Affections sentence example

affections
  • The perpetrator proved to be a thirteen year old girl, scarcely known to the victim, jealous of an older boy's changing affections.
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  • In prison she won the affections of the guards, and was allowed the privilege of writing materials and the occasional visits of devoted friends.
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  • Yet the Australian is capable of strong affections, and the blind (of whom there have always been a great number) are cared for, and are often the best fed in a tribe.
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  • - Externally, sulphur is of use in skin affections.
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  • Sulphur is of use in chronic bronchial affections, ridding the lungs of mucus and relieving cough.
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  • Anne Boleyn, however, remained unmarried, and a series of grants and favours bestowed by Henry on her father between 1522 and 1525 have been taken, though very doubtfully, as a symptom of the king's affections.
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  • Though not distinguished as a preacher, he was successful in winning the affections of his people.
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  • Like Plato, the elder Mill would have put poets under ban as enemies of truth, and he subordinated private to public affections.
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  • In this narrower sense the word has played a great part in ethical systems, which have spoken of the social or parental "affections" as in some sense a part of moral obligation.
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  • The local oedema seen in some nervous affections might be explained on the hypothesis of increased metabolic activity in these areas due to some local nervous stimulation.
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  • In France, Jean Baptiste Senac (1693-1770) wrote also an important work on the affections of the heart.
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  • The town has a spa, whose waters are efficacious in rheumatic affections and diseases of the skin.
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  • This undeniable Providence, the supreme dispenser of our destinies, becomes in the natural course the common centre of our affections, our thoughts, and our actions.
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  • They are especially efficacious in cases of gouty and rheumatic affections, and are much frequented by Swiss invalids, foreign visitors being but few in number.
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  • He was, however, a man of good intentions, strong family affections and considerable ability.
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  • During his stay in the city he riveted more firmly still the affections both of the senate and of the people.
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  • His school sermons were deeply impressive: they rooted religion in the loyalties of the heart and the conscience, and taught that faith might dwell secure amid all the bewilderments of the intellect, if only the life remained rooted in pure affections and a loyalty to the sense of duty.
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  • This disregard of responsibility was partly punished by the use his critics made of it when he became celebrated as a writer on education and a preacher of the domestic affections.'
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  • From this has developed the intramuscular injection of diluted sea-water in the treatment of gastro-enteritis, anaemia and various skin affections.
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  • His heart was kind and his affections were strong; he was magnanimous and disinterested, simple and honest.
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  • But Ammon had little hold on the affections of the Egyptian people.
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  • Such wholesale criticism was bitterly resented, but indeed throughout his career Wellington, cold and punctilious, never secured to himself the affections of officers and men as Marlborough or Napoleon did.
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  • His wife, Faustina, has almost become a byword for her lack of womanly virtue; but she seems to have kept her hold on his affections to the last.
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  • In his Principles of Psychology he twice quotes his point that " what we are conscious of as properties of matter, even down to its weight and resistance, are but subjective affections produced by objective agencies which are unknown and unknowable."
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  • If so, then all we know is these phenomena, affections of consciousness, subjective affections, but produced by an unknown power.
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  • The greater part of the process is a change in the facts of nature before consciousness; and in all that part, at all events, the phenomena evolved must mean physical facts which are not conscious affections, but, as they develop, are causes which gradually produce life and consciousness.
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  • However, with all the author's disclaimers, the general effect left on the reader's mind is that throughout the universe there is an unceasing change of matter and motion, that evolution is always such a change, that it begins with phenomena in the sense of physical facts, gradually issues in life and consciousness, and ends with phenomena in the sense of subjective affections of consciousness.
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  • Similarly, both in First Principles and in the Principles of Psychology, he assigns to us, in addition to our definite consciousness of our subjective affections, an indefinite consciousness of something out of consciousness, of something which resists, of objective existence.
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  • Thus it turns out that the objective agency, the noumenal power, the absolute force, declared unknown and unknowable, is known after all to exist, persist, resist and cause our subjective affections or phenomena, yet not to think or to will.
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  • Nothing could be more like Hume than his final statement that what we are conscious of is subjective affections produced by objective agencies unknown and unknowable.
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  • He vacillated a great deal about our mode of perceiving the external world; but his final view (edition of Reid's works, note D*) consisted in supposing that (1) sensation is an apprehension of secondary qualities purely as affections of the organism viewed as ego; (2) perception in general is an apprehension of primary qualities as relations of sensations in the organism viewed as non-ego; while (3) a special perception of a so-called " secundo-primary " quality consists in " the consciousness of a resisting something external to our organism."
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  • Thou must not sacrifice to private and recent friendships the traditional affections of the papacy.
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  • When he was no longer able to apply his mind to science, he remained content and happy in the exercise of those kindly feelings and warm affections which he had cultivated no less carefully than his scientific powers.
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  • Louise, who concealed great cleverness and a strong will under an appearance of languor and a rather childish beauty (Evelyn the diarist speaks of her "baby face"), yielded only when she had already established a strong hold on the king's affections and character.
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  • Brothers in arms were supposed to be partners in all things save the affections of their " lady-loves."
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  • It is remarkable that Hume does not appear to have been acquainted with Spinoza's analysis of the affections.
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  • Moreover, he had brought from Europe a new manner, full of the affections of ardent youth, and this he wore without ease in a society highly satisfied with itself; the young knight-errant was therefore subjected to considerable ridicule.
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  • But the threatened destruction of the constitution of 1782 quickly restored its author to his former place in the affections of the Irish people.
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  • He would then single out Man from the realm of nature, and, in a treatise De homine, show what specific bodily motions were involved in the production of the peculiar phenomena of sensation and knowledge, as also of the affections and passions thence resulting, whereby man came into relation with man.
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  • He carried out the principle of association into the analysis of the complex emotional states, as the affections, the aesthetic emotions and the moral sentiment, all which he endeavoured to resolve into pleasurable and painful sensations.
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  • The uses of atropine in cardiac affections are still obscure and dubious.
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  • Ramin (about the middle of the 11th century), can compete with Nizami in the wonderful delineation of character and the brilliant painting of human affections, especially of the joys and sorrows of a loving and beloved heart.
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  • Canada, however, where he went as governor-general in 1904, was the part of the British Empire to hold the first place in his affections.
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  • He was respected for his integrity and independence, and a stern outside covered warm affections.
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  • His unstinted generosity to his brothers during his worst times is only one proof of the singular strength of his family affections.
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  • It has been used with success as an antiperiodic and antipyretic in ague, and also as a diuretic in gout and kidney affections.
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  • France, and son of the rebellious Albany, brother of James III.; the constantly veering policy and affections of the queen-mother; and the gold of England, filled fourteen years with distractions, murders, treasons and conspiracies.
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  • Few men in American public life have possessed more intrinsic worth, more independence, more public spirit and more ability than Adams, but throughout his political career he was handicapped by a certain reserve, a certain austerity and coolness of manner, and by his consequent inability to appeal to the imaginations and affections of the people as a whole.
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  • Its waters - hot alkaline springs about twenty in number - are used both for drinking and bathing, and are efficacious in chronic nervous disorders, feminine complaints and affections of the liver and respiratory organs.
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  • This lady, however, was much older than Robert, who repudiated her in 989, fixing his affections upon Bertha, daughter of Conrad the Peaceful, king of Burgundy, or Arles, and wife of Eudes I., count of Blois; and although the pair were related, and the king had been godfather to one of Bertha's children, they were married in 996, a year after the death of Eudes.
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  • The universal custom of sleeping on the house-top in summer promotes rheumatic and neuralgic affections; and in the Koh Daman of Kabul, which the natives regard as having the finest of climates, the mortality from fever and bowel complaint, between July and October, is great, the immoderate use of fruit predisposing to such ailments.
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  • Its waters are efficacious in cases of gout, rheumatism and biliary affections.
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  • The manifold affections of sense are not simply aggregated in the individual, like the heroes in the Trojan horse.
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  • It thinks its system of concepts freely on the occasion of the affections of the receptivity.
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  • His person and mission assumed the first place in their affections and their thinking.
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  • In° India, on the other hand, the institution of caste - even if artificially contrived and imposed by the Indo-Aryan priest and ruler - had at least ample time allowed it to become firmly established in the social habits, and even in the affections, of the people.
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  • This great fact once ascertained, it became clear that the notion that electric phenomena are affections of the luminiferous ether was no longer a mere speculation but a scientific theory capable of verification.
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  • Bacon saw clearly that such a reputation would assuredly alienate the affections of the queen, who loved not to have a subject too powerful or too popular.
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  • These " affections " of vowels are as follows:- (a) I-affection, caused by i in a lost termination: a becomes ai or ei, and e, o, u became y, more rarely ai or ei.
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  • A third great group rises out of the sentiments and affections of man, or the moral energies which he sees working in human life.
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  • Spinoza, the story goes, fell in love with his fair instructress; but a fellow-student, called Kerkering, supplanted him in his mistress's affections by the help of a valuable necklace of pearls which he presented to the young lady.
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  • The queen for some time seems to have secured his affections, and she bore him seven children.
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  • Sulphur waters are chiefly used for painful and stiff joints, chronic skin disease, and chronic catarrhal affections.
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  • Iron waters are used in anaemia and the affections which are frequently associated with it.
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  • They are therefore used largely in chronic gout, rheumatism and in calculous affections of the kidney.
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  • During the paroxysms, or even preceding them, certain sensory disturbances may be experienced, more especially affections of vision, such as ocular spectra, hemiopia, diplopia, &c. Gout, eyestrain and intestinal toxaemia have been put forward as causes of migraine, and Sir W.
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  • The threefold division into passions and affections, self-love and benevolence, and conscience, is Butler's celebrated analysis of human nature as found in his first sermon.
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  • It seems merely to set the stamp of its approbation on certain courses of action to which we are led by the various passions and affections; it has in itself no originating power.
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  • Incidentally we meet there with the doctrines of Pneuma and of tension, of the corporeal nature of the virtues and the affections, and much more to the same effect.
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  • The domestic and social affections, the kindly care of the young and the old, some acknowledgment of marital and parental obligation, the duty of mutual defence in the tribe, the authority of the elders, and general respect to traditional custom as the regulator of life and duty, are more or less well marked in every savage tribe which is not disorganized and falling to pieces.
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  • To offset this feeling Edwards' preached at Northampton during the years 1742 and 174 3 a series of sermons published under the title of Religious Affections (1746), a restatement in a more philosophical and general tone of his ideas as to " distinguishing marks."
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  • As early as 1744 Edwards, in his sermons on the Religious Affections, had plainly intimated his dislike of this practice.
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  • He will not admit that there is any evidence of true virtue in the approbation of virtue and hatred of vice, in the workings of conscience or in the exercises of the natural affections; he thinks that these may all spring from self-love and the association of ideas, from " instinct " or from a " moral sense of a secondary kind " entirely different from " a sense or relish of the essential beauty of true virtue."
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  • In the agitation of their consciences and affections, the disciples have started into groups or clusters along the table, some standing, some still remaining seated.
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  • The philosophers, he says, "are those who are able to grasp the eternal and immutable"; they are "those who set their affections on that which in each case really exists" (Rep. 480).
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  • The same cramping realism clings to him everywhere beyond the domain of politics - in his religion, in his fancies, in his affections.
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  • The hypophosphites have been recommended in pulmonary affections, being said to act as free phosphorus without being irritant, and the glycero-phosphates are certainly useful to stimulate metabolism.
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  • Though himself pious, of blameless morality, hospitable to a fault, and so exempt from avarice, says his secretary Conti, that he could not endure the sight of money, it was Sixtus's misfortune to have had no natural outlet for strong affections except unworthy relatives; and his great vices were nepotism, ambition and extravagance.
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  • Nor did Henry want a French princess; his affections were fixed for the time on Anne Boleyn, and she was the hope of the anticlerical party.
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  • conciliate English affections, but they would not have Spanish control at any price.
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  • When Mary married Darnley she had the ball at her feet; the pair had the best claims to the English succession and enjoyed the united affections of the Catholics.
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  • In the summer of 1638 Charles had long ceased to reign in the affections of his subjects.
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  • Before the end of the year the invasion was repulsed, and the ragged armies of the Revolution had overrun Savoy and the Austrian Netherlands, and were threatening the aristocratic Dutch republic Very few governments in Europe were so rooted in the affections of their people as to be able to look without terror on the challenge thus thrown out to them.
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  • Campbell-Bannermans death in April 1908 he was succeeded as prime minister by Mr Asquith, a leader of far higher personal ability though with less hold on the affections of his party.
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  • The name Weissenburg occurs in three other places; the town of Weissenburg-am-Sand in Bavaria; a Swiss invalid resort in the Niedersimmental, above Lake Thun, with sulphate of lime springs, beneficial for bronchial affections; also a Hungarian comitat (Magyar Fejervar), with Stuhlweissenburg as capital.
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  • English Puritanism lives in the affections of modern readers more than the Protestant schoolmen of the Continent do - Richard Baxter, John Owen, John Howe, Thos.
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  • Odessa is rising in repute as a summer sea-bathing resort, and its mud-baths (from the mud of the limans or lagoons) are considered to be efficacious in cases of rheumatism, gout, nervous affections and skin diseases.
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  • Aristotle goes somewhat further in recognizing the moral value of friendship (c1xAia); and though he considers that in its highest form it can be realized only by the fellowship of the wise and good, he yet extends the notion so as to include the domestic affections, and takes notice of the importance of mutual kindness in binding together all human societies.
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  • It remains to try another psychological basis for ethical construction; instead of presenting the principle of social duty as abstract reason, liable to conflict to any extent naturalness of man's social affections, and demonstrate a normal harmony between these and his self-regarding impulses.
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  • When we speak of a man as good, we mean that his dispositions or affections are such as tend of themselves to promote the good or happiness of human society.
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  • Moral goodness, then, in a " sensible creature " implies primarily disinterested affections, whose direct object is the good of others; but Shaftesbury does not mean (as he has been misunderstood to mean) that only such benevolent social impulses are good, and that these are always good.
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  • On the contrary, he is careful to point out, first, that immoderate social affections defeat themselves, miss their proper end, and are therefore bad; secondly, that as an individual's good is part of the good of the whole " self-affections " existing in a duly limited degree are morally good.
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  • Goodness, in short, consists in due combination, in just proportion, of both sorts of " affections," tendency to promote general good being taken as the criterion of the right degrees and proportions.
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  • his social affections, mental pleasures being superior to bodily, and the pleasures of benevolence the richest of all.
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  • We have seen that goodness of character consists in a certain harmony of self-regarding and social affections.
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  • The view of " human nature " against which Butler preached was not exactly Mandeville's, nor was it properly to be called 2 Three classes of impulses are thus distinguished by Shaftesbury: - (i) " Natural Affections," (2) " Self-affections," and (3) " Unnatural Affections."
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  • He first follows Shaftesbury in exhibiting the social affections as no less natural than the appetites and desires which tend directly to self-preservation; then reviving the Stoic view of the prima naturae, the first objects of natural appetites, he argues that pleasure is not the primary aim even of the impulses which Shaftesbury allowed to be " self-affections "; but rather a result which follows upon their attaining their natural ends.
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  • We have, in fact, to distinguish self-love, the " general desire that every man hath of his own happiness " or pleasure, from the particular affections, passions, and appetites directed towards objects other than pleasure, in the satisfaction of which pleasure consists.
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  • We have seen that in the latter's system the " moral sense " is not absolutely required, or at least is necessary only as a substitute for enlightened self-regard; since if the harmony between prudence and virtue, self-regarding and social impulses, is complete, mere self-interest will prompt a duly enlightened mind to maintain precisely that " balance " of affections in which goodness consists.
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  • There is another side of Shaftesbury's harmony which Butler was ultimately led to oppose in a more decided manner, - the opposition, namely, between conscience or the moral sense and the social affections.
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  • Hutcheson follows Butler again in laying stress on the regulating and controlling function of the moral sense; but he still regards " kind affections " as the'principal objects of moral approbation - the " calm" and " extensive " affections being preferred to the turbulent and narrow - together with the desire and love of moral excellence which is ranked with universal benevolence, the two being equally worthy and necessarily harmonious.
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  • Only in a secondary sense is approval due to certain " abilities and dispositions immediately connected with virtuous affections," as candour, veracity, fortitude, sense of honour; while in a lower grade still are placed sciences and arts, along with even bodily skills and gifts; indeed, the approbation we give to these is not strictly moral, but is referred to the " sense of decency or dignity," which (as well as the sense of honour) is to be distinguished from 1 In a remarkable passage near the close of his eleventh sermon Butler seems even to allow that conscience would have to give way to self-love, if it were possible (which it is not) that the two should come into ultimate and irreconcilable conflict.
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  • While thus maintaining Shaftesbury's "harmony" between public and private good, Hutcheson is still more careful to establish the strict disinterestedness of benevolent affections.
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  • " An action," he says, " is materially good when in fact it tends to the interest of the system, so far as we can judge of its tendency, or to the good of some part consistent with that of the system, whatever were the affections of the agent.
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  • With a little straining these are made to correspond to five chief divisions of Jus, - personal security (benevolence being opposed to the ill-will that commonly causes personal injuries), property, contract, marriage and government; while the first, second and fourth, again, regulate respectively the three chief classes of human motives, - affections, mental desires and appetites.
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  • Notwithstanding his manifold engagements, he found time to attend to the tenderer affections; for it was during his residence at Strassburg that he married, in August 1540, Idelette de Bure, the widow of one Jean Stordeur of Liege, whom he had converted from Anabaptism.
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  • There are two children's hospitals, the climate proving peculiarly beneficial in the treatment of scrofulous affections.
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  • In 1900 an outbreak of "peripheral neuritis" with various skin affections occurred in Lancashire, which was traced to beer made from glucose and invert sugar, in the preparation of which sulphuric acid contaminated with arsenic was said to have been used.
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  • The conclusion reached is that with the exception of forgetfulness and ignorance all the affections are under the lordship of reason, or at all events of pious reason.
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  • That the writer owes no slavish adherence to any philosophical system is plain from his independent treatment of the affections.
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  • The growing disposition of the bourgeois and artisan classes, not in the large towns only, to imitate the intellectuals in desiring to live in closer touch with the rest of Europe as regards social, economic, scientific and political progress, embittered the struggle between the forces of Liberalism and those of Catholicism, powerfully entrenched in the affections of the women and the illiterate masses of the peasantry.
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  • There are several sulphurous springs - one saline, another strongly impregnated with sulphuretted hydrogen - in great repute for gout, rheumatism, skin diseases and affections of the liver and kidneys.
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  • p. 161, Lovanii, 1658, fol.) recommends it for tumours, ulcers of the head and ears, affections of the breast, vomiting, dysentery and fevers.
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  • Will the Dog win the affections of the lovely Jess?
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  • Make room for it, that carnal affections may not vomit and throw it up again.
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  • Use 3. Let the foresight of this glorious estate wean thee from all inordinate affections to human and earthly glory.
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  • He saw him as a rival for his mother's affections and blamed him for hurting his mother in the past.
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  • Michael Gambon is quite superb as Sir John Falstaff, and completely captures the audience's affections from the start.
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  • affections of a capricious teenage girl.
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  • All their thoughts are spent in empty declamations and forms of satire or anger, and these do not subdue affections.
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  • One of his daughters, Fanny, was the object of the affections of Rev Kilvert, who later became a renowned diarist.
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  • What vigor will it infuse into all thy graces and affections!
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  • His affections are there indeed, but they must only move now in the circle of divine holiness, of which gold speaks.
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  • He never lost the affections of his countrymen, but he refrained from an attempt to give practical effect to his opinions, nor did he allow his name to become a new cause of dissension.
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  • The pair went off and found their way eventually to Paris, leaving Musset in Italy, deeply wounded in his affections, but, to do him justice, taking all the blame for the rupture on himself.
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  • But her political ardour was short-lived; she cared little about forms of government, and, when the days of June dashed to the ground her hopes of social regeneration, she quitted once for all the field of politics and returned to her quiet country ways and her true vocation as an interpreter of nature, a spiritualizer of the commonest sights of earth and the homeliest household affections.
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  • As brother, as husband and as friend, his affections were as steadfast as they were warm.
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  • More general in its appeal still is the argument from the affections, which has been beautifully developed in Tennyson's In Memoriam.
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  • Among the reasons which led people to identify the liver with the very source of life, and hence as the seat of all affections and emotions, including what to us are intellectual functions, we may name the bloody appearance of that organ.
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  • In this stage of belief, therefore, the liver is the'seat of all emotions and affections, as well as of intellectual functions, and it is only when with advancing anatomical knowledge the functions of the heart and then of the brain come to be recognized that a differentiation of functions takes place which had its outcome in the assignment of intellectual activity to the brain or head, of the higher emotions and affections (as love and courage) to the heart, while the liver was degraded to the rank of being regarded as the seat of the lower emotions and affections, such as jealousy, moroseness and the like.
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  • Hepatoscopy, or divination through the liver, belongs therefore to the primitive period when that organ summed up all vitality and was regarded as the seat of all the emotions and affections - the higher as well as the lower - and also as the seat of intellectual functions.
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  • The waters are used in cases of liver affections, gout, diabetes and obesity; and the patients must conform during the cure to a strictly regulated diet.
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  • He was not an orator, and though he could express himself forcibly on occasion, his speech was incoherent and devoid of any of the arts of rhetoric. Clarendon notes on his first appearance in parliament that "he seemed to have a person in no degree gracious, no ornament of discourse, none of those talents which use to reconcile the affections of the standers by; yet as he grew into place and authority his parts seemed to be renewed."
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  • Before everything he was an ascetic and a mystic - an ascetic who, though gentle to others, wore out his body by self-denial, so much so that when he came to die he begged pardon of "brother Ass the body" for having unduly ill-treated it: a mystic irradiated with the love of God, endowed in an extraordinary degree with the spirit of prayer, and pouring forth his heart by the hour in the tenderest affections to God and our Lord.
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  • Notwithstanding his insulting language concerning Mary and the fact that he was the "stoutest" in refusing mass, he became one of her chief advisers, but his complete ascendancy over her mind and affections dates from the murder of Rizzio on the 9th of March 1566.
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  • In the earlier form of the legend, it is Artemis, not Arethusa, who is the object of the god's affections, and escapes by smearing her face with mire, so that he fails to recognize her (see L.
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  • He now saw that regard for the public good was too vague an object for the satisfaction of a man's affections.
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  • He gained from the struggle a more catholic view of human happiness, at delight in the poetry of nature and the affections as well as the poetry of heroic unselfishness, a disposition to study more sympathetically the point of view of opponents, a more courteous style of polemic, a hatred of sectarianism, an ambition,, no less noble and disinterested, but moderated to practical' possibilities.
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  • Her place in his affections was filled by the beautiful Giulia Farnese (Giulia Bella), wife of an Orsini, but his love for his children by Vannozza remained as strong as ever and proved, indeed, the determining factor of his whole career.
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  • There seems moreover to have been a sort of rivalry between mother and daughter for the chief place in Necker's affections, and it is not probable that the daughter's love for her mother was increased by the consciousness of her own inferiority in personal charms. Mme Necker was of a most refined though somewhat lackadaisical style of beauty, while her daughter was a plain child and a plainer woman, whose sole attractions were large and striking eyes and a buxom.
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  • The other subjects are Marriage (yabaK aoyos), Continence, the Duties of Bishops, Presbyters, Deacons and Widows, Prophecy, the Soul, the Transmigration of the Soul and the Devil, Angels, the Origin of the World, First Principles and the Divinity of the Logos, Allegorical Interpretations of Statements made with regard to God's anger and similar affections, the Unity of the Church, and the Resurrection.
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  • Sometimes there seem to be surgical cases, like that of a man who had a spear-head extracted from his jaw, and found it laid in his hands when he awoke in the morning, and there are many examples resembling those known at the present day at Lourdes or Tenos, where hysterical or other similar affections are cured by the influence of imagination or sudden emotion.
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  • According to Father Patrick Morrisroe, dean and professor of liturgy at Maynooth, the efficacy of benedictions is fourfold: (1) the excitation of pious emotions and affections of the heart, and by their means the remission of venial sins and of the temporal punishments due for these; (2) freedom from the power of evil spirits; (3) preservation and restoration of bodily health; (4) various other benefits, temporal and spiritual.
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  • For a consideration of these and similar problems, which depend ultimately on the degree in which the affections are regarded as voluntary, see H.
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  • A decree issued by the Neapolitan king (1482) depriving the Sienese of certain territories in favour of Florence entirely alienated their affections from that monarch.
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  • Moreover, the corrupt church had lost its hold on the affections of the people.
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  • The fact that the tubercle bacillus is to be found in the lesions of both has set at rest any misgiving on the subject, and put beyond dispute the fact that so-called scrofulous affections are simply local manifestations of tuberculosis.
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  • A knowledge of the bacteriology of scrofulous affections of bone and joints, such as caries and gelatinous degeneration, has shown that they also are tubercular diseases - that is to say, diseases due to the presence locally of the tubercle bacillus.
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  • The chief work has been the detection of chronic changes in the cortex of the brain, by staining and other histological methods, in degenerative affections of this organ - Theodor Meynert (1833-1892), W.
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  • The principal mineral springs of medicinal value are those of Korbus and Hammam Lif (of remarkable efficacy in rheumatic and syphilitic affections and certain skin diseases), of the Jerid and Gafsa, of El Hamma, near Gabes, and of various sites in the Kroumir country.
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  • The waters are used in cases of lymphatic affections, scrofula, rheumatism, wounds, &c. The principal buildings are a church of the 12th century, the state bathing-establishment and the military hospital; there are also the remains of a castle.
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  • In 1482 he reluctantly accepted a mission to Ferrara, and, regarding earthly affections as snares of the evil one, tried to keep aloof from his family.
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  • (I) In the first place man as an individual is a complex of appetites, passions, affections, more or less perfectly controlled by the central reason.
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  • In his efforts to win the affections of Roman society Trajan was aided by his wife Plotina, who was as simple as her husband, benevolent, pure in character, and entirely unambitious.
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  • Being childless, and with a husband who could not command her respect, her longing for affection led her to form various intimate friendships, above all with the princesse de Lamballe and the comtesse Jules de Polignac, who soon obtained such an empire over her affections that no favour was too great for them to ask, and often to obtain.
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  • She revived that faith; she consolidated her throne; she not only captivated the affections of the multitude, but won the respect of thoughtful men; and all this she achieved by methods which to her predecessors would have seemed impracticable - methods which it required no less shrewdness to discover than force of character and honesty of heart to adopt steadfastly.
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  • 5) recommends them as a remedy in affections of the gums and uvula, ulcerations of the mouth and some dozen more complaints.
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  • He also acquired the affections of Cheke's sister, Mary, and was in 1541 removed by his father to Gray's Inn, without, after six years' residence at Cambridge, having taken a degree.
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  • Used almost exclusively for bathing, they are prescribed for gout, rheumatism, and some scrofulous affections, and their reputed efficacy in alleviating the effects of gun-shot wounds had gained for Teplitz the sobriquet of "the warriors' bath."
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  • Ancestor-worship on this side is also in strong contrast with the teaching of the Gospel, for it is an apotheosis of family affections and supplies a real cement wherewith to bind society together; whereas the Christian Messiah taught that, "If any cometh to me, and hateth not his father E.
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  • But music has also other ends and uses, and on the whole four; namely amusement, virtue, occupation and purgation of the affections; for some men are liable more than others to pity and fear and enthusiasm, but from sacred melodies we see them, when they have heard those which act orgiastically on the soul, becoming settled by a kind of medicine and purgation (teapo - cs), and being relieved with pleasure.
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  • He thinks that he is always speaking of phenomena in the sense of subjective affections; and in spite of his definition, he half unconsciously changes the meaning of evolution from a change in matter and motion, first into a change in states of consciousness, then to a change in social institutions, and finally into a change in moral motives.
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  • In the second place, having declared the noumenal power, which causes phenomena, or conscious affections, to be unknowable, and having left anybody who pleased to make it a god and an object of religion, he proceeds to describe it as if it were known force, and known in two respects as persistent and as resistant force.
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  • Nevertheless, as he believes all the time that everything knowable throughout the whole world of evolution is phenomena in the sense of subjective affections of consciousness, and as he applies Hume's distinction of impressions and ideas as a distinction of vivid and faint states of consciousness to the distinction of ego and non-ego, spirit and matter, inner and outer phenomena, his philosophy of the world as knowable remains within the limits of phenomenalism.
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  • Perhaps the good of agriculture came next in his affections to the claims of empire; and he forwarded all promising schemes for its betterment and organization.
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  • In° India, on the other hand, the institution of caste - even if artificially contrived and imposed by the Indo-Aryan priest and ruler - had at least ample time allowed it to become firmly established in the social habits, and even in the affections, of the people.
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  • His union with Christina was not a happy one, and having fixed his affections upon Margaret von der Saal (d.
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  • Small and slight in person and never robust in health, Robertson Smith was yet a man of ceaseless and fiery energy; of an intellect extraordinarily alert and quick, and as sagacious in practical matters as it was keen and piercing in speculation; of an erudition astonishing both in its range and in its readiness; of a temper susceptible of the highest enthusiasm for worthy ends, and able to inspire others with its own ardour; endowed with the warmest affections, and with the kindest and most generous disposition, but impatient of stupidity and ready to blaze out at whatever savoured of wrong and injustice.
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  • This being established, the main aim of Shaftesbury's argument is to prove that the same balance of private and social affections, which tends naturally to public good, is also conducive to the happiness of the individual in whom it exists.
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  • At present the lord of my affections is one of these bull terriers.
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  • Man wanted a home, a place of warmth, or comfort, first of warmth, then the warmth of the affections.
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  • It is commonly said that this is the difference between the affections and the intellect.
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  • In Romans 1, it says that God has given them up to uncleanness, to vile affections, and to a reprobate mind.
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  • A Tranmere Rovers fanatic 's favorite striker just ca n't stop scoring but his affections turn sour when Super Davie scores once too often.
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  • Puckering up and leaving red lipstick kisses on napkins, collars and love notes has long been a way for women to express their endearing affections.
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  • Lipstick kisses make us giddy, feel good, and remind us that we can show our affections even when we're apart.
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  • You don't have to stop liking this guy, but you can't act on your affections just yet.
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  • LTK: During the airing of Apprentice, some viewers wondered if Sean's affections toward you were merely strategy.
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  • After beating out 24 other bachelors vying for Trista's affections, she chose Ryan Sutter, a firefighter based in Vail, Colorado.
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  • Her big break came in the 2002 feature film Scooby Doo, in which she starred as Mary Jane, the object of Shaggy's affections.
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  • At the finale, upon learning that she had won the affections of Miss Tequila, Miss Morgan declined her advances stating she "…wasn't ready for a relationship with a woman."
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  • A group of guys is chosen to be worthy to compete for Brody's affections.
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  • Their greater awareness of the divorce situation, however, may lead to elaborate and frightening fantasies of abandonment or of being replaced in the affections of the noncustodial parent.
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  • A crush-centric quote can be the focus of a love letter to tell the object of your affections how you really feel.
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  • Asking someone out for a date is a nerve-wracking experience, but the worst the object of your affections is going to say is 'no'.
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  • The difficulty of coming up with something that won't sound like a line to the object of your affections is a difficulty for would-be Romeo's all over the world.
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  • Slip little notes of love in his suitcase, lunch, briefcase, pillow, car, wallet, or shirt pocket where he will find them unexpectedly to remind him of your affections.
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  • Angry partners transfer their affections to someone else.
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  • However, you are then faced with the worry of making it a good date, and that can cause all sorts of fears and anxiety about impressing the target of your affections.
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  • While some may find this to be a bit too literal or sentimental, it's a perfect way to remind your partner of your affections.
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  • He's an unabashed flirt and truly enjoys the chase more than the capture of the lucky woman of his affections.
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  • Once you grasp the depth of passion revealed in a Scorpio male profile, you'll understand why toying with his affections is similar to playing with nitroglycerin.
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  • Jennifer Garner, (Alias, 13 Going on 30) appears on Felicity as Hanna, Noel's old girlfriend and potential rival for Noel's affections.
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  • Kris is torn between her affections for each man, their goals and the horseracing world they live in.
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  • Jesse's devotion to his best friend Tad and Tad's sister Jenny Gardner contributed to Angie's affections.
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  • While Ashley has been partnered with many characters over the years, it is Davidson's chemistry with Eric Braeden's Victor that has made Ashley, Nikki Newman's lifetime rival for Victor's affections.
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  • The bad boy vampire brother created a lot of fans as he competed with Stefan for Elena's affections.
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  • When Mike came back to town, Adam faked his own death to test his bride's affections.
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  • Her brutal affections left Damon bereft, Stefan on his guard and Caroline Forbes became a changed woman when Katherine smothered her in her sleep while she had the blood of Damon in her veins.
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  • In the book series, Jason was kidnapped by a rival for Crystal's affections and bitten repeatedly.
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  • Expressing your love this way generally requires that the recipient of your affections understand a fair amount of French.
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  • All she really wants for Christmas is the object of her affections.
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  • Viewers' heads spun again when a guest appearance on Flavor of Love 2 turned into New York coming back into the house as a competitor for Flav's affections.
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  • Continuing to play on the affections of viewers, the network introduced Confessions of a Teen Idol, which is based on a similar premise.
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  • I Love New York premiered on January 8, 2007, and featured 20 single men hoping to win New York's affections.
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  • Fourteen women were selected to compete for Sabato, Jr.'s affections.
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  • At the end of the first episode of the show, Tully appeared during the elimination meal and asked Sabato, Jr. to let her join the show and the competition for his affections.
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  • On Daisy of Love, Daisy got the chance to step into Bret's shoes as a group of hopeful suitors competed for her affections.
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  • The affections die away - die of their own conscious feebleness and uselessness.
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  • Petroleum has very long been known as a source of light and heat, while the use of crude oil for the treatment of wounds and cutaneous affections, and as a lubricant, was even more general and led to the raw material being an article of commerce at a still earlier date.
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  • His domestic affections were very strong.
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