Algebra sentence examples

algebra
  • The earliest algebra consists in the solution of equations.

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  • Principles of ordinary algebra; B.

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  • But when I took up algebra I had a harder time still.

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  • In algebra he discovered the method of approximating to the real roots of an equation by means of continued fractions, and imagined a general process of solving algebraical equations of every degree.

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  • In pure algebra Descartes expounded and illustrated the general methods of solving equations up to those of the fourth degree (and believed that his method could go beyond), stated the law which connects the positive and negative roots of an equation with the changes of sign in the consecutive terms, and introduced the method of indeterminate coefficients for the solution of equations.'

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  • The subject-matter of algebra will be treated in the following article under three divisions: - A.

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  • When 0=4 it is clear that no form, whose partition contains a part 3, can be reduced; but every form, whose partition is composed of the parts 4 and 2, is by elementary algebra reducible by means of perpetuants of degree 2.

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  • The theories of determinants and of symmetric functions and of the algebra of differential operations have an important bearing upon this comparatively new branch of mathematics.

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  • The braille worked well enough in the languages, but when it came to geometry and algebra, difficulties arose.

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  • But he seems to have been well cared for, and he was at the age of fourteen sufficiently advanced "in algebra, geometry, astronomy, and even the higher mathematics," to calculate a solar eclipse within four seconds of accuracy.

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  • However, the braille worked well enough in the languages; but when it came to Geometry and Algebra, it was different.

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  • But, when I took up Algebra, I had a harder time still--I was terribly handicapped by my imperfect knowledge of the notation.

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  • Algebra and geometry were the only studies that continued to defy my efforts to comprehend them.

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  • But on the night before the algebra examination, while I was struggling over some very complicated examples, I could not tell the combinations of bracket, brace and radical.

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  • Consequently, I did not do so well as I should have done, if Teacher had been allowed to read the Algebra and Geometry to me.

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  • Young, The Algebra of Invariants (Cambridge, 1903).

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  • The main work of Descartes, so far as algebra was concerned, was the establishment of a relation between arithmetical and geometrical measurement.

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  • When algebra had advanced to the point where exponents were introduced, nothing would be more natural than that their utility as a means of performing multiplications and divisions should be remarked; but it is one of the surprises in the history of science that logarithms were invented as an arithmetical improvement years before their connexion with exponents was known.

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  • From this formula we obtain by elementary algebra 1) !

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  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.

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  • His standard work on algebra, written in Arabic, and other treatises of a similar character raised him at once to the foremost rank among the mathematicians of that age, and induced Sultgn Malik-Shgh to summon him in A.H.

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  • From February to July, 1898, Mr. Keith came out to Wrentham twice a week, and taught me algebra, geometry, Greek and Latin.

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  • +a"aa"-1 have been much studied by Sylvester, Hammond, Hilbert and Elliott (Elliott, Algebra of Quantics, ch.

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  • He also studied the first six books of Euclid and some algebra, besides reading a considerable quantity of Hebrew and learning the Odes of Horace by heart.

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  • de Traytorrens, went through the elements of algebra and geometry, and the three fi r st books of the Marquis de l'Hopital's Conic Sections.

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  • The principal step in the modern development of algebra was the recognition of the meaning of negative quantities.

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  • i.-iv.), and in Elliott's Algebra of Quantics, chap. viii.

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  • ALGEBRA (from the Arab.

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  • Cantor's histories of mathematics, and more elaborate analyses are those of Nesselmann (Die Algebra der Griechen, Berlin, 1842) and G.

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  • At the age of eight he began Latin, Euclid, and algebra, and was appointed schoolmaster to the younger children of the family.

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  • After Maclaurin's death his account of Newton's philosophical discoveries was published by Patrick Murdoch, and also his algebra in 1748.

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  • Peirce, "Mathematics is the science which draws necessary conclusions" (Linear Associative Algebra, § i.

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  • They teach further the solution of problems leading to equations of the first and second degree, to determinate and indeterminate equations, not by single and double position only, but by real algebra, proved by means of geometric constructions, and including the use of letters as symbols for known numbers, the unknown quantity being called res and its square census.

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  • Elliott, Algebra of Quantics, Art.

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  • Principles Of Ordinary Algebra 1.

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  • Special kinds of algebra; C. History.

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  • This form of algebra was extensively studied in ancient Egypt; but, in accordance with the practical tendency of the Egyptian mind, the study consisted largely in the treatment of particular cases, very few general rules being obtained.

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  • Fiedler, Die Elemente der neueren Geometrie and der Algebra der bindren Formen (Leipzig, 1862); A.

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  • His principal writings are Micrographia (1664); Lectiones Cutlerianae (1674-1679); and Posthumous Works, containing a sketch of his "Philosophical Algebra," published by R.

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  • Each definition gives rise to a corresponding algebra of higher complex numbers.

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  • Cayley, " Memoirs on Quantics," in the Collected Mathematical Papers (Cambridge, 1898); Salmon, Lessons Introductory to the Modern Higher Algebra (Dublin, 1885); E.

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  • The Algebra Joannis Naperi Merchistonii Baronis consists of two books: (I) "De nominata Algebrae parte; (2) De positiva sive cossica Algebrae parte," and concludes with the words, "There is no more of his algebra orderlie sett doun."

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  • Elliott, Algebra of Quantics (Oxford, 1895); F.

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  • Heath, Diophantos of Alexandria: A Study in the History of Greek Algebra (Cambridge, 1885).

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  • For Tartaglia's discovery of the solution of cubic equations, and his contests with Antonio Marie Floridas, see Algebra (History).

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  • For the subjects of this general heading see the articles ALGEBRA, UNIVERSAL; GROUPS, THEORY OF; INFINITESIMAL CALCULUS; NUMBER; QUATERNIONS; VECTOR ANALYSIS.

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  • Under the general heading "Algebra and Theory of Numbers" occur the subheadings "Elements of Algebra," with the topics rational polynomials, permutations, &c., partitions, probabilities; "Linear Substitutions," with the topics determinants, &c., linear substitutions, general theory of quantics; "Theory of Algebraic Equations," with the topics existence of roots, separation of and approximation to, theory of Galois, &c. "Theory of Numbers," with the topics congruences, quadratic residues, prime numbers, particular irrational and transcendental numbers.

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  • During this period logarithms were invented, trigonometry and algebra developed, analytical geometry invented, dynamics put upon a sound basis, and the period closed with the magnificent invention of (or at least the perfecting of) the differential calculus by Newton and Leibnitz and the discovery of gravitation.

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  • The development of symbolic algebra by the use of general symbols to denote numbers is due to Franciscus Vieta (Francois Viete, 1540-1603).

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  • The Leiden copy of ~Omar Khayygms work on algebra was noticed as far back as i 742 by Gerald Meerman in the preface to his Specimen calculi fluxionalis; further notices of the same work by Sdillot appeared in the Nouv.

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  • This theorem is due to Cayley, and reference may be made to Salmon's Higher Algebra, 4th ed.

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  • For many centuries algebra was confined almost entirely to the solution of equations; one of the most important steps being the enunciation by Diophantus of Alexandria of the laws governing the use of the minus sign.

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  • Again in January 1757 he writes: " I began to study algebra under M.

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  • The first, second and third sections of this publication comprise respectively the papers communicated by him to the Academies of Sciences of Turin, Berlin and Paris; the fourth includes his miscellaneous contributions to other scientific collections, together with his additions to Euler's Algebra, and his Lecons elementaires at the Ecole Normale in 1795.

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  • The partition method of treating symmetrical algebra is one which has been singularly successful in indicating new paths of advance in the theory of invariants; the important theorem of expressibility is, directly we exclude unity from the partitions, a theorem concerning the expressibility of covariants, and involves the theory of the reducible forms and of the syzygies.

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  • This led to the idea of algebra as generalized arithmetic.

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  • But as yet he had only glimpses of a logical method which should invigorate the syllogism by the co-operation of ancient geometry and modern algebra.

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  • The title, which is written on the first leaf, and is also in Robert Napier's writing, runs thus: "The Baron of Merchiston his booke of Arithmeticke and Algebra.

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  • His largest work,Trattato generale di numeri e misure, is a comprehensive mathematical treatise, including arithmetic, geometry, mensuration, and algebra as far as quadratic equations (Venice, 1556, 1560).

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  • We will confine ourselves here to algebraic complex numbers - that is, to complex numbers of the second order taken in connexion with that definition of multiplication which leads to ordinary algebra.

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  • The medieval Arabians invented our system of numeration and developed algebra.

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  • He appears to have attended Dirichlet's lectures on theory of numbers, theory of definite integrals, and partial differential equations, and Jacobi's on analytical mechanics and higher algebra.

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  • The above definition gives only a partial view of the scope of algebra.

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  • These attempts at the unification of algebra, and its separation from other branches of mathematics, have usually been accompanied by an attempt to base it, as a deductive science, on certain fundamental laws or general rules; and this has tended to increase its difficulty.

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  • In reality, the variety of algebra corresponds to the variety of phenomena.

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  • This reaction has taken the form of a return to the alliance between algebra and geometry (�5), on which modern analytical geometry is based; the alliance, however, being concerned with the application of graphical methods to particular cases rather than to general expressions.

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  • One of the most recent developments of algebra is the algebraic theory of number, which is devised with the view of removing these difficulties.

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  • Two other developments of algebra are of special importance.

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  • The theory of sequences and series is sometimes treated as a part of elementary algebra; but it is more convenient to regard the simpler cases as isolated examples, leading up to the general theory.

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  • One of the most difficult questions for the teacher of algebra is the stage at which, and the extent to which, the ideas of a negative number and of continuity may be introduced.

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  • On the one hand, the modern developments of algebra began with these ideas, and particularly with the idea of a negative number.

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  • In the present article, therefore, the main portions of elementary algebra are treated in one section, without reference to these ideas, which are considered generally in two separate sections.

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  • They are preceded by two sections dealing with the introduction to algebra from4the arithmetical and the graphical sides, and are followed by a section dealing briefly with the developments mentioned in �� 9 and 1 o above.

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  • Arithmetical Introduction to Algebra.

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  • - It is important, before beginning the study of algebra, to have a clear idea as to the meanings of the symbols used to denote arithmetical operations.

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  • (iv.) Variation is generally included in text-books on algebra, but apparently only because the reasoning is general.

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  • Preparation for Algebra.

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  • These formulae are of two kinds: - (a) the general properties, such as m(a+b) = ma+mb, on which algebra is based, and (b) particular formulae such as (x - a) (x+a) = x 2 - a 2 .

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  • Graphical Introduction to Algebra.

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  • In relation to algebra, the graphic method is mainly useful in connexion with the theory of limits (�� 58, 61) and the functional treatment of equations (� 60).

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  • Elementary Algebra of Positive Numbers.

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  • (iv.) In algebra we have a theory of highest common factor and lowest common multiple, but it is different from the arithmetical theory of greatest common divisor and least common multiple.

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  • Negative Numbers and Formal Algebra.

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  • and iii., forms a good introduction to algebra.

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  • As to the teaching of algebra, see references under Arithmetic to works on the teaching of elementary mathematics.

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  • Chrystal, Introduction to Algebra (1898); H.

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  • Fine, A College Algebra (1905); C. Smith, A Treatise on Algebra (1st ed.

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  • Fine, The Number-System of Algebra (1891); H.

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  • Chrystal, TextBook of Algebra (pt.

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  • Pincherle, Algebra complementare (1893); G.

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  • Salmon, Lessons introductory to the Modern Higher Algebra (4th ed., 1885); J.

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  • Weber, Lehrbuch der Algebra, 2 vols.

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  • Special Kinds Of Algebra I.

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  • A special algebra is one which differs from ordinary algebra in the laws of equivalence which its symbols obey.

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  • Ordinary algebra developed very gradually as a kind of shorthand, devised to abbreviate the discussion of arithmetical problems and the statement of arithmetical facts.

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  • Although the results of ordinary algebra will be taken for granted, it is convenient to give the principal rules upon which it is based.

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  • But the symbols of ordinary algebra do not necessarily denote numbers; they may, for instance, be interpreted as coplanar points or vectors.

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  • Evolution and involution are usually regarded as operations of ordinary algebra; this leads to a notation for powers and roots, and a theory of irrational algebraic quantities analogous to that of irrational numbers.

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  • The only known type of algebra which does not contain arithmetical elements is substantially due to George Boole.

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  • Although originally suggested by formal logic, it is most simply interpreted as an algebra of regions in space.

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  • The symbol e 0 behaves exactly like i in ordinary algebra; Hamilton writes I, i, j, k instead of eo, el, e2, es, and in this notation all the special rules of operation may he summed up by the equalities = - I.

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  • An n-tuple linear algebra (also called a complex number system) deals with quantities of the type A=/aiei derived from n special units e l, e 2 ...

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  • Quaternions afford an example of a quadruple algebra of this kind; ordinary algebra is a special case of a duplex linear algebra.

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  • If, in the extensive calculus of the nth category, all the units (including i and the derived units E) are taken to be homologous instead of being distributed into species, we may regard it as a (2'-I)-tuple linear algebra, which, however, is not wholly associative.

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  • It should be observed that while the use of special units, or extraordinaries, in a linear algebra is convenient, especially in applications, it is not indispensable.

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  • Various special algebras (for example, quaternions) may be expressed in the notation of the algebra of matrices.

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  • In ordinary algebra we have the disjunctive law that if ab = o, then either a = o or b= o.

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  • One of the most important questions in investigating a linear algebra is to decide the necessary relations between a and b in order that this product may be zero.

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  • But when an algebra is used with a particular interpretation, or even in the course of its formal development, it frequently happens that new symbols of operation are, so to speak, superposed upon the algebra, and are found to obey certain formal laws of combination of their own.

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  • In most cases these subsidiary algebras, as they may be called, are inseparable from the applications in which they are used; but in any attempt at a natural classification of algebra (at present a hopeless task), they would have to be taken into account.

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  • Even in ordinary algebra the notation for powers and roots disturbs the symmetry of the rational theory; and when a schoolboy illegitimately extends the distributive law by writing -V (a+b)a+J b, he is unconsciously emphasizing this want of complete harmony.

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  • de Morgan, " On the Foundation of Algebra," Trans.

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  • Peacock, Symbolical Algebra (Cambridge, 1845); G.

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  • Algebra (Leipzig, 1873), Vorlesungen fiber die Algebra der Logik (ibid., 1890-1895); A.

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  • Peirce, " Linear Associative Algebra," Amer.

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  • cxlviii., on Multiple Algebra, Quart.

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  • M'Aulay, " Algebra after Hamilton, or Multenions," Proc. R.

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  • For the history of the development of ordinary algebra M.

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  • M.) C. History Various derivations of the word " algebra," which is of Arabian origin, have been given by different writers.

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  • Since, however, Geber happened to be the name of a celebrated Moorish philosopher who flourished in about the iith or 12th century, it has been supposed that he was the founder of algebra, which has since perpetuated his name.

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  • In the preface to his Arithmeticae libri duo et totidem Algebrae (1560) he says: " The name Algebra is Syriac, signifying the art or doctrine of an excellent man.

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  • There was a certain learned mathematician who sent his algebra, written in the Syriac language, to Alexander the Great, and he named it almucabala, that is, the book of dark or mysterious things, which others would rather call the doctrine of algebra.

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  • Robert Recorde in his Whetstone of Witte (1557) uses the variant algeber, while John Dee (1527-1608) affirms that algiebar, and not algebra, is the correct form, and appeals to the authority of the Arabian Avicenna.

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  • Although the term " algebra " is now in universal use, various other appellations were used by the Italian mathematicians during the Renaissance.

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  • The name l'arte magiore, the greater art, is designed to distinguish it from l'arte minore, the lesser art, a term which he applied to the modern arithmetic. His second variant, la regula de la cosa, the rule of the thing or unknown quantity, appears to have been in common use in Italy, and the word cosa was preserved for several centuries in the forms toss or algebra, cossic or algebraic, cossist or algebraist, &c. Other Italian writers termed it the Regula rei et census, the rule of the thing and the product, or the root and the square.

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  • The principle underlying this expression is probably to be found in the fact that it measured the limits of their attainments in algebra, for they were unable to solve equations of a higher degree than the quadratic or square.

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  • It was formerly the custom to assign the invention of algebra to the Greeks, but since the decipherment of the Rhind papyrus by Eisenlohr this view has changed, for in this work there are distinct signs of an algebraic analysis.

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  • The particular problem - a heap (hau) and its seventh makes 19 - is solved as we should now solve a simple equation; but Ahmes varies his methods in other similar problems. This discovery carries the invention of algebra back to about 1700 B.C., if not earlier.

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  • It is probable that the algebra of the Egyptians was of a most rudimentary nature, for otherwise we should expect to find traces of it in the works of the Greek geometers, of whom Thales of Miletus (640-546 B.C.) was the first.

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  • Notwithstanding the prolixity of writers and the number of the writings, all attempts at extracting an algebraic analysis from their geometrical theorems and problems have been fruitless, and it is generally conceded that their analysis was geometrical and had little or no affinity to algebra.

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  • The first extant work which approaches to a treatise on algebra is by Diophantus, an Alexandrian mathematician, who flourished about A.D.

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  • It is more than likely that he was indebted to earlier writers, whom he omits to mention, and whose works are now lost; nevertheless, but for this work, we should be led to assume that algebra was almost, if not entirely, unknown to the Greeks.

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  • We find that geometry was neglected except in so far as it was of service to astronomy; trigonometry was advanced, and algebra improved far beyond the attainments of Diophantus.

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  • Of other Indian writers mention may be made of Cridhara, the author of a Ganita-sara (" Quintessence of Calculation "), and Padmanabha, the author of an algebra.

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  • We refer to Bhaskara Acarya, whose work the Siddhanta-ciromani (" Diadem of an Astronomical System "), written in 1150, contains two important chapters, the Lilavati (" the beautiful [science or art] ") and Viga-ganita (" root-extraction "), which are given up to arithmetic and algebra.

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  • The question as to whether the Greeks borrowed their algebra from the Hindus or vice versa has been the subject of much discussion.

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  • John Wallis and Lord Brounker jointly obtained a tedious solution which was published in 1658, and afterwards in 1668 by John Pell in his Algebra.

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  • Although this transition from the discontinuous to continuous is not truly scientific, yet it materially augmented the development of algebra, and Hankel affirms that if we define algebra as the application of arithmetical operations to both rational and irrational numbers or magnitudes, then the Brahmans are the real inventors of algebra.

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  • His treatise on algebra and arithmetic (the latter part of which is only extant in the form of a Latin translation, discovered in 1857) contains nothing that was unknown to the Greeks and Hindus; it exhibits methods allied to those of both races, with the Greek element predominating.

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  • It thus came about that while some progress was made in algebra, the talents of the race were bestowed on astronomy and trigonometry.

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  • Fahri des al Karhi, who flourished about the beginning of the i 1 th century, is the author of the most important Arabian work on algebra.

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  • This author questioned the possibility of solving cubics by pure algebra, and biquadratics by geometry.

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  • Gabir ben Aflah of Sevilla, commonly called Geber, was a celebrated astronomer and apparently skilled in algebra, for it has been supposed that the word " algebra " is compounded from his name.

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  • In this work, which is one of the most valuable contributions to the literature of algebra, Cardan shows that he was familiar with both real positive and negative roots of equations whether rational or irrational, but of imaginary roots he was quite ignorant, and he admits his inability to resolve the so-called lation of Arabic manuscripts.

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  • The first successful attempt to revive the study of algebra in Christendom was due to Leonardo of Pisa, an Italian merchant trading in the Mediterranean.

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  • His travels and mercantile experience had led E t u eopre him to conclude that the Hindu methods of computing were in advance of those then in general use, and in 1202 he published his Liber Abaci, which treats of both algebra and arithmetic. In this work, which is of great historical interest, since it was published about two centuries before the art of printing was discovered, he adopts the Arabic notation for numbers, and solves many problems, both arithmetical and algebraical.

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  • This was Lucas Paciolus (Lucas de Burgo), a Minorite friar, who, having previously written works on algebra, arithmetic and geometry, published, in 1494, his principal work, entitled Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalita.

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  • Contemporaneously with the remarkable discoveries of the Italian mathematicians, algebra was increasing in popularity in Germany, France and England.

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  • The first treatise on algebra written in English was by Robert Recorde, who published his arithmetic in 1552, and his algebra entitled The Whetstone of Witte, which is the second part of Arithmetik, in 1557.

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  • Of other writers who published works about the end of the 16th century, we may mention Jacques Peletier, or Jacobus Peletarius (De occulta parte Numerorum, quam Algebram vocant, 1558); Petrus Ramus (Arithmeticae Libri duo et totidem Algebrae, 1560), and Christoph Clavius, who wrote on algebra in 1580, though it was not published until 1608.

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  • At this time also flourished Simon Stevinus (Stevin) of Bruges, who published an arithmetic in 1585 and an algebra shortly afterwards.

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  • These works exhibit great originality and mark an important epoch in the history of algebra.

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  • This writer, after having published an edition of Stevin's works in 1625, published in 1629 at Amsterdam a small tract on algebra which shows a considerable advance on the work of Vieta.

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  • Passing over the invention of logarithms by John Napier, and their development by Henry Briggs and others, the next author of moment was an Englishman, Thomas Harriot, whose algebra (Artis analyticae praxis) was published posthumously by Walter Warner in 1631.

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  • William Oughtred, a contemporary of Harriot, published an algebra, Clavis mathematicae, simultaneously with Harriot's treatise.

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  • So far the development of algebra and geometry had been mutually independent, except for a few isolated applications of geometrical constructions to the solution of algebraical problems. Certain minds had long suspected the advantages which would accrue from the unrestricted application of algebra to geometry, but it was not until the advent of the philosopher Rene Descartes that the co-ordination was effected.

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  • Many new fields were opened up, but there was still continual progress in pure algebra.

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  • In recent times many mathematicians have formulated other kinds of algebras, in which the operators do not obey the laws of ordinary algebra.

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  • This study was inaugurated by George Peacock, who was one of the earliest mathematicians to recognize the symbolic character of the fundamental principles of algebra.

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  • Gregory, published a paper " on the real nature of symbolical algebra."

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  • The preceding summary shows the specialized 'nature which algebra has assumed since the 17th century.

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  • - The history of algebra is treated in all historical works on mathematics in general (see MATHEMATICS: References).

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  • Greek algebra can be specially studied in T.

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  • See also John Wallis, Opera Mathematica (1693-1699), and Charles Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815), article " Algebra."

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  • - I.n - 2 asxn.-3 The I.2 I.2.3 reader is referred to the article Algebra for the proof and applications of this theorem; here we shall only treat of the history of its discovery.

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  • In algebra, if a be a real positive quantity and w a root of unity, then a is the amplitude of the product aw.

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  • In 1774 he published a French translation of Leonhard Euler's Elements of Algebra.

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  • Vieta is wont to be called the father of modern algebra.

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  • All that is wanting in his writings, especially in his Isagoge in artem analyticam (1591), in order to make them look like a modern school algebra, is merely the sign of equality - a want which is the more striking because Robert Recorde had made use of our present symbol for this purpose since 1 557, and Xylander had employed vertical parallel lines since 1575.

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  • Todhunter also published keys to the problems in his textbooks on algebra and trigonometry; and a biographical work, William Whewell, account of his writings and correspondence (1876), in addition to many original papers in scientific journals.

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  • Algebra >>

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  • Pell's connexion with the problem simply consists of the publication of the solutions of John Wallis and Lord Brounker in his edition of Branker's Translation of Rhonius's Algebra 0.668).

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  • In algebra, the "cube" of a quantity is the quantity multiplied by itself twice, i.e.

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  • 16 54" (1655); "Tractatus duo, prior de cycloide, posterior de cissoide et de curvarum turn linearum dthivvec turn superficierum RrXarva,uw" (1659); "Mechanica, sive de motu tractatus geometricus" (three parts, 1669-1670-1671); "De algebra tractatus historicus et practicus, ejusdem originem et progressus varios ostendens" (English, 1685); "De combinationibus alternationibus et partibus aliquotis tractatus" (English, 1685) "De sectionibus angularibus tractatus" (English, 1685); "De angulo contactus et semicirculi tractatus" (1656); "Ejusdem tractatus defensio" (1685); "De postulato quinto, et quinta definitione, lib.

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  • The Mathesis universalis, a more elementary work, contains copious dissertations on fundamental points of algebra, arithmetic and geometry, and critical remarks.

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  • The De algebra tractatus contains (chapters lxvi.-lxix.) the idea of the interpretation of imaginary quantities in geometry.

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  • Considered as a history of algebra, this work is strongly objected to by Jean Etienne Montucla on the ground of its unfairness as against the early Italian algebraists and also Franciscus Vieta and Rene Descartes and in favour of Harriot; but Augustus De Morgan, while admitting this, attributes to it considerable merit.

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  • As a mathematician he occupied himself with many branches of his favourite science, more especially with higher algebra, including the theory of determinants, with the general calculus of symbols, and with the application of analysis to geometry and mechanics.

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  • In 1857 he published his best known work, the System of Analytical Mechanics, which was, however, surpassed in brilliant originality by his Linear Associative Algebra (lithographed privately in a few copies, 1870; reprinted in the Amer.

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  • Essentially, therefore, Descartes's process is that known later as the process of isoperimeters, and often attributed wholly to Schwab.2 In 16J5 appeared the Arithmetica Infinitorum of John Wallis, where numerous problems of quadrature are dealt with, the curves being now represented in Cartesian co-ordinates, and algebra playing an important part.

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  • This was the first English book on algebra.

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  • On this subject see Nesselmann, Algebra der Griechen (Berlin, 1842), pp. 125-134; and M.

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  • Now by elementary algebra we know that if the number of independent equations be equal to the number of unknown quantities all the unknown quantities can be determined, and can possess each one value only.

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  • In a scientific point of view: (a) we see, in the first place, that by his two theorems he founded the geometry of lines, which has ever since remained the principal part of geometry; (b) he may, in the second place, be fairly considered to have laid the foundation of algebra, for his first theorem establishes an equation in the true sense of the word, while the second institutes a proportion.'

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  • (b) How then are the primary data of mathematical cognition to be derived from an experience containing space and time relations in Hume, in regard to this problem, distinctly separates geometry from algebra and arithmetic, i.e.

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  • With respect to arithmetic and algebra, the science of numbers, he expresses an equally definite opinion, but unfortunately it is quite impossible to state in any satisfactory fashion the grounds for it or even its full bearing.

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  • In algebra it denoted the characters which represented quantities in an equation.

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  • Lectures are also given on algebra and on the calculations of the Mahommedan calendar, the times of prayer, &c. (E.

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  • At Baltimore he gave an enormous impetus to the study of the higher mathematics in America, and during the time he was there he contributed to the American Journal of Mathematics, of which he was the first editor, no less than thirty papers, some of great length, dealing mainly with modern algebra, the theory of numbers, theory of partitions and universal algebra.

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  • Schroder, Vorlesungen iiber die Algebra der Logik (Leipzig, 1890, 1891, 1895); W.

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  • all propositions not concerned with the existence of individual facts ultimately analyse out into identities - obviously lend themselves to the design of this algebra of thought, though the mathematician in Leibnitz should have been aware that a significant equation is never an identity.

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  • " It is not an algebra," said Kant 3 of his technical logic, and the kind of support lent recently to symbolic logic by the Gegenstandstheorie identified with the name of Alexius Meinong (b.

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  • The evolution of quaternions belongs in part to each of two weighty branches of mathematical history - the interpretation of the imaginary (or impossible) quantity of common algebra, and the Cartesian application of algebra to geometry.

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  • One geometrical interpretation of the negative sign of algebra was early seen to be mere reversal of direction along a line.

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  • In his Treatise of Algebra (1685) he distinctly proposes to construct the imaginary roots of a quadratic equation by going out of the line on which the roots, if real, would have been constructed.

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  • From the more purely symbolical view it was developed by Peacock, De Morgan, &c., as double algebra.

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  • Hamilton, like most of the many inquirers who endeavoured to give a real interpretation to the imaginary of common algebra, found that at least two kinds, orders or ranks of quantities were necessary for the purpose.

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  • But, instead of dealing with points on a line, and then wandering out at right angles to it, as Buee and Argand had done, he chose to look on algebra as the science of " pure time," 1 and to investigate the properties of " sets " of time-steps.

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  • (See also Algebra: special kinds.) Relations to other Branches of Science.

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  • to the resources of ordinary algebra, for the solution of equations in quaternions."

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  • Joly's projective geometrical applications starting from the interpretation of the quaternion as a point-symbol;' these applications may be said to require no addition to the quaternion algebra; (b) W.

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  • An attempt has recently been made under the name of multenions to systematize this algebra.

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  • McAulay, Algebra after Hamilton, or Multenions (Edinburgh, 1908).

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  • Chrystal's Algebra, where also may be found details of the application of continued fractions to such interesting and important problems as the recurrence of eclipses and the rectification of the calendar.

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  • For proofs of the theorems here stated and for applications to the more general indeterminate equation x 2 - Ny 2 = H the reader may consult Chrystal's Algebra or Serret's Cours d'Algbbre Superieure; he may also profitably consult a tract by T.

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  • The reader will find the theory completely treated in Chrystal's Algebra, where will be found the exhibition of a prime number of the form 4p+I as the actual sum of two squares by means of continuants, a result given by H.

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  • A previous writer, Rafaello Bombelli, had used them in his treatise on Algebra (about 1579), and it is quite possible that Cataldi may have got his ideas from him.

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  • Nicol Saunderson (1682-1739), Euler and Lambert helped in developing the theory, and much was done by Lagrange in his additions to the French edition of Euler's Algebra (1795).

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  • In addition to this, he translated various other treatises, to the number, it is said, of sixty-six; among these were the Tables of "Arzakhel," or Al Zarkala of Toledo, Al Farabi On the Sciences (De scientiis), Euclid's Geometry, Al Farghani's Elements of Astronomy, and treatises on algebra, arithmetic and astrology.

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  • He was much interested, too, in universal algebra, non-Euclidean geometry and elliptic functions, his papers "Preliminary Sketch of Bi-quaternions" (1873) and "On the Canonical Form and Dissection of a Riemann's Surface" (1877) ranking as classics.

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  • It was in these circumstances that he dictated to his servant, a tailor's apprentice, who was absolutely devoid of mathematical knowledge, his Anleitung zur Algebra (1770), a work which, though purely elementary, displays the mathematical genius of its author, and is still reckoned one of the best works of its class.

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  • 8vo); Anleitung zur Algebra, or Introduction to Algebra (ibid., 1770, in 8vo); Dioptrica (ibid., 1767-1771, in 3 vols.

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  • With the view of stimulating mathematicians to write annotations on this admirable work, the celebrated 's Gravesande published a tract, entitled Specimen Commentarii in Arithmeticam Universalem; and Maclaurin's Algebra seems to have been drawn up in consequence of this appeal.

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  • (See Algebra.) If we take two objects A and B, it is obvious that whether we take them as A, B, or as B, A, we shall in each case get the sequence I, 2.

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  • It would therefore be better, in some ways, to retain the unit throughout, and to describe - 4A as a negative quantity, in order to avoid confusion with the " negative numbers " with which operations are performed in formal algebra.

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  • The notion of imaginary intersections, thus presenting itself, through algebra, in geometry, must be accepted in geometry - and it in fact plays an all-important part in modern geometry.

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  • As in algebra we say that an equation of the mth order has in roots, viz.

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  • we state this generally without in the first instance, or it may be without ever, distinguishing whether these are real or imaginary; so in geometry we say that a curve of the mth order is met by an arbitrary line in m points, or rather we thus, through algebra, obtain the proper geometrical definition of a curve of the mth order, as a curve which is met by an arbitrary line in m points (that is, of course, in m, and not more than m,.

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  • Various properties of curves in general, and of cubic curves, are established in Colin Maclaurin's memoir, "De linearum geometricarum proprietatibus generalibus Tractatus " (posthumous, say 1746, published in the 6th edition of his Algebra).

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  • His memoirs on the "Foundation of Algebra," in the 7th and 8th volumes of the Cambridge Philosophical Transactions, contain some of the most important contributions which have been made to the philosophy of mathematical method; and Sir W.

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  • The work on [[Trigonometry]] and Double Algebra (1849) contains in the latter part a most luminous and philosophical view of existing and possible systems of symbolic calculus.

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  • But De Morgan's influence on mathematical science in England can only be estimated by a review of his long series of publications, which commence, in 1828, with a translation of part of Bourdon's Elements of Algebra, prepared for his students.

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  • In Chinese he published books on arithmetic, geometry, algebra (De Morgan's), mechanics, astronomy (Herschel's), and The Marine Steam Engine (T.

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  • She received a rather desultory education, and mastered algebra and Euclid in secret after she had left school, and without any extraneous help. In 1804 she married her cousin, Captain Samuel Greig, who died in 1806; and in 1812 she married another cousin, Dr William Somerville (1771-1860), inspector of the army medical board, who encouraged and greatly aided her in the study of the physical sciences.

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  • The doctrine of geometrical continuity and the application of algebra to geometry, developed in the 16th and 17th centuries mainly by Kepler and Descartes, led to the discovery of many properties which gave to the notion of infinity, as a localized space conception, a predominant importance.

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  • This concept is extended to algebra: since a line, surface and solid are represented by linear, quadratic and cubic equations, and are of one, two and three dimensions; a biquadratic equation has its highest terms of four dimensions, and, in general, an equation in any number of variables which has the greatest sum of the indices of any term equal to n is said to have n dimensions.

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  • In the language of algebra putting m l, m2, m 3, &c. for the masses of the bodies, r1.2 r1.3 r2.3, &c. for their mutual distances apart; vi, v 2, v 3, &c., for the velocities with which they are moving at any moment; these quantities will continually satisfy the equation orbit, appear as arbitrary constants, introduced by the process of integration.

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  • Michael Scott, the translator of some treatises of Aristotle and of the commentaries of Averroes, Leonardo of Pisa, who introduced Arabic numerals and algebra to the West, and other scholars, Jewish and Mahommedan as well as Christian, were welcome at his court.

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  • These are mainly embodied in his three great treatises, Cours d'analyse de l'Ecole Polytechnique (1821); Le Calcul infinitesimal (1823); Lecons sur les applications du calcul infinitesimal a la g'ometrie (1826-1828); and also in his courses of mechanics (for the Ecole Polytechnique), higher algebra (for the Faculte des Sciences), and of mathematical physics (for the College de France).

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  • Apply the algebra of finite automata to design systems and to solve simple problems on creating acceptors for particular languages.

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  • We call a free associative algebra A over R a polynomial ring over R.

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  • Outline content: The module starts with review of linear algebra.

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  • Analysis of a multimedia stream using stochastic process algebra.

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  • geometric algebra can be applied to any subject in mathematics, physics or engineering which is in some part rooted in geometry.

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  • algebra package.

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  • algebra module from our scheme of work.

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  • In addition: the authors include in an appendix a review of all relevant topics in matrix algebra.

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  • The vast majority of simulations of physical systems, including the movement of rigid bodies under forces, are carried out using vector algebra.

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  • Have strong linkage to the Maple computer algebra system.

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  • The counterexample is the quantum exterior algebra in 2 variables.

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  • associative algebra A over R a polynomial ring over R.

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  • Just for explaining a little, a genetic algebra is basically an algebra in which multiplication is not associative.

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  • There is no operator precedence and the algebra is right associative.

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  • augmentation ideal, and not for the whole group algebra.

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  • Boolean algebra is the algebra that describes the simple properties of a single distinction.

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  • It enables us to extend matrix algebra calculus in an easy way.

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  • Her research interests are representation theory, algebraic combinatorics and computational algebra.

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  • commutation relations with H are also prescribed by the rules of the Lie algebra.

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  • Here, the mathematical derivation, which involves matrix algebra, will be followed first, in two dimensions to make things easier.

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  • Includes sections on ordinary and partial differential equations, matrix methods, Monte Carlo methods, and computer algebra.

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  • dimensional algebra by specifying an array of structure constants.

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  • The objective is to enable students to understand more advanced econometrics most of which relies heavily on matrix algebra.

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  • efficient parallel algorithms for solving Linear Algebra Problems.

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  • Algebra 2 Pages 66 to 69 Cancelation and four rules with algebraic fractions.

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  • A natural generalization of the problem is: Let M be a von Neumann algebra on a Hilbert space H.

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  • homological algebra.

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  • Its methods may assume that gens generates A and that the mapping of gens to imgs defines an algebra homomorphism.

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  • The angular integrals are carried out using the methods of Racah algebra.

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  • inverse of a group algebra element.

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  • It calculates the inverse of a group algebra element.

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  • involved algebras are Lie algebras then the result is also known to be a Lie algebra.

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  • These and a few further structural isomorphisms lead to tensor algebra (see next combinator ).

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  • linear problems usually involve linear algebra in their solution.

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  • Core modules include mathematical ecology, mathematical biology and medicine and applied linear algebra.

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  • Areas covered include linear algebra, optimization, quadrature, differential equations, regression analysis, and time series analysis.

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  • Knowledge of Maple as a tool for doing linear algebra.

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  • Here's an example describing *one* type of process associated with matrices, that I've used in teaching linear algebra.

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  • In numerical linear algebra he developed backward error analysis methods.

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  • Such a differential structure, expressing the local versus global nature of brain structure, is lacking in adaptive linear algebra.

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  • We shall concentrate on a particularly nice class of codes called linear codes, a beautiful application of elementary linear algebra.

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  • These include complete sets of curriculum material for various college and university level courses, including calculus, linear algebra and engineering mathematics.

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  • These are objects studied in operator and operator algebra theory.

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  • Database languages: relational algebra, relational algebra, relational calculus, SQL.

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  • Database languages: relational algebra, relational calculus, SQL.

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  • I have also a patent application on a new relational algebra operator: The relational algebra operator: The Relational Bayes.

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  • stochastic process algebra.

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  • theorem of algebra.

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  • The basic toolbox also allows you to access functions in Maple's linear algebra package.

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  • In 1545 he published Ars Magna the first Latin treatise on algebra.

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  • Course Description This module will extend the vector algebra of the first year to the calculus of three dimensional vector algebra of the first year to the calculus of three dimensional vectors.

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  • These papers are chiefly geometrical, many of them being developments and applications of the methods laid down in his great work, Der barycentrische Calcul (Leipzig, 1827), which, as the name implies, is based upon the properties of the mean point or centre of mass (see Algebra: Universal).

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  • 4 The mathematics of which he thus speaks included the geometry of the ancients, as it had been handed down to the modern world, and arithmetic with the developments it had received in the direction of algebra.

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  • The arithmetical half of mathematics, which had been gradually growing into algebra, and had decidedly established itself as such in the Ad logisticen speciosam notae priores of Francois Vieta (1540-1603), supplied to some extent the means of generalizing geometry.

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  • In this and other details he crowns and completes, in a form henceforth to be dominant for the language of algebra, the work of numerous obscure predecessors, such as Etienne de la Roche, Michael Stifel or Stiefel (1487-1567), and_ others.

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  • He did not regard logic as a branch of mathematics, as the title of his earlier pamphlet might be taken to imply, but he pointed out such a deep analogy between the symbols of algebra and those which can be made, in his opinion, to represent logical forms and syllogisms, that we can hardly help saying that logic is mathematics restricted to the two quantities, o and 1.

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  • He did good service in systematizing the operational laws of algebra, and in throwing light upon the nature and use of imaginaries.

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  • He published, first in 1830, and then in an enlarged form in 1842, a Treatise on Algebra, in which he applied his philosophical ideas concerning algebraical analysis to the elucidation of its elements.

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  • This branch of algebra he notably enriched, and to him is also due the notion of a group of substitutions (see Equation: Theory of Equations; also Theory of groups).

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  • - The first to publish anything on Diophantus in Europe was Rafael Bombelli, who embodied in his Algebra (1572) all the problems of Books I.

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  • He published, among other mathematical works, Clavis Mathematica, in 1631, in which he introduced new signs for certain mathematical operations (see Algebra); a treatise on navigation entitled Circles of Proportion, in 1632; works on trigonometry and dialling, and his Opuscula Mathematica, published posthumously in 1676.

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  • Arithmetic, algebra, and the infinitesimal calculus, are sciences directly concerned with integral numbers, rational (or fractional) numbers, and real numbers generally, which include incommensurable numbers.

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  • The importance of this algebra arises from the fact that in terms of such complex numbers with this definition of multiplication the utmost generality of expression, to the exclusion of exceptional cases, can be obtained for theorems which occur in analogous forms, but complicated with exceptional cases, in the algebras of real numbers and of signed real numbers.

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  • Under the general heading "Fundamental Notions" occur the subheadings "Foundations of Arithmetic," with the topics rational, irrational and transcendental numbers, and aggregates; "Universal Algebra," with the topics complex numbers, quaternions, ausdehnungslehre, vector analysis, matrices, and algebra of logic; and "Theory of Groups," with the topics finite and continuous groups.

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  • For the subjects of this general heading see the articles ALGEBRA; ALGEBRAIC FORMS; ARITHMETIC; COMBINATORIAL ANALYSIS; DETERMINANTS; EQUATION; FRACTION, CONTINUED; INTERPOLATION; LOGARITHMS; MAGIC SQUARE; PROBABILITY.

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  • Its weight will be mnp (see Salmon's Higher Algebra, 4th ed.

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  • It may be regarded as based on arithmetic, or as dealing in the first instance with formal results of the laws of arithmetical number; and in this sense Sir Isaac Newton gave the title Universal Arithmetic to a work on algebra.

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  • The great development of all branches of mathematics in the two centuries following Descartes has led to the term algebra being used to cover a great variety of subjects, many of which are really only ramifications of arithmetic, dealt with by algebraical methods, while others, such as the theory of numbers and the general theory of series, are outgrowths of the application of algebra to arithmetic, which involve such special ideas that they must properly be regarded as distinct subjects.

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  • Some writers have attempted unification by treating algebra as concerned with functions, and Comte accordingly defined algebra as the calculus of functions, arithmetic being regarded as the calculus of values.

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  • This reaction has taken the form of a return to the alliance between algebra and geometry (�5), on which modern analytical geometry is based; the alliance, however, being concerned with the application of graphical methods to particular cases rather than to general expressions.

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  • These applications are sometimes treated under arithmetic, sometimes under algebra; but it is more convenient to regard graphics as a separate subject, closely allied to arithmetic, algebra, mensuration and analytical geometry.

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  • The association of algebra with arithmetic on the one hand, and with geometry on the other, presents difficulties, in that geometrical measurement is based essentially on the idea of continuity, while arithmetical measurement is based essentially on the idea of discontinuity; both ideas being equally matters of intuition.

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  • They are preceded by two sections dealing with the introduction to algebra from4the arithmetical and the graphical sides, and are followed by a section dealing briefly with the developments mentioned in �� 9 and 1 o above.

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  • (4) The stage which is introductory to algebra consists merely in replacing the unit " cost of 1 lb tea " by a symbol, which may be a letter or a mark such as the mark of interrogation, the asterisk, &c. If we denote this unit by X, we have (2 XX) +6s.

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  • Notation of Multiples.-The above is arithmetic. The only thing which it is necessary to import from algebra is the notation by which we write 2X instead of 2 X X or 2.

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  • it cannot be said that " If A = B, then E=F " is arithmetic, while " If C = D, then E=F " is algebra.

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  • It will be seen from � 22 that the application of algebra to equations consists in the interchange of equivalent expressions, and therefore comes under (i.) and (ii.).

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  • Miscellaneous Developments in Arithmetic. - The following are matters which really belong to arithmetic; they are usually placed under algebra, since the general formulae involve the use of letters.

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  • In relation to algebra, the graphic method is mainly useful in connexion with the theory of limits (�� 58, 61) and the functional treatment of equations (� 60).

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  • Netto, Vorlesungen fiber Algebra (vol.

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  • A list of early works on algebra is given in Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th ed., vol.

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  • Although the distinction is one which cannot be ultimately maintained, it is convenient to classify the signs of algebra into symbols of quantity (usually figures or letters), symbols of operation, such as +, i, and symbols of distinction, such as brackets.

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  • It was at last realized that the laws of algebra do not depend for their validity upon any particular interpretation, whether arithmetical, geometrical or other; the only question is whether these laws do or do not involve any logical contradiction.

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  • They behave exactly like the corresponding symbols in arithmetic; and it follows from this that whatever " meaning " is attached to the symbols of quantity, ordinary algebra includes arithmetic, or at least an image of it.

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  • From every proposition in this algebra a reciprocal one may be deduced by interchanging + and X, and also the symbols o and i.

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  • a n) in which only its scalar coefficients occur; in fact, the special units only serve, in the algebra proper, as umbrae or regulators of certain operations on scalars (see Number).

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  • This idea finds fuller expression in the algebra of matrices, as to which it must suffice to say that a matrix is a symbol consisting of a rectangular array of scalars, and that matrices may be combined by a rule of addition which obeys the usual laws, and a rule of multiplication which is distributive and associative, but not, in general, commutative.

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  • Sylvester, on Universal Algebra (i.e.

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  • Whitehead, A Treatise on Universal Algebra, with Applications (vol.

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  • The part devoted to algebra has the title al-jebr wa'lmugabala, and the arithmetic begins with " Spoken has Algoritmi," the name Khwarizmi or Hovarezmi having passed into the word Algoritmi, which has been further transformed into the more modern words algorism and algorithm, signifying a method of computing.

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  • His discoveries had made him famous all over Italy, and he was earnestly solicited to publish his methods; but he abstained from doing so, saying that he intended to embody them in a treatise on algebra which he was preparing.

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  • In his famous Geometria (1637), which is really a treatise on the algebraic representation of geometric theorems, he founded the modern theory of analytical geometry (see Geometry), and at the same time he rendered signal service to algebra, more especially in the theory of equations.

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  • In England, multiple algebra was developed by j ames Joseph Sylvester, who, in company with Arthur Cayley, expanded the theory of matrices, the germs of which are to be found in the writings of Hamilton (see above, under (B); and Quaternions).

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  • == Treatise on the Differential Calculus and the Elements of the Integral Calculus (1852, 6th ed., 1873), Treatise on Analytical Statics (1853, 4th ed., 1874); Treatise on the Integral Calculus (1857, 4th ed., 1874); Treatise on Algebra (1858, 6th ed., 1871); Treatise on Plane Coordinate Geometry (1858, 3rd ed., 1861); Plane Trigonometry (1859, 4th ed., 1869); Spherical Trigonometry (1859); History of the Calculus of Variations (1861); Theory of Equations (1861, 2nd ed.

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  • Similarly the "cube root" of a quantity is another quantity which when multiplied by itself twice gives the original quantity; thus is the cube root of a (see Arithmetic and Algebra).

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  • Recorde's chief contributions to the progress of algebra were in the way of systematizing its notation (see ALGEBRA, History).

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  • The scope of his researches was described by Arthur Cayley, his friend and fellow worker, in the following words: "They relate chiefly to finite analysis, and cover by their subjects a large part of it - algebra, determinants, elimination, the theory of equations, partitions, tactic, the theory of forms, matrices, reciprocants, the Hamiltonian numbers, &c.; analytical and pure geometry occupy a less prominent position; and mechanics, optics and astronomy are not absent."

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  • In mathematics, the biquadratic power or root of a quantity is its fourth power or root (see ALGEBRA); a biquadratic equation is an equation in which the highest power of the unknown is the fourth (see EQUATION: Bgquadratic).

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  • The first day I had Elementary Greek and Advanced Latin, and the second day Geometry, Algebra and Advanced Greek.

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  • I was sorely perplexed, and felt discouraged wasting much precious time, especially in algebra.

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  • Two days before the examinations, Mr. Vining sent me a braille copy of one of the old Harvard papers in algebra.

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  • I was sorely perplexed, and felt quite discouraged, and wasted much precious time, especially in Algebra.

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  • This papyrus contains the first documentary evidence of the use of algebra. rhombus A quadrilateral with four sides of equal length.

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  • I have also a patent application on a new relational algebra operator: The Relational Bayes.

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  • Cayley gave a matrix algebra defining addition, multiplication, scalar multiplication and inverses.

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  • Gauss 's dissertation was a discussion of the fundamental theorem of algebra.

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  • Factoring trinomials - A complete course in algebra...

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  • After applying some simple algebra to some trite phrases and cliches a new understanding can be reached of the secret to wealth and success.

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  • Course Description This module will extend the vector algebra of the first year to the calculus of three dimensional vectors.

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