Aeroplanes sentence example

aeroplanes
  • Elastic aeroplanes were advocated by a' .i?
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  • The cardinal idea was to force the aeroplanes (slightly elevated at their anterior margins) forwards, kite-fashion, by means of powerful vertical screw propellers driven at high speed - the greater the horizontal speed provided by the propellers, the greater, by implication, the lifting capacity of the aerodrome.
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  • The machine was furnished with two wheels and vertical supports which depended from the anterior parts of the aeroplanes and supported it when it touched the ground FIG.
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  • Aeroplanes are made at Prague and Plzen (Pilsen).
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  • - Wenham's system of Aeroplanes designed to carry a man.
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  • Several inventors succeeded in making models fly by the aid of aeroplanes and screws, as, e.g.
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  • It was hoped that when the aeroplanes were wedged forward in the air by vertical screws, or by the body to be flown, each aeroplane would rest or float upon a stratum of undisturbed air, and that practically the aeroplanes would give the same support as if spread out horizontally.
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  • They were all constructed on a common principle, and were provided with extensive flying surfaces in the shape of rigid aeroplanes inclined at an upward angle to the horizon, and more or less fixed on the plan advocated by Henson.
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  • These investigators began their work in 1900, and at an early stage introduced two characteristic features - a horizontal rudder in front for steering in the vertical plane, and the flexing or bending of the ends of the main supporting aeroplanes as a means of maintaining the structure in proper balance.
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  • It consisted of the following parts: - (a) A system of aeroplanes arranged like the capital letter T at a certain upward angle to the horizon and bearing a general resemblance to box kites; (b) a pair of very light propellers driven at a high speed; and (c) an exceedingly light and powerful petrol engine.
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  • He constructed models to fly by three different methods: - (a) by means of screws acting vertically upwards; (b) by aeroplanes propelled horizontally by screws; and (c) by wings which FIG.
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  • There were also side aeroplanes arranged in tiers, and large aeroplanes in front, which were pivoted and served for vertical steering.
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  • Largely with the view of studying the problem of maintaining equilibrium, several experimenters, including Otto Lilienthal, Percy Filcher and Octave Chanute, cultivated gliding flight by means of aeroplanes capable of sustaining a man.
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  • Captain McCudden has at the present time accounted for 54 enemy aeroplanes.
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  • I was just making paper aeroplanes in the dressing room.
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  • Saturday Hazel and Len put on a free air display with many military aeroplanes flying over on their way to a display.
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  • It is odd that incidents involving supposedly civil aeroplanes similar to that which the Miami terrorists provoked years later were among the pretexts included.
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  • The early church had neither e-mail nor jet aeroplanes.
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  • Small numbers of Royal Flying Corps aeroplanes are kept at readiness to combat possible enemy airship raids.
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  • The poorly armed Ethiopians were no match for Italy's modern tanks and aeroplanes.
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  • The fully trained envelope stuffer sneaks off for expensive lunches, trips to the golf course, learning to fly aeroplanes etc.
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  • We all scrambled on deck and could hear the distant throb of aeroplanes, they were obviously coming toward us.
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  • On the contrary, it favours the belief that it should be a compact and moderately heavy and powerful structure, which trusts for elevation and propulsion entirely to its flying appliances - whether actively moving wings, or screws, or aeroplanes wedged forward by screws.
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  • The superimposed aeroplanes (a, b, c) in this machine contained a sustaining area of 28 sq.
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  • 8 and 9 cut out in paper to realize that extensive, inert, horizontal aeroplanes' in a flying machine would be a mistake.
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  • These surfaces may be conferred on artificial wings, aeroplanes, aerial screws or similar structures; and these structures, if we may judge from what we find in nature, should be of moderate size and elastic. The power of the flying organs will be increased if they are driven at a comparatively high speed, and particularly if they are made to reverse and reciprocate, as in this case they will practically create the currents upon which they are destined to rise and advance.
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  • This consisted of a small elastic aeroplane placed aft or behind the principal aeroplane which is also elastic. The two elastic aeroplanes extended horizontally and made a slight upward angle with the horizon, the angle made by the smaller aeroplane (the rudder).
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  • His experiments proved that two elastic aeroplanes united by a central shaft or shafts, and separated by a wide FIG.
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  • Wenham, thinking to improve upon Henson, invented in 1866 what he designated his aeroplanes.'
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  • The aeroplanes are aeronaut attached to main kept in parallel plane by spar.
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  • Stringfellow, however, stated that it occasionally left the wire and was sustained by its aeroplanes alone.
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  • This accomplished it was hoped that the weight of the machine would gradually be thrown upon the aeroplanes in the same way that the weight of certain birds - the eagle, e.g.
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  • Once in the air the aeroplanes, it was believed, would become effective in proportion to the speed attained.
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  • The bodies, frames and aeroplanes of the aerodromes were strengthened by vertical and other supports, to which were attached aluminium wires to ensure absolute rigidity so far as that was possible.
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  • His aeroplanes were variously shaped, and were, as a rule, concavo-convex, the convex surface being directed upwards.
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  • They threw themselves from natural or artificial elevations, or, facing the wind, they ran or were dragged forwards against it until they got under way and the wind caught hold of their aeroplanes.
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  • Largely in consequence of this progress, and partly no doubt owing to the stimulus given by the activity of builders of dirigible balloons, the construction of motor-driven aeroplanes began to attract a number of workers, especially in France.
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  • The rudder for lateral steering was placed about 21 metres behind the main surfaces and was formed of two vertical pivoted aeroplanes.
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  • The lever by which they were turned was connected with the device by which the ends of the main aeroplanes could be flexed simultaneously though in opposite directions; i.e.
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  • The only reason, it is clear, why no one hijacks aeroplanes out of Heathrow is that no one particularly wants to.
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  • The area of the aeroplanes was very nearly 4000 sq.
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  • About a year later Henry Farman made several short flights on a machine of the biplane type, consisting of two main supporting surfaces one above the other, with a box-shaped vertical rudder behind and two small balancing aeroplanes in front.
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  • About 3 metres in front of them was arranged a pair of smaller horizontal j aeroplanes, shaped like a long narrow ellipse, which formed the rudder that effected changes of elevation, the driver being able by means of a lever to incline them up or down according as he desired to ascend or descend.
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  • Fixity of all the parts was secured by a tubular mast extending upwards and downwards through about the middle of the craft, and from its extremities ran stays of aluminium wire to the tips of the aeroplanes and the end of the tubular backbone.
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  • Again, the practical engineers who are building aeroplanes, and those who are making practical tests by actual flight in those machines, cannot be called "researchers"; that term should be confined to the members, for example, of the scientific committee appointed by the British Government in 1909 to make investigations regarding aerial construction and navigation.
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  • Armour, 2 and elastic aeroplanes, wings and screws by Alphonse Penaud.3 Penaud's experiments are alike interesting and instructive.
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  • The wings, or aeroplanes, four in number, consisted of light frames of tubular aluminium steel covered with china silk.
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