Advowson sentence example

advowson
  • The Benefices Act 1898, however, now prohibits the grant of a lease of an advowson.
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  • In 1547 the king granted the advowson to the Lord Protector, Edward Seymour, duke of Somerset.
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  • You hold the advowson to Deerhurst church (the right to appoint the incumbent to be minister of the parish ).
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  • Sir George Dalston also sold the advowson to the Rev. Thos.
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  • He intended coming to Foxearth next year, having purchased the advowson of Foxearth and has built several houses there.
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  • Page 69, note f: In 9 John Robert claimed the advowson of Wimpole, co.
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  • Thereafter the lord of the manor retained the advowson of the mother church, Lord Amherst of Hackney being patron in 1987.
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  • It abolished the sale by auction of an advowson in gross, and empowered a bishop to refuse to institute or admit a presentee to a benefice on a number of specified grounds: among others, on the ground of possible corrupt presentation through a year not having elapsed since the last transfer of the right of patronage, and constituted a new court to hear appeals against a bishop's refusal to institute.
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  • The right of presentation to some 850o benefices or " livings " is in the hands of private persons; the right is regarded in law as property and is, under certain restrictions for the avoidance of gross simony, saleable (see Advowson).
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  • The earliest use of the word in English appears to have been in the special ecclesiastical sense of the holder of an advowson, the right of presentation to a benefice.
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  • The village and valley belonged of old to the emperor, who in 1234 gave the advowson to the Knights of St Lazarus, by whom it was sold in 1272 to the Austin Canons of Interlaken, on the suppression of whom in 1528 it passed to the state.
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  • Stubbs says of it: "The law of dower, of advowson, of appeal for felonies, is largely amended; the institution of justices of assize is remodelled, and the abuses of manorial jurisdiction repressed; the statute De religiosis, the statutes of Merton and Gloucester, are amended and re-enacted.
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  • At what period the right of advowson arose is uncertain; it was probably the result of gradual growth.
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  • Consequently where the right of patronage (the right of the patron to present to the bishop the person whom he has nominated to become rector or vicar of the parish to the benefice of which he claims the right of advowson) remains attached to the manor, it is called an advowson appendant, and passes with the estate by inheritance The distinction between nomination to a living and presentation is to be noted.
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  • But where, as is often the case, the right of presentation has been sold by itself, and so separated from the manor, it is called an advowson in gross.
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  • An advowson may also be partly appendant, and partly in gross, e.g.
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  • In a presentative advowson, the patron presents a clergyman to the bishop, with the petition that he be instituted into the vacant living.
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  • In a collative advowson the bishop is himself the patron, either in his own right or in the right of the proper patron, which has lapsed to him through not being exercised within the statutory period of six months after the vacancy occurred.
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  • In a donative advowson, the sovereign, or any subject by special licence from the sovereign, conferred a benefice by a simple letter of gift, without any reference to the bishop, and without presentation and institution.
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  • Briefly, it prevents the dealing with the right of presentation as a thing apart from the advowson itself; increases the power of the bishops to refuse the presentation of unfit persons, and removes several abuses which had arisen in the transfer of patronage.
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  • An advowson may, however, be sold during a vacancy, though that will not give the right to present to that vacancy; and a clerk may buy an advowson even though it be only an estate for life, and present himself on the next vacancy.
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  • The right of presentation may be exercised by its owner whether he be an infant, executors, trustees, coparceners (who, if they cannot agree, present in turn in order of age) or mortgagee (who must present the nominee of the mortgagor), or a bankrupt (who, although the advowson belongs to his creditors, yet has the right to present to a vacancy).
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  • The true patron can, however, exercise his right to present at the next vacancy, and can reserve the advowson from an usurper at any time within three successive incumbencies so created adversely to his right, or within sixty years.
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  • A church was built, probably in the iith century, and from 1301 to 1.535 the advowson, tithes, &c., belonged to the abbot of Halesowen.
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