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affinity

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affinity

affinity Sentence Examples

  • Some people have a natural affinity with children.

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  • You have an affinity for jumping off tall things.

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  • He had an affinity for opioid receptors and a slow dissociation from them.

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  • And as the undefinable essence of the force moving the heavenly bodies, the undefinable essence of the forces of heat and electricity, or of chemical affinity, or of the vital force, forms the content of astronomy, physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, and so on, just in the same way does the force of free will form the content of history.

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  • The affinity for the fourth oxygen to bind is approximately 300 times that for the first.

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  • Brady smiled, amused that Angel remembered his affinity for chocolate.

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  • The names point generally to an affinity with south Palestine and north Arabia (Edoin, Midian, &c.; see especially the lists in Gen.

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  • The metal possesses a strong affinity with gold, silver, platinum, and precious stones.

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  • It meshed well with Russia's traditional primary focus on relations with the United States and was reinforced by apparent ideological affinity.

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  • The close affinity of the author's thought to that of Philo point in the same direction.

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  • Cellulose has an affinity for acid stains, pectic substances for basic stains.

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  • In fact, as Roberto Unger has demonstrated, there is no elective affinity between capitalism and democracy.

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  • 4 [7] io) showing that the customs of the Bruttii had a certain affinity with those of the pre-Hellenic inhabitants of Greece, and it has been argued (Ridgeway apud Conway, Ital.

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  • Young Indian elephants are hairy, thus showing affinity with the mammoth.

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  • This linguistic poverty proves that the Australian tongue has no affinity to the Polynesian group of languages, where denary enumeration prevails: the nearest Polynesians, the Maoris, counting in thousands.

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  • Further, it is the opinion of competent ornithologists that there is affinity of the Australian emeus and cassowaries with the New Zealand moas and with the Malagasy Aepyornis.

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  • She boasts of the royal blood which ran through her veins, and disregarding the bar sinister she claims affinity with Charles X.

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  • Compounds in which all the units of affinity of the contained elements are engaged are said to be saturated, whilst those in which the affinities of the contained elements are not all engaged by other elements are said to be unsaturated.

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  • The number of units of affinity active in the case of any particular element is largely dependent, however, upon the nature of the element or elements with which it is associated.

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  • It is doubtless to be regarded as a revival of ancient habits of thought and feeling among a people who had adopted the Koran, not by affinity, but by compulsion.

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  • Other undoubted Dicotyledons, though of uncertain affinity, of similar age have now been detected in North America.

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  • Owen's researches of its ornithic affinity saw that it must belong to a type of birds wholly unknown before, and one that in any future for the arrangement of the class must have a special rank reserved for it.2 It behoves us next to mention the " Outlines of a Systematic Review of the Class of Birds," communicated by W.

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  • that the sum of the units of affinity of all the atoms in a compound is an even number.

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  • Questions of affinity, and the details of geographical distribution, were endowed with a real interest, in comparison with which any interest that had hitherto been taken was a trifling pastime.

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  • That there is a tendency in such groups as are placed at the opposite points of a circle of affinity ` to meet each other.'

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  • Nor, with perhaps the interesting exception of Castanopsis chrysophylla, the solitary representative in the New World of an east Asiatic genus, which ranges from Oregon to California, has it any affinity with the Chino-Japanese sub-region.

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  • Investigations proceeded in two directions: - (I) the nature of chemical affinity, (2) the laws of chemical combination.

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  • The affinity to Atlantic North America is strongly marked as it has long been known to be in Japan.

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  • Another effect is that different degrees of homology have to be recognized, just as there are different degrees of relationship or affinity between individual plants.

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  • The affinity of the Pterobranchia to the Enteropneusta may be regarded as definitely established.

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  • Our regions will not be natural unless they mark out real discontinuities both of origin and affinity, and these we can only seek to explain by reference to past changes in the earths history.

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  • Hence it is noteworthy that the late editor of Judges has given the first place to Othniel, a Kenizzite, and therefore of Edomite affinity, though subsequently reckoned as a Judaean (Judg i.

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  • An examination of their language seems to indicate that, it belongs to the Mon-Khmer group of languages, and the anthropological information forthcoming concerning the Sakai points to the conclusion that they show a greater affinity to the people of the Mon-Khmer races than to the Malayan stock.

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  • We are compelled to take into account the actual affinity of the plants inhabiting them.

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  • Boyle rejected this terminology, which was only strictly applicable to intelligent beings; and he used the word " affinity " as had been previously done by Stahl and others.

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  • The question of their affinity to other divisions of the animal kingdom depends principally on the views which are held with regard to the relationships of the Enteropneusta and Phoronidea respectively.

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  • When Edom is renowned for wisdom and a small Judaean family boasts of sages whose names have south Palestinian affinity (1 Chron.

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  • Dromotheriidae, and apparently showing decided traces of reptilian affinity.

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  • Out of the 860 indigenous plants, 80% are endemic, but Hillebrand finds that a large nun.mber are of American affinity.

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  • Some even rearranged the contents according to the alphabet or to zoological affinity.

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  • Whilst this principle is undoubtedly applicable to the great majority of chemical actions under ordinary conditions, it is subject to numerous exceptions, and cannot therefore be taken (as its authors originally intended) as a secure basis for theoretical reasoning on the connexion between thermal effect and chemical affinity.

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  • To a certain extent it would seem that even as Chronicles (q.v.) has passed through the hands of one who was keenly interested in the Temple service, so the other historical books have been shaped not only by the late priestly writers (symbolized in literary criticism by P), but also by rather earlier writers, also of priestly sympathies, but of " southern " or half-Edomite affinity.

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  • instance, Muller places in his third "tribe" the group which he called Ampelidae, meaning thereby the peculiar forms of South America that are now considered to be more properly named Cotingidae, and herein he was clearly right, while Nitzsch, who (misled by their supposed affinity to the genus A mpelis - peculiar to the Northern Hemisphere, and a purely Passerine form) had kept them among hisPasserinae, was as clearly wrong.

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  • Meanwhile the rest of the work (except in the prettily scored " Spinning Song," and other harmless and vigorous tunes) has more affinity with Wagner's mature style than the bulk of its much more ambitious successors, Tannhauser and Lohengrin.

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  • Herzegovina has more affinity to the Dalmatian mountains, oppressively hot in summer, when the mercury often rises beyond 110° Fahr.

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  • The Cambodians have a far more marked affinity with their Siamese than with their Annamese neighbours.

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  • It is within the bounds of possibility that Tornaria actually does indicate a remote affinity on the part of the Enteropneusta to the Echinoderms, not only on account of its external form, but also by reason of the possession of a dorsal water-pore communicating with the anterior body-cavity.

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  • It is then possible to assign to each body a specific coefficient of affinity.

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  • Arrhenius has pointed out that the coefficient of affinity of an acid is proportional to its electrolytic ionization.

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  • of the following table, the affinity of hydrochloric acid being taken as one hundred.

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  • It is found that the influence of different acids on this action is proportional to their specific coefficients of affinity.

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  • Among more recent preachers he had most affinity with George Whitefield, Richard Cecil and Joseph Irons.

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  • - Stra ussDiirckheim (1) was the first to insist on the affinity between Limulus and the Arachnids, indicated by the presence of a free suspended entosternum or plastron or entosternite in both.

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  • This arrangement has not hitherto been detected in any other class than the Arachnida, and if it should ultimately prove to be peculiar to that group, would have considerable weight as a proof of the close genetic affinity of Limulus and Scorpio.

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  • When we consider the relationships of the various classes of Arthropoda, having accepted and established the fact of the close genetic affinity of Limulus and Scorpio, we are led to important conclusions.

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  • It has been insisted, by those who accepted Lankester's original doctrine of the direct or genetic affinity of the Chaetopoda and Arthropoda, that Apus and Branchipus really come very near to the ancestral forms which connected those two great branches of Appendiculate (Parapodiate) animals.

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  • This fact renders their association with the Crustacea impossible, if classification is to be the expression of genetic affinity inferred from structural coincidence.

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  • But most important of the evidences presented by the trilobites of affinity with Limulus, and therefore with the Arachnida, is the tendency less marked in some, strongly carried out in others, to form a pygidial or telsonic shield - a fusion of the posterior somites of the body, which is precisely identical in character with the metasomatic carapace of Limulus.

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  • (From Lankester, " Limulus and Arachnid.") Galeodes has been made the means of a comparison between the structure of the Arachnida and Hexapod insects by Haeckel and other writers, and it was at one time suggested that there was a genetic affinity between the two groups - through Galeodes, or extinct forms similar to it.

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  • The flora consists of 129 species of angiosperms, i Cycas, 22 ferns, and a few mosses, lichens and fungi, 17 of which are endemic, while a considerable number - not specifically distinct - form local varieties nearly all presenting Indo-Malayan affinities, as do the single Cycas, the ferns and the cryptogams. As to its fauna, the island contains 319 species of animals-54 only being vertebrates-145 of which are endemic. A very remarkable distributional fact in regard to them, and one not yet fully explained, is that a large number show affinity with species in the Austro-Malayan rather than in the Indo-Malayan, their nearer, region.

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  • The tribe Ophiopogonoideae, with its tendency to an inferior ovary, suggests an affinity with the Amaryllidaceae which resemble Liliaceae in habit and in the horizontal plan of the flower, but have an inferior ovary.

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  • This union took place in defiance of a prohibition which had been promulgated, in 1049, by the papal council of Reims. But the affinity of William and Matilda was so remote that political rather than moral considerations may have determined the pope's action.

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  • They belong indeed (Gerson in particular) to the history of mysticism rather than of Scholasticism, and the same may be said of another cardinal, Nicolaus of Cusa (1401-1464), who is sometimes reckoned among the last of the Scholastics, but who has more affinity with Erigena than with any intervening teacher.

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  • It was a favourite idea of his that chemical affinity and capillary attraction would eventually be included under the same law, and it was perhaps because of its recalcitrance to this cherished generalization that the undulatory theory of light was distasteful to him.

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  • Notwithstanding the prolixity of writers and the number of the writings, all attempts at extracting an algebraic analysis from their geometrical theorems and problems have been fruitless, and it is generally conceded that their analysis was geometrical and had little or no affinity to algebra.

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  • ii.) except that Phylum 17, Diplochorda (a name doubtfully applicable to Phoronis) is replaced by Podaxonia, a term employed by Lankester in the 9th edition of this encyclopaedia and now used to include a number of groups of doubtful but possible affinity.

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  • Yet Terence had no affinity by birth either with the Greek race or with the people of Latium.

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  • The Pipridae, however, have no close affinity with the Paridae, 1 but belong to another great division of the order Passeres, the Clamatores group of the Anisomyodae.

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  • The nucleus in its vegetative stage shows a fine network throughout containing in the meshes the so-called nuclear-sap; attached to the network are the chromosomes, in the form of small irregular masses, which have a strong affinity for the " basic dyes."

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  • Embedded in the nucleus are one or more nucleoli (plasmosomes) having an affinity for the " acid dyes."

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  • Usually the cytoplasm shows a marked affinity for the acid stains, but the different bodies found in the cell may show great variation in their staining reactions.

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  • Not only so, but the physician, thus fascinated by "types," and impressed by the silent monumentsof the pathological museum, was led to localize disease too much, to isolate the acts of nature, and to forget not only the continuity of the phases which lead up to the exemplary forms, or link them together, but to forget also that even between the types themselves relations of affinity must exist - and these oftentimes none the less intimate for apparent diversities of form, for types of widely different form may be, and indeed often are, more closely allied than types which have more superficial resemblance - and to forget, moreover, how largely negative is the process of abstraction by which types are imagined.

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  • In his studies he was attracted by the older writers, both Greek and Roman, in whose masculine temperament and understanding he recognized an affinity with his own.

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  • As cold juice has a greater affinity for lime than hot juice, it is best to treat the juice with lime when cold.

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  • Those Cestodes which possess no very distinct organ of attachment (such, for example, as Gyrocotyle) have no distinct ganglionic thickening more pronounced at one end of the body than at the other; and as these are forms which have retained more primitive features than the rest, and show closer affinity to the Trematodes, it seems highly probable that the complicated nervous thickening found in the scolex, and often compared with the " brain " of other Platyelmia, is a structure sui generis developed within the limits of the sub-class.

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  • In hydatid disease there is, as a rule, a marked increase in the number of those white corpuscles which possess a specially staining affinity with the dye eosin, and are therefore known as eosinophile cells.

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  • Owing to the fact that at temperatures between its melting and boiling point zinc has a strong affinity for iron, it is often contaminated by the scraper while being drawn from the condenser, as is shown by the fact that the scraper wears away rapidly.

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  • Noteworthy is the affinity between some notions evidently not first framed by the prophet himself and the prologue to Job - the heavenly hosts that wander through the earth and bring back their report to Yahweh's throne, the figure of Satan, the idea that suffering and calamity are evidences of guilt and of accusations presented before God.

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  • The predictions of these chapters have no affinity either with the prophecy of Amos, Hosea and Isaiah, or with that of Jeremiah.

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  • The rigid Cheilostomes which have this habit were formerly placed in the genus Eschara, but the bilaminar type is common to a number of genera, and there can be no doubt that it is not in itself an indication of affinity.

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  • WATER-DEER, a small member of the deer-tribe from northern China differing from all other Cervidae except the muskdeer (with which it has no affinity) by the absence of antlers in both sexes.

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  • These, like the mollusca, indicate the influence of the Kuro Shiwo and the south-west monsoon, for they have close affinity with species found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

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  • In short, the Ainu suggest much closer affinity with Europeans than does any other of the types that go to make ug the population of Japan.

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  • In Europe the same physical traitsrelative length of head and shortness of legsdistinguish the central race (Alpine) from the Teutonic, and seem to indicate an affinity between the former and the Mongols.

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  • His affinity with his earlier countryman Aphraates is manifest both in his choice of subjects and his manner of treatment.

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  • The cobra venom is supposed to extinguish the functions of the various nerve-centres of the cerebro-spinal system, the paralysation extending from below upwards, and it has a special affinity for the respiratory centre.

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  • The general results of the last fifty years of the first period (130 to 80) may be thus summed up. In poetry we have the satires of Lucilius, the tragedies of Accius and of a few successors among the Roman aristocracy, who thus exemplified the affinity of the Roman stage to Roman oratory; various annalistic poems intended to serve as continuations of the great poem of Ennius; minor poems of an epigrammatic and erotic character, unimportant anticipations of the Alexandrian tendency operative in the following period; works of criticism in trochaic tetrameters by Porcius Licinus and others, forming part of the critical and grammatical movement which almost from the first accompanied the creative movement in Latin literature, and which may be regarded as rude precursors of the didactic epistles that Horace devoted to literary criticism.

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  • In his sympathy with the life and beliefs of the country people he shows an affinity both to the idyllic spirit and to the piety of Virgil.

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  • Its especial affinity for the nervous system is indicated by the fact that, when all traces of it have disappeared elsewhere, it can still be detected with ease in the cerebro-spinal fluid.

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  • Sieffert, on account of the superscription, would date as early as 70-80, but acknowledges the hyper-Pauline affinity of the heresy, its propagation as a doctrine, and close relation to the Nicolaitan of Rev. ii.

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  • This idea originated in the discovery of a jelly-fish, gasteropods, and other organisms of a more or less marine type, and presenting some affinity with forms of Jurassic age.

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  • And yet the Apocalypse shows in many of its phrases an undoubted affinity to the latter a fact which requires for its explanation the assumption that the book emanated from certain literary circles influenced by John.

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  • These, Swete holds, "create a strong presumption of affinity" between the two books, while Bousset infers that they "justify the assumption that the entire circle of Johannine writings spring from circles which stood under the influence of the John of Asia Minor."

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  • Originally the family was an Old World type, but in the Miocene it gained access into North America, where the earliest form is Bothriolabis, an ancestral peccary showing signs of affinity with the European Miocene genus Palaeochoerus.

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  • His investigations had led him to see that a certain affinity or resemblance existed amongst many of the authorities for the Greek text - MSS., versions, and ecclesiastical writers; that if a peculiar reading, e.g., was found in one of these, it was generally found also in the other members of the same class; and this general relationship seemed to point ultimately to a common origin for all the authorities which presented such peculiarities.

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  • To these he also adds the genus Promerops, 3 composed of 2 species of South African birds, of very different appearance, whose affinity to the rest can as yet hardly be taken as proved.

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  • proper Iberian race, that the Basques were always shut in by alien races, that their affinity is still to seek, and that the whole Basque-Iberian theory is a figment.

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  • In this he betrays his affinity with Ezekiel, who taught that it is by the possession of the sanctuary that Israel is sanctified.

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  • Of more interest is the imperfectly known Wynyardia, from older Tertiary beds in Tasmania, which apparently presents points of affinity both to phalangers and dasyures.

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  • A similar affinity exists between the life of the southern parts of Europe and that in the zone of Asia extending from the Mediterranean across to the Himalaya and northern China.

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  • Not less conspicuous are his merits in disposing of the groups of what are ordinarily known as water-birds, his indicating the affinity of the rails (No.

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  • in length, as afterwards appeared) having some affinity, it was thought, to the Colymbidae were described under the name of Hesperornis regalis, and a few months later (iv.

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  • The tendency of positive elements to unite with positive elements, or of negative elements to unite with negative elements, is much less than that of positive elements to unite with negative elements, and the greater the difference in properties between two elements the more powerful is their affinity for each other.

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  • According to this view, it is necessary to assume that, in all unsaturated compounds, two, or some even number of affinities are disengaged; and also that all elements which combine with an even number of monad atoms cannot combine with an odd number, and vice versa, - in other words, that the number of units of affinity active in the case of any given element must be always either an even or an odd number, and that it cannot be at one time an even and at another an odd number.

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  • The nucleolus appears to form a part of t-he Linin network, but has usually also a strong affinity for nuclear stains.

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  • In all, there is a wonderful amount of specialization, though perhaps in a very straight line from generalized forms; but the affinity to Australian or Polynesian types is in many cases clearly traceable, and it cannot be supposed but that these last are of cognate origin with those of New Zealand.

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  • There is no family of birds common to the Nearctic area and the Antillean subregion without occurring also in other parts of the Neotropical region, a fact which proves its, affinity to the latter.

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  • The close affinity of North America with the Palaearctic avifauna becomes at once apparent if we exclude those groups of birds which we have good reason to believe have their original home in the Neotropical region, notably numerous Tyrannidae, humming-birds and the turkey-buzzards.

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  • It will therefore be seen from the above that next to the Nearctic area the Palaearctic has a much greater affinity to any other, a fact which might be expected from geographical considerations.

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  • In September 1533 the birth of a daughter, afterwards Queen Elizabeth, instead of the long-hoped-for son, was a heavy disappointment; next year Of this there is no direct proof, but the statement rests upon contemporary belief and chiefly upon the extraordinary terms of the dispensation granted to Henry to marry Anne Boleyn, which included the suspension of all canons relating to impediments created by "affinity rising ex illicito coitu in any degree even in the first."

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  • Uzbegs and Kirghiz have but small affinity with the Mongol element of Asia.

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  • The old division into Zygobranchia and Azygobranchia must be abandoned, for the Azygobranchiate Rhipidoglossa have much greater affinity to the Zygobranchiate Haliotidae and Fissurellidae than to the Azygobranchia in general.

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  • What makes Origen's answer so instructive is that it shows how close an affinity existed between Celsus and himself in their fundamental philosophical and theological presuppositions.

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  • Elements which readily enter into reaction with each other, and which develop a large amount of heat on combination, are said to have a powerful affinity for each other.

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  • Changes of the first and second kind, according to our views of the constitution of molecules, are probably of very rare occurrence; in fact, chemical action appears almost always to involve the occurrence of both these kinds of change, for, as already pointed out, we must assume that the molecules of hydrogen, oxygen and several other elements are diatomic, or that they consist of two atoms. Indeed, it appears probable that with few exceptions the elements are all compounds of similar atoms united together by one or more units of affinity, according to their valencies.

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  • On the west coast Cupressus Lawsoniana replaces the northern Thuya gigantea, and a laurel (Umbellularia of isolated affinity) forms forests.

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  • Although there is no direct genetic affinity between the spiders of these two groups, an interesting parallelism in their habits may be traced.

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  • In explanation of these facts it is supposed that each element has a certain number of " units of affinity," which may be entirely, or only in part, engaged when it enters into combination with other elements; and in those cases in which the entire number of units of affinity are not engaged by other elements, it is supposed that those which are thus disengaged neutralize each other, as it were.

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  • Alfred de Musset was introduced, and the two natures leapt together as by elective affinity.

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  • (7) (2) In the first symbol it is assumed that one of the affinities of each of the two central carbon atoms common to the two rings acts into both rings, an assumption involving a somewhat wide departure from all ordinary views as to the manner in which affinity acts.

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  • In the oases of the Jerid are found several species of tropical African mammals and two or three of Senegalese birds, and the vegetation seems to have as much affinity with tropical Africa as with Europe.

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  • The literary language of Rome was in process of formation during the 2nd century B.C., and it was in the latter part of this century that the series of great Roman orators, with whose spirit Roman tragedy has a strong affinity, begins.

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  • Evidence as to the affinity between these breeds is afforded by the fact that a breed of cattle very similar to that at Chillingham was found in Wales in the 10th century; these cattle being white with red ears.

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  • Elands and kudus appear to have been represented in India during the Pliocene; the European Palaeoreas of the same age seems to be intermediate between the two, while Protragelaphus is evidently another European representative of the group. Helicophora is another spiral-horned European Pliocene antelope, but of somewhat doubtful affinity; the same being the case with the large Criotherium of the Samos Pliocene, in which the short horns are curiously twisted.

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  • Indeed even those first currents stand here for the deepest religious truths, the prevenience of God and man's affinity to Him.

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  • Waitz is often spoken of as the chief disciple of Ranke, though perhaps in general characteristics and mental attitude he has more affinity with Pertz or Dahlmann.

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  • those of Harnack and Kruger), and classed each under its own literary type - so sacrificing to outer form, which is quite secondary in primitive Christian writings, the more significant fact of religious affinity.

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  • In Hermas there is special affinity to the language and thought of the epistle of James, and in the homilist to those of Paul.

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  • Their language, the most distinctively Lao-Tai attribute which they have, plainly shows their very close relationship with the latter race and its present branches, the Shans (Tai Long) and the Ahom of Assam, while their appearance, customs, written character and religion bear strong evidence of their affinity with the Khmers.

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  • An affinity exists between the Berbers of Jerba and the Beni Mzab.

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  • cc.), and are said by him to show the greatest resemblance to the common Grey Parrot of Africa, Psittacus erithacus, through having also some affinity to the Ring-necked Parakeet of the same country, Palaeornis torquatus.

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  • There are ancient rocks, however, in New Caledonia, which .has a geological affinity with New Zealand; old sedimentary rocks are known in New Pomerania, besides granite and porphyry, and slates, sandstone and chalk occur in Fiji, as well as young volcanic rocks.

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  • In Great Britain, whither they began to straggle over during the revolutionary troubles at the close of the 18th century, and where, practically unaffected by the clause directed against them in the Emancipation Act of 1829, their chief settlement has been at Stonyhurst in Lancashire, an estate conferred on them by Thomas Weld in 1795, they have been unmolested; but there has been little affinity to the order in the British temperament, and the English province has consequently never risen to numerical or intellectual importance in the Society.

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  • This original connexion, if it may be accepted, would seem to belong to a long-past period, to judge from the failure of all attempts to discover an affinity between the languages of America and Asia.

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  • This typically consists of two concentric zones, the trochus and cingulum, often separated by a groove or gutter which may be finely ciliated; but in several genera of no close affinity, where it is very oblique to the longitudinal axis of the body, it is represented by a general ciliation of the surface (Taphrocampa, Rattulus, Copeus, Adineta).

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  • The phrase " when ye shall be stripped and not be ashamed " contains an idea which has some affinity with two passages found respectively in the Gospel according to the Egyptians and the so-called Second Epistle of Clement.

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  • gigantea was brought to England by Lobb in 1853, and received from Dr Lindley the name of Wellingtonia, by which it is still popularly known, though its affinity to the redwood is too marked to admit of generic distinction.

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  • Its chemical properties closely resemble those of chlorine and bromine; its affinity for other elements, however, is as a rule less than that of either.

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  • shown by the determination of its affinity constant, a much.

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  • Whatever may be the true affinity of these problematical mammals, undoubted rodents are known from the Lower Eocene of both Europe and North America.

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  • Bichloride of tin, having chemical affinity for silk fibre, bids fair to extinguish the use of sugar, which, from its hygrometric qualities, has a tendency to ruin the silk to which it is applied, if great care be not taken to regulate the quantity.

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  • It appears to his imagination that the affinity of two atoms of hydrogen to one of oxygen, the attraction of the spermatozoon to the ovum, and the elective affinity of d pair of lovers are all alike due to sensation and will.

    0
    0
  • Schelling was right; but he had too much affinity with Hegelian assumptions, e.g.

    0
    0
  • Hartmann has an affinity with all these predecessors, and with Spinoza, with whom he agrees that there is but one substance unaltered by the plurality of individuals which are only its modifications.

    0
    0
  • Thus his pantheistic is also a teleological idealism, which in its emphasis on free activity and moral order recalls Leibnitz and Fichte, but in its emphasis on the infinity of God has more affinity to Spinoza, Schelling and Hegel.

    0
    0
  • Fechner's panpsychism has a certain affinity both to Stahl's animism and to the hylozoism of materialists such as Haeckel.

    0
    0
  • Whether osmotic pressure be due to physical impact or to chemical affinity it must necessarily have the gas value in a dilute solution, and be related to vapour pressure and freezing point in the way we have traced.

    0
    0
  • Although, like protective resemblance, quite independent of affinity between the organisms concerned in the likeness, mimicry occurs most commonly between animals structurally similar, and therefore related, to one another, the relationship may be close or remote.

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  • So alike in form, colour and mode of flight are those Lepidoptera that when on the wing it is almost or quite impossible to distinguish one from the other, and the resemblance between members belonging to different sub-families cannot be assigned to affinity.

    0
    0
  • Though ibises resemble the curlews externally, there is no affinity between them.

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  • The current is supplied at a tension of 3 to 5 volts per cell, passing through 10 or 12 in series; and it performs two distinct functions: - (1) it overcomes the chemical affinity of the aluminium oxide, (2) it overcomes the resistance of the electrolyte, heating the liquid at the same time.

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  • The fact was studiously evaded or concealed that a dispensation had been granted by the archbishop of St Andrews for this irregularity, which could only have arisen through some illicit connexion of the husband with a relative of the wife between whom and himself no affinity by blood or marriage could be proved.

    0
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  • Their compact, moss-like growth and general structural peculiarities are not an expression of mutual affinity, but are in adaptation to the combined cold and dryness of their habitat.

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  • This operation is varied in detail according to the kind of plant to be propagated, but it is essential in all cases that the affinity between the two plants be near, that the union be neatly effected, and that the ratio as well as the season of growth of stock and scion be similar.

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  • The objects found in these cemeteries show close affinity with those found in the terremare of Emilia, these last being of earlier date, and hence Pigorini and Helbig consider that the Latini were close descendants of the inhabitants of the terremare.

    0
    0
  • In common parlance, it may be described as a species of wild dog with close affinity to the bear.

    0
    0
  • Its affinity with the giraffes is, however, clearly revealed by the structure of the skull and teeth, more especially the bilobed crown to the incisor-like lower canine teeth.

    0
    0
  • The narrative has no affinity with the point of view which looks on the history of Israel as a series of examples of divine justice and mercy in the successive rebellions and repentances of the people of God.'

    0
    0
  • Frankland, when in 1858 Kekule published a paper in which, after giving reasons for regarding carbon as a tetravalent element, he set forth the essential features of his famous doctrine of the linking of atoms. He explained that in substances containing several carbon atoms it must be assumed that some of the affinities of each carbon atom are bound by the affinities of the atoms of other elements contained in the substance, and some by an equal number of the affinities of the other carbon atoms. The simplest case is when two carbon atoms are combined so that one affinity of the one is tied to one affinity of the other; two, therefore, of the affinities of the two atoms are occupied in keeping the two atoms together, and only the remaining six are available for atoms of other elements.

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  • The next simplest case consists in the mutual interchange of two affinity units, and so on.

    0
    0
  • It would be difficult even to prove any ground of affinity among them beyond a desposition to take sense as a prime factor in the account of subjective experience: their common interest in physical science was shared equally by rationalist thinkers of the Cartesian school, and was indeed begotten of the time.

    0
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  • Amphibien, &c., p. 127) placed the Tinamous in the same order as the ostrich and its allies; and, though he did this on very insufficient grounds, his assignment has turned out to be not far from the mark, as in 1862 the great affinity of these groups was shown by W.

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  • The resemblance of Dinophilus to the Rotifera is, however, quite superficial, and the general structure of this genus with distinct traces of segmentation, especially in the embryo, points to its close affinity, if not to Polygordius in particular, at all events to the Annelida.

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  • It has been maintained that Greek influence is to be traced in parts of the Old Testament assigned to this period, as, for instance, the Book of Proverbs; but even in the case of Ecclesiastes, the canonical writing whose affinity with Greek thought is closest, the coincidence of idea need not necessarily prove a Greek source.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the absence of chlorophyll, and the consequent parasitic or saprophytic habit, Bacteriaceae agree in so many morphological features with Cyanophyceae that the affinity can hardly be doubted.

    0
    0
  • In Characeae no fewer than four methods of vegetative reproduction have been described, and the facility with which buds and branches are in these cases detached has been adduced as an evidence of affinity with Bryophyta, which, as a class, are distinguished by their ready resort to vegetative reproduction.

    0
    0
  • They have no close affinity with Euphaeophyceae.

    0
    0
  • standing their acknowledged morphological affinity with Cyanophyceae, or, in recognition of the incongruity of effecting such a separation, the whole group of the Schizophyta - that is to say, the Cyanophyceae in the narrow sense, together with Bacteriaceae, is included or excluded together.

    0
    0
  • A continuous line indicates a close affinity, and a dotted line a doubtful relationship.

    0
    0
  • The sheaths are akin to hair in structure, thus suggesting affinity with the hairs surmounting the giraffe's horns.

    0
    0
  • Yet their Christology and negative attitude towards the state rather indicate, as in the case of Wicklif, Hus and the Fraticelli, an affinity to the Cathari and other medieval sects.

    0
    0
  • 14, 20-24), a Judah consisting of fragments of an older stock replenished with families of South Palestinian, Edomite and North Arabian affinity.

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  • This retrospect of the Judaean kingdom must be taken with the following books, where the crucial features are (a) the presence (c. 444) of an aristocracy, partly (at all events) of half-Edomite affinity, before the return of any important body of exiles (Neh.

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  • Although the Berber tongue shows a certain affinity with Semitic in the construction both of its words and sentences Berber is quite distinct from the Semitic languages; and a remarkable fact is that in spite of the enormous space over which the dialects are spread and the thousands of years that some of the Berber peoples have been isolated from the rest, these dialects show but slight differences from the long-extinct Hamitic speech from which all are derived.

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  • The highlands which shut off the Turkestan provinces from Southern Afghanistan have afforded the best opportunities for geological investigation, and as might be expected from their geographical position, the general result of the examination of exposed sections leads to the identification of geological affinity with Himalayan, Indian and Persian regions.

    0
    0
  • The bond of affinity between the various peoples who compose the Pathan community is simply the bond of a common language.

    0
    0
  • There is a Stoic element in the ethic of the Pauline epistles, but the theological affinity that the Johannine gospel, with its background of philosophic ideas, exhibits to Platonic and Neoplatonist teaching caused the effort at absorption to be directed rather in that direction.

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    0
  • It is for this reason that it finally lacks real affinity to the " pure logic " of Fries.

    0
    0
  • It is no mere coincidence that his treatment of all forms of continuance and even his positive metaphysic of " reals " show affinity to Leibnitz.

    0
    0
  • Beneke's philosophy is a striking instance of this, with application to Fries and affinity to Herbart conjoined with obligations to Schelling both directly and through Schleiermacher.

    0
    0
  • This circumstance is not accidental, but points to an affinity in thought.

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    0
  • All four of the halogens unite with hydrogen, but the affinity for hydrogen decreases as the atomic weight increases, hydrogen and fluorine uniting explosively at very low temperatures and in the dark, whilst hydrogen and iodine unite only at high temperatures, and even then the resulting compound is very readily decomposed by heat.

    0
    0
  • near affinity; and while more nearly related to the Marsupialia (q.v.), in which an imperfect allantoic placenta is sometimes developed, it is broadly distinguished therefrom by the invariable presence of a functional placenta by the aid of which the foetus is nourished throughout the greater portion of intra-uterine life.

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  • These were lists, prepared by collating observations on the actions of substances one upon another, showing the varying degrees of affinity exhibited by analogous bodies for different reagents, and they retained their vogue for the rest of the century, until displaced by the profounder conceptions introduced by C. L.

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  • The general result was to place all the privileges, rights and possessions of these inferior chiefs under the guarantee or protection of the British government, to whom all disputes between the superior and inferior states must be referred, and whose decision is final upon all questions of succession to hereditary rights or rulership. The states have no general ethnological affinity, such as exists in Rajputana.

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    0
  • Representative art languishes, except a few childish terra-cottas; decorative art becomes once more purely geometrical, but shows only slight affinity with the contemporary geometrical art of the Aegean.

    0
    0
  • For since they now heap up wealth and enrich nephews removed from them by almost incalculable degrees of affinity, what would they do if they had legitimate children?.

    0
    0
  • Hinduism has also impressed its language upon the province, and the vernacular Assamese possesses a close affinity to Bengali, with the substitution of s for the Bengali ch, of a guttural h for the Bengali h or sh, and a few other dialectic changes.

    0
    0
  • But the fact that Irenaeus thought of him as Polycarp's contemporary and "a man of the old time" (apXaaos avilp), together with the affinity between the religious tendencies described in Papias's Preface (as quoted by Eusebius) and those reflected in the Epistles of Polycarp and Ignatius, all point to his having flourished in the first quarter of the 2nd century.

    0
    0
  • For, though they display undeniable affinity with P, they also exhibit certain features which closely distinguish them from that document.

    0
    0
  • display a marked affinity to Deuteronomy cannot be denied.

    0
    0
  • At the same time it exhibits many marks of affinity with P, a phenomenon most easily explained by the supposition that older laws of H have been expanded and modified by later hands in the spirit of P. Clear instances of such revision may be seen in the references to " the door of the tent of meeting " (vv.

    0
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  • Proust; but his speculations, in particular his insistence on the influence of the relative masses of the acting substances in chemical reactions, have exercised a dominating influence on the modern developments of the theory of chemical affinity, of which, far more than T.

    0
    0
  • In these latter the basic aniline dyes in solution are almost exclusively used, on account of their special affinity for the bacterial protoplasm.

    0
    0
  • In other cases such changes cannot be detected, and the only evidence of their occurrence may be the associated symptoms. The very important work of Ehrlich on diphtheria toxin shows that in the molecule of toxin there are at least two chief atom groups - one, the " haptophorous," by which the toxin molecule is attached to the cell protoplasm; and the other the " toxophorous," which has a ferment-like action on the living molecule, producing a disturbance which results in the toxic symptoms. On this theory, susceptibility to a toxin will imply both a chemical affinity of certain tissues for the toxin molecule and also sensitiveness to its actions, and, furthermore, non-susceptibility may result from the absence of either of these two properties.

    0
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  • Again, in certain cases the toxin has a special affinity for certain tissues.

    0
    0
  • The molecules which lead to the production of anti-substances are usually known as antigens, and each antigen has a specific combining affinity for its corresponding anti-substance, fitting it as a lock does a key.

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  • His view as to the dual composition of the toxin molecule has already been mentioned, and it is evident that if the haptophorous or combining group has its affinity satisfied by union with antitoxin, the toxin will no longer combine with living cells, and will thus be rendered harmless.

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  • This result, which is usually known now as the " Ehrlich phenomenon," was explained by him on the supposition that the " toxin " does not represent molecules which are all the same, but contains molecules of different degrees of combining affinity and of toxic action.

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  • Wassermann and Takaki in the case of tetanus, that there do exist in the nervous system molecules with combining affinity for the tetanus toxin.

    0
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  • The development of the immune body with specific combining affinity thus presents an analogy to antitoxin production, the difference being that in lysogenesis another substance is necessary to complete the process.

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  • Natural immunity against toxins must be taken into account, and, if Ehrlich's view with regard to toxic action be correct, this may depend upon either the absence of chemical affinity of the living molecules of the tissues for the toxic molecule, or upon insensitiveness to the action of the toxophorous group. It has been shown with regard to the former, for example, that the nervous system of the fowl, which possesses immunity against tetanus toxin, has little combining affinity for it.

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  • Its systematic position, however, can scarcely be considered settled, for though on the whole its predominating alliance may be with the Caprimulgidae, nearly as much affinity may be traced to the Strigidae, while it possesses some characters in which it differs from both (Proc. Zool.

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  • Some modern writers have included in the same class the Burgundians, a nation which had apparently come from the basin of the Oder, but the evidence at our disposal on the whole hardly justifies the supposition that their language retained a close affinity with Gothic.

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  • His views on the independence of civil rule were even more decidedly expressed in the Tractatus de jurisdictione imperatoris in causis matrimonialibus, in which, in spite of the medieval idea that matrimony is a sacrament, he demands that it belongs to the civil power to decide cases of affinity and to state the prohibited degrees.

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  • He summed up his results in the general statement that "hydrogen, the alkaline substances, the metals and certain metallic oxides are attracted by negatively electrified metallic surfaces, and repelled by positively electrified metallic surfaces; and contrariwise, that oxygen and acid substances are attracted by positively electrified metallic surfaces and repelled by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and these attractive and repulsive forces are sufficiently energetic to destroy or suspend the usual operation of elective affinity."

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  • He also sketched a theory of chemical affinity on the facts he had discovered, and concluded by suggesting that the electric decomposition of neutral salts might in some cases admit of economical applications and lead to the isolation of the true elements of bodies.

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  • A few words may be said regarding the different kinds of types or devices appropriate to particular classes or groups of medieval seals; and, although these remarks have special reference to English seals, it may be noted that there is a common affinity between the several classes of seals of all countries of western Europe, and that what is said of the seal-devices of one country may be applied in general terms to those of the rest.

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  • It may be useful to give here a synopsis of the classification adopted in this encyclopaedia, noting that, for convenience of treatment, it has been thought, necessary to adopt a grouping not always expressive of the most recent views of affinity.

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  • But though some of those who bore the title may be reckoned at their best as orthodox conservatives, their position was, as far as our mainly Pharisaic authorities permit us to learn, merely negative; and all the information we possess, whether it rests on facts or on prejudice, points to their close affinity with the Jews who renounced their faith altogether and advertised the fact - say by habitual and unwarranted breach of the Sabbath, for example.

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  • The Bruchidae are often called "weevils," but they have no close affinity with the Rhynchophora, being nearly allied to the Chryso - melidae or leaf beetles.

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  • Tze-lu went back, and reported what the man had said to the master, who observed: " It is impossible to withdraw from the world, and associate with birds and beasts that have no affinity with us.

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  • It may be mere coincidence that the material in Matthew as well as in the Didache seems to be arranged in five divisions, beginning with a commendation of the right way, and ending with warnings of the judgment, while the logical analysis of James yields something similar; but of the affinity of spirit there can be no doubt.

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  • In some respects it shows affinity with Panochthus, although in the simple structure of the tail-sheath it recalls the undermentioned Propalaeohoplophorus.

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  • 1165) and the narrative of Eldad; but the affinity is not close.

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  • The line of descent of recent cycads is comparatively clear in so far as they have undoubted affinity with Palaeozoic plants which combined cycadean and filicinean features; but opinion is much more divided as to the nature of the phylum from which the conifers are derived.

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  • In its fauna, Walachia has far more affinity to the lands lying south of the Danube than to Transylvania, although several species of Claudilia, once regarded as exclusively Transylvanian, are found south of the Carpathians.

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    0
  • A MS. Psalter more recently discovered shows close affinity to this edition, and, in spite of the opinions held by some critics, must be considered as a copy of it made about 1585; it even reproduces the printer's errors of Koresi's edition.

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  • No two things, according to him, had less affinity than the form of prayer and the spirit of prayer.

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  • Its powerful affinity for the elements of water makes it a valuable dehydrating and condensation agent.

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    0
  • For external use, sulphuric acid is a powerful irritant and caustic, acting by its powerful affinity for water and therefore dehydrating the tissues and causing them to turn black.

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  • Formerly all corals in which tabulae are present were classed together as Tabulata, but Tubipora is an undoubted Alcyonarian with a lamellar stolon, and the structure of the fossil genus Syringopora, which has vertical corallites united by horizontal solenia, clearly shows its affinity to Tubipora.

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  • Or divisions were based upon certain modifications of structure which, as we now see, affected assemblages of diverse affinity: thus both Blastoidea and Euechinoidea were divided into Regularia and Irregularia; the Holothuroidea into Pneumophora and Apneumona; and Crinoids were discussed under the heads "stalked" and "unstalked."

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  • The problem of the interrelations of the classes will thus be reduced to its simplest terms, and even questions as to the nature of the primitive Echinoderm and its affinity to the ancestors of other phyla may become more than exercises for the ingenuity of youth.

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    0
  • The earliest form of the Grail story, the Gawain- Bleheris version, exhibits a marked affinity with the characteristic features of the Adonis or Tammuz worship; we have a castle on the sea-shore, a dead body on a bier, the identity of which is never revealed, mourned over with solemn rites; a wasted country, whose desolation is mysteriously connected with the dead man, and which is restored to fruitfulness when the quester asks the meaning of the marvels he beholds (the two features of the weeping women and the wasted land being retained in versions where they have no significance); finally the mysterious food-providing, self-acting talisman of a common feast - one and all of these features may be explained as survivals of the Adonis ritual.

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  • This theory of affinity had beenwell known in the 12th century, an.d had been urged in favor of King John when he was contending with his nephew Arthur.

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  • The Insectivora are certainly the lowest group of existing placental mammals, and exhibit many signs of affinity with marsupials; they may even be a more generalized group than the latter.

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    0
  • The raccoon group (Procyonidae) is mainly American, being represented in the Old World only by the pandas (Aelurus and Aeluropus), of which the latter apparently exhibits some affinity to the bears.

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    0
  • Such is the affinity of the oxide for this impurity that it may contain from 50 to 60% by weight of free sulphur after revivification and still remain active.

    0
    0
  • The general morphology of the cones, on the other hand, suggests some affinity with the Equisetales.

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    0
  • In the absence of direct evidence from Palaeobotany, and bearing in mind the modifications associated with adaptation to an aquatic life in other plants, the recognition of any more definite affinity for these heterosporous ferns than that indicated above appears to be inadvisable.

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  • This, however, is not the character to which we now ascribe the chief weight as evidence of the genetic affinity and monophyletic (uni-ancestral) origin of the Chaetopods, Rotifers and Arthropods.

    0
    0
  • Hence the presence or absence of such tubes cannot be used as an argument as to affinity without some discrimination.

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    0
  • They were until recently classified with the Chilopoda (Centipedes), with which they have no close affinity, but only a superficial resemblance.

    0
    0
  • The white cattle formerly kept at Chartley Park, Staffordshire, exhibit signs of affinity with the long-horn breed.

    0
    0
  • In the Pleistocene of India occurs a large ox (Bos namadicus), possibly showing some affinity with the Bibos group, and in the same formation are found remains of a buffalo, allied to, but distinct from the living Indian species.

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  • Ignoring processes of oxidation or reduction simply brought about by heat or some other form of energy, we may regard an oxidizing agent as a substance having a strong affinity for electro-positive atoms or groups, and a reducing agent as having a strong affinity for electro-negative atoms or groups; in the actual processes the oxidizing agent suffers reduction and the reducing agent oxidation.

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  • The fragments that remain of the moral treatises of Democritus are sufficient, perhaps, to convince us that the turn of Greek philosophy in the direction of conduct, which was actually due to Socrates, would have taken place without him, though in a less decided manner; but when we compare the Democritean ethics with the post-Socratic system to which it has most affinity, Epicureanism, we find that it exhibits a very rudimentary apprehension of the formal conditions which moral teaching must fulfil before it can lay claim to be treated as scientific.

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  • 2 The last charge of Epicurus to his disciples is said to have been, Twv Soy / 2t Twv µe%cv11 vOac. on the essentially Greek doctrine which it received, - a reaction all the more inevitable from the very affinity between the Stoic sage and the ancient Roman ideal of manliness.

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  • Partly in conscious antagonism to the schoolmen, yet with close affinity to the central ethico-theological doctrine which they read out of or into Aristotle, the mystical manner of thought continued to maintain itself in the church.

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  • The English moralist with whom Kant has most affinity is Price; in fact, Kantism, in the ethical thought of modern Europe, holds a place somewhat analogous to that Kant.

    0
    0
  • 2 Hegel's ethical doctrine (expounded chiefly in his Philosophie des Rechts, 1821) shows a close affinity, and also a striking contrast, to Kant's.

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  • He began by disclaiming any affinity to Utilitarianism on the part of his own philosophy.

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    0
  • The affinity of the two classes of objects became known in 1866 through G.

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  • have little affinity or resemblance to the Papuans."

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  • A law passed in May 1908 against nepotism (closely following the Texas law of 1907) forbids public officers to appoint (or vote for) any person related to them by affinity or consanguinity within the third degree to any position in the government of which they are a part; makes persons thus related to public officers ineligible to positions in the branch in which their relative is an official; and renders any official making such an appointment liable to fine and removal from office.

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  • Aribo, however, refused to perform this ceremony for Gisela, as she was within the prohibited degrees of affinity, and she was crowned some days later at Aix-laChapelle by Pilgrim, archbishop of Cologne.

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  • Sometimes the receptivity is so vigorous in its affinity, that without teaching it rises at one step to the vision of truth, by a certain " holy force " above ordinary measure.

    0
    0
  • An attempt has been made to explain the Volta effect as due to the affinity of the metals for each other, but that would not account for the variation of the effect with the state of the surface, except as affecting the actual surface of contact.

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    0
  • It is equally evident that chemical affinity between the metals cannot be the explanation of the Peltier E.M.F.

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  • Of the mammals in which Spain shows more affinity to the fauna of central and northern Europe, some of the most characteristic are the Spanish lynx (Lynx pardinus), a species confined to the Peninsula, the Spanish hare (Lepus madritenss), and the species mentioned in the article PYRENEES.

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  • They sometimes appear with the child Dionysus, between whose cult and that of the Mother there was a close affinity.

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  • Such forms he distinguished as Coelentera, and showed that they had no special affinity with echinoderms, polyzoa, &c. He divided the Coelentera into a group Hydrozoa, in which the sexually produced embryos were usually set free from the surface of the body, and a group Actinozoa, in which the embryos are detached from the interior of the body and escape generally by the oral aperture.

    0
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  • A great group of Palaeozoic fossils, showing evident affinity to Ferns, has proved to consist of seed-bearing plants allied to Gymnosperms, especially Cycads.

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  • There are no recent stems with a structure quite like that of Sphenophyllum; so far as the primary structure is concerned, the nearest approach is among the Psiloteae, with which other characters indicate some affinity; the base of the stem in Psilotum forms some secondary wood.

    0
    0
  • Professor Nathorst has described a remarkable Devonian plant, Pseudobornia ursina (from Bear Island, in the Arctic Ocean), which shows affinity both with the Equisetales and Sphenophyllales.

    0
    0
  • There seems to be no near affinity between these genera, in which the seed-habit must have arisen independently.

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  • in diameter; the wood, however, was dense, and had the structure of that of an Araucarian Conifer; specimens of the wood have accordingly been commonly referred to the genus Araucarioxylon, and at one time the idea prevailed that wood of this type indicated actual affinity with Araucarieae.

    0
    0
  • The very remarkable plumose seeds described by Renault under the name Gnetopsis are of uncertain affinity, but have much in common with Lagenostoma, the seed of Lyginodendron.

    0
    0
  • Among its Gymnosperms are numerous Cupressineae of African affinity belonging to the genera Callitris and Widdringtonia, and a juniper close to one indigenous in Greece.

    0
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  • Yet, that the Stegocephalia, notwithstanding their great affinity to the reptiles, ought to be included in the batrachians as commonly understood, seems sufficiently obvious from the mere fact of their passing through a branchiate condition, i.e.

    0
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  • The recent addition of a third genus of Aglossa, Hymenochirus (24) from tropical Africa, combining characters of Pipa and Xenopus, has removed every doubt as to the real affinity which connects these genera.

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  • It may be said that, on the whole, the distribution of the batrachians agrees to some extent with that of fresh-water fishes, except for the much less marked affinity between South America and Africa, although even among the former we have the striking example of the distribution of the very natural group of the aglossal batrachians, represented by Pipa in South America and by Xenopus and Hymenochirus in Africa.

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  • Owing to their strong affinity for the hydrogen of organic compounds they often act as bleachers and deodorizers.

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    0
  • The flora and fauna present a large infusion of Ethiopian types; and the fish, with which the river is abundantly stocked, have a great affinity with those of the rivers and lakes of east Africa.

    0
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  • Czerno's affinity for castles meant they couldn't simply blow the place up and hope she survived an avalanche of stone.

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  • You're an off-duty serial killer with an affinity for weapons with blades who believes in imaginary creatures and takes the time to talk to crazy women lying on the beach.

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  • Sasha had an affinity for collecting the worst of the worst -- creatures whose intentions toward humans and immortals alike were as far from the Immortal Code as could be.

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  • A single step affinity purification of recombinant GST by expanded bed adsorption.

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  • Turk feels an affinity with the dour playwright's style.

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  • You should also be able to demonstrate an affinity with the Outdoors and camping.

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  • A reliable assay is needed to be able to measure binding affinity.

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  • This is the reverse of the electron affinity of the chlorine.

    0
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  • The lack of processor affinity also causes less damage with a shared L2 cache.

    0
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  • There is a reduction in cardiac output and an increase in hemoglobin oxygen affinity.

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  • binding affinity.

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  • This material bound, specifically, the extracellular matrix protein laminin in an optical biosensor (Affinity Sensors, Cambridge, UK ).

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  • The antibiotic shows strong affinity for ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane.

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  • Further work is also needed on the affinity chromatography procedure to enable total folic acid to be measured without further HPLC.

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  • codeine phosphate, with a low affinity for opioid receptors, carries minimal risk of physical dependence.

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  • There has also been the suggestion that benzodiazepines can increase the conductance of high affinity GABA A receptors 79.

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  • My affinity for Finchingfield, however tenuous my connection with Spain's Hall, made inspection somehow distasteful.

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  • draughtsman landscape draftsmen all display a marked affinity with the fantastic ruggedness of the Chinese.

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  • elective affinity between capitalism and democracy.

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  • frequent-flier miles or a similar affinity program.

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  • heterogeneous in nature with differences occurring in their affinity and capacity for binding insulin molecules.

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  • inanimate things for which we have a special affinity.

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  • The 60 Ã… gain regions of these devices typically contains 9% indium and 34% aluminum resulting in a high affinity for oxygen.

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  • Rayan's concern for the poor and awareness of Marxist analysis gave him a natural affinity with Latin American liberation theology.

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  • affinity maturation is a consequence of somatic mutation in Ig gene segments.

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  • Various pectin methyltransferase activities with affinity for low and highly methylated pectins.

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  • With increasing attractant concentrations, the MCPs are gradually converted into a fully methylated, low affinity state.

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  • The affinity between other cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, catalytic domains, and the SH2 domains of SHP-1 and SHP-2 will also be analyzed.

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  • processor affinity also causes less damage with a shared L2 cache.

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  • pyrrole group we have enhanced the affinity of this class of receptor for anions.

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  • His affinity also with the unique textures and radical utopianism of Messiaen is no accident.

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  • So, are affinity cards an example of that rare event in business, a genuine win-win?

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  • In this he betrays his affinity with Ezekiel, who taught that it is by the possession of the sanctuary that Israel is sanctified (Ezek.

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  • Ilu ger, without having seen an example, renamed the genus Dicholophus - a term which has since been frequently applied to it - placing it in the curious congeries of forms having little affinity which he called Alectorides.

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  • Of the legal passages that speak of the Sabbath all those which show affinity with the doctrine of the Scribes - regarding the Sabbath as an arbitrary sign between Yahweh and Israel, entering into details as to particular acts that are forbidden, and enforcing the observance by severe penalties, so that it no longer has any religious value, but appears as a mere legal constraint - are post-exilic (Exod.

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  • The reason why the whole of the energy of the current is not available is that heat must always be generated in a wire in which a finite current is flowing, so that, in the case of a battery in which the whole of the energy of chemical affinity is employed in producing a current, the availability of the energy is limited only on account of the resistance of the conductors, and may be increased by diminishing this resistance.

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  • This class bears affinity to some of the phenomena of hypnotism and of certain nervous 1 It is possible that the family of Dr Phelps were unaware of the "Rochester knockings" when the disturbances began in his house at Stratford, Connecticut, in 1850 (see Capron's Modern Spiritualism, its Facts, &c.); but these disturbances, as recorded, have no closer resemblance to the ordinary occurrences at a spiritualistic séance than those which took place at Tedworth in 1661 (see Glanvill's Sadducismus Triumphatus) and at Slawensik in 1806 (see Kerner's Seherin von Prevorst), and others too numerous to mention.

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  • The cult in fact corresponds in its main outlines with the early religious conceptions of Syria and a large part of Anatolia - a correspondence probably explained by a considerable amount of ethnic affinity existing between a large section of the primitive Cretan population and that of southern Asia Minor.

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  • Evidence of an original affinity between Turkoman and Rajput has also been found in the mutual possession by these races of a ruddy skin, so that as ethnographical inquiry advances the Turk appears to recede from his Mongolian affinities and to approach the Caucasian.

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  • But it is obvious to every one who nowadays indulges in the profitless pastime of studying their writings that, as a whole, they failed in grasping the essential difference between homology (or " affinity," as they generally termed it) and analogy - though this difference had been fully understood and set forth by Aristotle himself - and, moreover, that in seeking for analogies on which to base their foregone conclusions they were often put to hard shifts.

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  • He explained chemical combination on the hypotheses that matter consisted of minute corpuscles, that by the coalescence of corpuscles of different substances distinctly new corpuscles of a compound were formed, and that each corpuscle had a certain affinity for other corpuscles.

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  • For example, in phosphorus pentachloride the five units of affinity possessed by the phosphorus atom are satisfied by the five monad atoms of chlorine, but in the trichloride two are disengaged, and, it may be supposed, satisfy each other.

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  • The valency of an element is usually expressed by dashes or Roman numerals placed on the right of its symbol, thus: H', O", B"', C I ", P", mow; but in constructing graphic formulae the symbols of the elements are written with as many lines attached to each symbol as the element which it represents has units of affinity.

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  • In this compound only two of the oxygen atoms are wholly associated with the sulphur atom, each of the remaining oxygen atoms being united by one of its affinities to the sulphur atoms, and by the remaining affinity to an atom of hydrogen; thus H O S ?O H O> The graphic formula of a sulphate is readily deduced by remembering that the hydrogen atoms are partially or entirely replaced.

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  • H O H serves in a measure to express this, three of the atoms of hydrogen being represented as associated with one of the atoms of carbon, whilst the fourth atom is associated with an atom of oxygen which is united by a single affinity to the second atom of carbon, to which, however, the second atom of oxygen is united by both of its affinities.

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  • Herzegovina has more affinity to the Dalmatian mountains, oppressively hot in summer, when the mercury often rises beyond 110° Fahr.

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  • In view of the other points of 1 It has been suggested that Saphon, which is often rather troublesome if rendered "the north," may be a weakened form of .ib'on, a affinity between Joel and Ezekiel, this word inevitably suggests Gog and Magog, and it is difficult to see how a swarm of locusts could receive such a name, or if they came from the north could perish; as the verse puts it, in the desert between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

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  • The insurrection of Bosnia against the Turks only served to increase party discords: for though it aroused the keenest sympathy of all Serbs and Croats, and thus furthered the sense of racial affinity, it gave rise to rival claims upon Bosnia which could be exploited in the interest of Vienna and Budapest.

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  • degenerated parts are darkly stained owing (x 50o diam.) to the calcareous particles having a strong affinity for the haemotoxylin stain.

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  • Here we enter upon one of the most interesting chapters of disorders and modes of disorder of this and of other systems. It has come out more and more clearly of late years that poisons do not betray even an approximately indifferent affinity for all tissues, which indeed a little reflection would tell us to be a priori improbable, but that each tends to fix itself to this cell group or to that, picking out parts for which they severally have affinities.

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  • For he applied himself to manufacture wares having a close affinity with the shocking monstrosities used for sepulchral purposes in ancient Apulia, where fragments of dissected satyrs, busts of nymphs or halves of horses were considered graceful excrescences for the adornment of an amphora or a pithos.

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  • Scott this view is incorrect and there is no affinity between the two groups.

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  • For underneath obvious differences, like the Arminian theology of the Wesleys and the Presbyterian type of their organization, there was latent affinity between a " methodist society " and the original congregational idea of a church; and in practice Methodism, outside the actual control of the Wesleys, in various ways worked out into Congregationalism (see Mackennal, op. cit.

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  • These personal traits determine by selective affinity, working under conditions given by the special local type of tradition and piety, the elements in the Apostolic writings which each was able to assimilate and express - though we must allow also for variety in the occasions of writing.

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  • The marriage was declared invalid ab initio either on the ground of Anne's precontract with Lord Percy or more probably on the ground of the affinity established between Henry and Anne by Henry's previous relations with Mary Boleyn.

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  • No importance can be attached to the presence of horns as an indication of affinity between Arsinoitherium and the Amblypoda; and there are important differences in the structure of the skulls of the two, notably in the external auditory meatus, the occiput, the premaxill.ae, the palatal foramina and the lower jaw.

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  • 47, 48), belong to the genera Chromis, Barbus, Capoeta, Discognathus, Nemachilus, Blennius and Clarias; and there is a great affinity between them and the fish of the East African lakes and streams. There are eight species of Chromis, most of which hatch their eggs and raise their young in the buccal cavities of the males.

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  • Under the head of physics we have the theory of the elements, of sound, heat and cohesion, and finally of chemical affinity - presenting the phenomena of material change and interchange in a series of special forces which generate the variety of the life of nature.

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  • It has no affinity for vegetable fibres, and consequently cotton goods must be mordanted before dyeing with it (see Dyeing).

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  • Jamieson's name stands at the head of a tolerably long list of works in the Bibliotheca britannica; but by far his most important book is the laborious and erudite compilation, best described by its own title-page: An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language; illustrating the words in their different significations by examples from Ancient and Modern Writers; shewing their Affinity to those of other Languages, and especially the Northern; explaining many terms which though now obsolete in England were formerly common to both countries; and elucidating National Rites, Customs and Institutions in their Analogy to those of other nations; to which is prefixed a Dissertation on the Origin of the Scottish Language.

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  • The development of all antagonistic substances which confer the special character on antimicrobic sera, as well as antitoxins, may be expressed as the formation of bodies with specific combining affinity for the organic substance introduced into the system - toxin, bacterium, red corpuscle, &c., as the case may be.

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  • The unarmed Gephyreans (see Gephyrea) are now separated from their former associates and divided into two groups of little affinity, the Sipunculoidea and the Priapuloidea (qq.v.).

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  • In Stauropteris, a genus showing some affinity with Zygopteris, the branched rachis of the fertile frond terminates in fine branchlets, each bearing a single, spherical sporangium, without any differentiated annulus (fig.

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  • She knew that being thrown together again under such terrible circumstances they would again fall in love with one another, and that Nicholas would then not be able to marry Princess Mary as they would be within the prohibited degrees of affinity.

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  • By adding an extra pyrrole group we have enhanced the affinity of this class of receptor for anions.

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  • However, most infants will develop a routine and an affinity for their food-type, making the process much easier over time.

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  • Even an indoor cat may demonstrate an affinity for open windows, so pet owners must exercise vigilance regarding their pet safety measures.

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  • Juster has a great affinity for puns and wordplay, which show up constantly in his novel.

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  • Affinity debit cards help businesses establish strong brand image while providing consumers with a way to earn rewards.

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  • Tempo issues Affinity Debit Cards to partner companies.

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  • You may not realize the company's debit card offer is an Affinity card.

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  • To find out, ask the partner company or look at the back of the card for the Affinity logo.

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  • Companies can tap into the debit card industry by using Affinity cards.

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  • The partner company earns a transactional revenue share when working with Affinity.

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  • Affinity works with its partners to establish the program and to implement it using merchandising and other marketing materials.

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  • Since each company's Affinity card program is different, read the card's terms and agreements before selecting a card.

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  • Vaughn developed an affinity for acting at a young age; shortly after graduating from Lake Forest High School in 1988, he moved out to Los Angeles to become a star.

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  • The youngest Hogan, known for his affinity for fast cars and careless driving, was serving the sentence due to a 2007 accident that gravely injured his friend John Graziano.

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  • He also had an affinity for nudity, and was dubbed "the fat naked guy" by late night talk show host David Letterman.

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  • Boxers seem to have a natural affinity to children.

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  • He had a strong affinity for dogs at an early age.

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  • Shell swirl earrings - Shell earrings are beloved by women with an affinity to the ocean.

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  • The herpes family of viruses share some common characteristics, including the capacity for long life, going into a dormant phase that in some cases can literally last decades following infection, having an affinity for nerve tissue.

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  • Savion Glover is known as an innovative tap dancer, and he discovered his affinity for the dance form at a young age.

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  • While there are various definitions of soulmates most have one thing in a common: with a soulmate you are connected together so deeply that you have a natural affinity for each other, including love, intimacy, and compatibility.

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  • It requires special apparel, an affinity for cropped parachute pants and plaid…beret-like hats reminiscent of Payne Stewart.

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  • Just a glance at Kiely's vibrant designs proves she has a great affinity for intriguing shapes, cheerful motifs and vibrant hues.

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  • In Raiders, Sallah and Indy are old friends and Sallah's large family of nine children have a strong affinity toward Jones.

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  • The top 100 chick flicks that are out there are named such because of the affinity that woman tend to have for romantic comedies.

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  • An ideal choice if you're hoping to embrace the season's affinity for artistic heels, Cookie pairs a sassy wooden platform with a gleaming patent leather upper.

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  • Red, despite its strong affinity with winter holidays, is often considered a "bright neutral."

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  • The site's affinity for shirtless scenes plays well into the hunk theme.

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  • The self-professed average young man, Patrick confesses an affinity for listening to Coldplay, watching his favorite football team, Liverpool, playing football himself and traveling with friends.

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  • An affinity for baseball and a fastball that was clocked at 93 miles per hour got Moore drafted by both the Boston Red Sox and the Baltimore Orioles, but his mother convinced him to go to college before embarking on a sports career.

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  • Somerhalder was raised in Louisiana and maintained an affinity for his southern roots despite a career that has taken him all over the country.

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  • The tats, along with his multi-colored hair, piercings, affinity for dresses and talent for creating trouble, all contribute to Rodman's reputation as one of the most controversial players ever to hit the court.

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  • Whether they feel a real affinity with heavenly bodies, or it's just wishful thinking on their part, a lot of tat enthusiasts have a feathery wing inked on each blade.

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  • One of the more unique traits of the Gemini is their affinity for more than one special color.

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  • First and foremost, it can show your affinity to the sun.

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  • You may feel an affinity for the darker side of things or you may just love those curious little flying mammals.

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  • Professional and amateur zoologists alike may feel an affinity toward or interest in these fascinating night-time creatures; the only mammals with the ability to fly.

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  • Don't forget that the best Internet home businesses are those in which you have a true affinity.

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  • In fact, fat is such a good source of energy humans and other animals are equipped with a natural affinity for the substance to prevent malnutrition or starvation.

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  • Hartford offers disability, life and accident insurance products for associations and affinity groups.

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  • He had previously attempted music, in the form of playing the clarinet at school, but felt no real affinity for it.

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  • His parents gave him a guitar for his 10th birthday - not the present he wanted - but with the help of his uncles, he learned how to play and showed a natural affinity for the instrument.

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  • I have an affinity for Aphrodite (Venus) but Athena (Minerva) or Artemis (Diana) are fun as well.

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  • While Stroud had always had an affinity for the great outdoors, a wilderness canoe trip through Ontario's Temagami region sparked a desire for something new.

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  • Whether it's a bride with an odd affinity toward zebra stripes or a bride that wants every single aspect of her ceremony and reception to include glitter and sequins, David takes the basic theme and turns it into something elegant.

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  • Of course, interpretation is a matter of intuition and skill; oddly, Lyra has an affinity to the artifact and seems to know how to operate it instinctively.

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