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adjectival

adjectival

adjectival Sentence Examples

  • - Partly derived from adjectival formations in y, from nouns and infinitives:e.g.

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  • In the adjectival meaning, healthy, perfect, complete, chiefly used of a deep undisturbed sleep, or of a well-based argument or doctrine, or of a person well trained in his profession, the word is in O.

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  • Since Kant the two phrases have become purely adjectival (instead of adverbial) with a technical controversial sense, closely allied to the Aristotelian, in relation to knowledge and judgments generally.

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  • " adjectival pa ?

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  • " adjectival pa ?

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  • In the case of any subject-kind, its definition and its existence being avouched by vas, "heavenly body" for example, the problem is, given the fact of a non-self-subsistent characteristic of it, such as the eclipse of the said body, to find a ground, a / .t aov which expressed the a'irwv, in virtue of which the adjectival concept can be exhibited as belonging to the subjectconcept Kau' a&rO in the strictly adequate sense of the phrase in which it means also?7 abrO.

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  • The act of judgment " which refers an ideal content (recognized as such) to a reality beyond the act " is the unit for logic. Grammatical subject and predicate necessarily both fall under the rubric of the adjectival, that is, within the logical idea or ideal content asserted.

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  • For more examples see noun phrase, adjectival phrase and adverbial phrase.

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  • adjectival nouns, see the previous chapter.

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  • adjectival phrase that occur in the partial transformation of a sentence.

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  • adjectival agreement to the pupils.

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  • adjectival form of a lost MacDara, ' son of the oak ' " .

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  • adjectival grades for those who may prefer to lead them.

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  • Hudson's prose throughout is densely adjectival and often indiscriminate.

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  • It is from the verb " sever " but it is past, passive, and adjectival, i.e. a perfective passive participle.

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  • geometrical optics, physical optics, meteorological optics, &c. Greek terminology included two adjectival forms - ra 01rTixfi, for all optical phenomena, including vision and the nature of light, and I) &rTLiO (sc. OEcopfa), for the objective study of light, i.e.

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  • The Syriac noun has three states - the absolute (used chiefly in adjectival or participial predicates, but also with numerals and negatives, in adverbial phrases, &c.), the construct (which, as in Hebrew, must be immediately followed by a genitive), and the emphatic (see above).

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  • (See Intelligence Of Animals.) In recent scientific literature the term is more frequently used in its adjectival than in its substantive form; and the term "instinctive" is generally applied to certain hereditary modes of behaviour.

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  • In the adjectival meaning, healthy, perfect, complete, chiefly used of a deep undisturbed sleep, or of a well-based argument or doctrine, or of a person well trained in his profession, the word is in O.

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  • - Partly derived from adjectival formations in y, from nouns and infinitives:e.g.

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  • patricius, an adjectival form from pater, father; not, as some say, from pater and ciere, to call), a term originally applied to the members of the old citizen families of ancient Rome (see I.

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  • In the case of any subject-kind, its definition and its existence being avouched by vas, "heavenly body" for example, the problem is, given the fact of a non-self-subsistent characteristic of it, such as the eclipse of the said body, to find a ground, a / .t aov which expressed the a'irwv, in virtue of which the adjectival concept can be exhibited as belonging to the subjectconcept Kau' a&rO in the strictly adequate sense of the phrase in which it means also?7 abrO.

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  • The act of judgment " which refers an ideal content (recognized as such) to a reality beyond the act " is the unit for logic. Grammatical subject and predicate necessarily both fall under the rubric of the adjectival, that is, within the logical idea or ideal content asserted.

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  • Since Kant the two phrases have become purely adjectival (instead of adverbial) with a technical controversial sense, closely allied to the Aristotelian, in relation to knowledge and judgments generally.

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