Affectation sentence example

affectation
  • But there was no affectation in her assumption of a becoming bearing or in her picturesque words.
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  • She's beautiful, truthful, and hilarious, without vanity or affectation, exceptionally clever " .
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  • There is no affectation about them, and as they come straight from your heart, so they go straight to mine.
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  • There is a curious affectation about his style - a falsetto note - which, notwithstanding all his efforts to please, is often irritating to the reader.
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  • Don't indicate - it is an unnecessary affectation.
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  • A man in intellect and courage, yet without conceit or bravado; a woman in sensibility and tenderness, yet without shrinking or weakness; a saint in purity of life and devotion of heart, yet without asceticism or religiosity; a knight-errant in hatred of wrong and contempt of baseness, yet without self-righteousness or cynicism; a prince in dignity and courtesy, yet without formality or condescension; a poet in thought and feeling, yet without jealousy or affectation; a scholar in tastes and habits, yet without aloofness or bookishness; a dutiful son, a loving husband, a judicious father, a trusty friend, a useful citizen and an enthusiastic patriot, - he united in his strong, transparent humanity almost every virtue under heaven.
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  • He renewed former acquaintance, however, with the " poet " Mallet, and through him gained access to Lady Hervey's circle, where a congenial admiration, not to say affectation, of French manners and literature made him a welcome guest.
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  • His style, though marred by Latinisms, is clearer than that of his model Thucydides, and his narrative shows the hand of the practised soldier and politician; the language is correct and free from affectation.
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  • Few come in contact with his writings without feeling his deep spiritual nature and an absolute genuineness and marvellous individuality which seem never to sink into mere routine or affectation.
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  • His style is copious and flexible; abundantly idiomatic, but without any affectation of being so, it carries with it the force and freshness of popular speech, while it lacks not at the same time a flavour of academic culture.
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  • The short-sighted policy of the amir Abdur Rahman in discouraging imports doubtless affected the balance, nor did his affectation of ignoring the railway between New Chaman and Kila Abdulla (on the Peshin side of the Khojak) conduce to the improvement of trade.
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  • In manner he was simple, direct, void of the least affectation, and entirely free from awkwardness, oddity or eccentricity.
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  • They also show that his Oriental fopperies were not so much "purposed affectation" as Froude and others have surmised.
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  • Theirs was the affectation of respectability; if indeed there be an affectation so honorable.
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  • He did not say that the Emperor had kept him, and Prince Andrew noticed this affectation of modesty.
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  • The others all followed, dispirited and shamefaced, and only much later were they able to regain their former affectation of indifference.
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  • Curiously, Apotheosis is used by the Latin Christian poet, Prudentius (c. 400), as the title of a poem defending orthodox views on the person of Christ and other points of doctrine - the affectation of a decadent age.
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  • But he is always ingenious, often witty, and nobody has carried farther than he the harmony of diction, sometimes marred by an affectation of symmetry and an excessive use of antithesis.
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  • The reaction was shortlived; but the same affectation of antiquity is seen in the writings of Apuleius, also an African, who lived a little later than Fronto and was a man of much greater natural parts.
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  • Af ter the death of Holberg, the affectation of Gallicism had reappeared in Denmark; and the tragedies of Voltaire, with their stilted rhetoric, were the most popular dramas of the day.
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  • It would not be difficult to show that the reaction in the i 8th century against literary and class affectation - however editorial and bookish it was in the choice of subjects and forms - was in reality a re-expression of the old themes in the old ways, which had never been forgotten, even when Middle Scots, Jacobean and early 18th-century verse-fashions were strongest.
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  • To him also belongs the great merit of liberating Russian preaching from the fetters of Polish turgidity and affectation by introducing popular themes and a simple style into Orthodox pulpit eloquence.
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  • Fru Nordenflycht wrote with facility and grace; her collection of lyrics, The Sorrowing Turtledove (1743), in spite of its affectation, enjoyed and merited a great success; it was the expression of a deep and genuine sorrow - the death of her husband after a very brief and happy married life.
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  • Such diplomacy in such conditions is paralytic. It cannot speak thrice, with whatever affectation of boldness, without discovering its true character to trained ears; which should be remembered when Disraeli's successes at Berlin are measured.
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  • The third as much less simple; in part a mixture of truth with Byronic affectation, and for the rest (and more significantly), as intimating the resolute exercise of extraordinary powers of control over the promptings and passions by which so many capable ambitions have come to grief.
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  • Perhaps it was the soft light - but the advanced age seemed more an affectation than a true tyranny of the years.
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  • It has sunk into an empty parade; it is a mere affectation of humility, an apology and excuse for something better.
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  • You must know, " said Teddy, with a great affectation of being particular, " Mr.
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  • Juan, it's not his name, yet to keep calling him the Unconscious Argentinean would be a silly affectation.
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  • Perhaps any search for common ground between the Greeks and ourselves is similarly a romantic affectation.
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  • From his Stoic teachers he learned to work hard, to deny himself, to avoid listening to slander, to endure misfortunes, never to deviate from his purpose, to be grave without affectation, delicate in correcting others, "not frequently to say to any one, nor to write in a letter, that I have no leisure," nor to excuse the neglect of duties by alleging urgent occupations.
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  • His Poesies pastorales (1688) have no greater claim to permanent repute, being characterized by stiffness and affectation; and the utmost that can be said for his poetry in general is that it displays much of the limae labor, great purity of diction and occasional felicity of expression.
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  • There is no lack of humour in them, and there is never a hint of affectation in the writing; indeed, the author, doing spontaneously the work nearest to his hand, was very likely unconscious that he was making a contribution to history.
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  • In all his life nothing became him so well as his manner of leaving it; but the fortitude he then showed, even if it was not merely the courage of despair, cannot blind us to the fact that he was little better than a reckless and vicious spendthrift, who was not the less dangerous because his fiercer passions were concealed beneath an affectation of effeminate dandyism.
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  • Moreover, he did not spare his own estate, for in his Sexagesima sermon he boldly attacked the current style of preaching, its subtleties, affectation, obscurity and abuse of metaphor, and declared the ideal of a sermon to be one which sent men away "not contented with the preacher, but discontented with themselves."
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  • All the affectation of interest she had assumed had left her kindly and tear-worn face and it now expressed only anxiety and fear.
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  • The dull, sleepy expression was no longer there, nor the affectation of profound thought.
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  • And the little princess began to cry capriciously like a suffering child and to wring her little hands even with some affectation.
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  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
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  • In language they are still Scottish; if they show any southern affectations, it is (all echoes of the older aureate style notwithstanding) the affectation of Tudor and Elizabethan English.
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  • His refusal to accept a salary, either as commander-in-chief or as president, might have been taken as affectation or impertinence in any one else; it seemed natural and proper enough in the case of Washington, but it was his peculiar privilege.
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  • The first part of the 18th century differs little from the preceding age except that both affectation and bad taste tended to increase; but gradually signs appeared of a literary revolution, which preceded the political and developed into the Romantic movement.
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  • Benedict wisely plays his part in a stolid, straightforward manner; Titmuss goes for sweet sadness but produces only girlish affectation.
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  • "What year did you enter the service?" he asked with that affectation of military bluntness and geniality with which he always addressed the soldiers.
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  • He went to balls and into ladies' society with an affectation of doing so against his will.
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  • This was a weak affectation that found its chief votaries amongst literary men ambitious of an easily earned artistic reputation.
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