This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

adonis

adonis

adonis Sentence Examples

  • Aphrodite, charmed by his beauty, hid the infant in a box and handed him over to the care of Persephone, who afterwards refused to give him up. On an appeal being made to Zeus, he decided that Adonis should spend a third of the year with Persephone and a third with Aphrodite, the remaining third being at his own disposal.

    6
    2
  • Its political importance now ended, but its temple of Adonis and Aphrodite (Venus Amathusia) remained famous in Roman time.

    4
    1
  • Two small sanctuaries, with terra-cotta votive offerings of Graeco-Phoenician age, lie not far off, but the great shrine of Adonis and Aphrodite has not been identified (M.

    3
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, 165; and R.

    3
    0
  • Hartland, Primitive Paternity (1909); Frazer, Adonis (Index, s.v.

    3
    0
  • Hartland, Primitive Paternity (1909); Frazer, Adonis (Index, s.v.

    3
    0
  • If Jackson was Adonis, then Sarah was Aphrodite.

    3
    1
  • 14 Frazer, Adonis, 72 (with other 'examples)..

    2
    0
  • Laelius; Frazer, Adonis, 74 n.

    2
    0
  • Laelius; Frazer, Adonis, 74 n.

    2
    0
  • The river Adonis is the Nahr alIbrahim, which flows near the town.

    1
    1
  • Frazer, Adonis, Allis and Osiris (London, 1907), pp. 12 sqq., 401.

    1
    1
  • Thus, at Delphi there was an image of Aphrodite 6rtrupt31a (" Aphrodite of the tomb "), to which the dead were summoned to receive libations; the epithets ru,u i 3capvxos (" grave-digger "), µvxia (" goddess of the depths "), peXacv%s (" the dark one "), the grave of Ariadne-Aphrodite at Amathus, and the myth of Adonis, point in the same direction.

    1
    1
  • ADONIS, in classical mythology, a youth of remarkable beauty, the favourite of Aphrodite.

    1
    1
  • Thus, at Delphi there was an image of Aphrodite 6rtrupt31a (" Aphrodite of the tomb "), to which the dead were summoned to receive libations; the epithets ru,u i 3capvxos (" grave-digger "), µvxia (" goddess of the depths "), peXacv%s (" the dark one "), the grave of Ariadne-Aphrodite at Amathus, and the myth of Adonis, point in the same direction.

    1
    1
  • The famous poem about' Gorgo and Praxinoe at the feast of Adonis was modelled on one by Sophron about women looking on at the Isthmian games (Ir0 1 uC ovaac), and fragments quoted from this are closely imitated by Theocritus.

    1
    2
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1907), p. 67: " Prophecy of the Hebrew type has not been limited to Israel; it is indeed a phenomenon of almost world-wide occurrence; in many lands and in many ages the wild, whirling words of frenzied men and women have been accepted as the utterances of an in-dwelling deity.

    0
    0
  • Hylas, like Adonis and Hyacinthus, represents the fresh vegetation of spring, or the water of a fountain, which dries up under the heat of summer.

    0
    0
  • pp. 123-140; and the articles Adonis, Aphrodite, Artemis, Baal.

    0
    0
  • With this may be compared the festivals of Adonis and Osiris and the myth of Persephone.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed.), pp. 428-435.

    0
    0
  • 2 List of Plants commonly met with in northern Tunisia Adonis microcarpa, DC. Nigella damascena, L.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, &c., 2nd ed.

    0
    0
  • Thus, he engages in combat with Heracles on two occasions to avenge the death of his son Cycnus; once Zeus separates the combatants by a flash of lightning, but in the second encounter he is severely wounded by his adversary, who has the active support of Athena; maddened by jealousy, he changes himself into the boar which slew Adonis, the favourite of Aphrodite; and stirs up the war between the Lapithae and Centaurs.

    0
    0
  • Adonis (Mythology) >>

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Joseph Bingham, Antiquities of the Christian Church, bk.

    0
    0
  • Recent grail researches have made it most probable that that mysterious talisman was originally the vessel of the ritual feast held in honour of a deity of vegetation, - Adonis, or another; if the Round Table also, as Dr Mott suggests, derives from a similar source, we have a link between these two notable features of Arthurian tradition, and an additional piece of evidence in support of the view that behind the Arthur of romance there lie not only memories of an historic British chieftain, but distinct traces of a mythological and beneficent hero.

    0
    0
  • In Europe the corn spirit sometimes immanent in the crop, sometimes a presiding deity whose life does not depend on that of the growing corn, is conceived in some districts in the form of an ox, hare or cock, in others as an old man or woman; in the East Indies and America the rice or maize mother is a corresponding figure; in classical Europe and the East we have in Ceres and Demeter, Adonis and Dionysus, and other deities, vegetation gods whose origin we can readily trace back to the rustic corn spirit.

    0
    0
  • The traditional scene of the Nativity, a grotto on the eastern part of the ridge, is alleged to have been desecrated during the reign of Hadrian by a temple of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Like Aphrodite and Adonis in Syria, Baal and Astarte at Sidon, and Isis and Osiris in Egypt, the Great Mother and Attis formed a duality which symbolized the relations between Mother Earth and her fruitage.

    0
    0
  • He was confused with Pan, Sabazios, Men and Adonis, and there were resemblances between the orgiastic features of his worship and that of Dionysus.

    0
    0
  • His resemblance to Adonis has led to the theory that the names of the two are identical, and that Attis is only the Semitic companion of Syrian Aphrodite grafted on to the Phrygian Great Mother worship (Haakh, Stuttgarter-Philolog.- Vers., 18J7, 176 ff.).

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906).

    0
    0
  • Not a vestige remains of the great sanctuary of Melqarth at Tyre; a few traces of the temple of Adonis near Byblus were discovered by Renan, and a peculiar mausoleum, Burj alBezzaq, is still to be seen near Amrit; recent excavations at Bostan esh-Shekh near Sidon have unearthed parts of the enclosure or foundations of the temple of Eshmun (NSI.

    0
    0
  • The 6 See Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris, 44 seq.

    0
    0
  • No'man, a name of the deity Adonis).

    0
    0
  • In Syria, the temple of Atargatis in Hierapolis was an immemorial resort of pilgrims. In Phoenicia, a similar significance was enjoyed by the shrine of Astarte, on the richly-watered source of the river Adonis, till, as late as the 4th century after Christ, it was destroyed by Constantine the Great.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion (1907); A.

    0
    0
  • ADONIS, a genus of plants belonging to the natural order Ranunculaceae, known commonly by the names of pheasant's eye and Flos Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Adonis autumnalis has become naturalized in some parts of England; the petals are scarlet with a dark spot at the base.

    0
    0
  • An early flowering species, Adonis vernalis, with large bright yellow flowers, is well worthy of cultivation.

    0
    0
  • The name is also given to the butterfly, Mazarine or Clifton Blue (Polyommatus Adonis).

    0
    0
  • 13 Frazer, Adonis, 73 seq.; for India, see Winternitz, 258.

    0
    0
  • The serpent was probably regarded as the embodiment of the king Erechtheus; see Frazer, Adonis, 75; A.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, 57 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Serapis' (OsirisApis) who came to acquire the attributes of Aesculapius and of Pluto, god of the dead, sometimes had serpent-form, and even in the reign of Constantine popular belief connected the rise of the Nile with his agency (Frazer, Adonis, 398).

    0
    0
  • 9; for Hercules and healing waters, see Frazer, Adonis, 174 seq.; cf.

    0
    0
  • (Frazer, Adonis, p. 80); A.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, 74 (with the suggestion that it is because milk is the food of babes), Crooke ii.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.

    0
    0
  • Reinach, Cultes, mythes et religions (2 vols., Paris, 1905-6); Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); Ed.

    0
    0
  • Hero, the beautiful priestess of Aphrodite at Sestos, was seen by Leander, a youth of Abydos, at the celebration of the festival of Aphrodite and Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Gellius and Ausonius state that he composed an Erotopaegnia, and in other sources he is credited with Adonis, Alcestis, Centauri, Helena, Ino, Protesilaudamia, Sirenocirca, Phoenix, which may, however, be only the parts of the Erotopaegnia.

    0
    0
  • Cybele was usually worshipped in connexion with Attis, as Aphrodite with Adonis, the two being a duality interpreted by the philosophers as symbolic of Mother Earth and her vegetation.

    0
    0
  • Gorgo and Praxinoe go to the festival of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Thus, Ishtar descends to the kingdom of Ilat the queen of the dead, to find the means of restoring her favourite Tammuz (Adon, Adonis) to life.

    0
    0
  • Her character as a goddess of vegetation is clearly shown in the cult and ritual of Adonis (q.v.; also Farnell, ii.

    0
    0
  • After ten months the tree burst asunder and from it came forth Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Adonis was afterwards killed by a boar sent by Artemis.

    0
    0
  • The name is generally supposed to be of Phoenician origin (from adon - " lord"), Adonis himself being identified with Tammuz (but see F.

    0
    0
  • Although there were variations in the ceremony itself and in its date, the central idea was the death and resurrection of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • A vivid description of the festival at Alexandria (for which Bion probably wrote his Dirge of Adonis) is given by Theocritus in his fifteenth idyll, the Adoniazusae.

    0
    0
  • On the first day, which celebrated the union of Adonis and Aphrodite, their images were placed side by side on a silver couch, around them all the fruits of the season, "Adonis gardens" in silver baskets, golden boxes of myrrh, cakes of meal, honey and oil, made in the likeness of things that creep and things that fly.

    0
    0
  • On the day following the image of Adonis was carried down to the shore and cast into the sea by women with dishevelled hair and bared breasts.

    0
    0
  • It is now generally agreed that Adonis is a vegetation spirit, whose death and return to life represent the decay of nature in winter and its revival in spring.

    0
    0
  • A special feature of the Athenian festival was the "Adonis gardens," small pots of flowers forced to grow artificially, which rapidly faded (hence the expression was used to denote any transitory pleasure).

    0
    0
  • An important element in the story is the connexion of Adonis with the boar, which (according to one version) brings him into the world by splitting with his tusk the bark of the tree into which Smyrna was changed, and finally kills him.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that Adonis himself was looked upon as incarnate in the swine, so that the sacrifice to him by way of expiation on special occasions of an animal which otherwise was specially sacred, and its consumption by its worshippers, was a sacramental act.

    0
    0
  • The swine would be sacrificed as having caused the death of Adonis, which explains the dislike of Aphrodite for that animal.

    0
    0
  • It has been observed that whenever swinesacrifices occur in the ritual of Aphrodite there is reference to Adonis.

    0
    0
  • (2nd ed.), p. 115, and Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); L.

    0
    0
  • Robertson Smith (Religion of the Semites, new ed., 1894, pp. 191, 290, 411), who, regarding Adonis as the swine-god, characterizes the Adonia as an annual piacular sacrifice (of swine), "in which the sacrifice has come to be overshadowed by its popular and dramatic accompaniments, to which the Greek celebration, not forming part of the state religion, was limited."

    0
    0
  • Adonis (Plant) >>

    0
    0
  • Frazer in England have amply demonstrated the enduring influence exercised on popular thought and custom by certain primitive forms of vegetation worship, of which the most noteworthy example is the so-called mysteries of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • The earliest form of the Grail story, the Gawain- Bleheris version, exhibits a marked affinity with the characteristic features of the Adonis or Tammuz worship; we have a castle on the sea-shore, a dead body on a bier, the identity of which is never revealed, mourned over with solemn rites; a wasted country, whose desolation is mysteriously connected with the dead man, and which is restored to fruitfulness when the quester asks the meaning of the marvels he beholds (the two features of the weeping women and the wasted land being retained in versions where they have no significance); finally the mysterious food-providing, self-acting talisman of a common feast - one and all of these features may be explained as survivals of the Adonis ritual.

    0
    0
  • Adonis, Linus, Hyacinthus); the flower itself was regarded as a symbol of such death.

    0
    0
  • The primula is thus spoken of, on account of its yellow centre, also the adonis, or "pheasant's eye," and the blue veronica, or germander speedwell.

    0
    0
  • From the natives of northern and central Australia to the actors in the ritual of Adonis, or the folk among whom arose the customs of crowning the May king or the king of the May, all peoples have done magic to encourage the breeding of animals as part of the food supply, and to stimulate the growth of plants, wild or cultivated.

    0
    0
  • the same set of ideas in more detail, are Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906) and Lectures on the Early History of the Kingship (1905).

    0
    0
  • The legendary kings are but faint echoes of the kings of Biainas; the story of Semiramis and Ara is but another form of the myth of Venus and Adonis; and tradition has clothed Tigranes, the reputed friend of Cyrus, with the transient glory of the opponent of Lucullus.

    0
    0
  • If Jackson was Adonis, then Sarah was Aphrodite.

    0
    0
  • The chalk grassland supports an outstanding butterfly fauna including the nationally scarce Adonis blue and chalkhill blue butterflies.

    0
    0
  • biographer's tale Andrew Adonis In 1994 I asked Roy Jenkins if I could write his biography.

    0
    0
  • The Brighton Adonis show (a hen party extravaganza!

    0
    0
  • J. L. Weston thought it part of a pagan fertility rite, involving a story similar to that of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • No Brown Argus, Common Blue, Adonis or Small Heath seen on transect, yet.

    0
    0
  • Then, while hunting, Adonis was killed by a wild boar, which sent him back to Hades and Persephone.

    0
    0
  • Frazer's latest view is that he is the old cult associate of Diana of Aricia (to whom he is related as Attis to Cybele or Adonis to Venus), the mythical predecessor or archetype of the kings of the grove.

    0
    0
  • Osiris, like Orpheus, is torn in pieces, and his head floats down every year from Egypt to Byblus; the body of Attis, the Phrygian counterpart of Adonis, like that of Orpheus, does not suffer decay.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1907), p. 67: " Prophecy of the Hebrew type has not been limited to Israel; it is indeed a phenomenon of almost world-wide occurrence; in many lands and in many ages the wild, whirling words of frenzied men and women have been accepted as the utterances of an in-dwelling deity.

    0
    0
  • Hylas, like Adonis and Hyacinthus, represents the fresh vegetation of spring, or the water of a fountain, which dries up under the heat of summer.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906).

    0
    0
  • pp. 123-140; and the articles Adonis, Aphrodite, Artemis, Baal.

    0
    0
  • With this may be compared the festivals of Adonis and Osiris and the myth of Persephone.

    0
    0
  • Gilgamesh becomes a god, and in certain portions of the epic clearly plays the part of the sungod of the spring-time, taking the place apparently of Tammuz or Adonis, the youthful sun-god, though the story shows traits that differentiate it from the ordinary Tammuz myths.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed.), pp. 428-435.

    0
    0
  • According to Jerome and all the older Christian interpreters, the mourning for something that occurred at a place called Hadadrimmon (Maximianopolis) in the valley of Megiddo is meant, the event alluded to being generally held to be the death of Josiah (or, as in the Targum, the death of Ahab at the hands of Hadadrimmon); but more recently the opinion has been gaining ground that Hadadrimmon is merely another name for Adonis or Tammuz, the allusion being to the mournings by which the Adonis festivals were usually accompanied (Hitzig on Zech.

    0
    0
  • 2 List of Plants commonly met with in northern Tunisia Adonis microcarpa, DC. Nigella damascena, L.

    0
    0
  • Its political importance now ended, but its temple of Adonis and Aphrodite (Venus Amathusia) remained famous in Roman time.

    0
    0
  • Two small sanctuaries, with terra-cotta votive offerings of Graeco-Phoenician age, lie not far off, but the great shrine of Adonis and Aphrodite has not been identified (M.

    0
    0
  • The orgies of Adonis in the temple of Baalit (Aphrodite Byblia) are described by Lucian, De Dea Syr., cap. vi.

    0
    0
  • The river Adonis is the Nahr alIbrahim, which flows near the town.

    0
    0
  • Kadisha, "the holy river" (the valley of which begins in the immediate neighbourhood of the highest summits, and rapidly descends in a series of great bends till the river reaches the sea at Tripoli), Wadi el-Joz (falling into the sea at Batrun), Wadi Fidar, Nahr Ibrahim (the ancient Adonis, having its source in a recess of the great mountain amphitheatre where the famous sanctuary Apheca, the modern Afka, lay), Nahr el-Kelb (the ancient Lycus), Nahr Beirut (the ancient Magoras, entering the sea at Beirut), Nahr Damur (ancient Tamyras), Nahr el-'Auwali (the ancient Bostrenus, which in the upper part of its course is joined by the Nahr el-Baruk).

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, &c., 2nd ed.

    0
    0
  • Thus, he engages in combat with Heracles on two occasions to avenge the death of his son Cycnus; once Zeus separates the combatants by a flash of lightning, but in the second encounter he is severely wounded by his adversary, who has the active support of Athena; maddened by jealousy, he changes himself into the boar which slew Adonis, the favourite of Aphrodite; and stirs up the war between the Lapithae and Centaurs.

    0
    0
  • Adonis (Mythology) >>

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Joseph Bingham, Antiquities of the Christian Church, bk.

    0
    0
  • Recent grail researches have made it most probable that that mysterious talisman was originally the vessel of the ritual feast held in honour of a deity of vegetation, - Adonis, or another; if the Round Table also, as Dr Mott suggests, derives from a similar source, we have a link between these two notable features of Arthurian tradition, and an additional piece of evidence in support of the view that behind the Arthur of romance there lie not only memories of an historic British chieftain, but distinct traces of a mythological and beneficent hero.

    0
    0
  • And finally, just as the mother-goddess of south-western Asia stands in particularly intimate connexion with the youthful god of spring (Tammuz, Adonis, Attis), so we ought perhaps to compare here as a parallel the relation of Sophia with the Soter in certain Gnostic systems (see below) .

    0
    0
  • In Europe the corn spirit sometimes immanent in the crop, sometimes a presiding deity whose life does not depend on that of the growing corn, is conceived in some districts in the form of an ox, hare or cock, in others as an old man or woman; in the East Indies and America the rice or maize mother is a corresponding figure; in classical Europe and the East we have in Ceres and Demeter, Adonis and Dionysus, and other deities, vegetation gods whose origin we can readily trace back to the rustic corn spirit.

    0
    0
  • The traditional scene of the Nativity, a grotto on the eastern part of the ridge, is alleged to have been desecrated during the reign of Hadrian by a temple of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Like Aphrodite and Adonis in Syria, Baal and Astarte at Sidon, and Isis and Osiris in Egypt, the Great Mother and Attis formed a duality which symbolized the relations between Mother Earth and her fruitage.

    0
    0
  • He was confused with Pan, Sabazios, Men and Adonis, and there were resemblances between the orgiastic features of his worship and that of Dionysus.

    0
    0
  • His resemblance to Adonis has led to the theory that the names of the two are identical, and that Attis is only the Semitic companion of Syrian Aphrodite grafted on to the Phrygian Great Mother worship (Haakh, Stuttgarter-Philolog.- Vers., 18J7, 176 ff.).

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906).

    0
    0
  • Not a vestige remains of the great sanctuary of Melqarth at Tyre; a few traces of the temple of Adonis near Byblus were discovered by Renan, and a peculiar mausoleum, Burj alBezzaq, is still to be seen near Amrit; recent excavations at Bostan esh-Shekh near Sidon have unearthed parts of the enclosure or foundations of the temple of Eshmun (NSI.

    0
    0
  • The 6 See Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris, 44 seq.

    0
    0
  • 22, 2), a belief which probably reflects the custom of ceremonial purification after marriage (see Frazer, Adonis, p. 176).

    0
    0
  • No'man, a name of the deity Adonis).

    0
    0
  • In Syria, the temple of Atargatis in Hierapolis was an immemorial resort of pilgrims. In Phoenicia, a similar significance was enjoyed by the shrine of Astarte, on the richly-watered source of the river Adonis, till, as late as the 4th century after Christ, it was destroyed by Constantine the Great.

    0
    0
  • Sabazius was identified with Adonis or Attis (Atys), Cybele with the Syrian goddess; and many of the coarsest rites of the Phrygian worship, the mutilation of the priests, the prostitution at the shrine, 5 came from the countries of the south-east.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Allis and Osiris (London, 1907), pp. 12 sqq., 401.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion (1907); A.

    0
    0
  • Reinach suggests that the words uttered by the "voice" were ea,uous, ea,sous, ravyeyas, Tebpy7ke ("Tammuz, Tammuz, the all-great, is dead"), and that it was merely the lament for the "great Tammuz" or Adonis (see L.

    0
    0
  • ADONIS, a genus of plants belonging to the natural order Ranunculaceae, known commonly by the names of pheasant's eye and Flos Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Adonis autumnalis has become naturalized in some parts of England; the petals are scarlet with a dark spot at the base.

    0
    0
  • An early flowering species, Adonis vernalis, with large bright yellow flowers, is well worthy of cultivation.

    0
    0
  • The name is also given to the butterfly, Mazarine or Clifton Blue (Polyommatus Adonis).

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed., London, 1907), p. 153; also his notes on Pausanias, vol.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, 165; and R.

    0
    0
  • 14 Frazer, Adonis, 72 (with other 'examples)..

    0
    0
  • 13 Frazer, Adonis, 73 seq.; for India, see Winternitz, 258.

    0
    0
  • The serpent was probably regarded as the embodiment of the king Erechtheus; see Frazer, Adonis, 75; A.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, 57 sqq.

    0
    0
  • Plouton, also associated with Proserpine, the great mother-goddess, was patron of the chasms with mephitic vapours in the valley of the Maeander (see Frazer, Adonis, 170 sqq.).

    0
    0
  • Serapis' (OsirisApis) who came to acquire the attributes of Aesculapius and of Pluto, god of the dead, sometimes had serpent-form, and even in the reign of Constantine popular belief connected the rise of the Nile with his agency (Frazer, Adonis, 398).

    0
    0
  • 9; for Hercules and healing waters, see Frazer, Adonis, 174 seq.; cf.

    0
    0
  • (Frazer, Adonis, p. 80); A.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, 74 (with the suggestion that it is because milk is the food of babes), Crooke ii.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.

    0
    0
  • Reinach, Cultes, mythes et religions (2 vols., Paris, 1905-6); Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); Ed.

    0
    0
  • Hero, the beautiful priestess of Aphrodite at Sestos, was seen by Leander, a youth of Abydos, at the celebration of the festival of Aphrodite and Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Gellius and Ausonius state that he composed an Erotopaegnia, and in other sources he is credited with Adonis, Alcestis, Centauri, Helena, Ino, Protesilaudamia, Sirenocirca, Phoenix, which may, however, be only the parts of the Erotopaegnia.

    0
    0
  • Cybele was usually worshipped in connexion with Attis, as Aphrodite with Adonis, the two being a duality interpreted by the philosophers as symbolic of Mother Earth and her vegetation.

    0
    0
  • Gorgo and Praxinoe go to the festival of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • The famous poem about' Gorgo and Praxinoe at the feast of Adonis was modelled on one by Sophron about women looking on at the Isthmian games (Ir0 1 uC ovaac), and fragments quoted from this are closely imitated by Theocritus.

    0
    0
  • Thus, Ishtar descends to the kingdom of Ilat the queen of the dead, to find the means of restoring her favourite Tammuz (Adon, Adonis) to life.

    0
    0
  • Her character as a goddess of vegetation is clearly shown in the cult and ritual of Adonis (q.v.; also Farnell, ii.

    0
    0
  • The water-supply of ancient Tyre came from the powerful springs of Ras-al `Ain (see Aqueduct) on the mainland, one hour south of the city, where there are still remarkable reservoirs, in connexion with which curious survivals of Adonis worship have been observed by travellers.

    0
    0
  • ADONIS, in classical mythology, a youth of remarkable beauty, the favourite of Aphrodite.

    0
    0
  • After ten months the tree burst asunder and from it came forth Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Aphrodite, charmed by his beauty, hid the infant in a box and handed him over to the care of Persephone, who afterwards refused to give him up. On an appeal being made to Zeus, he decided that Adonis should spend a third of the year with Persephone and a third with Aphrodite, the remaining third being at his own disposal.

    0
    0
  • Adonis was afterwards killed by a boar sent by Artemis.

    0
    0
  • The name is generally supposed to be of Phoenician origin (from adon - " lord"), Adonis himself being identified with Tammuz (but see F.

    0
    0
  • Although there were variations in the ceremony itself and in its date, the central idea was the death and resurrection of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • A vivid description of the festival at Alexandria (for which Bion probably wrote his Dirge of Adonis) is given by Theocritus in his fifteenth idyll, the Adoniazusae.

    0
    0
  • On the first day, which celebrated the union of Adonis and Aphrodite, their images were placed side by side on a silver couch, around them all the fruits of the season, "Adonis gardens" in silver baskets, golden boxes of myrrh, cakes of meal, honey and oil, made in the likeness of things that creep and things that fly.

    0
    0
  • On the day following the image of Adonis was carried down to the shore and cast into the sea by women with dishevelled hair and bared breasts.

    0
    0
  • It is now generally agreed that Adonis is a vegetation spirit, whose death and return to life represent the decay of nature in winter and its revival in spring.

    0
    0
  • A special feature of the Athenian festival was the "Adonis gardens," small pots of flowers forced to grow artificially, which rapidly faded (hence the expression was used to denote any transitory pleasure).

    0
    0
  • The dispute between Aphrodite and Persephone for the possession of Adonis, settled by the agreement that he is to spend a third (or half) of the year in the lower world (the seed at first underground and then reappearing above it), finds a parallel in the story of Tammuz and Ishtar (see APHRODITE).

    0
    0
  • It is suggested (Frazer) that Adonis is not a god of vegetation generally, but specially a corn-spirit, and that the lamentation is not for the decay of vegetation in winter, but for the cruel treatment of the corn by the reaper and miller (cf.

    0
    0
  • An important element in the story is the connexion of Adonis with the boar, which (according to one version) brings him into the world by splitting with his tusk the bark of the tree into which Smyrna was changed, and finally kills him.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that Adonis himself was looked upon as incarnate in the swine, so that the sacrifice to him by way of expiation on special occasions of an animal which otherwise was specially sacred, and its consumption by its worshippers, was a sacramental act.

    0
    0
  • The swine would be sacrificed as having caused the death of Adonis, which explains the dislike of Aphrodite for that animal.

    0
    0
  • It has been observed that whenever swinesacrifices occur in the ritual of Aphrodite there is reference to Adonis.

    0
    0
  • In any case, the conception of Adonis as a swine-god does not contradict the idea of him as a vegetation or corn spirit, which in many parts of Europe appears in the form of a boar or sow.

    0
    0
  • (2nd ed.), p. 115, and Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); L.

    0
    0
  • Robertson Smith (Religion of the Semites, new ed., 1894, pp. 191, 290, 411), who, regarding Adonis as the swine-god, characterizes the Adonia as an annual piacular sacrifice (of swine), "in which the sacrifice has come to be overshadowed by its popular and dramatic accompaniments, to which the Greek celebration, not forming part of the state religion, was limited."

    0
    0
  • Adonis (Plant) >>

    0
    0
  • Frazer in England have amply demonstrated the enduring influence exercised on popular thought and custom by certain primitive forms of vegetation worship, of which the most noteworthy example is the so-called mysteries of Adonis.

    0
    0
  • The earliest form of the Grail story, the Gawain- Bleheris version, exhibits a marked affinity with the characteristic features of the Adonis or Tammuz worship; we have a castle on the sea-shore, a dead body on a bier, the identity of which is never revealed, mourned over with solemn rites; a wasted country, whose desolation is mysteriously connected with the dead man, and which is restored to fruitfulness when the quester asks the meaning of the marvels he beholds (the two features of the weeping women and the wasted land being retained in versions where they have no significance); finally the mysterious food-providing, self-acting talisman of a common feast - one and all of these features may be explained as survivals of the Adonis ritual.

    0
    0
  • Adonis, Linus, Hyacinthus); the flower itself was regarded as a symbol of such death.

    0
    0
  • The primula is thus spoken of, on account of its yellow centre, also the adonis, or "pheasant's eye," and the blue veronica, or germander speedwell.

    0
    0
  • From the natives of northern and central Australia to the actors in the ritual of Adonis, or the folk among whom arose the customs of crowning the May king or the king of the May, all peoples have done magic to encourage the breeding of animals as part of the food supply, and to stimulate the growth of plants, wild or cultivated.

    0
    0
  • the same set of ideas in more detail, are Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906) and Lectures on the Early History of the Kingship (1905).

    0
    0
  • The legendary kings are but faint echoes of the kings of Biainas; the story of Semiramis and Ara is but another form of the myth of Venus and Adonis; and tradition has clothed Tigranes, the reputed friend of Cyrus, with the transient glory of the opponent of Lucullus.

    0
    0
  • No Brown Argus, Common Blue, Adonis or Small Heath seen on transect, yet.

    0
    0
  • Then, while hunting, Adonis was killed by a wild boar, which sent him back to Hades and Persephone.

    0
    0
  • Pheasants Eye (Adonis) - Beautiful perennial or biennial plants, belonging to the Buttercup order, chiefly natives of cornfields in Europe and Western Asia, dwarf, with finely-divided leaves, and red or yellow flowers.

    0
    0
  • Aphrodite had relationships with Adonis, Hermes, Dionysos, Ankhises, Boutes and Zeus, among others.

    0
    0
  • Every summer, the site hosts a 16 week contest to elect the Adonis of soap hunks for that year.

    0
    0
  • Previous Adonis winners include Eric Martsolf, Mark Collier and Justin Bruening.

    0
    0
  • Other features include soap clichés, ideal hunks, banners and wallpaper downloads as well as a live chat where Adonis winners are announced and other events are hosted.

    0
    0
  • In this interview, the creator of the site discusses what makes a soap actor a "hunk", what moments in soap history hold meaning and why every soap hunk is an Adonis.

    0
    0
  • Every soap hunk is an Adonis to his fans.

    0
    0
  • All of the Adonis winners, of course. have bodies and looks beyond belief.

    0
    0
  • Adonis is a tremendously long contest, so fan devotion--or obsession--is required to do well in the polling.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906).

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →