Algeria sentence example

algeria
  • Each colony and protectorate, including Algeria, has a separate budget.
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  • In the last-named year the commerce of Algeria amounted to 24,506,020 and that of Tunisia to 5,969,248, making a grand total for French colonial trade in 1905 of 65,432,746 The figures were made up as follows:
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  • Thus in 1857 he went to Peru in order to determine the magnetic equator; in1861-1862and 1864, he studied telluric absorption in the solar spectrum in Italy and Switzerland; in 1867 he carried out optical and magnetic experiments at the Azores; he successfully observed both transits of Venus, that of 1874 in Japan, that of 1882 at Oran in Algeria; and he took part in a long series of solar eclipse-expeditions, e.g.
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  • The Jewish parishes, called synagogues, are grouped into departmental consistories (Paris, Bordeaux, Nancy, Marseilles, Bayonne, Lille, Vesoul, Besancon and three in Algeria).
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  • There is also an acadmie comprising Algeria.
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  • Commerce.The value of the external trade of the French possessions, exclusive of Algeria and Tunisia, increased in the ten years 1896-1905 from 18,784,060 to 34,957,479.
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  • Youssouff acknowledged this protection given by a Frenchman by distinguishing himself in the ranks of the French army at the time of the conquest of Algeria.
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  • Ferdinand de Lesseps was also entrusted by his father with missions to Marshal Count Clausel, general-in-chief of the army of occupation in Algeria.
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  • Among later residents commemorated is Edward Lloyd, who was the first person to show the value of esparto grass for the manufacture of paper, and thus started an industry which is one of the most important in Algeria.
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  • Khaired-Din, succeeding Arouj, drove the Spaniards from the Penon (1530) and was the founder of the pashalik, afterwards deylik, of Algeria.
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  • For example, in southern Algeria, a region of steppes is situated on a flat plateau, about 3000 ft.
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  • At Ghardaia, in south-eastern Algeria, the mean annual rainfall, from 1887 to I892, was about 43/4 in.
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  • He travelled a great deal in Europe, Egypt, Palestine, Russia, Algeria and America, and between 1853 and 1863 was largely occupied with researches into the history and methods of marine propulsion.
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  • The rabbit is believed to be a native of the western half of the Mediterranean basin, and still abounds in Spain, Sardinia, southern Italy, Sicily, Greece, Tunis and Algeria;.
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  • Algeria has been in course of survey since 1868, Tunis since 1878, and the results have been published on scales of I :50,000 and 1:250,000.
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  • They extend from Cape Nun on the west to the Gulf of Gabes on the east, a distance of some i 50o m., traversing Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia.
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  • This general disposition is seen most distinctly in eastern Morocco and Algeria.
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  • The maritime Atlas and the inner ranges in Algeria and Tunisia are then treated under the heading Eastern Ranges.
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  • It has an average height of over 1 i,000 ft., whereas the loftiest peaks in Algeria do not exceed 8000 ft., and the highest in Tunisia are under 6000 ft.
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  • The lower portion of the Moroccan Atlas (sometimes called the Middle Atlas), extending north - east and east from an undefined point to the north of the Great Atlas to near the frontier of Algeria, is crossed by the pass from Fez to Tafilalt.
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  • The eastern division of the Atlas, which forms the backbone of Algeria and Tunisia, is adequately known with the exception of the small portion in Morocco forming the province of Er-Rif.
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  • In Algeria the Maritime Atlas has five chief ranges, several mountains rising over 5000 ft.
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  • It was in these coast mountains of Algeria that the Romans quarried the celebrated Numidian marbles.
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  • (2) Another town which in Roman times was called Tipasa is in the department of Constantine, Algeria, 55 m.
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  • From 1881 to 1884 his activity in Tunisia so raised the prestige of France that it drew from Gambetta the celebrated declaration, L'Anticldricalisme n'est pas un article d'exportation, and led to the e .?mption of Algeria from the application of the decrees concerning the religious orders.
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  • In all the towns of Algeria and Tunisia museums have been founded for storing the antiquities of the region; the most important of these are the museums of St Louis, Carthage and the palace of Bardo (musee Alaoui) near Tunis, those of Susa, Constantine, Lambessa, Timgad, Tebessa, Philippeville, Cherchel and Oran.
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  • The archaeological exploration of Algeria has kept pace with the expansion of French dominion.
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  • In 1850 Leon Renier was officially instructed to collect all the inscriptions in Algeria which should be found by the military expeditionary columns.
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  • Owing to this he had spent the winter of 1860 in Algeria, and every subsequent winter he had to be very careful and confine himself to the house, especially in damp and foggy weather.
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  • El Wad is one of the most interesting places in Algeria.
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  • (For map, see Algeria.) Physical Features.
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  • On the north and north-west the Aures mountains of Algeria are prolonged into Tunisia, and constitute the mountainous region of the north, which lies between the Majerda river and the sea, and also includes the vicinity of the city of Tunis and the peninsula of the Dakhelat el Mawin, which terminates in Ras Addar (Cape Bon).
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  • The range of the Saharan Atlas of Algeria divides (roughly speaking) into two at the Tunisian frontier.
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  • The present writer believes that the date palm was really indigenous to this district of the Jerid, as it is to countries of similar description in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, parts of the Tripolitaine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, southern Persia and north-western India; but that north of the latitude of the Jerid the date did not grow naturally in Mauretania, just as it was foreign to all parts of Europe, in which, as in true North Africa, its presence is due to the hand of man.
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  • The flora of Tunisia is very nearly identical with that of Algeria, though it offers a few species either peculiar to itself or not found in the last-named country.
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  • On the whole its character is less Saharan than that of parts of Algeria, for the influences of the desert do not penetrate so far north in Tunisia as they do in Algeria.
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  • The wild olive, the wild cherry, two species of wild plums, the myrtle, the ivy, arbutus, and two species of holly are found in the mountains of Khmiria, at various sites at high elevation near Tunis and Bizerta, and along the mountainous belt of the south-west which forms the frontier region between Tunisia and Algeria.
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  • The Tunisian hedgehog is peculiar to that country and to Algeria.
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  • Tunisia does not appear to possess the Barbary ape, which is found in Algeria and Morocco.
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  • The forested regions shelter the handsome Barbary red deer, which is peculiar to this region and the adjoining districts of Algeria.
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  • [An allied form with gigantic horns is found fossil in Algeria.] They are the private property of the bey, who very properly preserves them.
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  • A beautiful little bird almost peculiar to the south of Tunisia and the adjoining regions of Algeria, is a species of bunting (Fringilla), called by the Arabs bu-habibi.
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  • Saracenic art has perhaps not attained here the high degree it reached in western Algeria, Spain and Egypt; still it presents much that is beautiful to see and worthy to be studied.
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  • From Algeria the imports were £656,000; to Algeria the exports were £185,000.
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  • The second railway connects the capital with the frontier of Algeria, where, at Suk Ahras, it joins the main line to Constantine, Algiers, &c. This line was built by the Bone-Guelma Company.
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  • The French began to regard the dominions of the Bey as a natural adjunct to Algeria, but after the Crimean War Turkish rights over the regency of Tunis were revived.
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  • South of that point the Saharan frontiers of Algeria, Tunisia and Tripoli remained undefined.
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  • Working eastward from Tunisia and Algeria the French occupied several points to which Turkey laid claim.
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  • Jonquilla, with yellow flowers, a native of south Europe and Algeria, of which there are single and double flowered varieties, is also grown in pots for early flowering, but does well outside in a warm border.
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  • Yarmorasen, who died in 1282, founded the dynasty of the Abd-el-Wahid, who ruled the greater part of what now constitutes Algeria.
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  • When the French entered Algeria the sultans of Morocco were disputing the possession of Tlemcen with the Kuluglis, who fought first for themselves and afterwards for France.
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  • He entered the army, saw much service in Algeria (1862), and took part in the fighting around Metz in 1870.
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  • Bona is in direct steamship communication with Marseilles, and is the centre of a large commerce, ranking after Algiers and Oran alone in Algeria.
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  • In 1885 it crossed the Mediterranean to Algeria.
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  • The chief exports are stone for road-making, butter, eggs and vegetables; the chief imports are coal, timber, superphosphates and wine from Algeria.
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  • In the same year the French Roman Catholic mission of the White Fathers of Algeria was inaugurated,.
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  • He was president of the Universal Israelite Alliance, and while in the government of the national dofence he secured the franchise for the Jews in Algeria.
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  • Algeria contains important deposits of phosphorite, especially near Tebessa and at Tocqueville in the province of Constantine.
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  • Near Jebel Kouif, on the frontier between Algeria and Tunis, there are phosphate workings, as also in Tunis, at Gafsa.
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  • The joint production of Tunis and Algeria in 1907 was not less than a million tons.
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  • He saw active service in Algeria, and became chef d'escadron in 1849 and lieutenant-colonel in 1850.
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  • In 1858 he was appointed minister for the Colonies and Algeria, and his administration aroused great hopes, but his activity was diverted into a different channel by his sudden marriage 1 Derived, it is supposed, from the nickname "Plomb-plomb," or "Craint-plomb" (fear-lead), given him by his soldiers in the Crimea.
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  • Colonel Denfert-Rochereau was, however, a scientific engineer of advanced ideas as well as a veteran soldier of the Crimea and Algeria, and he had been stationed at Belfort for six years.
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  • It is indigenous to the south of Spain and the north of Africa (where it is known as Halfa or Alfa), and is especially abundant in the sterile and rugged parts of Murcia and Valencia, and in Algeria, flourishing best in sandy, ferruginous soils, in dry, sunny situations on the sea coast.
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  • Another grass, Lygeum Spartum, with stiff rush-like leaves, growing in rocky soil on the high plains of countries bordering on the Mediterranean, especially of Spain and Algeria, is also a source of esparto.
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  • He prosecuted the war against France vigorously and in a "short time had rallied to his standard all the tribes of western Algeria.
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  • The story of his fifteen years' struggle against the French is given under Algeria.
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  • On the 23rd, his submission was formally made to the duc d'Aumale, then governor of Algeria.
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  • The export trade is chiefly with the Peninsula, France, Italy, Algeria and with Cuba and Porto Rico.
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  • Algeria extends for about 650 m.
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  • To the south this region is divided by the Great Atlas from the deserts of the Sahara, with its oases, in which the boundary of Algeria is lost.
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  • The peak of Shellia, the highest point in Algeria, in the Aures range, has a height of 7611 ft.
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  • The Jurjura range, forming the background of the plains between Algiers and Bougie, extends through the district of Kabylia, with which for grandeur of scenery no other part of Algeria can compare.
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  • The Mejerda and its affluent the Mellegue, rivers of Tunisia, have their rise in Algeria, in the mountainous country east of Constantine.
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  • Algeria abounds in extensive salt lakes and marshes.
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  • The Lower Eocene rocks contain the chief phosphatic deposits of Algeria, those of the Tebessa region being the best known.
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  • - Although Algeria enjoys a warm climate, the temperature varies considerably in different parts, according to the elevation and configuration of the country.
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  • (For the climate of the Saharan region see Sahara.) Throughout Algeria, especially in the summer, there is a great difference between day and night temperature, notably in the inland districts.
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  • The fauna of Algeria resembles that of the Mediterranean system generally, though many animals once common to South Europe and North Africa - such as the lion, panther, hyena and jackal - are now extinct in Europe.
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  • The chief wealth of the Arab tribes of the plateaus consists in their immense flocks of sheep. The horses and mules of Algeria are noted; and the native cattle are an excellent stock on which to graft the better European varieties.
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  • The flora of Algeria consists of about 3000 species, of which some 450 are indigenous to the country, ioo being peculiar to the Sahara.
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  • Algeria had in 1906 a population of 5,231,850, consisting of a medley of European, Eastern and African races.
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  • The Turks, though for a considerable period the dominant race, were never very numerous in Algeria.
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  • Jews have long been settled in Algeria.
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  • The place is an important station for the caravan trade between Algeria and the countries to the south.
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  • - Algeria is rich in prehistoric memorials of man, especially in megalithic remains, of which nearly every known kind has been found in the country.
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  • Algeria contains many Roman remains besides those mentioned and is also rich in monuments of Saracenic art.
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  • ==Agriculture== Ever since the time of the Romans Algeria has been noted for the fertility of its soil.
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  • The soil of Algeria everywhere favours the growth of the vine.
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  • The culture of the vine was early undertaken by the colonists, but it was not until vineyards in France were attacked by phylloxera that the export of wine from Algeria became considerable.
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  • Algeria is rich in minerals, found chiefly in the department of Constantine, where iron, lead and zinc, copper, calamine, antimony and mercury mines are worked.
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  • - The carrying trade between Algeria and France is confined, by a law passed in 1889, to French bottoms. The largest port is Algiers, after which follow Oran, Philippeville and Bona.
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  • Under French administration the commerce of Algeria has greatly developed.
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  • French goods, except sugar, have been admitted into Algeria without payment of duty since 1835.
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  • After the increase, in 1892, of the French minimum tariff, which applied to Algeria also, foreign trade greatly diminished.
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  • Algeria possesses a railway system covering over 2000 m.
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  • Algeria is also traversed by a network of roads constructed by the French, of which the routes nationales alone are 2000 m.
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  • By decree of the 24th of November 1860, the ministry of Algeria and the colonies was abolished and the office of governor-general reestablished with increased powers.
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  • By a law of the 19th of December 1900, Algeria was constituted a legal personality, with power to own goods, contract loans, &c., and a decree of 1901 placed the customs department, until then directed from Paris, under the control of the governor-general, whose hands were also strengthened in various minor matters.
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  • To the legislature in Paris Algeria elects three senators and six deputies (one senator and two deputies for each department).
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  • The actual form of government may be summarized thus: - At the head of the administration in Algeria is a governorgeneral, who exercises control over all branches, civil and military, of the administration, except the services of justice, public instruction and worship (as far as concerns Europeans) and the treasury.
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  • The canton (in France a judicial area) has, however, no existence in Algeria.
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  • By decree of the 14th of August 1905, the frontier between Saharan territory dependent on Algeria and that attached to French West Africa was laid down.
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  • The governor-general represents the territories in civil affairs; the budget is distinct from that of Algeria and an annual subvention is provided by France.
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  • Algeria has had a budget distinct from that of France since 1901.
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  • This budget includes all the expenses of Algeria save the cost of the army (estimated at £2,000,000 yearly) and the guarantee of interest on the railways open before 1901.
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  • The troops quartered in Algeria exceed 50,000.
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  • The colonization of Algeria by the French has been greatly hampered by the system of land tenure which they found in force.
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  • Two-thirds of the villagers were to be French immigrants, the other third Frenchmen or naturalized Frenchmen already settled in Algeria.
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  • Two judicial systems exist in Algeria - native and French.
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  • Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia - dates back to the time of the Turkish dominion.
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  • It is since that time only that the expression Algeria has been in use.
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  • The more serious section in parliament were frankly opposed to the idea of conquering or of colonizing Algeria; on the other hand, popular sentiment was hostile to evacuation.
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  • In this gradual manner were the French led to conquer Algeria.
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  • General Bertrand Clausel,who succeeded Marshal de Bourmont, was one of the few men who at that period dreamed of conquering and colonizing Algeria.
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  • The French, not yet certain whether or not they would retain Algeria, remained on the defensive.
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  • Such was the situation at the period when, the French having at last resolved to keep Algeria, the ordinance of the 22nd of July 1834 laid down the bases of the political and administrative organization of the " French possessions in the north of Africa," at the head of which was placed a governor-general.
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  • All the western part of Algeria belonged to him.
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  • In return for a vague recognition of the sovereignty of France in Africa, this treaty gave up to the amir the whole of western Algeria.
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  • Islam made a supreme effort in Algeria.
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  • Abd-el-Kader reappeared in Algeria, which he overran with a rapidity which baffled all pursuit.
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  • The policy followed at this period consisted in assimilating Algeria to France.
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  • Important efforts were made to attract French colonists to the country, the colonization of Algeria appearing as a means towards the extinction of pauperism in the mother-country.
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  • Randon (1795-1871), named governorgeneral of Algeria after the coup d'etat, had at first to repress in the south a rising of a new " master of the hour," Mahomet ben Abdallah, the sherif of Wargla.
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  • In 1858 the creation of a " ministry of Algeria and of the colonies " brought about the resignation of Marshal Randon.
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  • The administrative headquarters of Algeria was then transferred from Algiers to Paris.
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  • Algeria was considered as a kind of great military fief, and the officers who ruled there commonly took the side of the native chieftains against the civil population.
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  • An effort was made to attract French colonists to Algeria by gratuitous concessions of land.
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  • Peasants from the south of France, whose vines had been destroyed by the phylloxera, crossed the Mediterranean and established in Algeria an important vineyard.
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  • The tendency then was to treat Algeria as a piece of France.
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  • Profoundly troubled as Algeria was in the last years of the 19th century by the anti-Semitic agitation, which occasioned frequent changes of governors, it appears to-day to have turned aside from sterile political struggles to interest itself exclusively in the economic development of the country.
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  • This being accomplished by March 1901, the conquest of the Algerine Sahara was from that time completed, and nothing any longer hindered the attempts to join Algeria and the Sudan across the Sahara.
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  • Lambert Playfair's Handbook for Travellers in Algeria (Murray's Handbooks), corrected to 1902, is a capital guide to the country, as is also Algerie et Tunisie (Paris, 1906), in the GuidesJoanne Series; the Bibliography of Algeria (London, 1888), and the Supplement to the Bibliography of Algeria (London, 1898), by Sir Lambert Playfair, contain thousands of entries and many notes.
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  • Stephane Gsell's Les monuments antiques de l'Algerie (2 vols., Paris, 1901), one of the publications of the Service des monuments historiques of the colony, is an authoritative and finely illustrated work on the antiquities of Algeria.
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  • The best elementary work on the history of Algeria is that of Cat, Petite histoire de l'Algerie (Algiers, 1889).
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  • He entered the army in 1856, and served in Algeria, Italy, Cochin-China and the Franco-German War, earning the reputation of being a smart soldier.
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  • He was one of the most distinguished and efficient of Bugeaud's generals, rendered special service at Isly (August 14, 1844), acted temporarily as governor-general of Algeria, and finally effected the capture of Abd el-Kader in 1847.
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  • (3) In the steppe the vegetation is that which prevails in similar soil from Central Asia to Algeria; but many of the arborescent plants that grow in the rockier and more irregular plateaux of western Asia, and especially of Persia, have been reported as missing.
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  • Juba's tomb, the so-called Tombeau de la Chretienne (see Algeria), is 71 m.
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  • The Roman Mission too has been very successful; for some years a French agency, the White Fathers of Algeria, carried it on, but they were afterwards joined by English helpers from St Joseph's Society at Mill Hill.
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  • Their empire, which during the reign of Abdurrahman (761-784) and his son Abdul Wahab (784-823) extended over the greater part of the modern Algeria, was known as the Ibadite Empire from Abdallah ibn Ibad, the founder of the heretical sect to which Abdurrahman belonged.
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  • Algeria, Canada, Cuba and India have valuable ore bodies.
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  • It also crosses the Mediterranean to Algeria and Morocco; but there, as in southern Spain, it is probably but a winter immigrant.
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  • But unmistakable traces of much more ancient bored springs appear in Lombardy, in Asia Minor, in Persia, in China, in Egypt, in Algeria, and even in the great desert of Sahara.
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  • (See Algeria.) Mostaganem occupies the site of a Roman town.
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  • This is exactly of the modern Kabyle style in Algeria, and entirely disappeared from Egypt very early in the prehistoric age.
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  • He defended the fort of Issy at the siege of Paris, and served in Corsica and in Algeria in 1873.
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  • Remains of camels (C. thomasi) have also been found in the Pleistocene strata of Oran and Ouen Seguen, in Algeria; and certain remains from the Isle of Samos have been assigned to the same genus, although the reference requires confirmation.
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  • To speak of more modern times there can be enumerated the Zouaoua and Jebalia (Tripoli and Tunisia); the Chauwia, Kabyles and Beni-Mzab (Algeria); the Shluh (Chlouah), Amazigh and Berbers (Morocco); the Tuareg, Amoshagh, Sorgu, &c. (Sahara).
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  • Latham, who writes: " All that is not Arabic in the kingdom of Morocco, all that is not Arabic in the French provinces of Algeria, and all that is not Arabic in Tunis, Tripoli and Fezzan, is Berber."
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  • At present he forms at least three-fifths of the population in Algeria, and in Morocco the proportion is greater.
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  • Whatever these dialects be called, the Kabyle, the Shilha, the Zenati, the Tuareg or Tamashek, the Berber language is still essentially one, and the similarity between the forms current in Morocco, Algeria, the Sahara and the far-distant oasis of Siwa is much more marked than between the Norse and English in the sub-Aryan Teutonic group. The Berbers have, moreover, a writing of their own, peculiar and little used or known, the antiquity of which is proved by monuments and inscriptions ranging over the whole of North Africa.
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  • He served in the army pay department in Algeria from 1844 to 1848, and extended his travels to the East.
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  • In 1900 the oasis of Atar, on the western borders of the territory, was reached by Paul Blanchet, previously known for his researches on ancient Berber remains in Algeria.
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  • In Algeria and West Africa the French government has not merely found practical training schools for her own soldiers, but by opening a recruiting field amongst the native tribes it has added an available contingent to the French army.
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  • The average imports are in the neighbourhood of 120 million gallons, of which rather more than one-half comes from Algeria.
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  • Owing, however, to the fact that viticulture has made much progress in South America, in California, in Australia and particularly in Algeria, and also to the fact that the quality of these Midi wines has fallen off considerably since the phylloxera period, the outlet for them has become much reduced.
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  • Viticulture has made great strides in Algeria during recent years.
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  • The first impetus to this department was given by the destruction Algeria .
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  • The wines, moreover, of Algeria are on the whole of decidedly fair quality, possessing body and strength and also stability.
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  • Thus in parts of California, where high temperatures are liable to prevail during the vintage, the system - first employed in Algeria - of cooling the must during fermentation to the proper temperature by means of a series of pipes in which iced water circulates is now largely employed.
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  • He withdrew the French garrison from Ancona, but pursued an active policy in Mexico and in Algeria.
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  • They have, for instance, attained a population of millions in such severe climates as Poland and Russia; in the towns of Algeria they have succeeded so conspicuously as to bring about an outburst of anti-semitism; and in Cochin-China and Aden they succeed in rearing children and forming permanent communities.
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  • From its position on the route of vessels plying between Algeria and the south of France, the harbour is much frequented by French cargosteamers; it is also a Spanish naval station.
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  • The company- Compagnie d'Afrique - who owned the concession for the fishery was suppressed in 1798 on the outbreak of war between France and Algeria.
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  • In consequence of the growing importance of the port and the decision of the French government to make Oran the chief naval station in Algeria, it was decided to build an eastern harbour.
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  • Meanwhile the Turks had become masters of Algeria, and expelled the Spaniards from all their possessions except Oran.
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  • Under French rule Oran has regained its ancient commercial activity and has become the second city in Algeria.
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  • A beginning was made by ordering the translation of the Code Napoleon, the Indian Mahommedan code, and the Code Napoleon as modified for Algeria; but nothing further was done.
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  • He afterwards travelled in France, Italy, Spain and Algeria.
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  • In 1831 he was removed from active duty in consequence of his declared republicanism, but in 1832 he was recalled to the service and sent to Algeria.
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  • Almost every step of his promotion was gained on the field of battle, and in 1844 the duc d'Aumale himself asked for Cavaignac's promotion to the rank of marechal de camp. This was made in the same year, and he held various district commands in Algeria up to 1848, when the provisional government appointed him governor-general of the province with the rank of general of division.
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  • The most important fisheries extend along the coasts of Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco; but red coral is also obtained in the vicinity of Naples, near Leghorn and Genoa, and on the coasts of Sardinia, Corsica, Catalonia and Provence.
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  • After the fall of Warsaw he took out letters of naturalization in France and entered the French army, seeing some service in Algeria.
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  • Their tribal home seems to have been south of Oran in Algeria, and they seem to have early claimed an Arab origin, though it was alleged by the Arabs that they were descendants of Goliath, i.e.
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  • 428 reduced it to a condition of gradual decay; and the invasion of the Arabs in the 8th century again brought desolation on the land, which was aggravated by continual misgovernment till the conquest of Algeria by the French in 1833.
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  • It is true that stone implements of palaeolithic and neolithic types are found sporadically in the Nile valley, Somaliland, on the Zambezi, in Cape Colony and the northern portions of the Congo Free State, as well as in Algeria and Tunisia; but the localities are far too few and too widely separated to warrant the inference that they are to be in any way connected.
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  • Other early remains, but of equally uncertain date, are the stone circles of Algeria, the Cross river and the Gambia.
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  • The story of the establishment of Turkish rule in northern Africa and of the revolutions of Morocco must be sought under the heads of Turkey, Tripoli, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco.
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  • With 3 mobile operators in Algeria, the market competition is extremely fierce.
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  • The group conducts basin analysis research with a petroleum geoscience theme in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Libya and Tunisia.
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  • Elsewhere, as in Egypt and Algeria, the advent of an Islamic order never came to pass and appeared illusory.
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  • The greatest influx of outside fighters to join the insurgency has been from Algeria.
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  • Algeria: West put to the test For years western governments have known about the gruesome events gathering pace in Algeria.
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  • Algeria telecom is the largest state-owned telecom operator in Algeria.
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  • This building, one of the finest Roman monuments in Algeria, bears evidence of having been built at various epochs; the earlier portions probably date from not later than the beginning of the 2nd century A.D.
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  • The climate becomes more continental in type from west to east, but there are great local irregularities - the elevated plateaus of Algeria and Spain cause a rise of pressure in winter and delay the rainy seasons: the rains set in earlier in the west than in the east, and the total fall is greater.
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  • Similar winds are met with in Spain (the Leveche), but they reach their greatest development in the Simooms of Algeria and Syria, and the Khamsin of Egypt.
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  • It is highly probable that his influence would not have outlived him, if he had not found a lieutenant in `Abd-el-Mumin el Kumi, another Berber, from Algeria, who was undoubtedly a soldier and statesman of a high order.
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  • C. Nordmann (25) describes some similar results which he obtained in Algeria during August and September 1905.
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  • - - 3,88~ scriptions (including Algeria), which Barley.
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  • Other countries importing largely into France are Russia, Algeria and British India, whose imports in each case averagedover~9,ooo,ooo in value in the period 1901-1905; China (average value 7,000,000); and Italy (average value 6,ooo,000).
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  • Kwang-Chow-Wan however, is bound to providefor destitute children (see FOUNDLING HOSPITALS) Total in As and pauper lunatics (both these being under the care of the department), aged In Africa and the mdi Algeria and infirm people without resources and Algerian Sahara victims of incurable illness, and to furnish Tunisia medical assistance gratuitously to those West Africa without resources who are afflicted with Senegal..
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  • In addition to Algeria, which sends three senators and six deputies to Paris and is treated in many respects not as a colony but as part of France, the colonies represented in the legislature are: Martinique, Guadeloupe and Reunion (each electing one senator and two deputies), French India (one senator and one deputy),Guiana, Senegal and Cochin-China (one deputy each).
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  • The finding of the remains of the saint in 18J3 afforded striking confirmation of an incident recorded by a Spanish Benedictine named Haedo, who published a topography of Algeria in 1612.
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  • (For trade statistics see Algeria.) The inner harbour was begun in 1518 by Khair-edDin (see History, below), who, to accommodate his pirate vessels, caused the island on which was Fort Penon to be connected with the mainland by a mole.
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  • On the 4th of July in that year a French army under General de Bourmont attacked the city, which capitulated on the following day (see ALGERIA, History).
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  • Laveran, a French army surgeon serving in Algeria.
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  • That this was the case is undeniably shown by some remarks of Canon Tristram, who, in treating of the Alaudidae and Saxicolinae of Algeria (whence he had recently brought a large collection of specimens of his own making), stated (Ibis, 18 59, pp. 4 2 9-433) that he could " not help feeling convinced of the truth of the views set forth by Messrs Darwin and Wallace," adding that it was " hardly possible, I 'should think, to illustrate this theory better than by the larks and chats of North Africa."
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  • (See further Algeria.) The Mejerda range, which extends into Tunisia, has no heights exceeding 3 700 ft.
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  • (See also Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Sahara.) Authorities.
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  • While bishop of Nancy he met Marshal MacMahon, then governor-general of Algeria, who in 1866 offered him the see of Algiers, just raised to an archbishopric., Lavigerie landed in Africa on the 11th of May 1868, when the great famine was already making itself felt, and he began in November to collect the orphans into villages.
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  • This action, however, did not meet with the approval of MacMahon, who feared that the Arabs would resent it as an infraction of the religious peace, and thought that the Mahommedan church, being a state institution in Algeria, ought to be protected from proselytism; so it was intimated to the prelate that his sole duty was to minister to the colonists.
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  • Apart from the province of Constantine, Algeria is less rich in Roman remains than Tunisia; mention must, however, be made of the excavations of Victor Waille at Cherchel, where were found fine statues in the Greek style of the time of King Juba II.; of P. Gavault at Tigzirt (Rusuccuru), and finally of those of Stephane Gsell at Tipasa (basilica of St Salsa) and throughout the district of Setif and at Khamissa (Thuburticum Numidarum).
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  • Thus the "w," though constantly represented in French by "ou," is continually changed by them into "v" when they transcribe foreign languages, just as the Greek x and the German and Scottish "ch" is almost invariably rendered by the French in Algeria and Tunis as "kr."
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  • The telegraph system penetrates to the farthest French post in the Sahara, is connected with the Turkish system on the Tripolitan frontier and with Algeria, and by cable with Sicily, Malta, Sardinia and Marseilles.
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  • In the Kubr-er-Rumia - " grave of the Roman lady " (Roman being used by the Arabs to designate strangers of Christian origin) - the Medrassen and the Jedars, Algeria possesses a remarkable series of sepulchral monuments.
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  • Under the Turkish dominion Algeria had originally at its head a beylerbey resident at Algiers.
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  • The system of rattachement was in great part abandoned, and decentralization was obtained by augmenting the powers of the governor-general, and by granting to Algeria legal personality and a special budget (see above, Central Government).
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  • (Euprepes) vittata, the "poisson de sable" of Algeria, is semi-aquatic. Chalcides s.
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  • He served as a captain in Algeria under Marshal Bugeaud, who, in recognition of his gallantry in the battles of Sidi Yussuf and Isly, made him his aide-de-camp and entrusted him with important commissions.
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  • In Algeria the deys of the janissaries became in the 17th century rulers of that country (see Algeria: History).
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  • From about 1518 till the death of Uluch Ali in 1587, Algiers was the main seat of government of the beylerbeys of northern Africa, who ruled over Tripoli, Tunisia and Algeria.
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  • People in a small town in Alabama, a small city in Algeria, and a large city in Argentina all desire different forms of governments with different services.
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  • Algeria Telecom is the largest state-owned telecom operator in Algeria.
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  • At 10,000-year-old sites in Tanzoumaitak, Algeria, tattooing instruments used for puncturing the skin were found with the female tattooed mummy of Tassili N'Ajje.
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  • I think these trees are unfitted for our climate, and even in Algeria, where many species were planted by the French Government, the result, as I saw it some years ago, was anything but good.
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  • Today it is grown around the world, from Algeria to the United States.
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  • Another popular school of African music comes from Algeria - Rai music.
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  • It may be added that fossil remains of the African elephant have been obtained from Spain, Sicily, Algeria and Egypt, in strata of the Pleistocene age.
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  • 239,178 The Basques of Basses-PyrnCes go in considerable 442,777 numbers to the Argentine Republic, the inhabitants of 333,621 Basses Alpes to Mexico and the United States, and 429,812 there are important French colonies in Algeria and 315,199 Tunisia.
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  • In Algeria the Mahommedan religion received similar recognition.
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  • Shipping has been fostered by paying bounties for vessels constructed in France and sailing under the French flag, and by reserving the coasting trade, traffic between France and Algeria, &c., to French vessels.
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  • In 1906 the peace strength of the army in France was estimated at 532,593 officers and men; in Algeria 54,580; in Tunis 20,320; total 607,493.
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  • But in 1908, owing to the prevailing want of trained soldiers in France, it was proposed to set free the white troops in Algeria by applying the principles of universal service to the natives, as in Tunis.
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  • Besides the important harbours already referred to, the French fleet has naval bases at Oran in Algeria, Bizerta in Tunisia, Saigon in Cochin China and Hongaj in Tongking, DiegoSuarez in Madagascar, Dakar in Senegal, Fort de France in Martinique, Nouma in New Caledonia.
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  • The only countries in which there is a considerable white population are Algeria, Tunisia and New Caledonia.
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  • A partial exception to this rule is found in Algeria, where all laws in force in France before the conquest of the country are also (in theory, not in practice) in force in Algeria.
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  • The oversight of all the colonies and protectorates save Algeria and Tunisia is confided to a minister of the colonies (law of March 20, 1894)1 whose powers correspond to those exercised in France by the minister of the interior.
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  • ~Colonial Finance.The cost of the extra-European possessions, other than Algeria and Tunisia, to the state is shown in the expenses of the colonial ministry.
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  • The similar expenses of Algeria borne by the state are not separately shown, but are estimated at 2,000,000.
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  • The colonial budgets totalled in 1907 some 16,760,000, being divisible into six categories: Algeria 4,120,000; Tunisia 3,640,000; Indo-China3 about 5,000,ooo; West Africa 1,600,000; Madagascar 960,000; all other colonies combined 1,440,000.
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  • The authorized colonial loans, omitting Algeria and Tunisia, during the period 1884f 904 amounted to 19,200,000, the sums paid for interest and sinking funds on loans varying from 600,000 to 800,000 a year.
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  • Over three-fourths of the trade of Algeria and Tunisia is with France and other French possessions.
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  • In the museum are some of the ancient sculptures and mosaics discovered in Algeria, together with medals and Algerian money.
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  • At Beni Ounif and Colomb Bchar, in south-western Algeria, I was informed, in March 1910, that there had been no rain for about three years.
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  • He became first a postmaster near Lyons, and in 1841 was appointed, through the influence of some of his friends who had risen to posts of power, member of a scientific commission on Algeria, which led him to engage in researches concerning North Africa and colonization in general.
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  • Others of the more important totals are: France 95,000 (besides Algeria 63,000 and Tunis 62,000); Italy 52,000; Persia 49,000; Egypt 39,000; Bulgaria 36,000; Argentine Republic 30,000; Tripoli 19,000; Turkestan and Afghanistan 14,000; Switzerland and Belgium each 12,000; Mexico 90oO; Greece 8000; Servia 6000; Sweden and Cuba each 4000; Denmark 3500; Brazil and Abyssinia (Falashas) each 3000; Spain and Portugal 2500; China and Japan 2000.
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  • It is widely distributed in the United States, and occurs in Mexico and Brazil; it is found in Tunisia and Algeria, in the Altai Mountains and India, and in New South Wales, Queensland, and in Tasmania.
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  • Roman Africa has been the subject of innumerable historical and archaeological researches, especially since the conquest of Algeria and Tunisia by the French.
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