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adjective

adjective

adjective Sentence Examples

  • Pick an adjective from the title.

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  • It is important to study the various adjective forms.

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  • To use this sort of language implies that "bishop" is masculine unless it is modified by a feminine adjective.

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  • The name has a curious origin, which explains also the particular meaning of the adjective "spruce," neatly dressed, smart in appearance, fine.

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  • The language started to have adjective comparison in late middle, early modern and modern English.

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  • In the Avesta, airya- is found both as adjective and substantive in the sense of Aryan, but no light is thrown upon the history of the word.

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  • We will discuss adjective endings in a later section.

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  • In mathematics and music, the adjective has been used as synonymous with "continuous" as opposed to "discrete," i.e.

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  • He did not know what grammar was, or the difference between a noun adjective and a noun substantive.

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  • Adjective noun phrases are intersective; thus, a "red apple" is both red and an apple.

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  • Substances which were comparatively transparent to heat he designated by the adjective "diathermane," the property being "diathermanate," while for the heattint or heat-coloration produced by passage through different materials he coined the word "diathermansie."

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  • "mean"), middle or intermediate, an adjective used in several legal phrases.

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  • "mean"), middle or intermediate, an adjective used in several legal phrases.

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  • Beginning with the Belgae and the Gallia Belgica of the Romans, the use of the adjective to distinguish the inhabitants of the south Netherlands can be traced through all stages of subsequent history.

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  • The adjective "synechological" is used in the same general sense; "synechology" is a theory of continuity or universal causation; "synechia" is a term in ophthalmology for a morbid union of parts.

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  • More personal than Ouranos and Helios - with whom he has only slight associations - he was worshipped and invoked as the deity of the bright day ('Apapcos, 'Aevea70s, AvKa70s), who sends the rain, the wind and dew ("Op(3pcos, Naios, `Tetcos, Oupcos, EMIÆpos, 'IK,uaZos), and such a primitive adjective as Sc17rET7)3, applied to things " that fall from heaven," attests the primeval significance of the name of Zeus.

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  • In August the city was named "the City of the Great Salt Lake," and this name was used until 1868 when the adjective was dropped by legislative act.

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  • The close connexion of the two expressions, it is true, makes it probable that Mahomet only added the adjective Rahim to the substantive Rahman in order to strengthen the conception.

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  • Confirmation of this may be found in Cicero's description (Pro Milone, 85) of the destruction of the shrines and sacred groves of Alba by the construction of Clodius's villa, in the local application of the adjective Albanus, and in the position of Castel Gandolfo itself, which exactly suits Livy's description.

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  • But the introduction of the adjective " apologetic " and of the substantive " apologetics " is recent.

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  • The adjective "beetle-browed," and similarly "beetling" (of a cliff), are derived from the name of the insect.

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  • The adjective "beetle-browed," and similarly "beetling" (of a cliff), are derived from the name of the insect.

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  • angelus, an angle), shaped with corners or angles; an adjective used in botany and zoology for the shape of stems, leaves and wings.

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  • The derivative adjective Aequicus might be taken to range them with the Volsci rather than the Sabini, but it is not clear that this adjective was ever used as a real ethnicon; the name of the tribe is always Aequi, or Aequicoli.

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  • The derivation of the name Alps is still very uncertain, some writers connecting it with a Celtic root alb, said to mean height, while others suggest the Latin adjective albus (white), referring to the colour of the snowy peaks.

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  • ATTHIS (an adjective meaning "Attic"), the name given to a monograph or special treatise on the religious and political history, antiquities and topography of Attica and Athens.

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  • The derivation of the name Alps is still very uncertain, some writers connecting it with a Celtic root alb, said to mean height, while others suggest the Latin adjective albus (white), referring to the colour of the snowy peaks.

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  • It is derived from the adjective rab (in Aramaic, and frequently also in Hebrew, "great"), which acquired in modern Hebrew the signification of "lord," in relation to servants or slaves, and of "teacher," "master," in relation to the disciple.

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  • It is derived from the adjective rab (in Aramaic, and frequently also in Hebrew, "great"), which acquired in modern Hebrew the signification of "lord," in relation to servants or slaves, and of "teacher," "master," in relation to the disciple.

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  • Previously to Linnaeus long many-worded names had been used, sometimes with one additional adjective, sometimes with another, so that no true names were fixed and accepted.

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  • QUIRINUS, the Sabine name of the god Mars, probably an adjective meaning "wielder of the spear" (Quiris, cf.

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  • Apart from the facts contained in this statement, the phraseology is of some importance, as the district of " Palestinian Syria " clearly includes more than the territory of the Philistines, which the adjective properly denotes (Josephus, Antiquities, i.

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  • QUIRINUS, the Sabine name of the god Mars, probably an adjective meaning "wielder of the spear" (Quiris, cf.

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  • Compare the use of the adjective, Ephr.

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  • The adjective "legal" is only used in the first sense, never in the second.

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  • The word is the English representative of the substantive common to Teutonic languages, as "dead" is of the adjective, and "die" of the verb; the ultimate origin is the pre-Teutonic verbal stem dau-; cf.

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  • In ordinary language the adjective "humane" is restricted to the sense of "kind-hearted," "unselfish": the abstract "humanity" has this sense and also the sense of "that which pertains to mankind" derived in this case with the companion adjective "human."

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  • These are the adjective vigadabhi applied to the stone, and rendered in our translation "flawless"; and secondly, the last word, rendered in our translation "one-eighth part (of the crop)."

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  • Balkis Kale, or, more anciently in the native language, Estvedys (whence the adjective Estvedijys on coins), an ancient city of Pamphylia, very strongly situated on an isolated hill on the right bank of the Eurymedon at the point where the river issues from the Taurus.

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  • Balkis Kale, or, more anciently in the native language, Estvedys (whence the adjective Estvedijys on coins), an ancient city of Pamphylia, very strongly situated on an isolated hill on the right bank of the Eurymedon at the point where the river issues from the Taurus.

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  • The negative judgment, for example, cannot be held in one and the same undivided act to presuppose the unity of the real, project an adjective as conceivably applicable to it and assert its rejection.

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  • The adjective masculus points to the power of bringing forth fruit possessed by the new philosophy, and perhaps indicates that all previous births of time were to be looked upon as feminine or imperfect; it is used in a somewhat similar sense in Letters and Life, vi.

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  • The adjective Achaemendus is used by the Latin poets as the equivalent of "Persian" (Horace, Odes, ii.

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  • The Turkish adjective uzun, ~j~J,t long, applied to I-,Iasan, the Turkoman monarch of Persia (called also by the Arabs Uasanu t-Tawil), is precisely the qualifying Persian word J!j) used in the compound designation of Artaxerxes Longimanus; and Malcolm quotes the statement of a Venetian envoy in evidence that Uzun IJasan was a tall thin man, of a very open and engaging countenance.

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  • TAWDRY, an adjective used to characterize cheap finery, and especially things which imitate in a cheap way that which is rich or costly, or adornments of which the freshness and elegance have worn off.

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  • adjective medianus, from medius, middle.

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  • The term Finn has a wider application than Finland, being, with its adjective Finnic or Finno-Ugric (q.v.) or Ugro-Finnic, the collective name of the westernmost branch of the Ural-Altaic family, dispersed throughout Finland, Lapland, the Baltic provinces (Esthonia, Livonia, Curland), parts of Russia proper (south of Lake Onega), both banks of middle Volga, Perm, Vologda, West Siberia (between the Ural Mountains and the Yenissei) and Hungary.

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  • The totemistic theory in its application to Greek religion cannot be here discussed; but we may note that there is no hint in the story that the wolf was offered to Zeus and that the name AvKaios could not originally have designated the " wolf "-God: for from the stem Xveo- we should get the adjective XvKEGOS, not XvKacos; the latter is better derived from a word such as XvKn = " light," and may allude to the God of the clear sky; in fact the wolf, which was a necessary animal in the ritual and legend of Apollo AuKeIOS, may have strayed casually into association with Zeus AvKaios, attracted by a false etymology.

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  • standingplace (from stare, to stand), to a stall or enclosure for all kinds of domestic animals, cows, sheep, &c. The adjective "stable," meaning firmly established, comes directly from Latin stabilis, also from stare, to stand.

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  • A further peculiarity of the use of C in Latin is in the abbreviation for the district Subura in Roma and its adjective Suburanus, which appears as SVC. Here C no doubt represents G, but there is no interchange between g and b in Latin.

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  • These two examples of the wider use of the adjective and noun seem to testify to the forgotten predominance of the Philistines in the land of Canaan.

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  • The latter generic name is derived from the Greek adjective /Slljtos, formed from (Los, life, probably in connexion with the name "tree of life."

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  • comptus, neat), an adjective meaning unusual or fanciful, often applied to things with a sense of old-fashioned charm or prettiness.

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  • (2) An adjective and substantive meaning "that which is in the middle."

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  • The term, with its adjective " formal " and the derived nouns " formality " and " formalism," is hence contemptuously used for that which is superficial, unessential, hypocritical: chap. xxiii.

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  • The term is usually coupled with a qualifying adjective.

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  • The word is used both as a substantive and as an adjective.

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  • minutes, small; minuere, to make less), an adjective meaning of very small size, petty or trifling; also extremely precise.

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  • The adjective "hypothetical" is used in the same sense, both loosely in contradistinction to "real" or "actual," and technically in the phrases "hypothetical judgment" and "hypothetical syllogism."

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  • The oldest certain form is the Aramaic Urhai (" Western " pronunciation Urhoi), which appears in Greek as an adjective as Oppor i vi t, 2 -voi 3 (perhaps also as a fortress with spring, as Oppa),4 and in Latin as Orr(h)ei, 5 and (in the inscription on Abgar's grave) Orrhenoru(m).

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  • bini, two at a time, and oculi, eyes) was originally an adjective used to describe things adapted for the simultaneous use of both eyes, as in "binocular vision," "a binocular telescope or microscope"; now "a binocular" is used as a noun, meaning a binocular microscope, a field-glass, &c.

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  • The results exceed any adjective in my poor vocabulary.

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  • The adjective "beautiful" refers to the noun "sunset."

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  • The qualifying adjective here is not clear in meaning.

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  • Is it an adverb, modifying the verbal adjective?

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  • Copy these sentences, adding an adjective into each one to make the sentence complete.

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  • For instance, " The boy hit the ball " contains three descriptive holes: " The adjective boy adverb hit the adjective ball.

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  • attributive adjective?

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  • However in the new case of double copula preceding predicate adjective, the tendency would possibly be to create an inseparable reduplicated form.

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  • The adjective applied to the plant, the specific epithet, is often helpful in describing the plant.

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  • If the adjective takes only genitive, the complement is labeled genitive, even when acc/gen/dat ambiguous.

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  • Magian Adjective from Magi (sing. Magus) referring to a member of the Zoroastrian priestly caste in Ancient Persia.

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  • Gender means making the adjective masculine or feminine to agree with the noun.

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  • Now have a good muse on an adjective to describe them.

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  • The MorphoFinder function helps you find words using English past participles, gerunds, and plural and adjective forms.

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  • past participle used as an adjective.

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  • The MorphoFinder function helps you find words using English past participles, gerunds, and plural and adjective forms.

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  • person adjective singular or plural form.

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  • possessive adjective ' his ' involves a very brave step.

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  • Certainly there should have been a chapter on Hayden White, the most significant historian who might qualify for the adjective ' postmodern ' .

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  • Byatt seldom meets an adjective or adverb she doesn't like, and the result is often risible rather than revelatory.

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  • A14 Question 14 asked you to make an adjective from the word ' energy ' by adding a derivational suffix.

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  • tendentious adjective " insidious " applied to EE.

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  • The name has a curious origin, which explains also the particular meaning of the adjective "spruce," neatly dressed, smart in appearance, fine.

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  • The same formative element appears in the adjective Mons Massicus, and the names Glanica and Marica belonging to the Auruncan district, with Graviscae in south Etruria, and a few other names in central Italy (see " I due strati nella popolazione Indo-Europea dell' Italia Antica," in the Atti del Congresso Internazionale di Scienze Storiche, Rome, 1903, p. 17).

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  • The taking of omens may be said to be a part of all systems of divination, in which the future is predicted by means of indications of one sort or another; and tradition has thus gathered round many subjects - events, actions, colours, numbers, &c. - which are considered "ominous," an adjective which generally connotes ill-fortune.

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  • Generally the noun is qualified by an adjective so as to delimitate the principal groups of optical phenomena, e.g.

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  • But the introduction of the adjective " apologetic " and of the substantive " apologetics " is recent.

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  • (1) An adjective meaning soft, either physically or figuratively, derived from Fr.

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  • TAWDRY, an adjective used to characterize cheap finery, and especially things which imitate in a cheap way that which is rich or costly, or adornments of which the freshness and elegance have worn off.

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  • These are the adjective vigadabhi applied to the stone, and rendered in our translation "flawless"; and secondly, the last word, rendered in our translation "one-eighth part (of the crop)."

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  • The term "iconography," once confined to the study of engravings, is now applied to the history of portrait images in Christian art, though it is also used with a qualifying adjective of Greek, Roman and other art.

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  • The term, with its adjective " formal " and the derived nouns " formality " and " formalism," is hence contemptuously used for that which is superficial, unessential, hypocritical: chap. xxiii.

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  • Previously to Linnaeus long many-worded names had been used, sometimes with one additional adjective, sometimes with another, so that no true names were fixed and accepted.

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  • A further peculiarity of the use of C in Latin is in the abbreviation for the district Subura in Roma and its adjective Suburanus, which appears as SVC. Here C no doubt represents G, but there is no interchange between g and b in Latin.

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  • animalis, from anima, breath, soul), a term first used as a noun or adjective to denote a living thing, but now used to designate one branch of living things as opposed to the other branch known as plants.

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  • comptus, neat), an adjective meaning unusual or fanciful, often applied to things with a sense of old-fashioned charm or prettiness.

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  • The adjective "synechological" is used in the same general sense; "synechology" is a theory of continuity or universal causation; "synechia" is a term in ophthalmology for a morbid union of parts.

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  • Again, if a limiting adjective is added to a noun (e.g.

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  • AMORPHISM (from a, privative, and pop0, form), a term used in chemistry and mineralogy to denote the absence of regular or crystalline structure in a body; the adjective "amorphous," formless or of irregular shape, being also used technically in biology, &c.

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  • (2) An adjective and substantive meaning "that which is in the middle."

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  • adjective medianus, from medius, middle.

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  • The adjective "mean" is chiefly used in the sense of "average," as in mean temperature, mean birth or death rate, &c.

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  • Compare the use of the adjective, Ephr.

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  • The adjective "legal" is only used in the first sense, never in the second.

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  • Post-positions, pa or be and ma, are required by the noun (substantive or adjective) that is to be singled out; po or bo (masc.) and mo (fern.) are used for distinction of gender or for emphasis.

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  • In the order of the sentence the substantive precedes the adjective and the verb stands last; the object and the adverb precede the verb, and the genitive precedes the noun on which it depends - this contrasts with the order in the isolating Chinese, where the order is subject, verb, object.

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  • The word is the English representative of the substantive common to Teutonic languages, as "dead" is of the adjective, and "die" of the verb; the ultimate origin is the pre-Teutonic verbal stem dau-; cf.

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  • The adjective Achaemendus is used by the Latin poets as the equivalent of "Persian" (Horace, Odes, ii.

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  • In view of the historical significance of the NOethnicon (see Sabini) it is important to observe that the original form of the ethnic adjective no doubt appears in the title of Juppiter Latiaris (not Latinus); and that Virgil's description of the descent of the noble Drances at Latinus's court (Aen.

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  • Beginning with the Belgae and the Gallia Belgica of the Romans, the use of the adjective to distinguish the inhabitants of the south Netherlands can be traced through all stages of subsequent history.

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  • The close connexion of the two expressions, it is true, makes it probable that Mahomet only added the adjective Rahim to the substantive Rahman in order to strengthen the conception.

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  • (From Archaeologia, liii.) the ancient Greek language, the adjective OacnXucos could not well be derived.

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  • In its rudiments it is akin to the HamitoSemitic group. It possesses two grammatical genders, not masculine and feminine, but the human and the non-human; the adjective agrees in assonance with its noun, and euphony plays a great part in verbal and nominal inflections.

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  • Apart from the facts contained in this statement, the phraseology is of some importance, as the district of " Palestinian Syria " clearly includes more than the territory of the Philistines, which the adjective properly denotes (Josephus, Antiquities, i.

    0
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  • These two examples of the wider use of the adjective and noun seem to testify to the forgotten predominance of the Philistines in the land of Canaan.

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  • ATTHIS (an adjective meaning "Attic"), the name given to a monograph or special treatise on the religious and political history, antiquities and topography of Attica and Athens.

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  • In the same passage he used an incorrect adjective, Phliuntii for Phliasii; he says that he had already corrected his own copy, but the mistake survives in the single palimpsest in which this work has been preserved.

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  • The negative judgment, for example, cannot be held in one and the same undivided act to presuppose the unity of the real, project an adjective as conceivably applicable to it and assert its rejection.

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  • By the ancients this name, signifying a strait, was especially applied to the Bosporus Cimmerius (see below), and the Bosporus Thracius; but when used without any adjective it now denotes the latter, which unites the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmora and forms part of the boundary between Europe and Asia.

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  • The term Finn has a wider application than Finland, being, with its adjective Finnic or Finno-Ugric (q.v.) or Ugro-Finnic, the collective name of the westernmost branch of the Ural-Altaic family, dispersed throughout Finland, Lapland, the Baltic provinces (Esthonia, Livonia, Curland), parts of Russia proper (south of Lake Onega), both banks of middle Volga, Perm, Vologda, West Siberia (between the Ural Mountains and the Yenissei) and Hungary.

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  • verb &c7K w, " I practise," whence the noun 81 K'61s and the adjective aaxfnKO; and it embodies a metaphor taken from the ancient wrestling-place or palaestra, where victory rewarded those who had best trained their bodies.

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  • The adjective masculus points to the power of bringing forth fruit possessed by the new philosophy, and perhaps indicates that all previous births of time were to be looked upon as feminine or imperfect; it is used in a somewhat similar sense in Letters and Life, vi.

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  • The term is usually coupled with a qualifying adjective.

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  • The more important rules for initial mutation are the following: the soft mutation occurs in a feminine singular noun after the article, thus y fam, " the mother " (radical mam); in an adjective following a feminine singular noun, as in mam dda, " a good mother " (da, " good "); in a noun following a positive adjective, as in hen dd9n, " old man," because this order represents what was originally a compound; in a noun following dy, " thy," and ei, " his," thus dy ben," thy head," ei ben, " his head " (pen," head "); in the object after a verb; in a noun after a simple preposition; in a verb after the relative a.

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  • The adjective has four degrees ot comparison-positive, equative, comparative, superlative; as gldn, " clean," glaned, " as clean (as)," glanach, " cleaner," glanaf, " cleanest."

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  • Syntax.-A qualifying adjective follows its noun, and agrees with it in gender and generally in number.

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  • It may, however, precede its noun, and a compared adjective generally does so.

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  • angelus, an angle), shaped with corners or angles; an adjective used in botany and zoology for the shape of stems, leaves and wings.

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  • The Turkish adjective uzun, ~j~J,t long, applied to I-,Iasan, the Turkoman monarch of Persia (called also by the Arabs Uasanu t-Tawil), is precisely the qualifying Persian word J!j) used in the compound designation of Artaxerxes Longimanus; and Malcolm quotes the statement of a Venetian envoy in evidence that Uzun IJasan was a tall thin man, of a very open and engaging countenance.

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  • standingplace (from stare, to stand), to a stall or enclosure for all kinds of domestic animals, cows, sheep, &c. The adjective "stable," meaning firmly established, comes directly from Latin stabilis, also from stare, to stand.

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  • The latter generic name is derived from the Greek adjective /Slljtos, formed from (Los, life, probably in connexion with the name "tree of life."

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  • 3); while the adjective "apostolic" was applied to men like Polycarp (in his contemporary Acts of Martyrdom) and the Phrygian, Alexander, martyred at Lyons in A.D.

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  • The word is used both as a substantive and as an adjective.

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  • The totemistic theory in its application to Greek religion cannot be here discussed; but we may note that there is no hint in the story that the wolf was offered to Zeus and that the name AvKaios could not originally have designated the " wolf "-God: for from the stem Xveo- we should get the adjective XvKEGOS, not XvKacos; the latter is better derived from a word such as XvKn = " light," and may allude to the God of the clear sky; in fact the wolf, which was a necessary animal in the ritual and legend of Apollo AuKeIOS, may have strayed casually into association with Zeus AvKaios, attracted by a false etymology.

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    0
  • More personal than Ouranos and Helios - with whom he has only slight associations - he was worshipped and invoked as the deity of the bright day ('Apapcos, 'Aevea70s, AvKa70s), who sends the rain, the wind and dew ("Op(3pcos, Naios, `Tetcos, Oupcos, EMIÆpos, 'IK,uaZos), and such a primitive adjective as Sc17rET7)3, applied to things " that fall from heaven," attests the primeval significance of the name of Zeus.

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  • Substances which were comparatively transparent to heat he designated by the adjective "diathermane," the property being "diathermanate," while for the heattint or heat-coloration produced by passage through different materials he coined the word "diathermansie."

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  • The epithet Maleatas, which, as the quantity of the first vowel (a) shows,' cannot mean god of "sheep" or "the apple-tree," is probably a local adjective derived from Malea (perhaps Cape Malea), and may refer to an originally distinct personality, subsequently merged in that of Apollo (see below).

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  • Confirmation of this may be found in Cicero's description (Pro Milone, 85) of the destruction of the shrines and sacred groves of Alba by the construction of Clodius's villa, in the local application of the adjective Albanus, and in the position of Castel Gandolfo itself, which exactly suits Livy's description.

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  • In August the city was named "the City of the Great Salt Lake," and this name was used until 1868 when the adjective was dropped by legislative act.

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  • In the Avesta, airya- is found both as adjective and substantive in the sense of Aryan, but no light is thrown upon the history of the word.

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  • In ordinary language the adjective "humane" is restricted to the sense of "kind-hearted," "unselfish": the abstract "humanity" has this sense and also the sense of "that which pertains to mankind" derived in this case with the companion adjective "human."

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  • In mathematics and music, the adjective has been used as synonymous with "continuous" as opposed to "discrete," i.e.

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  • The derivative adjective Aequicus might be taken to range them with the Volsci rather than the Sabini, but it is not clear that this adjective was ever used as a real ethnicon; the name of the tribe is always Aequi, or Aequicoli.

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  • minutes, small; minuere, to make less), an adjective meaning of very small size, petty or trifling; also extremely precise.

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  • The adjective "hypothetical" is used in the same sense, both loosely in contradistinction to "real" or "actual," and technically in the phrases "hypothetical judgment" and "hypothetical syllogism."

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  • The oldest certain form is the Aramaic Urhai (" Western " pronunciation Urhoi), which appears in Greek as an adjective as Oppor i vi t, 2 -voi 3 (perhaps also as a fortress with spring, as Oppa),4 and in Latin as Orr(h)ei, 5 and (in the inscription on Abgar's grave) Orrhenoru(m).

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  • bini, two at a time, and oculi, eyes) was originally an adjective used to describe things adapted for the simultaneous use of both eyes, as in "binocular vision," "a binocular telescope or microscope"; now "a binocular" is used as a noun, meaning a binocular microscope, a field-glass, &c.

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  • Byatt seldom meets an adjective or adverb she does n't like, and the result is often risible rather than revelatory.

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  • A14 Question 14 asked you to make an adjective from the word ' energy ' by adding a derivational suffix.

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  • Note the tendentious adjective " insidious " applied to EE.

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  • A prepositional phrase functions as an adjective or adverb.

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  • Incorporate adjectives into your layouts and include a photo of your pet that reflects the adjective.

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  • For example, if your dog is easily excitable, use that adjective on a page that shows him jumping, wagging his tail and running in circles.

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  • The often outspoken Siriano peppered many of his sentences with his favorite word…fierce, which later became his trademark, although he is definitely not the first person to use the adjective.

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  • The occasion for which a fancy dress will be purchased is more telling than just the adjective "fancy".

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  • The word is often shortened to "frat," especially when used as an adjective, such as "frat house" or "frat party."

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  • If I had to describe iWin's Jewel Quest in two words, I'd probably use some adjective like "really, very, or incredibly" and then "boring."

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  • By adding an adjective, the game will give you credit for a new item altogether.

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  • For the most part, Italy's pale straw-colored Pinot Grigio is often described as innocuous and one has to dig deep to find a descriptive adjective for this indistinct white wine.

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  • What adjective best describes your spouse in the bedroom?

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  • This is why they choose the adjective ''mature'' to place in front of their acronyms in personal ads and online dating online dating profiles.

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  • To say the least use le/la moins + adjective.

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  • Make sure that the definite article le/la as well as the adjective being used, agrees with the noun being described.

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  • To say the most use le/la plus + adjective.

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  • Likewise, the definite article le/la, as well as the adjective, must agree in gender and number with the noun being described.

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  • For those who role play and want to select an elvish name, the common rule in creating an elf name is to use an adjective and noun combination as given in the example of Legolas.

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  • Balmy - an adjective to let someone know you are feeling sleepy or to tell someone he is weak minded.

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  • Adjective >>

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