Agincourt sentence example

agincourt
  • In 1404 Antony, Philip's second son (killed at Agincourt 1415), became duke of Brabant by bequest of his great-aunt Joan.
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  • Plans of them are also given by Agincourt in his great work on Christian art.
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  • They are also figured by Agincourt,.
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  • Other catacombs in the vicinity of the same city are described by Pocock and other travellers, and are figured by Agincourt.
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  • This anomaly aroused lively protests, especially in the French group, after the battle of Agincourt had rekindled national animosity on both sides.
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  • His earliest poem is the Livre des quatre dames, written after the battle of Agincourt.
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  • His successor, Edward III., was killed at Agincourt in 1415.
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  • The battle was fought in the defile formed by the wood of Agincourt and that of Tramecourt, at the northern exit of which the army under d'Albret, constable of France, had placed itself so as to bar the way to Calais against the English forces which had been campaigning on the Somme.
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  • John the Fearless then began negotiations with the English, while Bernard VII., appointed constable in place of the count of SaintPol, who had been killed at Agincourt, returned to defend Paris.
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  • Although he talked of helping his sovereign, his troops took no part in the battle of Agincourt (1415), where, however, two of his brothers, Anthony, duke of Brabant, and Philip, count of Nevers, fell fighting for France.
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  • How far Edward's solicitude was disinterested may be gauged from Froissart's parallel remark about the battle of Aljubarrota, where, as at Agincourt, the handful of victors were obliged by a sudden panic to slay their prisoners.
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  • His next brother, Edmund of Langley, who was created duke of York (1385),(1385), founded the Yorkist line, and was father, by a daughter and co-heiress of Pedro the Cruel, king of Castile, of two sons, Edward, second duke, who was slain at Agincourt, and Richard, earl of Cambridge, who by marrying the granddaughter and eventual heiress of Lionel's daughter Philippa, brought the right to the succession into the house of York.
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  • In 1440 he paid the ransom of Charles of Orleans (the son of his father's old enemy), who had been a prisoner in England since the battle of Agincourt; received him with great honour at Gravelines; and married him to Mary of Cleves, upon whom he bestowed a handsome dowry.
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  • His father died at the siege of Harfleur, and his elder brother was killed at Agincourt on the 25th of October 1415.
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  • The campaign of 1415, with its brilliant conclusion at Agincourt (October 25), was only the first step. Two years of patient preparation followed.
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  • In 1415 he fought at Agincourt; he was afterwards sent as an ambassador to Charles VI.
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  • He became a Benedictine monk at Canterbury, and then joining the Cluniacs, was prior of Lenton Abbey, near Nottingham; he was chaplain to Henry V., whom he accompanied to France in 1415, being present at Agincourt.
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  • Guy, sire de la Tremoille, standard-bearer of France, was taken prisoner at the battle of Nicopolis (1396), and Georges, the favourite of King Charles VII., was captured at Agincourt (1415).
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  • His son Charles became constable of France, and was killed at the battle of Agincourt in 1415.
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  • By the death of his uncle Edward at Agincourt he became duke of York, and on the death of Edmund Mortimer in 1425 he succeeded to his claims as representing in the female line the elder branch of the royal family.
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  • He won the victory of Agincourt (October 25, 1415), and then seized Caen and part of Normandy, while France was exhausting herself in the feuds of Armagnacs and Burgundians.
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  • At Agincourt he was wounded and captured, and remained a prisoner in England from 1415 to 1420.
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  • He served in the war next year, and was wounded at Agincourt, where he owed his life.
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  • Of noble birth, he adopted the profession of arms and with other Burgundians fought in the English ranks at Agincourt.
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  • Domestic malcontents did not scruple to hint that the king, like his father-in-law before him, had made war on France, not with any hope of renewing the glories of Crecy or Agincourt, still less with any design of helping his allies, but purely to get first grants from his parliament, and then a war indemnity from his enemies.
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  • The Battle of Agincourt is the classic example of the infantry massacring the downed armored cavalry.
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  • Henry V is a celebration of Hal's almost legendary exploits in France, culminating in the great reversal of the odds at Agincourt.
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  • See Sir Harris Nicolas, Battle of Agincourt; Fortescue, History of the British Army, vol.
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  • His first exploit in arms was at the battle of Agincourt in 1415; he followed the party of the Armagnacs and attached himself to the dauphin Charles.
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