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adopted

adopted Sentence Examples

  • They had two adopted children already.

  • In a way, Carmen and Alex had adopted a family.

  • The answer came swiftly - because she no longer thought of him as adopted.

  • Still, if Señor Medena adopted Dulce when she was a baby and raised her, then he was her father - blood relative or not.

  • It shouldn't make any difference if he's adopted.

  • It won't make any difference to you whether they are adopted or biological - not in how much you love them or how you treat them.

  • Unfortunately, there is no one left alive to salute the LeBlanc and Betsy and I want our adopted daughter Claire to know she is fully a part of our lives.

  • Dusty looked at his adopted sister again.

  • Damian himself would be overjoyed, and Jule-- the third adopted brother in their threesome-- ecstatic.

  • He hadn't trusted anyone outside of his adopted brothers-- and Sofi-- since he was ten.

  • His memories and thoughts played like home videos, similar to those of her mate, Damian, and his adopted brothers.

  • Damian laughed, thrilled to be back with his adopted brother and to see the glow in his face.

  • After a childhood filled with foster homes, she feared getting too comfortable, even in the home of the man who adopted her twelve years ago, when she was ten.

  • No. He adopted me when I was ten.

  • Her father sent her to the store for her own things since she was adopted.

  • As different as night and day, they were his adopted brothers—and the only men in the universe he trusted with his life.

  • As his adopted brothers in the war against evil, the two of them were his equals.

  • He'd been alone since, except for his two adopted brothers.

  • He strode down the hallway to his office, his two adopted brothers following.

  • As for Fred, he was downright ecstatic about a baby in his adopted family—hang the underlying circumstances of the blessed event.

  • Back on the pavement, Dean pedaled past Tom, a well-known wild turkey who'd in past months adopted a location on the highway from which he never seemed to stray more than a few hundred yards.

  • He knew I was adopted by my stepfather, but he wasn't sure what I'd been told, so he just kept quiet.

  • They were fortunate - fortunate to have each other and fortunate to have adopted two wonderful children.

  • That's why we went ahead and adopted her.

  • The Great Pyrenees dog had adopted the buffalo calves shortly after they were born.

  • No apologies, no regrets, she repeated the mantra she adopted when Wynn first diagnosed her as terminal.

  • The Code had always been his foundation in a world that adopted him despite his origins.

  • He didn.t know what happened to Darkyn, but Death adopted him, raised him, and trained him to be the most ruthless of all assassins.

  • If that were the best Ne'Rin could say of the difficult woman … She should have settled by this point, adopted her role and been properly behaved.

  • Unless he claims to be Donnie's father or he's adopted the boy, I doubt he'd have any rights to see him either.

  • Did you see how she adopted the Annie Quincy persona?

  • Scouts are reporting it's overrun with demons and Darkyn has adopted it as his terra headquarters for his trips here from Hell.

  • "Put on your glasses, you'll go blind doing that," Dean said, handing Fred his beer and reclaiming his rocker from Mrs. Lincoln, the large black cat that had adopted the pair the prior February.

  • Being a stay-at-home mother had always been her career choice, but that wasn't going to be an option – unless they adopted children.

  • Many times people gave up trying and adopted – only to immediately become pregnant.

  • She had thought of the stress on an adopted baby before, but in this instance, her entire focus had been on Lori.

  • "I need my own space, like Jule and Dusty," Darian continued, referring to their adopted brothers.

  • Jenn ignored him and went to the punching bag she'd adopted as hers.

  • Her mate, the White God Damian, sat with his adopted brothers, the assassin Dusty and the Original Immortal Jule.

  • He turned to see Yully in the hallway outside the study, holding one of the dozen cats they'd adopted.

  • Alex had taught Jonathan to shoot the first year after they had adopted him, but today he still got the same precautionary lecture that her father had given her.

  • I know I said I wanted five children, but that was two adopted children and a set of twins ago.

  • The boy you adopted is now an animal without restraint.

  • The ten-year-old child she adopted and turned into a killer started as a weapon with no more attachment to her than a sword or dagger.

  • Her adopted son was no longer needed in her world.

  • No one outside the woman who adopted me and turned me into a killing machine.

  • The true method of science which he possessed forced him to condemn as useless the entire form which Schelling's and Hegel's expositions had adopted, especially the dialectic method of the latter, whilst his love of art and beauty, and his appreciation of moral purposes, revealed to him the existence of a transphenomenal world of values into which no exact science could penetrate.

  • The two books mentioned remained unnoticed by the reading public, and Lotze first became known to a larger circle through a series of works which aimed at establishing in the study of the physical and mental phenomena of the human organism in its normal and diseased states the same general principles which had been adopted in the investigation of inorganic phenomena.

  • At the Hague Conference of 1899 the position of irregular combatants was one of the subjects dealt with, and the rules there adopted were reaffirmed at the Conference of 1907.

  • He adopted the economic principles of List, and founded a society, the "Vedegylet," the members of which were to consume none but home produce.

  • During his tenancy of office the system adopted at Shanghai was applied to the other treaty ports, so that when on Mr Lay's resignation Mr Hart was appointed inspector-general of foreign customs, he found himself at the head of an organization which collected a revenue of upwards of eight million taels per annum at fourteen treaty ports.

  • The old method of growing mushrooms in ridges out of doors, or on prepared beds either level or sloping from a back wall in sheds or cellars, may generally be adopted with success.

  • This is only one of the many Greek legends adopted by the Romans for the purpose of connecting places in Italy with others of likesounding name in Greece.

  • The first constitution of 1863 was superseded by the present instrument which was adopted August 1872 and was amended in 1880, 1883 and 1902.

  • For an account of the Virginia convention of 1861, which adopted the Ordinance of Secession, see Virginia.

  • In 1872, an entirely new constitution was adopted.

  • The legislature of the latter state in 1873 adopted a report declaring that between 1822 and 1861, during which period the debt had been incurred, the western counties had paid an excess of taxes, more than equal to the amount which had been expended in the west for the purposes for which the debt had been incurred, and concluded with the statement: " West Virginia owes no debt, has no bonds for sale and asks no credit."

  • Apotheosis after his death, being in the hands of the senate, did not at once cease, even when Christianity was officially adopted.

  • Positive law, at least in progressive societies, is constantly tending to fall behind public opinion, and the expedients adopted for bringing it into harmony therewith are three, viz, legal fictions, equity and statutory legislation.

  • The four-book numbering is now the current one and is adopted in this article though there is little doubt that there were originally four books besides the Cynthia.

  • In 1814-1815, before the decrees of the Vienna Congress were known, an extraordinary attempt was made by Philippe d'Auvergne of the British navy, the cousin and adopted son of the last duke, to revive the ancient duchy of Bouillon.

  • On the arrival of the news that Hyder had descended from the highlands of Mysore, cut to pieces the only British army in the field, and swept the Carnatic up to the gates of Madras, he at once adopted a policy of extraordinary boldness.

  • Her children he adopted as his own; and it was chiefly for her sake that he desired the peerage which was twice held out to him.

  • He adopted the name Grynaeus from the epithet of Apollo in Virgil.

  • The method of counting the total number of revolutions gives more friction and is less convenient than Repsolds', and no provision seems to be made for illuminating the micrometer head in the practical and convenient plan adopted by Repsolds.

  • Between 1283 and 1290, a Bavarian disciple of Wolfram's 2 adopted the story and developed it into an epic poem of nearly 8000 lines, incorporating episodes of Lohengrin's prowess in tournament, his wars with Henry I.

  • Some reforms were adopted, the public peace was proclaimed without any limitation of time and a general tax was levied.

  • His financial affairs he had entrusted to the care of the abbe Picot, and as his literary and scientific representative he adopted Mersenne.

  • at Liege (September 1633), with the words " although he professes that the [Copernican] theory was only adopted by him as a hypothesis."

  • The doctrine of the circulation of the blood, which Descartes adopted from Harvey, supplied additional arguments in favour of his mechanical theory, and he probably did much to popularize the discovery.

  • In 1677 the university of Caen adopted not less stringent measures against Cartesianism.

  • Mitchell (1803-1884), who prepared a code that was immediately adopted in Scotland as the standard laws.

  • This name was adopted for the new gas.

  • He captured it in 1215, but it was not till 1284 that it was adopted as the imperial residence in lieu of Karakorum in the Mongol steppes by his grandson Kublai.

  • The university adopted the reformed faith in 1 534, and in 1537 a Protestant theological seminary, a residential college - the so-called Stift - was incorporated with it.

  • But the Philharmonic Society adopted the Diapason Normal in 1896, and the military bands have not gone with it.

  • There would then have been less disturbance owing to the breath of the players and heat of the theatres or concert-rooms. It would be a great advantage to get this higher grade generally adopted.

  • The name Gheg (Gege-a) is not adopted by the Ghegs themselves, being regarded as a nickname; the designation Tosk (Toske-a) is restricted by the Tosks to the inhabitants of a small region north of the lower Viossa (Toskeria).

  • The costume of the Tosks differs from that of the Ghegs; its distinctive feature is the white plaited linen fustanella or petticoat, which has been adopted by the Greeks; the Ghegs wear trews of white or crimson native cloth adorned with black braid, and a short, close-fitting jacket, which in the case of wealthy persons is embellished with gold lace.

  • The groundwork, so far as it can be ascertained, and the grammar are Indo-European, but a large number of words have been borrowed from the Latin or Italian and Greek, and it is not always easy to decide whether the mutilated and curtailed forms now in use represent adopted words or belong to the original vocabulary.

  • In the use of these no uniform system has yet been adopted.

  • The archbishop opened the conference with an address: deliberation followed; committees were appointed to report on special questions; resolutions were adopted, and an encyclical letter was addressed to the faithful of the Anglican Communion.

  • For large public buildings, factories, &c., heating by steam is generally adopted on account of the rapidity with which heat is available, and the great distance from the boiler at which warming is effected.

  • This method is frequently adopted in combined schemes of heating and ventilating; the fresh air is warmed by being passed over their surfaces previously to being admitted through the gratings into the room.

  • This method differs from that adopted in the cylinder system, where all services are led from the top of the cylinder.

  • With the success of this undertaking in view it is a matter of wonder that the example set in this instance has not been adopted to a much greater extent elsewhere.

  • There seems but little doubt that Napier was the first to make use of a decimal separator, and it is curious that the separator which he used, the point, should be that which has been ultimately adopted, and after a long period of partial disuse.

  • His own children, who sign deeds along with him, use every mode except Napier, the form now adopted by the family, and which is comparatively modern.

  • In 1902 a city-and-county of Denver was created with extensive powers of framing its own charter, and in 1904 a charter was adopted.

  • It adopted a confession of faith and a book of order or discipline.

  • In 1851 the system now in force was adopted.

  • During the reign of Edward, the title of superintendent was often adopted instead of bishop, and it will be recollected that John Knox was an honoured worker in England with the title of superintendent during this reign.

  • They adopted a purely Presbyterian system which was published as the Orders of Wandsworth.

  • Without setting aside the Confession as the church's standard, twenty-four "Articles of the Faith" have been adopted.

  • The synod seems to have remained without a constitution and without subscription until 1729, when it adopted the Westminster standards.

  • The two parties united under the act of 1729, which adopted the Westminster symbols "as being, in all the essential and necessary articles, good forms of sound words and systems of Christian doctrine."

  • The Old Side adopted the academy at New London, Chester (disambiguation)|Chester county, Pennsylvania, which had been organized by Francis Alison in 1741, as their own; but the New London school broke up when Alison became a professor in the Philadelphia Academy (afterwards the university of Pennsylvania).

  • At the close of the Civil War this Southern Church adopted the name of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States.

  • The fiction of Belisarius wandering as a blind beggar through the streets of Constantinople, which has been adopted by Marmontel in his Belisaire, and by various painters and poets, is first heard of in the 10th century.

  • Its Prescript or constitution, adopted in 1867, and revised in 1868, provided for the following organization: The entire South was the Invisible Empire under a Grand Wizard, General N.

  • Another disturbing influence has been the high protective tariffs, adopted during the closing years of the century, which increased the costs of living more rapidly than the wages for labour, and compelled thousands of immigrants to seek employment elsewhere.

  • Next year a large programme of railway expansion was adopted, at an estimated cost to the state of 14o,000,000, and from 1880 to 1882 nearly 40,000,000 was expended and some 18cc m.

  • Cellular imprisonment was, however, partially adopted for persons awaiting trial., Central prisons, in which prisoners lived and worked in association, had been in existence from the commencement of the i9th century.

  • These prisons received all sentenced to short terms of imprisonment, the long-term convicts going to the bagnes (the great convict prisons at the arsenals of Rochefort, Brest and Toulon), while in 1851 transportation to penal colonies was adopted.

  • Recruiting and Strength.EJniversal compulsory service was adopted after the disasters of 1870-1871, though in principle it had been established by Marshal Niels reforms a few years before that date.

  • Some information as to the types of fortification adopted in.

  • It was afterwards adopted by other cities, and first appears on a Florentine battlefield in 1228.

  • He now took the lead in the reform of the pronunciation of Greek, his views after considerable controversy being universally adopted.

  • He early adopted Protestant views, a fact which brought him into prominence when Edward VI.

  • The first family, Phascolomyidae, is typified by the wombats; but according to the view adopted by Mr H.

  • During the draft riots in July he proclaimed the city and county of New York in a state of insurrection, but in a speech to the rioters adopted a tone of conciliation - a political error which injured his career.

  • The Catalans, who had adopted the cause of Charles and who had grievances of their own, called in a succession of foreign pretenders.

  • During 1906 a more rational view of the value of immigration was adopted by the various state governments and by the federal government, and immigration to Australia is now systematically encouraged.

  • A considerable number of men are engaged in the various states on alluvial fields, in hydraulic sluicing, and dredging is now adopted for the winning of gold in river deposits.

  • This conference adopted an address to the queen expressing its loyalty and attachment, and submitting certain resolutions which affirmed the desirability of an early union, under the crown, of the Australasian colonies, on principles just to all, and provided that the remoter Australasian colonies should be entitled to admission upon terms to be afterwards agreed upon, and that steps should be taken for the appointment of delegates to a national Australasian convention, to consider and report upon an adequate scheme for a federal convention.

  • These resolutions were slightly altered by the conference, and were adopted in the following form: - 1.

  • In 1894 an unofficial convention was held at Corowa, at which the cause of federation was strenuously advocated, but it was not until 1895 that the movement obtained new life, by reason of the proposals adopted at a meeting of premiers convened by Mr G.

  • The third and final session was opened in Melbourne on the 10th of January 1898, but Queensland was still unrepresented; and, after further consideration, the draft bill was finally adopted on the 16th of March and remitted to the various colonies for submission to the people.

  • The Enabling Bill passed the various stages in the parliament of that colony, and the question was then adopted by referendum.

  • In New South Wales, whose example was followed by Western Australia, the machinery adopted for fixing the statutory rate of wages was of a somewhat different type.

  • The eighty-one canons which were adopted reflect with considerable fulness the internal life and external relations of the Spanish Church of the 4th century.

  • After being slightly modified, the plan was adopted in 1856 by an international commission of civil engineers to which it had been submitted.

  • In the course of centuries, however, they were absorbed into the Babylonian population; the kings adopted Semitic names and married into the royal family of Assyria.

  • On the collapse of the rebellion he fled to Turkey, adopted Mahommedanism, and under the name of Murad Pasha served as governor of Aleppo, at which place, at the risk of his life, he saved the Christian population from being massacred by the Moslems. Here he died on the 6th of September 1850.

  • The highest form of the doctrine is scientific materialism, by which term is meant the doctrine so commonly adopted by the physicist, zoologist and biologist.

  • Among the more civilized, however, the Malay numerals up to ten are adopted by the Sakai.

  • Vermont has been governed under the constitution of 1777, that of 1786 and that of 1793, with twentyeight amendments, of which the first was adopted in 1828, the second to thirteenth in 1836, the fourteenth to twenty-third in 1850, the twenty-fourth, twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth in 1870, and the twenty-seventh and twenty-eighth in 1883.

  • Propositions to establish the judiciary on a more permanent tenure were also voted down in 1814, 1822, 1857 and 1870, and the state still elects its judges for two years' terms. On its own suggestion, the council of censors was abolished in 1870 and the present method of amending the constitution was adopted.

  • 16-17, July 24-25, September 25-28, October 30), and on the 1 5th of January 1777 adopted a declaration of independence, assumed the name New Connecticut and appointed Dr Jonas Fay (1 737 -, 818), Thomas Chittenden (1730-1797), Hemon Allen (1740-1788), Dr Reuben Jones and Jacob Bayley a committee to submit their proceedings to the Continental Congress.

  • The Latinizing Armenians adopted it from Rome in the crusading epoch.

  • Seward's Travels around the World (New York, 1873), by his adopted daughter, Olive R.

  • sessiliflora in the New Forest, has been adopted by foresters as a general term for this kind of oak; it seems to be the most prevalent form in Germany and in the south of Europe.

  • The law was ably and justly administered, and Irish trade was admitted to the same privileges as English, enjoying the same rights in foreign and colonial trade; and no attempt was made to subordinate the interests of the former to the latter, which was the policy adopted both before and after Cromwell's time, while the union of Irish and English interests was further recognized by the Irish representation at Westminster in the parliaments of 1654, 1656 and 16J9.

  • He was not actually the personal disciple of either, but he adopted their methods, though without the consistency and boldness of the first-named.

  • It is characteristic of Fichte's almost excessive receptiveness that in his latest published work, Der neuere Spiritualismus (1878), he supports his position by arguments of a somewhat occult or theosophical cast, not unlike those adopted by F.

  • Various arrangements are adopted; the one indicated in fig.

  • These children could be legitimized by their father's acknowledgment before witnesses, and were often adopted.

  • They then ranked equally in sharing their father's estate, but if not adopted, the wife's children divided and took first choice.

  • The child was then adopted to care for the parents' old age.

  • They even, in some cases, found the estate for the adopted child who was to relieve them of a care.

  • If the adopted child failed to carry out the filial duty the contract was annulled in the law courts.

  • Slaves were often adopted and if they proved unfilial were reduced to slavery again.

  • A craftsman often adopted a son to learn the craft.

  • A man who adopted a son, and afterwards married and had a family of his own, could dissolve the contract but must give the adopted child one-third of a child's share in goods, but no real estate.

  • Vestals frequently adopted daughters, usually other vestals, to care for their old age.

  • If the adopted child discovered his true parents and wanted to return to them, his eye or tongue was torn out.

  • An adopted child was a full heir, the contract might even assign him the position of eldest son.

  • 17 and a thickness of insulating material which formerly would have been considered quite insufficient is now very generally adopted with complete success.

  • The subjection of the core to a hydraulic pressure of four tons to the square inch and an electric pressure of 5000 volts from an alternating-current transformer has been adopted, by one manufacturer at least, to secure the detection of masked faults which might develop themselves after submergence.

  • Since by international agreement the wilful damage of a cable has been constituted a criminal offence, and the cable companies have avoided crossing the fishing banks, or have adopted the wise policy of refunding the value of anchors lost on their cables, the number of such fractures has greatly diminished.

  • 18), although general in America, is not adopted in England.

  • the working of several instruments from one set of batteries or accumulators, is adopted, the positive and negative currents have to be sent from independent batteries, as shown by fig.

  • Four years later Varley patented his artificial cable, which was the first near approach to a successful solution of the duplex problem on the principle now adopted.

  • Delany (which was adopted to a limited extent in Great Britain, but has now been entirely discarded) had for its object the working of a number of instruments simultaneously on one wire.

  • This device was originally adopted in the d'Arlincourt copying telegraph.

  • The heavier cores, with the consequent advance in speed of working attainable, have necessitated the introduction of automatic sending, the instruments adopted being in general a modification of the Wheatstone transmitter adapted to the form of cable signals, while the regularity of transmission thus secured has caused its introduction even on circuits where the speed cannot exceed that of the ordinary operator's hand signalling.

  • Evershed, and has been practically adopted at Lavernock and Flat Holme.

  • If the direct coupling is adopted then the lower end of the antenna is connected directly to the condenser circuit.

  • By the middle of 1905 a very large number of vessels had been equipped with the Marconi short distance and long distance wireless telegraph apparatus for intercommunication and reception of messages from power stations on both sides of the Atlantic, and the chief navies of the world had adopted the apparatus.

  • An important International Conference on radiotelegraphy was held in Berlin in 1906, and as a result of its deliberations international regulations have been adopted by the chief Powers of the world.

  • Soon after the dialect had reached its latest form, the Latin alphabet was adopted.

  • It is not practicable to connect each subscriber directly to all the others, hence a system of exchanges has been adopted.

  • Another method of distribution, largely adopted, is to run the lead cables into the interior of blocks of buildings, and to terminate them there in iron boxes from which the circuits are distributed to the surrounding buildings by means of rubber-covered wires run along the walls.

  • Aerial distribution from distributing poles is a method frequently adopted.

  • The aspects which stand out most prominently in this history are: (a) The vacillation of successive governments due to the conflicting policies adopted from time to time to protect the telegraph revenues of the Post Office and to avoid the suppression of an enterprise which was becoming a public necessity and yielding substantial royalties to the PostmasterGeneral.

  • The original method of charging adopted in Great Britain took the telephone instrument as the unit, charging a fixed annual rental independent of the amount of use to which the instrument was put.

  • Free intercommunication was established by the agreement between the subscribers of the company and those of the Post Office, and a scale of charges was adopted or arranged to be agreed as binding on both the Post Office and the company.

  • Thus Nepenthes secures a supply of nitrogenous food from the animal world in a manner somewhat similar to that adopted by the British sundew, butterwort, and other insectivorous plants.

  • It was adopted by Augustus as the boundary of Gallia Cispadana; the far-famed Rubicon was a trifling stream a few miles farther north, now called Fiumicino.

  • Farther south no very lofty summits are found till we come to the group of Monti del Matese, in Samnium (6660 ft.), which according to the division here adopted belongs to Southern Italy.

  • In the province of Naples, Caserta, &c., the method of fallows is widely adopted, the ground often being left in this state for fifteen or twenty years; and in some parts of Sicily there is a regular interchange of fallow and crop year by year.

  • At the end of 1907 Italy was among the few Countries that had not adopted the reduction of postage sanctioned at the Postal Union congress, held in Rome in 1906, by which the rates became 23/4d.

  • The property could now be disposed of like the other property of the domain; and except in Sicily, where the system of emphyteusis was adopted, the church lands began to be sold by auction.

  • She too, though twice married, died without issue, having at one time adopted Louis III.

  • Napoleon sought to push matters to an extreme, and on the 2nd of April Annexa- he adopted the rigorous measure of annexing to the tion of the kingdom of Italy the papal provinces of Ancona, Papal Urbino, Macerata and Camerina.

  • Not only did she govern Lombardy and Venetia directly, but Austrian princes ruled in Modena, Parma and Tuscany; Piacenza, Ferrara and Comacchio had Austrian garrisons; Prince Metternich, the Austrian chancellor, believed that he could always secure the election of an Austrophil pope, and Ferdinand of Naples, reinstated by an Austrian army, had bound himself, by a secret article of the treaty of June 12, 1815, not to introduce methods of government incompatible with those adopted in Austrias Italian possessions.

  • He now prorogued parliament, adopted stringent measures against the Liberals, and retired to Gaeta, the haven of refuge for deposed despots.

  • Yet after these warlike declarations and after the signing of a military convention at Turin, the king agreeing to all the conditions proposed by Napoleon, the latter suddenly became pacific again, and adopted the Russian suggestion that Italian affairs should be settled by a congress.

  • His bill, adopted by parliament on the 7th of June 1875, still forms the ground plan of the Italian army.

  • Count Corti had no suspicion that France had adopted a less disinterested attitude towards similar suggestions from Bismarck and Lord Salisbury.

  • five years, to -have pledged the contracting parties to join in resisting attack upon the territory of any one of them, and to have specified the military disposition to be adopted by each in case attack should come either from France, or from Russia, or from both simultaneously.

  • On the 2gth of June 1881 the Chamber adopted a Franchise Reform Bill, which increased the electorate from oo,ooo to 2,000,000 by lowering the fiscal qualification from 40 to 19.80 lire in direct taxation, and by extending the suffrage to all persons who had passed through the two lower standards of the elementary schools, and practically to all persons able to read and write.

  • A month later (10th March I 882) Rubattino made over his establishment to the Italian government, and on the 12th of June the Chamber adopted a bill constituting Assab an Italian crown colony.

  • Meanwhile the enthusiastic reception accorded to the young German emperor on the occasion of his visit to Rome in October 1888, and the cordiality shown towards King Humbert and Crispi at Berlin in May 1889, increased the tension of FrancoItalian relations; nor was it until after the fall of Prince Bismarck in March 1890 that Crispi adopted towards the Republic a more friendly attitude by sending an Italian squadron to salute President Carnot at Toulon.

  • The Italian foreign minister, Brin, began by demanding the punishment of the persons guilty of the massacre, but has~ned to accept as satisfactory the anodyne measures adopted by the French government.

  • Intimately acquainted with the conditions of his native island, Crispi adopted efficacious remedies.

  • Austria had persistently adopted a policy of pin-pricks and aggravating police provocation towards the Italians of the Adriatic Littoral and of the Trentino, while encouraging the Slavonic element in the former and the Germans in the latter.

  • In its original form the text of Magna Carta was not divided into chapters, but in later times a division of this kind was adopted.

  • Moreover she must not be compelled to marry, a proceeding sometimes adopted to get her lands into the possession of a royal minion.

  • The constables of these castles had adopted the custom of compelling these landholders to give money and not service, mercenaries being then hired to perform this.

  • The following is the main outline of the classification that is adopted in the present article.

  • Supported by the great authority of Haller, the doctrine of evolution, or development, prevailed throughout the whole of the 18th century, and Cuvier appears to have substantially adopted Bonnet's later views, though probably he would not have gone all lengths in the direction of " emboitement."

  • The original road, too, adopted in imperial times a more devious but easier route by Aeclanum instead of by Trevicum.

  • But the matter is now determined for all countries which have adopted codes, whether after the pattern of the Code Napoleon or otherwise.

  • When, in the generations after the Buddha's death, his disciples compiled the documents of the faith, the form they adopted became dominant.

  • This was so nearly correct that the usage has been followed by other European scholars, and is being increasingly adopted.

  • Marcus was three months old when his father died, and was thereupon adopted by his grandfather.

  • Hadrian adopted, as his successor, Titus Antoninus Pius (uncle of Marcus), on condition that he in turn adopted both Marcus (then seventeen) and Lucius Ceionius Commodus, the son of Aelius Caesar, who had originally been intended by Hadrian as his successor, but had died before him.

  • Antoninus Pius died in 161, having recommended as his successor Aurelius, then forty years of age, without mentioning Commodus, his other adopted son, commonly called Lucius Verus.

  • This expedient of buying off the invader was first adopted in 991 on the advice of certain great men of the kingdom.

  • The educational course adopted in different countries varies as to the details of the subjects taught.

  • It is evident that as the latter increases in bulk, more and more attention must be paid to the dangers of uprooting by winds and storms. Various mechanisms have been adopted in different cases, some connected with the subterranean and others with the sub-aerial portions of the plant.

  • ti Recently, Warmingi (1909: 136), assisted by VahI, has, odified his earlier classification, and adopted the following: fl A.

  • It is interesting to observe that though deduced exclusively from the study of flowering plants, they are in substantial agreement with those now generally adopted by zoologists, and may therefore be presumed to be on the whole natural.

  • The Pythagorean school of philosophers adopted the theory of a spherical earth, but from metaphysical rather than scientific reasons; their convincing argument was that a sphere being the most perfect solid figure was the only one worthy to circumscribe the dwellingplace of man.

  • This argument was tacitly accepted or explicitly avowed by almost every writer on the theory of geography, and Carl Ritter distinctly recognized and adopted it as the unifying principle of his system.

  • been made to arrive at a definite international agreement on this subject, and certain terms suggested by a committee were adopted by the Eighth International Geographical Congress at New York in 1904.4 The forms of the ocean floor include the " shelf," or shallow sea margin, the " depression," a general term applied to all submarine hollows, and the " elevation."

  • His six main divisions - practically adopted by A.

  • The scheme adopted in the following account stands as follows: - New Zealand subregion.

  • During these critical years he adopted the "states' rights" attitude.

  • Squarcione adopted him as his son, and purposed making him the heir of his fortune.

  • He never changed, though he developed and perfected, the manner which he had adopted in Padua; his colouring, at first rather neutral and undecided, strengthened and matured.

  • As Hebrew became less familiar to the people, a system of translating the text of the Law into the Aramaic vernacular verse by verse, was adopted in the synagogue.

  • His system was' adopted by Abu'l-walid ibn Jannah, of Saragossa (died early in the nth century), in his lexicon (Kitab al-usul, in Arabic) and other works.

  • Their religion was pagan, being quite distinct from Buddhism; but in Assam they gradually became Hinduized, and their kings finally adopted Hindu names and titles.

  • They are well known in cultivation, and owing to the wide distribution of the genus different methods are adopted with different species.

  • Canons were adopted, thirty according to the generally received tradition, although the most ancient texts contain but twentyeight, and, as Hefele points out, the so-called twenty-ninth and thirtieth are properly not canons, but repetitions of proposals made in a previous session.

  • In the form of "Norman" (Northmannus, Normannus, Normand) it is the name of those colonists from Scandinavia who settled themselves in Gaul, who founded Normandy, who adopted the French tongue and French manners, and who from their new home set forth on new errands of conquest, chiefly in the British Islands and in southern Italy and Sicily.

  • Their national character remains largely the same; but they have adopted a new religion, a new language, a new system of law and society, new thoughts and feelings on all matters.

  • where the.y gradually lost themselves among the people whom they conquered; they adopted the language and the national feelings of the lands in which they settled; but at the same time they often modified, often strengthened the national usages and national life of the various nations in which they were finally merged.

  • They adopted the French tongue, and were presently among the first to practise and spread abroad its literature.

  • They adopted the growing feudal doctrines of France, and worked them, both in Normandy and in England, into a harmonious system.

  • From northern Italy, as it would seem, they adopted a style of architecture which grew in their hands, both in Normandy and in England, into a marked and living form of art.

  • The gifts of each were adopted and bore fruit on both sides of the Channel.

  • By the end of the 12th century the Normans in England might fairly pass as Englishmen, and they had largely adopted the use of the English language.

  • We speak of the Saracen very much as we speak of the Norman; for of the Mussulman masters of Sicily very many must have been only artificial Arabs, Africans who had adopted the creed, language and manners of Arabia.

  • Where, as in Sicily, the Normans felt that they could not improve, they simply adopted the style of the country.

  • Where, as in England, they felt that they could improve, they substituted for the style of the country their own style - that is, a style which they had not created but which they had adopted, which they had made thoroughly their own, and which they went on improving in England no less than in Normandy.

  • In his translation he discarded the native Saturnian metre, and adopted the iambic, trochaic and cretic metres, to which Latin more easily adapted itself than either to the hexameter or to the lyrical measures of a later time.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been officially adopted, but the old Spanish system is still in general use.

  • To obtain pure sulphuretted hydrogen the method generally adopted consists in decomposing precipitated antimony sulphide with concentrated hydrochloric acid.

  • Indianapolis is governed under a form of government adopted originally in a special charter of 1891 and in 1905 incorporated in the new state municipal code, which was based upon it, It provides for a mayor elected every four years, a single legislative chamber, a common council, and various administrative departments - of public safety, public health, &c. The guiding principle of the charter, which is generally accepted as a model of its kind, is that of the complete separation of powers and the absolute placing of responsibility.

  • Antisthenes adopted this principle in its most literal sense, and proceeded to explain "knowledge" in the narrowest terms of practical action and decision, excluding from the conception everything except the problem of individual will realizing itself in the sphere of ordinary existence.

  • phase of Platonism, however, was much more slowly adopted.

  • Along with this affirmation, the Church of Rome (if less decisively) has adopted the limitations of the Thomist theory by the condemnation of " Ontologism "; certain mysterious doctrines are beyond reason.

  • They adopted the Mahommedan religion and founded an empire which in the 17th and 18th centuries ruled over a large part of the eastern Sudan.

  • Aristotle's term was adopted by Linnaeus (1758), and has been universally used by zoologists.

  • Geoffroy in 1762, adopted by P. A.

  • In the classification adopted in this article, the attempt has been made to combine the best points in old and recent schemes, and to avoid the inconvenience of a large heterogeneous group including the vast majority of the families.

  • (4) The Meshcheryaks, a tribe of Finnish origin who formerly inhabited the basin of the Oka, and, driven thence during the 15th century by the Russian colonists, immigrated into Ufa and Perm, where they now live among the Baskhirs, having adopted their religion and customs. (5) The Teptyars, also of Finnish origin, settled among the Tatars and Bashkirs in Samara and Vyatka.

  • Protected as they were by the right of self-government, exempted from military service, and endowed with considerable allotments of good land, these colonies are much wealthier than the neighbouring Russian peasants, from whom they have adopted the slowly modified village community.

  • The methods adopted by the zemstvos for improving the condition of agriculture have included the formation of agricultural councils, the appointment of inspectors, and the founding of museums, meteorological stations and depots for the sale of agricultural machinery.

  • Byzantine territory, threatened Constantinople with a fleet of small craft, obtained as consort for one of their princes, Vladimir I, (q.v.), a sister of the Byzantine emperor on condition of the prince becoming a Christian, adopted Christianity for themselves and their subjects, learned to hold in check the nomadic hordes of the steppe, and formed matrimonial alliances with the reigning families of Poland, Hungary, Norway and France.

  • When they first appeared in Europe they were idolaters or Shamanists, and as such they had naturally no religious fanaticism; but even when they adopted Islam they remained as tolerant as before, and the khan of the Golden Horde (Berkai) who first became a Mussulman allowed the Russians to found a Christian bishopric in his capital.

  • Now the tsar of Muscovy and of all Russia adopted the airs and methods of a Tatar khan and surrounded himself with the pomp and splendours of a Byzantine emperor.

  • Those of them who lived on the outskirts of the pacified territory adopted a mode of life similar to that of their hereditary opponents, and constituted a peculiar class known as Cossacks, living more by flocks and The h e rds and by marauding expeditions than by a ri y g p ?'

  • During the Russian Dark Ages certain clerical errors had crept into the liturgical books Reforms a nd certain peculiarities had been adopted in the ritual.

  • Numerous foreigners had been allowed to settle in Moscow and to build for themselves a heretical church, and their strange unholy customs had been adopted by not a few courtiers and great dignitaries.

  • In foreign affairs Catherine devoted her attention mainly to pushing forward the Russian frontier westwards and south- Foreign wards, and as France was the traditional ally of policy of Sweden, Poland and Turkey, she adopted at first Cath- the so-called systeme du Nord, that is to say, a close erine.

  • In the affairs of his own country he refrained from developing and extending the liberal institutions which he had created immediately after his accession, and he finally adopted in all departments of administration a strongly reactionary policy.

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