Allusion sentence example

allusion
  • The beginning of the book has an allusion which hints at how the book ends.
    174
    69
  • It was an ironic allusion to 19th century modes of narration.
    82
    57
  • The penchant for classical allusion in Irish lyrics is not exclusive to this type of music. 
    199
    175
  • Peter enjoys finding symbols that point to famous people or places, so his favorite artists are those that use the technique of allusion.
    51
    42
  • Though faithful in a high degree to the duties of friendship, he could not bear to visit his friends in sickness, and after their death he repressed all allusion to their memory.
    8
    1
    Advertisement
  • Artists of renown perpetuated her features on canvas, on marble and on many exquisite medals, one of which has a closed book graven on the reverse, with the inscription " Elegiae " in allusion to poems she was said to have written.
    6
    1
  • Beliar (?), b avruc€1,2€vo - the allusion that follows to Dan xi.
    9
    5
  • If you look closely at any Northern Renaissance paintings, you will likely see an allusion to the Bible.
    41
    37
  • Sir William Tite gave reasons for believing that Bishopsgate Street was not a Roman thoroughfare, and in the excavations at Leadenhall the basilica to which allusion has already been made was found apparently crossing the present thoroughfare of Gracechurch Street.
    7
    4
  • If we compare this with a similar allegory in Nasir's diwan, which culminates in the praise of Mostansir, we are fairly entitled to look upon it as a covert allusion to the eminent men who revealed to the poet in Cairo the secrets of the Isma`ilitic faith, and showed him what he considered the "heavenly ladder" to superior knowledge and spiritual bliss.
    6
    3
    Advertisement
  • There is at the most not more than an allusion to Christ, who is never mentioned by name, and though there are frequent allusions to the regaining of life, which is accomplished by union with the Logos, there is no reference to the doctrines of the incarnation or of the atonement.
    5
    2
  • According to an allusion in Clemens, Strom.
    2
    0
  • Allusion is made below to recent work on the production of undamped trains of electric waves.
    10
    9
  • Thus the name of the chief god of the Babylonian pantheon, Marduk, is written by two signs to be pronounced Amar-Ud, which describe the god as the "young bullock of the day " - an allusion to the solar character of the god in question.
    7
    6
  • The term "biting-lice" is sometimes given to these parasites, in allusion to the mandibulate character of their mouth-parts, which serves to distinguish them at once from the true lice of the order Rhynchota in which the jaws are haustellate.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • But with the advent of the new regimen in Meiji days there arose a desire for social plays depicting the life of the modern generation, and as these croppy dramas (zampatsumono)so called in allusion to the European method of cutting the hair closewere not included in the repertoire of the orthodox theatre, amateur troupes (known as sOshi-yakusha) were organized to fill the void.
    2
    1
  • A footnote (1743) explained away the allusion by making it apply to Richard Brome, the disciple of Ben Jonson.
    2
    1
  • The invasion was commonly believed to have proceeded by way of Aetolia and Elis, and the name Naupactus was interpreted as an allusion to the needful " shipbuilding " on the Corinthian Gulf.
    2
    1
  • In the north of England Passion Sunday was formerly known as Carle or Carling Sunday, a name corrupted from "care," in allusion to the sorrowful season which the day heralds.
    2
    1
  • It was called Long Friday by the Anglo-Saxons 1 and Danes, possibly in allusion to the length of the services which marked the day.
    9
    8
    Advertisement
  • Secondly, it contains no polemic against Christianity, to the doctrines of which, in fact, there is no allusion.
    1
    0
  • Allusion has been made already to the efforts to plant the extensive heaths in Jutland with pine-trees.
    1
    0
  • No allusion, however, is made by Moses to this previous demand; he merely urges the same objection as that put forward in iv.
    1
    0
  • Moorish poets describe it as " a pearl set in emeralds," in allusion to the brilliant colour of its buildings, and the luxuriant woods round them.
    1
    0
  • The weight of authority, however, is against any further revision of the code having been made after the formal revision which it underwent in the reign of the emperor Leo, who appointed a commission of jurists under the presidency of Sympathius, the captain of the body-guard, to revise the work of his father, to which he makes allusion in the first of his Novellae.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • There is no allusion either to the immortality of the soul or to the resurrection of the dead.
    3
    2
  • The custom of postponing baptism, which was very general in the 4th and 5th centuries, probably made such cases more rare than is generally supposed, and so accounts for the absence of any allusion to them 1 A post.
    4
    3
  • It's a multilayered story, rich in cultural allusion and historical pastiche.
    4
    3
  • Apart from the literal allusion to a dangerous snake, the words are said to refer to the loss of a girl's virginity.
    4
    3
  • These treatises were probably composed before Napier had invented the logarithms or any of the apparatuses described in the Rabdologia; for they contain no allusion to the principle of logarithms, even where we should expect to find such a reference, and the one solitary sentence where the Rabdologia is mentioned ("sive omnium facillime per ossa Rhabdologiae nostrae") was probably added afterwards.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • Didelphia, the alternative name of the group was given in allusion to the circumstance that the uterus has two separate openings; while other features are the inclusion of the openings of the alimentary canal and the urino-genital sinus in a common sphincter muscle, and the position of the scrotum in advance of the penis.
    2
    1
  • But it appears certain that the decalogue as it lay before the Deuteronomist did not contain any allusion to the creation (see Decalogue), and it is generally believed that this reference was added by the same post-exilic hand that wrote Gen.
    1
    0
  • Chosen by Cook himself, she was renamed the " Endeavour," in allusion to the great work which her commander was setting out to achieve.
    1
    0
  • Teignmouth (Tennemue, Tengemue) possessed a church of St Michael as early as 1044, when what is now East Teignmouth was granted by Edward the Confessor to Leofric, bishop of Exeter, and an allusion to salterers in the same grant proves the existence of the.
    1
    0
  • The antagonism between the "black" and the "white marquess" (the latter being the nickname given to Carmarthen in allusion to his sickly appearance), which had been forgotten in their common hatred to the French policy and to Rome, revived in all its bitterness.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Mid-Lent, or the fourth Sunday in Lent, was long known as Mothering Sunday, in allusion to the custom for girls in service to be allowed a holiday on that day to visit their parents.
    1
    0
  • This allusion annoyed Jerome, who was exceedingly sensitive as to his reputation for orthodoxy, and the consequence was a bitter pamphlet war, very wonderful to the modern onlooker, who finds it difficult to see anything discreditable in the accusation against a biblical scholar that he had once thought well of Origen, or in the countercharge against a translator that he had avowedly exercised editorial functions as well.
    1
    0
  • The book closes with the allusion to Germanus and the panegyric on Justinian as the conqueror of the Goths referred to above.
    1
    0
  • The poets asked for an explanation of this allusion, and Firdousi recited to them the battle as described in the Shahnama, and delighted and astonished them with his learning and eloquence.
    1
    0
  • The last section of the "right-hand" part (the "Book of Kings") is one of the older portions, and from its allusion to "the Persian and Arabian kings" may be dated somewhere between A.D.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The other work to the importance of which on ornithology in England allusion has been made is Bewick's History of British Birds.
    1
    0
  • He published in 1551 Regola generale per sollevare ogni affondata nave, intitolata la Travagliata Invenzione (an allusion to his personal troubles at Brescia), setting forth a method for raising sunken ships, and describing the diving-bell, then little known in western Europe.
    1
    0
  • The question of the authorship of Ephesians is less important to the student of the history of Christian thought than in the case of most of the Pauline epistles, because of the generalness of tone and the lack of specific allusion in the work.
    1
    0
  • In every Mahommedan and Hindu country the most scurrilous epithet bestowed on a European or a Christian is "a dog," and that accounts for the fact that in the whole of the Jewish history there is not a single allusion to hunting with dogs.
    1
    0
  • In 1200 he submitted all his writings to the judgment of the Holy See, and unreservedly affirmed his orthodoxy; the Lateran council, which condemned his criticism of Peter Lombard, made no allusion to his eschatological temerities; and the bull of 1220 was a formal certificate of his orthodoxy.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The word Shetland is supposed to be simply a modernized rendering of the Old Norse Hjaltland, of which the meaning is variously given as "high land," "Hjalti's land" - after Hjalti, a man whose name occurs in ancient Norse literature, but of whom little else is known - and "hilt land," in allusion to an imagined, though not too obvious, resemblance in the configuration of the archipelago to the hilt of a sword.
    1
    0
  • The historical review in the second part is coloured by a bitter hatred of the ancient Egyptians; whether this springs from resentment of the former sufferings of the Israelites or is meant as an allusion to the circumstances of the author's own time it is hardly possible to say.
    1
    0
  • The vote of £T50o,000 a year for ten years for the reconstruction of the Ottoman navy by " national subscription," as already mentioned, was not included in the official budget, nor was there any allusion to it in the prefatory memorandum.
    1
    0
  • No provision was then made in the budget to meet these liabilities, nor did the minister in his prefatory memorandum make any allusion to them; in his budget speech, however, he announced that a scheme for dealing with them would be presented with the budget for 1911-1912.
    1
    0
  • Some have found an allusion to the treatise on the Soul already mentioned.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Mayflies belong to the Ephemeridae, a remarkable family of winged insects, included by Linnaeus in his order Neuroptera, which derive their scientific name from E4n cpos, in allusion to their very short lives.
    1
    0
  • The d modification is of the commonest occurrence, the other forms being only known as synthetic products; for this reason it is usually termed glucose, simply; alternative names are dextrose, grape sugar and diabetic sugar, in allusion to its right-handed optical rotation, its occurrence in large quantity in grapes, and in the urine of diabetic patients respectively.
    1
    0
  • Peculiar to Arcadia is the title Athena Alea, probably = "warder off of evil," although others explain it as = "warmth," and see in it an allusion to her physical nature as one of the powers of light.
    1
    0
  • The absence of allusion to a hostile or oppressing empire may be fairly taken in connexion with the fact that the prophecy gives no indication of political life at Jerusalem.
    1
    0
  • Thus the allusion to Javan in Joel better suits a later date, when Syrian slaves were in special request in Greece.'
    1
    0
  • The name is derived from alcohol dehydrogenatum in allusion to the fact that they may be prepared by the oxidation of alcohols.
    1
    0
  • James Grant's view that it may have been the earlier name of the castle, from dun (" the fort "), and edin (" on the slope "), conflicts with the more generally received opinion that the Britons knew the fortress as Castelh Mynedh Agnedh (" the hill of the plain "), a designation once wrongly interpreted as the " castle of the maidens " (castrum puellarum), in allusion to the supposed fact that the Pictish princesses were lodged within it during their education.
    1
    0
  • The name is a corruption of Brugh or Burgh Tay, in allusion to the fortress standing on the rock that juts into the Firth.
    1
    0
  • Gerbert's letters contain more than one allusion to organs which he seems to have constructed, and William of Malmesbury has preserved an account of a wonderful musical instrument still to be seen in his days at Reims, which, so far as the English chronicler's words can be made out, seems to refer to an organ worked by steam.
    1
    0
  • Forsaken by his Radical friends, Crispi governed with the help of the Right until, on the 31st of January 1891, an intemperate allusion to the sante memorie of the conservative party led to his overthrow.
    1
    0
  • Sir Henry's own tendency to favour the anti-war section, his refusal to support the government in any way, and his allusion to "methods of barbarism" in connexion with the conduct of the British army (June 14, 1901), accentuated the crisis within the party; and in 1901 the Liberal Imperialists, who looked to Lord Rosebery (q.v.) and Mr Asquith (q.v.) for their political inspiration, showed pronounced signs of restiveness.
    1
    0
  • In 1450 Basil Valentine referred to it by the name "wismut," and characterized it as a metal; some years later Paracelsus termed it "wissmat," and, in allusion to its brittle nature, affirmed it to be a "bastard" or "half-metal"; Georgius Agricola used the form "wissmuth," latinized to "bisemutum," and also the term "plumbum cineareum."
    1
    0
  • Church, in the paper cited below, derives it from Costa de Oreja," Earring Coast," in allusion to the earrings worn by the Indians and remarked by their conquerors.
    1
    0
  • Beyond the allusion to Thomas in the introductory paragraph to the 1903 series, there seems to be no tangible evidence in support of this view.
    1
    0
  • The oolitic brown ores of Lorraine and Luxemburg are known as "minette," a diminutive of the French mine (ore), in allusion to their low content of metal.
    1
    0
  • Apart from the religious cult suggested in the name Mount Nebo, there were local cults of the Baal of Peor and the Baal of Meon, and Mesha's allusion to `Ashtar-Chemosh, a compound deity, has been taken to point to a corresponding consort whose existence might naturally be expected upon other grounds (see Astarte).
    1
    0
  • Unfortunately the methods pursued were as little reasonable as those adopted by the medieval Jewish Rabbis; instead of the context being studied as a whole, with a view to the recovery of its literal sense, each single verse was considered separately, and explained as an allusion to some obscure myth or as embodying some mystical meaning.
    1
    0
  • It has been suggested that this is an allusion to the couvade of certain barbarous tribes, amongst whom it is customary, when a child is born, for the husband to take to his bed and receive medical treatment, as if he shared the pains of maternity (see Couvade, and references there).
    1
    0
  • Unfortunately such allusion to these disconnected certainties as alone might be introduced here would be too brief for comprehension, and we are forced to select a few of the broader hypotheses for a treatment that may seem dogmatic and prejudiced.
    1
    0
  • Apart from the literal allusion to a dangerous snake, the words are said to refer to the loss of a girl 's virginity.
    1
    0
  • The author of mystery books likes to use the technique of allusion in her writing to help the readers solve the cases.
    1
    0
  • A twisted bodice, diagonal stripes, or large prints builds up the allusion of a stylish bust area.
    1
    0
  • Even Gunkel is obliged to abandon his favourite theory here, though he contests strongly the recognition of any allusion to Nero.
    0
    0
  • This strange statement suggested some historical allusion, and the discovery of the allusion was made by Reinach, who points out that Domitian by an edict in A.D.
    0
    0
  • These men did not merely collect works, but sought to arrange them, to subject the texts to criticism, and to explain any allusion or reference in them which at a later date might become obscure.
    0
    0
  • Over a the Protestant revolt would be complete without some allusion to the contrast between the course of affairs in France and in the neighbouring countries.
    0
    0
  • Against Egypt has been urged the allusion in one of the eucharistic prayers to "corn upon the mountains."
    0
    0
  • He was able to speak and write Greek, and gives evidence of familiarity alike with its prose and with its poetry; and his excellent memory - though he himself complains about it - enabled him always to bring in at the right place an appropriate, often brilliant, quotation or some historical allusion.
    0
    0
  • As frequent allusion is made by classical writers to this embarrassing method of computation, which is carefully retained in the ecclesiastical calendar, we here give a table showing the correspondence of the Roman months with those of modern Europe.
    0
    0
  • The name "Kurile" is derived from the Russian kurit (to smoke), in allusion to the active volcanic character of the group. The dense fogs that envelop these islands, and the violence of the currents in their vicinity, have greatly hindered exploration, so that little is known of their physiography.
    0
    0
  • So too there is no allusion to a human kingship in Joel or in Malachi; the old forms of the Hebrew state were broken, and religious hopes expressed themselves in other shapes.
    0
    0
  • It is on the site of the Roman Pistoriae, which is hardly mentioned in ancient times, except for the destruction of Catiline's forces and the slaughter of their leader near it in 62 B.C., and as a station on the road between Florentia and Luca; and earlier still by Plautus, but only with jesting allusion to the similarity of the name to the word pistor (baker).
    0
    0
  • It is a large rodent known to the Tupi Indians as the paca-rana, or false paca, in allusion to the resemblance of its coloration to that of the true paca, from which it differs by its elldeveloped tail, the absence of cheek-pouches, the full development of all five toes and the wider thorax.
    0
    0
  • This sudden leap into popularity seems to have been occasioned in connexion with a veiled allusion to Irving's striking eloquence made in the House of Commons by Canning, who had been induced to attend his church from admiration of an expression in one of his prayers, quoted to him by Sir James Mackintosh.
    0
    0
  • No sea-going ships were built in China before 139 B.C. The earliest allusion to the power of the lodestone in Chinese literature occurs in a Chinese dictionary, finished in A.D.
    0
    0
  • In allusion to medieval partisans of the papacy this theory was dubbed Neo-Guelphism.
    0
    0
  • Finally, the likeness of an edible species to a warningly coloured inedible one in the same locality is termed " pseudaposematic," in allusion to the pretentiousness or falsity of the warning signal.
    0
    0
  • Popes, princes and nobles endowed it with estates and privileges, including that of administering and succeeding to the property of lepers, which eventually led to grave 1 It has been taken as the Latin word meaning " he bears " or as representing the initials of the legend Fortitudo Ejus Rhodum Tenuit, with an allusion to a defence of the island of Rhodes by an ancient count of Savoy.
    0
    0
  • Not far from the town are the remains of what is believed to be a Phoenician city, Shammish, mentioned by Idrisi, who makes no allusion to Laraish.
    0
    0
  • The only allusion to his death is contained in the prophecy of Teiresias, who promised him a happy old age and a peaceful death from the sea.
    0
    0
  • The fact that the Icelandic sagas concerning Vinland are not contemporaneous written records has caused them to be viewed by many with suspicion; hence such a significant allusion as that by Adam of Bremen is not to be overlooked.
    0
    0
  • From this allusion one cannot but think that so keen and alert a writer as Ari had given some attention to Vinland in the lost work.
    0
    0
  • Wallis, who had deftly steered his course amid all the political changes of the previous years, managing ever to be on the side of the ruling power, was now apparently stung to fury by a wanton allusion in Hobbes's latest dialogue to a passage of his former life (his deciphering for the parliament the king's papers taken at Naseby), whereof he had once boasted but after the Restoration could not speak or hear too little.
    0
    0
  • Allusion has been already made to the canals of Sind.
    0
    0
  • He thinks there is an allusion to a room in the Temple where the great key was kept; this room was called Kephas, because the key was placed in a recess closed by a stone.
    0
    0
  • Cape Ann was too bleak, but Naumkeag was a "pleasant and fruitful neck of land," which they named Salem in June 1629, probably in allusion to Psalm lxxvi.
    0
    0
  • Maundy Thursday is sometimes known as Sheer or Chare Thursday, either in allusion, it is thought, to the "shearing" of heads and beards in preparation for Easter, or more probably in the word's Middle English sense of "pure," in allusion to the ablutions of the day.
    0
    0
  • This is an allusion to the charges of Thyestean banquets and other immoralities, which the early apologists constantly rebut.
    0
    0
  • There, thoughts about God's greatness and man's duty, which are familiar to us from childhood, were all new to the hearers - it is hearers we have to think of in the first instance, not readers - to whom, at the same time, every allusion had a meaning which often escapes our notice.
    0
    0
  • Allusion has already been made to the flat-topped moorlands which in the eastern Grampians reach heights of 3000 to 4000 ft.
    0
    0
  • According to him the men of Schwyz and of Unterwalden were the first to rise, those of Uri following suit much later But neither Justinger nor Hemmerli makes any allusion to Tell or his feat.
    0
    0
  • Remarkable also is the allusion to a power which 1 See further, Bousset, Religion des Judentums, ed.
    0
    0
  • Among the finest examples of this sort of work are the screens round the tombs of the Scala family at Verona, 1 35 0 - 1 375, - a sort of network of light cusped quatrefoils, each filled up with a small ladder (scala) in allusion to the name of the family.
    0
    0
  • Its name was in allusion to the custom that each worshipper should present in the church a loaf made of the new wheat as an offering of the first-fruits.
    0
    0
  • The precise character of the kingdom or empire to which allusion is made has been the subject of much discussion, and some modern historians have gone so far as to relegate the monomotapa to the realm of myth.
    0
    0
  • European scholars have taken it unjustly in the sense of the bloodthirsty, and found in it an allusion to the slaughter of the Omayyads and many others.
    0
    0
  • In that case it would fall shortly before the Relief visit, to which there may be tacit explanatory allusion, in Gal.
    0
    0
  • Note the confident local allusion in xix.
    0
    0
  • Hence also frequent allusion is made by poets to the anxious care caused to the Fathers by the possibility of the living head of the family being afflicted with failure of offspring; this dire prospect compelling them to use but sparingly their little store of provisions, in case the supply should shortly cease altogether.
    0
    0
  • Their name seems to have been first used in Persia of the Shiites in allusion to their red caps.
    0
    0
  • Then follows the usual allusion to Clematius; the date is expressly fixed at 238, and the whole revelation is seemingly ascribed to St Cordula, one of the 11,000 who, after escaping death on the first day by hiding in one of the vessels, on the morrow gave herself up to death of her own accord.
    0
    0
  • Llewelyn's head was brought to Edward at Conway Castle, who ordered it to be exhibited in the capital, surrounded by a wreath of ivy, in mocking allusion to an ancient Cymric prophecy concerning a Welsh prince being crowned in London.
    0
    0
  • Traquair in 1890, in allusion to its well-developed vertebral rings; and its structure was studied in detail in 1903 by Professor and Miss Sollas, who succeeded in making enlarged models of the fossil in wax.
    0
    0
  • The earliest allusion to the epistle 11 is the notice of its inclusion in Marcion's canon, but almost verbal echoes of iii.
    0
    0
  • Pauline particles like apa, Sc6, Sam, E7recra, Iise and Moo 1 When the literary integrity of the epistle is maintained this allusion naturally drops to the ground, since the use of the epistle by Polycarp rules the earlier conjectures of Baur and others (who made the pastorals anti-Marcionite) out of court; besides, passages like i.
    0
    0
  • The latter has no allusion to the KaXov g pyov, the ErepoScSaaxaXEav, the Sca/3E13atouaOat, &c., of the others, and contains one or two specific phrases of its own.
    0
    0
  • The etymology suggested is from KwF oaav, to wail, in allusion to the cries of the dead.
    0
    0
  • In the eighth satire another reference is made (120) to the misgovernment of Marius in Africa as a recent event, and at line 51 there may be an allusion to the Eastern wars that occupied the last years of Trajan's reign.
    0
    0
  • The ninth has no allusion to determine its date, but it is written with the same outspoken freedom as the second and the sixth, and belongs to the period when the poet's power was most vigorous, and his exposure of vice most uncompromising.
    0
    0
  • According to Rabbi Johanan it derived its name from the allusion in v.
    0
    0
  • Allusion to the lightness of the wood is made in Aristoph.
    0
    0
  • He holds the doctrine that everything endowed with an apparent quality possesses an opposite occult quality in much the same terms as it is found in Latin writers of the middle ages, but he makes no allusion to the theory of the generation of the metals by sulphur and mercury, a theory generally attributed to Geber, who also added arsenic to the list.
    0
    0
  • The word was early applied by the Protestants to the Romanists, with an allusion to the "congregation of evil doers" (Vulgate Ecclesiam malignantium) of Psalm xxvi.
    0
    0
  • An indistinct allusion of his own has been taken to mean that he was tonsured in childhood at seven or nine years old; and tradition says that he was sent to the convent of Seuilly.
    0
    0
  • In 1526, however, Charles de Bordigne, in a satiric work of no great merit, entitled la Legende de Pierre Faifeu, has the name Gargantua with an allusion, and in 1532 (if not earlier) there appeared at Lyons les Grandes et inestimables chroniques du grand et enorme grant Gargantua.
    0
    0
  • No one supposes that he wrote it, though it has been supposed that he edited it and that in reality it is older than 1532, and may be the direct subject of Bordigne's allusion six years earlier.
    0
    0
  • The voyage in particular allowed the widest licence of satirical allusion, and he availed himself of that licence in the widest sense.
    0
    0
  • Dionysius, Alcaeus, Anacreon, Pindar, Bacchylides, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Antiphanes, make frequent and familiar allusion to the Ke rraOos; but in the writers of the Roman and Alexandrian period such reference as occurs shows that the fashion had died out.
    0
    0
  • The premature death of the child in the Greek form of the legend is probably an allusion to this.
    0
    0
  • He determined this time to carry out his old plan of searching for a passage up Davis's "overf all" - so-called in allusion to the overfall of the tide which Davis had observed rushing through the strait.
    0
    0
  • Now here, we are told, there is a malicious allusion to the " messenger of Satan to buffet me " of 2 Cor.
    0
    0
  • They refrained from practically every allusion to ephemeral or local circumstances.
    0
    0
  • Others explain it as German Berg-geist, " mountain demon," or Bar-geist, " bear-demon," in allusion to its alleged appearance at times as a bear.
    0
    0
  • The ill-chosen name of Caucasian, invented by Blumenbach in allusion to a South Caucasian skull of specially typical proportions, and applied by him to the so-called white races, is still current; it brings into one race peoples such as the Arabs and Swedes, although these are scarcely less different than the Americans and Malays, who are set down as two distinct races.
    0
    0
  • In allusion to his unusual stature he was called "the Tall Sycamore of the Wabash."
    0
    0
  • It was to the insight of Lawrence and the splendid organization of the Punjab province - the spoilt child -of the Indian government, as it had been called in allusion to the custom of sending thither the best of the Indian officials and soldiers - that the reduction of Delhi and the limitation of the outbreak were due.
    0
    0
  • The allusion must almost certainly be to the attempted assassination of Ludovico by agents of the duchess Bona in 1484.
    0
    0
  • Of the numerous charters the earliest known (through an allusion found in a document of Bishop Houghton of St Davids, c. 1370) is one from Henry II., who therein confirms all former rights granted by his grandfather, Henry I.
    0
    0
  • Many of his speeches were monuments of erudition, but the wealth of detail, of allusion, and of quotation, often from the Greek and Latin, sometimes detracted from their effect.
    0
    0
  • In the MS. of the chronicle of Diebold Schilling of Bern (c. 1480) there is in the picture of the battle of Sempach a warrior pierced with spears falling to the ground, which may possibly be meant for Winkelried; while in that of Diebold Schilling of Lucerne (1511), though in the text no allusion is made to any such incident, there is a similar picture of a man who has accomplished Winkelried's feat, but he is dressed in the colours of Lucerne.
    0
    0
  • It was also known formerly as White Sunday, being still officially termed by the Roman Catholic Church Dominica in albis, " Sunday in white garments," in allusion to the white garments anciently worn on this day by those who had been baptized and received into the Church just before Easter.
    0
    0
  • These latter appear to be dependent on the former, for whereas we may have a Quest romance without any insistence on the previous history of the Grail, that history is never found without some allusion to the hero who is destined to bring the quest to its successful termination.
    0
    0
  • The last reference contains an allusion to the weekly fasts which were observed on the 2nd and 5th days of each week, in commemoration, it was said, of the ascent and descent of Moses at Sinai.
    0
    0
  • I The allusion to the ark warns us to be cautious in assuming the laws of the Mishna to have been ever in force.
    0
    0
  • Ideographically he is represented by two signs signifying "child of the day" (or "of the sun") which is a distinct allusion to his original solar character.
    0
    0
  • This neutral mass is often termed the Plain, in allusion to its seats on the floor of the House.
    0
    0
  • In July 1859 failing health led him to seek rest in a trip to Europe, but he died on the 13th of that month at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he had been put ashore when it was seen that he probably could not outlive the voyage across the Atlantic. Choate, besides being one of the ablest of American lawyers, was one of the most scholarly of American public men, and his numerous orations and addresses were remarkable for their pure style, their grace and elegance of form, and their wealth of classical allusion.
    0
    0
  • Thus the Tagliche Rundschau observed, in allusion to Erzberger's personal appearance, " he may be as round as a bullet, but he is not bullet-proof."
    0
    0
  • In February 1792 an allusion in debate by Toler (afterwards earl of Norbury), the attorney-general, to Tandy's personal ugliness, provoked him into sending a challenge; this was treated by the House of Commons as a breach of privilege, and a Speaker's warrant was issued for his arrest, which however he managed to elude till its validity expired on the prorogation of parliament.
    0
    0
  • At both places the chief sanctuary bore the name E-barra (or E-babbara) "the shining house" - a direct allusion to the brilliancy of the sun-god.
    0
    0
  • Classical authors explained the name of Procida either as an allusion to its having been detached from Ischia, or as being that of the nurse of Aeneas.
    0
    0
  • I to the parallel story in xii., the absence of allusion to xx., and the apparent editorial references to xxi.
    0
    0
  • It is significant that Jacob's body is taken to Palestine, but the brethren return to Egypt; in spite of a possible allusion to the famine in v.
    0
    0
  • It has revealed conditions which are not reflected in Genesis, and important facts upon which the book is silent - unless, indeed, there is a passing allusion to the great Babylonian monarch Khammurabi in the Amraphel of Gen.
    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, some allusion to national fortunes is reflected in the exaltation of Jacob (Israel) over Esau (Edom), and in the promise that the latter should break the yoke from his neck.
    0
    0
  • Allusion has already been made to the great change in the aspect of London and its surroundings made during the Norman period by the establishment of a large number of monasteries.
    1
    1
  • It is usually maintained that this work was written before the Old Testament poems. The arguments for this view are that the Heliand contains no allusion to any foregoing poetical treatment of the antecedent history, and that the Genesis fragments exhibit a higher degree of poetic skill.
    1
    1
  • This, and the various other spellings of the name, attempted to reproduce the Indian name of the village here, which Kelton thinks was pronounced Minewagi and meant "there is a good point" or "there is a point where huckleberries grow," in allusion to the fertile soil.
    1
    1
  • Allusion has been made above to the subject of male nursing.
    1
    1
  • The Rig-Veda contains only one allusion to them, where it is said that " Soma is placed in the lap of the nakshatras "; and this is in a part including later interpolations.
    1
    1
  • Shrove Tuesday is called the French Mardi gras, " Fat Tuesday," in allusion to the fat ox which is ceremoniously paraded through the streets.
    1
    1
  • Another allusion to the tripartite division is also no doubt to be found in the expression " the law, the prophets, and the psalms," in Luke xxiv.
    8
    8
  • The legends of his escape from a fiery furnace may have a philological basis (Ur interpreted as " fire "), but the allusion to the redemption of Abraham in Isa.
    1
    1
  • Passing now to the invention of common or decimal logarithms, that is, to the transition from the logarithms originally invented by Napier to logarithms to the base io, the first allusion to a change of system occurs in the "Admonitio " on the last page of the Descriptio (1614), the concluding paragraph of which is " Verum si huius inventi usum eruditis gratum fore intellexero, dabo fortasse brevi (Deo aspirante) rationem ac methodum aut hunc canonem emendandi, aut emendatiorem de novo condendi, ut ita plurium Logistarum diligentia,limatior tandem et accuratior, quam unius opera fieri potuit, in lucem prodeat.
    0
    1
  • There is no sufficient ground for finding an allusion to this act in the noted line of Dante, "Che fece per viltate it gran rifiuto" ("who made from cowardice the great refusal," Inferno, 3, 60).
    1
    1
  • Allusion has already been made to the peculiar habit of the shell-boring algae.
    1
    1
  • The only "missing link" is the want of any precise allusion to a mask in the references to Dauger.
    1
    1
  • The untimely fate of Josiah became a stock allusion in dirges.
    1
    1
  • Usener and others identify Lycaon with Zeus Lycaeus, the god of light, who slays his son Nyctimus (the dark) or is succeeded by him, in allusion to the perpetual succession of night and day.
    0
    1
  • Mannhardt sees in the ceremony an allusion to certain agricultural rites, the object of which was to prevent the failure of the crops and to avert pestilence (or to protect them and the flocks against the ravages of wolves).
    0
    1
  • Hume's casual allusion to "this famous atheist" and his "hideous hypothesis" is a fair specimen of the tone in which he is usually referred to; people talked about Spinoza, Lessing said, "as if he were a dead dog."
    0
    1
  • She was called " The Swedish Sappho," and scandal has been needlessly busy in giving point to the allusion.
    0
    1
  • In later times they are often represented drawing the car of Dionysus, or bound and ridden by Eros, in allusion to their drunken and amorous habits.
    1
    1
  • The name is derived from mercurium captans, in allusion to the fact that these compounds react readily with mercuric oxide to form crystalline mercury derivatives.
    1
    1
  • Thessalonica was built on the site of the older Greek city of Therma, so called in allusion to the hot-springs of the neighbourhood.
    1
    1
  • By mutual consent no allusion was made to the death of the Wangs.
    1
    1
  • Although not strictly forming part of the skull, allusion should be made here to the ring of sclerotic plates which has been found in many of the Stegocephalia, and which is only found elsewhere in a few Crossopterygian fishes as well as in many reptiles and birds.
    1
    1
  • The allusion to the hilarity of the students and the general levity of the occasions aroused Coleridge's indignation.
    1
    1
  • True amber has sometimes been called karabe, a word of oriental derivation signifying "that which attracts straw," in allusion to the power which amber possesses of acquiring an electric charge by friction.
    1
    1
  • Their name is variously derived from the building in Athens called Cynosarges, the earliest home of the school, and from the Greek word for a dog (Ki wv), in contemptuous allusion to the uncouth and aggressive manners adopted by the members of the school.
    1
    1
  • That this was still a recent settlement in the 7th century is suggested by an allusion in a list of the allies of Assur-bani-pal of Assyria in 668 B.C. to a King Damasu of Kartihadasti (Phoenician for "New-town"), where Citium would be expected.
    1
    1
  • The walls of the nave are adorned with mosaics of the 6th century; the scenes from the New Testament above the windows date from the time of Theodoric, while the somewhat stiff processions below, of virgins on one side and of saints on the other, are substitutions of the latter half of the 6th century for representations which probably contained some allusion to Arianism or episodes in the life of Theodoric (so Ricci).
    1
    1
  • The Brodies - the old name of their estate was Brothie, from the Irish broth, a ditch, in allusion to the trench that ran from the village of Dyke to the north of the house - were a family of great consequence at the period of the Covenant.
    1
    1
  • But the thread of the history is broken, and apart from an allusion to the favour shown to the captive Jehoiachin (with which the books of Jeremiah and Kings conclude), there is a gap in the records, and subsequent events are viewed from a new standpoint (§ 20).
    1
    1
  • Provided with an escort and with the right to obtain supplies of wood for the buildings, he returned to the city of his fathers' sepulchres (the allusion may suggest his royal ancestry).
    1
    1
  • Of the existence of this tributary, however, there is no evidence, and the origin of the name is found in Hole-bourne, the stream in the hollow, in allusion to the Fleet itself.
    1
    1
  • In the military history of all these centuries constant allusion is made to the Rhine, its passages and its fortresses.
    132
    134
  • The authory of the mystery books like to use the technique of allusion in her writing to help the readers solve the cases.
    28
    32
  • A too frequent allusion to Greek mythological names is a defect sometimes observable in his writings.
    75
    85
  • For example, eyes that are very asymmetrical or disproportioned (permanent eyeliner may be able to give the allusion of a more symmetrical look).
    22
    43