of the supreme court of appeal for Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • In 1681 it was formally annexed to France by a decree of Louis XIV.'s Chambre de Reunion, and remained French till 1871, when it passed with Alsace-Lorraine to the new German empire.
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  • Large quantities of wine are produced in Alsace-Lorraine, Baden and Wurttemberg, but the majority of these have little interest, inasmuch as they are used only for home consumption.
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  • He was the only Socialist who was elected to the Reichstag in 1871, but he used his position to protest against the annexation of Alsace-Lorraine and to express his full sympathy with the Paris Commune.
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  • Since 1871 it has been the seat of government for the German territory of Alsace-Lorraine, and it is also the see of a Roman Catholic bishop and the headquarters of the XV.
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  • This category contains places located in the Kingdom of Württemberg, the Grand Duchy of Baden, the Prussian province of Hohenzollern, and the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • In Alsace-Lorraine German-speaking immigrants are gradually displacing, under 1 Schemes of thinkers, like William Penn's European Parliament (1693); the Abbe St Pierre's elaboration (c. 1700) of Henry IV.'s " grand design " (see supra); Jeremy Bentham's International Tribunal (1786-1789); Kant's Permanent Congress of Nations and Perpetual Peace (1796); John Stuart Mill's Federal Supreme Court; Seeley's, Bluntschli's, David Dudley Field's, Professor Leone Levi's, Sir Edmund Hornby's co-operative schemes for promoting law and order among nations, have all contributed to popularizing in different countries the idea of a federation of mankind for the preservation of peace.
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