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adapted

adapted Sentence Examples

  • Nature is as well adapted to our weakness as to our strength.

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  • It seems peculiarly adapted for the mild moist climate of Ireland.

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  • It seems peculiarly adapted for the mild moist climate of Ireland.

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  • From this early astrological use the form of "glory" or "nimbus" has been adapted or inherited under new beliefs.

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  • By the end of the second day, she had adapted to the guests and felt completely at ease - a state that Claudette apparently wanted to shatter.

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  • Nothing better shows the plasticity of her character than the ease with which she adapted herself to this sudden change.

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  • This latter sense has been adapted and extended by modern historians concerned with the frontiers of the Roman Empire.

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  • Everything I found in books that pleased me I retained in my memory, consciously or unconsciously, and adapted it.

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  • Why, it is the print that can be most readily adapted to many different languages.

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  • All organisms, then, are closely adapted to their surroundings.

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  • All organisms, then, are closely adapted to their surroundings.

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  • o), while the rural schools are not buildings adapted for their purpose.

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  • The leaves, again, have special histological features adapted to the performance of their special functions.

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  • In some species of Rana and Staurois inhabiting mountainous districts in south-eastern Asia, the larvae are adapted for life in torrents, being provided with a circular adhesive disk on the ventral surface behind the mouth, by means of which they are able to anchor themselves to stones.

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  • This was a theory not only attractive to the philosophical mind, but eminently adapted to promote exploration.

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  • This was a theory not only attractive to the philosophical mind, but eminently adapted to promote exploration.

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  • Practically the whole of the territory between the 145° meridian and the Great Dividing Range, as well as extensive tracts in the south and west, are a natural sheep pasture with climatic conditions and indigenous vegetation pre - eminently adapted for the growth of wool of the highest quality.

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  • Liguria is not much adapted for sheep-farming on a large scale; but a number of small flocks come down to thc plain of Tuscany in the winter.

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  • It is also probable that the various forms of the angiospermous flower, with its many specialized mechanisms for pollination, may be the result of insect-visits, the flowers becoming adapted to certain kinds of insects, and the insects having undergone corresponding modification.

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  • Dividing the land into zones of average summer temperature, the following are the areas which would fall to each: - Judging from the figures just given, it must be conceded that a considerable area of the continent is not adapted for colonization by European races.

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  • The fact is that the wind is continually varying in force, and while the ordinary pressure plate is admirably adapted for measuring the force of a steady and uniform wind, it is entirely unsuitable for following the rapid fluctuations of the natural wind.

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  • For instance, the animal traps of carnivorous plants (Drosera, Nepenihes, &c.) did not, presumably, originate as such; they began as organs of quite another kind which became adapted to their present function in consequence of animals having been accidentally caught.

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  • The town has a picturesque inn, adapted from a building dating partly from the 16th century, and market buildings dating from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

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  • Thomas Heywood adapted the Amphitruo in his Silver Age (1613), the Rudens in his Captives (licensed 1624), and the Mostellaria in his English Traveller (1633).

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  • I have tried many machines, and I find the Hammond is the best adapted to the peculiar needs of my work.

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  • This opisthodomus was completely fenced in with bronze gratings; and the excavators believe it to have been adapted for use as an adytum (shrine).

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  • Thus between London and Manchester only four sets of apparatus could be worked, but between London and Birmingham, a shorter distance, six sets (the maximum for which the system is adapted) were used.

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  • Thus between London and Manchester only four sets of apparatus could be worked, but between London and Birmingham, a shorter distance, six sets (the maximum for which the system is adapted) were used.

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  • The date of this famous letter was 1767, but after Alceste Gluck was still able to use material from earlier work; and the overture to Armide is adapted from that of Telemacco, written in the year of Bach's death (1750).

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  • In the course of three or four years, when the country became adapted to agriculture, they built themselves handsome houses, spending on them several thousands.

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  • In his translation he discarded the native Saturnian metre, and adopted the iambic, trochaic and cretic metres, to which Latin more easily adapted itself than either to the hexameter or to the lyrical measures of a later time.

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  • The heavier cores, with the consequent advance in speed of working attainable, have necessitated the introduction of automatic sending, the instruments adopted being in general a modification of the Wheatstone transmitter adapted to the form of cable signals, while the regularity of transmission thus secured has caused its introduction even on circuits where the speed cannot exceed that of the ordinary operator's hand signalling.

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  • It was found to be peculiarly adapted for communication between ships at sea and between ship and shore, and a system of regular supermarine communication was put into operation by two limited companies, Marconi's Wireless Telegraph Company and the Marconi International Marine Communication Company.

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  • Some fly through the air, others burrow in the earth, while several families have become fully adapted to life in fresh water.

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  • In fresh-water Hydromedusae the life-cycle is usually secondarily simplified, but in marine forms the life-cycle may be extremely complicated, and a given species often passes in the course of its history through widely different forms adapted to different habitats and modes of life.

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  • Accepting this view of the phylogeny of the leaf, the perianthleaves (sepals and petals) and the foliage-leaves may be regarded as modified or metamorphosed sporophylls; that is, as leaves which are adapted to functions other than the bearing of spores.

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  • And one essentially similar but adapted to slightly cooler conditions existed as far north as the latitude of Greenland.

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  • Birds being of all animals most particularly adapted for extended and rapid locomotion, it became necessary for him to eliminate from his consideration those groups, be they small or large, which are of more or less universal occurrence, and to ground his results on what was at that time commonly known as the order Insessores or Passeres, comprehending the orders now differentiated as Passeriformes, Coraciiformes and Cuculiformes, in other words the mass of arboreal birds.

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  • With regard to the occurrence of plants, such as Juncus effusus, which possess xerophytic characters and yet live in situations which are not ordinarily of marked physiological dryness, it should be remembered that such habitats are liable to occasional physical drought; and a plant must eventually succumb if it is not adapted to the extreme conditions of its habitat.

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  • - Extinct Starling of Reunion (Fregilupus varius), adapted from figures by Daubenton, Levaillant and others.

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  • In the first half of the 13th century, Abraham ibn Ilasdai, a vigorous supporter of Maimonides, translated (or adapted) a large number of philosophical works from Arabic, among them being the Sepher ha-tappuah, based on Aristotle's de Anima, and the Mozene Zedeq of Ghazzali on moral philosophy, of both of which the originals are lost.

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  • 2) are Adephaga highly specialized for life in the water, the hind-legs having the segments short, broad and fringed, so as to be well adapted for swimming, and the feet without claws.

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  • 2 b) possess slender, curved, hollow mandibles, which are perforated at the tip and at the base, being thus adapted for sucking the juices of victims. Large dyticid larvae often attack small fishes and tadpoles.

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  • It can be moved (by its own locomotive power, if desired) long distances without requiring any complicated means of conveying power to it; and it is rapid in work, fairly economical, and can be adapted to the most varying circumstances.

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  • Thus all existing hygrophytes (excepting the Algae) are considered to have been derived from land-plants which have adapted themselves to a watery habitat.

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  • 18, 21 b); the body shortened, with the abdomen swollen, but protected with tubercles and spines, and with longish legs adapted for an active life, as in the predaceous larvae of ladybirds; the body soft-skinned, swollen and caterpillar-like, with legs well developed, but leading a sluggish underground life, as in the grub of a chafer; the body soft-skinned and whitish, and the legs greatly reduced in size, as in the wood-feeding grub of a longhorn beetle.

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  • 4, 5, 6), the legs of all three pairs being alike and adapted for rapid running.

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  • There were, however, but few prisons in France adapted for the cellular system, and the process of reconstruction has been slow, In 1898 the old Paris prisons of Grande-Roquette, Saint-Plagie and Mazas were demolished, and to replace them a large prison with 1500 cells was erected at Fresnes-ls-Rungis.

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  • The P0 valley and the valleys of Emilia and the Romagna are best adapted for rice, but the area is diminishing on account of the competition of foreign rice and of the impoverishment of the soil by too intense cultivation.

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  • That is, the discerning Norman, as ever, adapted himself, but adapted himself in an intelligent way, to the circumstances of each land in which he found himself.

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  • The lands are admirably adapted for cattle-breeding purposes, although not capable of fattening animals.

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  • It is probable that these later Cynics adapted themselves somewhat to the times in which they lived and avoided the crude extravagance of Diogenes and others.

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  • Fleming, " A Note on a Form of Magnetic Detector for Hertzian Waves adapted for Quantitative Work," Proc. Roy.

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  • These words seem to contain the mere truth: Francis's peculiar religious genius was probably not adapted for the government of an enormous society spread over the world, as the Friars Minor had now become.

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  • High mountain levels supplied paths of communication for stocking the South Temperate region, the floras of which were enriched by adapted forms of tropical types.

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  • mandibles being well adapted for the capture of small insect-victims. The larvae are more specialized than those of other Adephaga, the head and prothorax being very large and broad, the succeeding segments slender and incompletely chitinized.

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  • Its object is a practical one, to determine by scientific considerations the shape of lens best adapted to improve the capabilities of the telescope, which had been invented not long before.

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  • In the universities of the Netherlands and of lower Germany, as yet free from the conservatism of the old-established seats of learning, the new system gained an easy victory over Aristotelianism, and, as it was adapted for lectures and examinations, soon became almost as scholastic as the doctrines it had supplanted.

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  • In the universities of the Netherlands and of lower Germany, as yet free from the conservatism of the old-established seats of learning, the new system gained an easy victory over Aristotelianism, and, as it was adapted for lectures and examinations, soon became almost as scholastic as the doctrines it had supplanted.

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  • But the circumstances of the country at his accession were ill adapted for liberal developments.

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  • the numerous galls on the oakbut the gall itself furnishes well adapted protection and abundant stores of nutriment to its particular larva, and often appears to be borne without injury to the plant.

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  • It is true that the earths physical geography presents certain broad features to which plants are adapted.

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  • 4), a Malayan genus found beneath fallen trees, a situation for which its compressed shape is admirably adapted.

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  • The fore-legs are elongate and adapted for clasping, while the short and flattened intermediate and hind legs form very perfect oar-like propellers.

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  • They are admirably adapted for moving through the soil, where some of them live on decaying organic matter, while others are predaceous.

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  • The mandibles are strong, adapted for biting the vegetable substances on which these beetles feed, and the palps of the second maxillae have three segments.

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  • 43) are well adapted for their burrowing habits under the bark of trees.

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  • Hitherto the western terminus of this group of lines had been Salt Lake City, Utah; by the exceedingly bold construction of the Western Pacific from Salt Lake City to Oakland, Cal., opposite San Francisco, an additional line to the Pacific coast was provided, having low grades and being in all respects well adapted for cheap operation.

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  • If, however, cost within reasonable limits is a secondary consideration and the intention is to build a line adapted for express trains and for the carriage of the largest volume of traffic with speed and economy, he will lean towards the second.

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  • It is adapted for light, high-speed service, and noted for its simplicity, excellent riding qualities, low cost of maintenance, and high mechanical efficiency; but having limited adhesive weight it is unsuitable for starting and accelerating heavy trains.

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  • Many of these ballads are adapted from secular songs.

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  • The early Christian agape admitted of adaptation to the older funeral and sacrificial feasts, and was so adapted.

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  • The soil when reclaimed is well adapted for forage crops, cereals, vegetables and deciduous fruits.

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  • Suarez endeavoured to reconcile this view with the more orthodox doctrines of the efficacy of grace and special election, maintaining that, though all share in an absolutely sufficient grace, there is granted to the elect a grace which is so adapted to their peculiar dispositions and circumstances that they infallibly, though at the same time quite freely, yield themselves to its influence.

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  • The other structural characters of the Order may be briefly summarized as: - mouth-parts adapted for piercing and sucking, or for suction alone, and consisting of a proboscis formed of the labium, and enclosing modifications of the other usual parts of the mouth, some of which, however, may be wanting; a thorax fused into a single mass; and legs with five-jointed tarsi.

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  • 14-26), and the evidence for the conclusion that traditions originally of (north) Israelite interest were taken over and adapted to the later standpoint of Judah and Jerusalem (viz.

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  • The mountainous country, ill-suited for agricultural purposes, was well adapted for these hardy warriors,whose training was Spartan in its simplicity and severity.

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  • The building, of beautiful classical design, and admirably adapted to its uses, was completed in 1916.

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  • The insects of this order have mandibles adapted for biting, and two pairs of membranous wings are usually present; the first abdominal segment (propodeum) becomes closely associated with the fore-body (thorax), of which it appears to form a part.

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  • The didactic novel of Xenophon, the Cyropaedia, is a free invention adapted to the purposes of the author, based upon the account of Herodotus and occasionally influenced by Ctesias, without any independent traditional element.

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  • The slopes and valleys are densely wooded, the lower regions being very fertile and adapted to tropical agriculture.

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  • In the years 1903 and 1904 petrol motors adapted for ploughing and other agricultural operations formed a prominent feature of the exhibits.

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  • Where not exposed to the weather the wood is probably as lasting as that of the pine, but, not being so resinous, appears less adapted for out-door uses.

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  • For hop-poles it is not so well adapted as the larch.

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  • Forms adapted to terrestrial life and to aerial respiration occur in various divisions of Gastropods, and do not constitute a single homogeneous group. Thus the Helicinidae, which are terrestrial, are now placed among the Aspidobranchia.

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  • It is now understood that they are Euthyneurous Gastropods adapted to natatory locomotion and pelagic life.

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  • Sieyes, conscious that his political mechanism would merely winnow the air, until the profoundly able and forceful man at his side adapted it to the work of government, relapsed into silence; and his resignation of the office of consul, together with that of Ducos, was announced as imminent.

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  • The climate is semi-tropical, and the vega or plain of Motril has been found peculiarly adapted for the culture of sugar-cane and sugar-beet.

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  • In insects whose mouths are adapted for sucking and piercing, remarkable modifications may occur.

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  • In the relative development and shape of the various segments of the leg there is almost endless variety, dependent on the order to which the insect belongs, and the special function - walking, running, climbing, digging or swimming - for which the limb is adapted.

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  • its attachment to the trunk, we find a highly complex series of small sclerites adapted for the varied movements necessary for flight.

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  • The adult caterpillar may be described as a creature the hypodermis of which is studded with Adapted from Koerschelt and buds that expand and form the butterHerder, and Lowne.

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  • These later stages, comprising the greater part of the larval history, are adapted for an inquiline or a parasitic life, where shelter is assured and food abundant, while the short-lived, active condition enables the newly-hatched insect to make its way to the spot favourable for its future development, clinging, for example, in the case of an oil-beetle's larva, to the hairs of a bee as she flies towards her nest.

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  • Mandibles rarely present, adapted for piercing; first maxillae with palps; second maxillae forming with hypopharynx a suctorial proboscis.

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  • But a survey of the Hexapoda as a whole, and especially a comparative study of the tracheal system, can hardly leave room for doubt that this system is primitively adapted for atmospheric breathing, and that the presence of tracheal gills in larvae must be regarded as a special adaptation for temporary aquatic life.

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  • Hesperornis too, with its keelless sternum, had aborted wings but strong legs and feet adapted for swimming, while Ichthyornis had a keeled sternum and powerful wings, but diminutive legs and feet.

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  • For two years he acted as manager of his father's bank, and in 1830 was inducted to his first charge, Arbirlot, in Forfarshire, where he adopted a vivid dramatic style of preaching adapted to his congregation of peasants, farmers and weavers.

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  • It would be difficult to imagine a site less adapted for the foundation and growth of a great community.

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  • Every "line" of its build is designed and eminently adapted for rapid progression through the water; the muscles massed along the vertebral column are enormously developed, especially on the back and the sides of the tail, and impart to the body a certain rigidity which interferes with abruptly sideward motions of the fish.

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  • The fibre is generally white, somewhat harsh and wiry, and especially adapted for mixing with wool.

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  • Saw gins are not adapted to long-stapled cottons, such as Sea Island and Egyptian, which are generally ginned by machines of the Macarthy type.

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  • Carolina; but, through the selection of seed from early maturing individual plants, the cotton has been rendered much earlier, until now it is thoroughly adapted to the existing conditions.

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  • They are adapted to special conditions which are lacking in their new surroundings, but a few will probably do fairly well the first year, and the seeds from these probably rather better the next, and so on, so that in a few years' time a strain may be available which is equal or even superior to the original one introduced.

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  • " Rough Peruvian," the produce of one of the tree cottons, has a special use, as being rather harsh and wiry it is well adapted for mixing with wool.

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  • Conditions are well adapted to the cultivation of the plant, and since the cessation of the RussoJapanese War the Japanese have undertaken the development of the industry.

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  • These are of importance to the spinner owing to the necessity of his cleaning machinery being adapted to the condition of the cotton.

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  • In accordance with these more sedentary habits during the first phases of life, the characteristic pilidium larva, which is so eminently adapted for a pelagic existence, appears to have been reduced to a close-fitting exterior layer of cells, which is stripped off after the definite body-wall of the Nemertine has similarly originated out of four ingrowths from the primary epiblast.

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  • In certain forms, hot-wire instruments are well adapted for the measurement of very small alternating currents.

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  • Although therefore most simple and cheap to construct, such soft-iron instruments are not well adapted for accurate work.

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  • of this the climate is sub-tropical, well adapted to the cultivation of pineapples.

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  • Irrigation, introduced in 1888 by the orange growers, has been adapted by other farmers, especially the tobacco-growers of Gadsden county, and so the evil effects of the droughts, so common from February to June, are avoided.

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  • Nothing is more likely than that Christianity gained adherents among the Therapeutae, and that their institutions were adapted to the new religion, just as they seem to have been borrowed by the Jews from the Egyptians.

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  • While taking the title, the idea of division by periods and the subjects of most of the meditations from the older work, Ignatius skilfully adapted it to his own requirements.

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  • But it was hardly adapted to teach a people utterly without political experience the essential elements of self-government.

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  • In India as in other countries the Mahommedans took possession of the ancient buildings and adapted them to their religious requirements.

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  • The eastern part of the Nagpur country and the Chhattisgarh plain, comprising the Mahanadi basin, form the great rice tract of the province, its heavy rainfall and hard yellowish soil rendering it excellently adapted for the growth of this crop.

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  • Messinger, and we may hope that with subsequent improvements it may be adapted to all classes of organic compounds.

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  • The process is therefore adapted to the simultaneous estimation of carbon,hydrogen, the halogens and sulphur.

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  • He had composed an opera called Die Feen adapted by himself from Gozzi's La Donna Serpente, and another, Das Liebesverbot, founded on Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, but only Das Liebesverbot obtained a single performance in 1836.

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  • Thirlmere itself was raised in level, and adapted by means of a dam at the north end, as a reservoir for the watersupply of Manchester in 1890-1894.

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  • An elaborate universal alphabet, abounding in diacritical marks, has been devised for the purpose by Professor Lepsius, and various other systems have been adopted for Oriental languages, and by certain missionary societies, adapted to the languages in which they teach.

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  • The valleys are particularly adapted to horseand sheep-farming, which are growing industries.

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  • The animal is thoroughly adapted for extreme speed, the long, rat-like tail being used in balancing the body in quick turns.

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  • They are pre-eminently dogs for sporting purposes, and special strains or breeds adapted to the peculiarities of different kinds of sporting have been produced.

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  • The feet are five-toed, and the third and fourth toes of the front pair armed with enormous claws adapted for digging.

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  • The harbour has been extended and adapted for the reception of yachts.

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  • His work, Monumenti delle anti christiane primitive, is the first in which the strange misconception, received with unquestioning faith by earlier writers, that the catacombs were exhausted sand-pits adapted by the Christians to the purpose of interment, was dispelled, and the true history of their formation demonstrated.

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  • There are only three front toes, and the limbs are long and adapted for running.

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  • The material used is a soft, porous magnesian limestone, which is well adapted to the purpose in view.

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  • Apart from the arid wastes of the Karst, the soil is well adapted for the growing of cereals, especially Indian corn; olives, vines, mulberries, figs, pomegranates, melons, oranges, lemons, rice and tobacco flourish in Herzegovina and the more sheltered portions of Bosnia.

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  • The revenues produced by the customs duties for the five years1905-1906to1909-1910are as follows: Finance Preliminary Sketch.-From the outset of their history the Osmanli Turks adapted to their own needs most of the political, economic and administrative institutions which existed before them.

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  • These men, returning to their various districts, impart to others the instruction they have received, and thus spread through the regions adapted to sericulture the proper methods of selection and rearing.

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  • He imroved the laws and institutions established by p i his predecessors and adapted them to the require ments of the age; to him are due important modifications in the feudal system, aimed.

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  • The few remaining fragments produce the impression of vivid and rapid narrative, to which the flow of the native Saturnian verse, in contradistinction to the weighty and complex structure of the hexameter, was naturally adapted.

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  • This practice is well adapted to cold situations.

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  • The Pena de los Enamorados, or "Lovers' Peak," is a conspicuous crag which owes its name to the romantic legend adapted by Robert Southey (1774-1843) in his Laila and Manuel.

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  • The collar-pores are remarkable for their constancy; this is probably owing to the fact that they have become adapted to a special function, the inhalation of water to render the collar turgid during progression.

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  • Arche, adapted from the Lat.

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  • In Africa it seems probable that the production of rubber from vines is likely to be entirely superseded in process of time, and replaced by the plantations of trees which are already being established in those districts in which careful experiment has determined the kind of rubber tree best adapted to the locality.

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  • It is therefore adapted for conditions which are unsuitable for Hevea.

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  • Innumerable forms have been devised adapted for all purposes, and provided with arrangements for filling the tube, or for keeping it full and starting it into action automatically when required.

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  • He adapted Sir Home Popham's code of signals to a code for the Mercantile Marine, for which he was made F.R.S.

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  • The soil is varied, much of it being good meadow land or well adapted to the growing of grain and fruit.

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  • In the internal field of a long coil of wire carrying an electric current, the lines of force are, except near the ends, parallel to the axis of the coil, and it is chiefly for this reason that the field due to a coil is particularly well adapted for inductively magnetizing iron and steel.

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  • But for much important experimental work it is better adapted than any other, and is indeed sometimes the only method possible.'

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  • The second has a very small area, showing that the work done in reversing the magnetization is small; the metal is therefore adapted for use in alternating current trans formers.

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  • in thickness is said to be adapted for measuring fields of the order of moo units.

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  • Elsewhere in the township the surface is gently undulating and generally well adapted to agriculture, especially to the growing of onions.

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  • The difference between the gill-books of Limulus and the lung-books of Scorpio depends on the fact that the latter are adapted to aerial respiration, while the former serve for aquatic respiration.

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  • The Eu-arachnida are divided into two grades with reference to the condition of the respiratory organs as adapted to aquatic or terrestrial life.

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  • In primitive forms the respiratory lamellae of the appendages of the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th, or of the 1st and 2nd mesosomatic somites are sunk beneath the surface of the body, and become adapted to breathe atmospheric oxygen, forming the leaves of the so-called lung-books.

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  • l oo and 300, and adapted to this new use about the latter date.

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  • There are still other bays along the coast which are well adapted for commercial purposes but are used only in the coasting trade.

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  • to Rio de Janeiro is adapted to the cultivation of a great variety of fruits of a superior quality.

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  • Cattle-breeding is probably the most lucrative branch of stock-farming, the country being pre-eminently adapted for horned cattle.

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  • Although he broke off the Magyar tribal system, encouraged the private ownership of land, and even made grants of land on condition of military service... he based his new principle of government, not on feudalism, but on the organization of the Frankish empire, which he adapted.

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  • Of the institutions thus borrowed and adapted the most notable was the famous county system which still plays so conspicuous a part in Hungarian national life.

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  • It is, therefore, admirably adapted for both literary and rhetorical purposes.

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  • Thomas and Valentine) adapted from older sources a large portion of the Bible for the use of the Hungarian refugees in Moldavia.

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  • The last, considered the best, was corrected and re-edited by Albert Molnar at Hanau in 1608.7 Heltai published also (1571) a translation, improved from that by Blasius Veres (1565), of the Tripartitum of VerbOczy, and Chronika (1575) adapted from the Decades of Bonfini.

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  • His national romances, however, and especially Etelka (Pozsony, 1787) and Az arany pereczek (Pest and Pozsony, 1790), attracted public attention, and were soon adapted for the stage.

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  • It cannot be said that previously to Darwin there had been any very profound study of teleology, but it had been the delight of a certain type of mind - that of the lovers of nature or naturalists par excellence, as they were sometimes termed - to watch the habits of living animals and plants, and to point out the remarkable ways in which the structure of each variety of organic life was adapted to the special circumstances of life of the variety or species.

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  • The plants are admirably adapted for climates in which a season favourable to growth alternates with a hot or dry season;.

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  • and only adapted to the Temple worship when they had become part of the devotional life of the people.

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  • The high veld is admirably adapted for the raising of stock, its grasses being of excellent quality and the climate good.

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  • Fruit farming is a thriving industry, the slopes of the plateaus and the river valleys being specially adapted for this culture.

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  • In the tropical district of the Limpopo valley there is some cultivation of the coffee-tree, and this region is also adapted for the growing of tea, sugar, cotton and rice.

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  • The system was soon adapted to police methods, as the immense value of being able to fix a person's identity was fully realized, both in preventing false personation and in bringing home to any one charged with an offence his responsibility for previous wrongdoing.

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  • Much the greater part of the republic is fertile and adapted to cultivation.

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  • About 120 species of Gadids are distinguished, mostly marine, many being adapted to life at great depths; all are carnivorous.

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  • Juncaceae are, in fact, a less elaborated group of the same series as Liliaceae, but adapted to a simpler and more uniform environment than that larger and much more highly developed family.

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  • Medea is the heroine of extant tragedies of Euripides and Seneca; those of Aeschylus and Ennius (adapted from Euripides) are lost.

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  • Vertical shafts are better adapted to rapid hoisting, and have therefore somewhat greater capacity, than inclined shafts.

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  • The subdrift system requires a smaller amount of narrow work in excavating the necessary haulage roads, and is therefore better adapted to hard ores in which such narrow work is expensive.

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  • Steam shovels are not well adapted to deep excavation unless provision is made for the rapid handling of the cars when filled.

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  • In the tail-rope system of haulage, best adapted for single track roads, there are two ropes - a main and a " tail " rope - winding on a pair of drums operated by an engine.

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  • The Ottoman authorities were moreover known to have given much attention to the problem of mine-fields especially adapted to the peculiar conditions existing within the Dardanelles; and the development which had taken place in this particular form of defence was such as to render the task of a fleet which should try to force the passage a more difficult one than it would have been a few years earlier.

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  • But he would seem in some degree to have adapted his manner of writing to the subjectmatter in hand.

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  • Among the many developments of the Jena Works, not the least important are the glasses made in the form of a tube, from which gas-chimneys, gauge-glasses and chemical apparatus are fashioned, specially adapted to resist sudden changes of temperature.

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  • The invention of colourless Bohemian glass brought in its train the practice of cutting glass, a method of ornamentation for which Venetian glass, from its thinness, was ill adapted.

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  • It was well adapted for receiving cut and engraved decoration, and in these processes the German craftsmen proved themselves to be exceptionally skilful.

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  • Collectors of glass are chiefly concerned with the drinking-glasses which were produced in great profusion and adapted for every description of beverage.

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  • metallum, mine, quarry, adapted from Gr.

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  • The cuneiform system of writing Semitic. w as still in process of growth when it was borrowed influence p g and adapted by the new comers, and the Semitic Babylonian language was profoundly influenced by the older language of the country, borrowing its words and even its grammatical usages.

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  • This script, together with the general Sumerian culture, was taken over by the Babylonians upon their settlement in the Euphrates valley and adapted to their language, which belonged to the Semitic group. In this transfer the Sumerian words - largely monosyllabic - were reproduced, but read as Semitic, and 1 Cf.

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  • The relative inferiority of the wines made at the Cape of Good Hope and in Australia is partly due to variations of climate, the vine not yet having adapted itself to the new conditions, - and partly to the deficient skill of the manufacturers.

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  • To make this apparatus more perfectly automatic, an arrangement for continually adding to and mixing with the juice the proper proportion of milk of lime has been adapted to it; and although it may be objected that once the proportion has been determined no allowance is made for the variation in the quality of the juice coming from the mill owing to the variations that may occur in the canes fed into the mills, it is obviously as easy to vary the proportion with the automatic arrangement from time to time as it is to vary in each separate direction, if the man in charge will take the trouble to do so, which he very seldom does with the ordinary defecators, satisfying himself with testing the juice once or twice in a watch.

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  • The table has been adapted from the Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance of the United States, January 1907, prepared in the Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Department, Washington Government Printing Office, 1902.

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  • Of course care must be exercised in the selection of plants - such as sorghum, maize, wheat, and alfalfa or lucerne - which are adapted to dry conditions and a warm climate.

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  • They are responsible for many important chemical processes which make the soil constituents more available and better adapted to the nutrition of crops.

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  • It is best adapted for application to clays and fen lands and should not be practised on shallow light sands or gravelly soils, since the humus so necessary for the fertility of such areas is reduced too much and the soil rendered too porous and liable to suffer from drought.

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  • The optimum temperature adapted to its growth and extension is 37° C. =98°.

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  • The magnetic concentrates contain enough zinc to be well adapted to the manufacture of zinc oxide.

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  • The ores of the Joplin district, in the Ozark uplift in the Mississippi Valley, are remarkable in that they are specially adapted to mechanical concentration.

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  • Three modes of gas-firing are to be noticed, each of which is :adapted to special local conditions.

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  • Adjoining the museums to the west is the palace of justice (1881), and this is closely followed by the houses of parliament (1883), in which the Grecian style has been successfully adapted to modern requirements.

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  • Its wider historic significance - it was felt by its author to be adapted to the needs of the Church at large, and was generally welcomed as such - is great but hard to determine in detail.'

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  • The surrounding country is well adapted to agriculture, and slate, iron ore, cement rock and limestone are found in the vicinity.

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  • The architectural style which has been principally followed in the later public buildings, among them the law courts, finished in 1897, the German bank, St Martin's hospital, as well as in numerous private dwellings, is the Italian and French Rococo, or Renaissance, adapted to the traditions of Munich architecture in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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  • The digestive system consists of a simple or bifurcated sac, opening through the mouth by means of a "pharynx bulbosus," adapted to act primarily as a sucker, and secondarily, when drawing blood, as an aspirator.

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  • It was adapted for Christian use by St Nilus of Constantinople (5th century), and Simplicius (about 550) wrote a commentary on it which we still possess.

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  • The censers or thuribles in Christian usage have been specially adapted to be swung, though there are in existence many early specimens of heavy weight and made of gold or silver which were obviously not meant to be used in this way and have handles and not chains.

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  • The Ctenostomata are ill adapted for preservation as fossils, though remains referred to this group have been 1 Calcareous spicules have been described by Lomas in Alcyonidium gelatinosum.

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  • The blood-sucking habit is common to both sexes, and the abdomen, being capable of great expansion, is adapted for the periodical ingestion of an abundant food-supply.

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  • He refers to de Maistre's memorable book, Du Pape, as the most profound, accurate and methodical account of the old spiritual organization, and starts from that as the model to be adapted to the changed intellectual and social conditions of the modern time.

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  • The boulder clay or " hard pan " of which most of the surface lands are composed, forms a very indifferent support for vegetation, and consequently the state is not well adapted for the growing of crops.

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  • These machines were soon adapted to the spinning of wool, and in 1804 a woollen factory was built at Peacedale, South Kingston.

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  • Wild animals and tame, carnivorous and graminivorous, insects, birds, fishes and man are adapted to each other."

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  • The immediate source of this version is the poem of Wolfram von Eschenbach, though the Grail, of course, is represented in the form of the Christian relic, not as the jewel talisman of the Parzival; but the psychological reading of the hero's character, the distinctive note of von Eschenbach's version, has been adapted by Wagner with marvellous skill, and his picture of the hero's mental and spiritual development, from extreme simplicity to the wisdom born of perfect charity, is most striking and impressive.

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  • At first they adapted them frankly to their own tongue.

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  • But while every one appreciates the magnitude of the relief that would thus be afforded, there has as yet been little substantial progress A language which has been adapted from its infancy to ideographi transmission cannot easily be fitted to phonetic uses.

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  • But the project failed signally, and indeed it may well be doubted whether the Japanese language can be adapted to such uses.

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  • The frec end of the hilt was crowned with a metallic cap or pommel (kashira), the other extremity next the tsuba was embraced by an oval ring (fuchi), and in the middle was affixed on each side a special ornament called the menuki, all adapted in material and workmanship to harmonize with the guard.

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  • The same process is then repeated in another direction, so that the new bands cross the old at an angle adapted to the nature of the design.

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  • Tapestry, as it is employed in Europe, was not thought of, nor indeed could the small hand-looms of the period be easily adapted to such work.

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  • ~The nature of its paste and glaze adapted it for the infusion of powdered tea, and its homely character suited the austere canons of the tea ceremonies.

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  • They are frankly adapted to Western taste.

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  • Adapted into English by Sidney Whitman, Life of the Emperor Frederick (1901).

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  • The enlargement of the horizon of knowledge by the advance of science, the recognition of the only relative validity of human opinions and beliefs as determined by and adapted to each stage of human development, which is due to the growing historical sense, the alteration of view regarding the nature of inspiration, and the purpose of the Holy Scriptures, the revolt against all ecclesiastical authority, and the acceptance of reason and conscience as alone authoritative, the growth of the spirit of Christian charity, the clamorous demand of the social problem for immediate attention, all combine in making the Christian churches less anxious about the danger, and less zealous in the discovery and condemnation of heresy.

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  • We say " in a purely formal aspect," because the strictness with which Babylonian mythic elements have been adapted in Gen.

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  • In the year after the war (240), when the armies had returned and the people were at leisure to enjoy the fruits of victory, Livius Andronicus substituted at one of the public festivals a regular drama, translated or adapted from the Greek, for the musical medleys (saturae) hitherto in use.

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  • Thus far Latin literature, of which the predominant characteristics are dignity, gravity and fervour of feeling, seemed likely to become a mere vehicle of amusement adapted to all classes of the people in their holiday mood.

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  • The influence of Panaetius and Polybius was more adapted to their maturity, when they led the state in war, statesmanship and oratory, and when the humaner teaching of Stoicism began to enlarge the sympathies of Roman jurists.

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  • He was well adapted to his time by his good sense and sobriety of judgment.

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  • Johannesburg has several theatres and buildings adapted for public meetings.

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  • It is best adapted for free-milling ores, especially after the bulk of the gold has been removed by amalgamation.

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  • Meanwhile, in America the Puritan tradition, adapted to the new conditions, is represented by Cotton Mather, and later by Jonathan Edwards, the greatest preacher of his time and country.

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  • 272, and was adapted to the dogmatic requirements of the time, all the later creeds of Palestine, Asia Minor and Egypt being dependent on it.

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  • 362 Cyril would find " a natural occasion for the revision of the public creed by the skilful insertion of some of the conciliar language, including the term which proclaimed the restoration of full communion with the champions of Nicaea, and other phrases and clauses adapted for impressing on the people positive truth."

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  • In 1745 Diderot adapted or reproduced the Inquiry concerning Virtue in what was afterwards known as his Essai sur le Merite et la Vertu.

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  • It is also well adapted for forming wind-breaks or screens, or for holding the banks of streams and preventing the removal of the soil by the current.

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  • The wheat and barley have a full round grain, and the climate is well adapted to the production of both European and Asiatic vegetables.

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  • Several firms are engaged in the manufacture of mineral waters, for which the water of the Cromac Springs is peculiarly adapted.

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  • Dingli adapted a considerable portion of the Napoleonic Code in a series of Malta Ordinances, but stopped short at points likely to cause agitation.

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  • The entire plain was well adapted for pasturage and corn-growing, but was liable to floods owing to the lack of free outlets for its water-courses.

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  • He was peculiarly adapted for the wise and skilful treatment of difficult problems in the spirit of an international set, playing the great game of diplomacy with grace and honour.

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  • The canines are somewhat elongated, and were followed by a short gap in each jaw, and the cheek-teeth were adapted for succulent food.

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  • The Gandhara school of sculpture, of which the best specimens come from the neighbourhood of Kanishka's capital, Purushpura (the modern Peshawar), is a branch of Graeco-Roman art adapted to Oriental religious subjects.

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  • UNGULATA, the name of an order of placental mammals in which the terminal joints of the toes are usually encased in solid hoofs or covered with broad hoof-like nails, while the molar (and not unfrequently some or all of the premolar) teeth have broad tuberculated crowns adapted for crushing vegetable substances.

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  • All the existing members of the group are eminently adapted for a terrestrial life, and in the main for a vegetable diet.

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  • 1, C, D) are well developed, being adapted, as in the more lowly winged in,ects,such as the Orthoptera, for biting.

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  • Many ants possess several different forms of worker, adapted for special duties.

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  • Most saw-fly larvae devour leaves, and the beautifully serrate processes of the ovipositor are well adapted for egg-laying in plant tissues.

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  • The principle is readily adapted to the determination of the relative densities of two liquids, for it is obvious that if W be the weight of a solid body in air, W, and W2 its weights when immersed in the liquids, then W - W, and W - W 2 are the weights of equal volumes of the liquids, and therefore the relative density is the quotient (W - W,)/(W - W2).

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  • But the wings vary considerably in different families, and the most distinctive feature is the structure of the jaws, which form a beaklike organ with stylets adapted for piercing and sucking.

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  • 10) is a larva differing markedly in form from its parent, and adapted for a different mode of life, while the nymph before the final moult is sluggish and inactive.

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  • The Notonectidae, or " water-boatmen " (q.v.) have convex ovoid bodies admirably adapted for aquatic life.

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  • to) adapted for digging; they live underground and feed on the roots of plants.

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  • The wings and are well adapted for FIG.

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  • (2) That an additional motion intermediate between the quick and slow motion in position angle was necessary, because, whilst the slow motion provided by Repsolds was admirably adapted for adjusting the pointings in position angle, it was too slow for causing the images to "cross through " each other in the process of measuring distances.

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  • Thus 7-12, which is really a Jewish fragment recounting the victory of Michael over Satan, has to a certain degree been adapted to a Christian environment by the insertion of the b - I 1.

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  • 1-13, xii., xiii., xvii., as wholly or in part independent sources, which our author has laid under contribution and adapted more or less adequately to his purpose.

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  • This method, which is the oldest, is best adapted for ways that are nearly level, or when many branches are intended to be worked from one engine, and can be carried round curves of small radius without deranging the trains; but as it is intermittent in action, considerable engine-power is required in order to get up the required speed, which is from 8 to ro m.

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  • This fact having been fully demonstrated, acetylene dissolved in this way was exempted from the Explosives Act, and consequently upon this exemption a large business has grown up in the preparation and use of dissolved acetylene for lighting motor omnibuses, motor cars, railway carriages, lighthouses, buoys, yachts, &c., for which it is particularly adapted.

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  • He adapted himself early to parliamentary conditions.

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  • MERCY (adapted from Fr.

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  • That city, founded by Alexander the Great about the time when Greece, in losing her national independence, lost also her intellectual supremacy, was in every way admirably adapted for becoming the new centre of the world's activity and thought.

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  • Before 1840 a ship of 500 tons was a large ship, but after the discovery of gold in California the size of vessels increased rapidly and their lines were more and more adapted to speed.

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  • They adapted to these conditions some of the methods for managing local affairs with which they had been familiar in England, and called the resultant institution a town.

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  • The Catholic sovereigns, Ferdinand and Isabella, adapted an existing hermandad to the purpose of a general police acting under officials appointed by themselves, and endowed with large powers of summary jurisdiction even in capital cases.

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  • The English Benedictines never advanced farther along the path of centralization; up to their destruction this polity remained in operation among them, and proved itself by its results to be well adapted to the conditions of the Benedictine Rule and life.

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  • The states of the American Union are non-tropical, adapted to the development of European races, not mixed with Indian blood, and possessed by long inheritance of the machinery needed for the successful conduct of self-government.

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  • ' The Spanish and Portuguese states of America are mainly tropical, and therefore ill adapted to the health of a white race.

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  • In Mexico, and in Peru especially, the human back was utilized to its utmost extent, and in most parts of America harness adapted for carrying was made and frequently decorated with the best art.

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  • Josephus 7 paraphrases the story more suo, and speaks of Balaam as the best prophet of his time, but with a disposition ill adapted to resist temptation.

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  • The hindquarters are comparatively large and heavy, while the tail is long, deep and more or less laterally compressed, evidently adapted for swimming.

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  • Gesner's figure of the aurochs, or as he calls it "thur," given in the Icones to his History of Animals, was probably adapted from Herberstein's.

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  • The plants are herbs or small shrubs, generally with thick fleshy stems and leaves, adapted for life in dry, especially rocky places.

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  • That the text has been much adapted and altered is certain; not less obvious are the corruptions due to carelessness and accident.

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  • 3, was adapted from that of astronomers by Martin Behaim, c. 1480.

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  • (a) The nature of the bounding curve or surface may not be exactly known, so that certain assumptions have to be made, a formula being then used which is adapted to these assumptions.

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  • The formulae can be adapted to the case in which cp(x) is tabulated for xl,.

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  • 3 is adapted for the narrow rows of grain crops and is also convertible into a root-hoe.

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  • Having obtained the prize for an essay on "the kind of free government best adapted to Italy" he decided upon the career of a publicist.

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  • This race was formerly used for malt and beer, but owing to its larger amount of gluten as compared with starch it is less adapted for brewing than the two-rowed sorts.

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  • In the south centre, the upland plain of the Wairarapa, ending in a large but commonplace lake, has a climate adapted for both grazing and cereals.

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  • viii.) further adapted the siren for more extensive use, by the addition to Dove's instrument Helmholtz's of another chest cone), i Double taming its own fixed Siren.

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  • The method is easily adapted for the converse determination of speed of revolution when the frequency of a fork is known.

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  • Although the district is principally devoted to mining it is well adapted for sheep-farming, and some of the finest wool in the world is produced near Ballarat.

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  • The dry western plains are best adapted for sheep rearing, while the well-watered eastern regions are specially suitable for the growing of cereals and;also for horse breeding.

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  • The great cantilever bridges have been erected in the same way, and they are specially adapted for erection by building out.

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  • - In the case of girders with braced webs, the tension bars of which are not adapted to resist a thrust, another circumstance due to the position of the live load must be considered.

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  • The bracing bars, therefore, for this part of the girder must be adapted to resist either tension or thrust.

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  • At first indeed, since the war was only expected to last a short time, there was little disposition to incur the heavy expenditure necessary in order to secure a share in the manufacture of war material; but this attitude was soon changed, and within six months factories everywhere had been adapted to the supply of munitions and all the variety of other things required by the Government for the armies.

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  • It is often locally enriched by vegetable mould, and is well adapted for wheat-growing.

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  • The state is especially well adapted for grazing, and during1890-1900there was a large increase in the number of farm animals.

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  • "Queer," which has much the same meaning, is of doubtful etymology, but is generally taken as adapted from German.

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  • In the Baltic, where the water is gradually losing its saline constituents, thus becoming less adapted for the development of marine species, the herring continues to exist in large numbers, but as a dwarfed form, not growing either to the size or to the condition of the North-Sea herring.

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  • The Laksana Phra Thamasat, the Phra Tamra, Phra Tamnon, Phra Racha Kamnot and Inthapat are ancient works setting forth the laws of the country in their oldest form, adapted from the Dharmacastra and the Classification of the Law of Manu.

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  • above sea-level, adapted as a distributing reservoir in the city's waterworks; and behind it are verdure-covered hills rising to an elevation of 500 ft., forming a picturesque background to the grey walls and red-tiled roofs of the city.

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  • Philo drew his traditions from various sources, adapted them to suit his purpose, and conjured with a venerable name to gain credit for his narrative.

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  • When two different generations are produced in one year on the same kind of tree it is clear the properties of the sap and tissues of the tree must be diverse so that the two generations are adapted to different conditions.

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  • 'TARIFF (adapted in English from the French; the word comes through the Spanish tarifa, a list or schedule of prices,.

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  • A cheap edition of the leading Polish classics, well adapted for dissemination among the people, has been published, under the title of Biblioteka Polska, at Cracow.

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  • His passionate appeal on behalf of "legitimacy" was particularly adapted to the necessities of the situation.

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  • The grounds are beautifully laid out and the collection is particularly rich in African animals, to which the climate is well adapted.

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  • The chief danger with herbivorous and frugivorous creatures is that their constitutions are not adapted to the richness of cultivated fruits and cereals, and, in captivity, they may suffer mechanically from the want of bulk in their food supply, or if they eat a quantity sufficient in bulk, it contains an excess of nutritive material.

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  • Those of 1735, 1762, 1780 and 1791 have been mentioned; those of 1817, 1832, 1859 and 1904-1905 were no less powerful, and their history is interwoven with Calvinistic Methodism, the system of which is so admirably adapted for the passing on of the torch.

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  • Anton Kerner has shown that crowded inflorescences such as those of Compositae and Umbelliferae are especially adapted for geitonogamy.

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  • - 1 or, as (88) and (90) may be written for small angles, (91) sin 20.=2C [I (V) - oS j, (92) sin 20 =2C [O S - I (v)] To simplify the work, so as to look out the value of sin 20 without the intermediate calculation of the remaining velocity v, a doubleentry table has been devised by Captain Braccialini Scipione =S (U) - S (u), = I (U) - I (u); mean angle (70), (Problemi del Tiro, Roma, 1883), and adapted to yd., ft., in.

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  • For the most part they are considerably heavier with clay than are those of the Coastal Plain, and better adapted to general agricultural purposes.

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  • In the east portion of the mountainous region the soil so well adapted to peach culture contains much clay, together with particles of Cambrian sandstone.

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  • Ind., May 1884), nickel basins are far better adapted than iron basins for the preliminary concentration of potash ley.

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  • Muller), Scourfield has shown how it is adapted for movement back downwards in the water along the underside of the surface film, which to many small crustaceans is a dangerously disabling trap. (b) Bosminidae.

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  • By various modifications of their valves and appendages the creatures have become adapted for swimming, creeping, burrowing, or climbing, some of them combining two or more of these activities, for which their structure seems at the first glance little adapted.

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  • In impressive and persuasive oratory he sets before Israel, in a form adapted to the needs of the age in which he lived, the fundamental principles which Moses had taught.

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  • There are methods of measuring electrical power by means of electrostatic voltmeters, or of quadrant electrometers adapted for the purpose, which when so employed may be called electrostatic wattmeters.

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  • Mill justified protection - that, namely, in which an industry well adapted to a country is kept down by the acquired ascendancy of foreign producers - is referred to by Smith; but he is opposed to the admission of this exception for reasons which do not appear to be conclusive.

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  • Its use is now generally preceded by something more adapted to the child-mind, and this is true also in other communions and in the case of other catechisms.

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  • living horse, rear view, showing large lateral digits on the fore and hind feet, adapted to prevent the animal from sinking into the soft soil.

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  • - Neohipparion, a plains-living horse with very slender limbs and lateral digits small and well raised from the ground, adapted to a dry, hard soil.

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  • - It is obvious that the Linnaean binomial terminology and its subsequent trinomial refinement for species, sub-species, and varieties was adapted to express the differences between animals as they exist to-day, distributed contemporaneously over the surface of the earth, and that it is wholly inadapted to express either the minute gradations of successive generic series or the branchings of a genetically connected chain of life.

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  • A succession of devout but incapable generals, after the death of Acquaviva, saw the gradual secularization of tone by the flocking in of recruits of rank and wealth desirous to share in the glories and influence of the Society, but not well adapted to increase them.

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  • The mule is more generally used in every part of the country, being hardier, more intelligent and better adapted for service as a draft and pack animal.

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  • The borough has a large trade with the surrounding country, which is well adapted to agriculture and abounds in limestone.

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  • No remains are to be seen, but the site is admirably adapted for an ancient settlement.

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  • viminalis are best adapted for this purpose.

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  • This was translated or adapted in French, German and English.

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  • TRYPANOSOMES, Or Haemoflagellates, minute Protozoan parasites, characterized by the possession of one or two flagella and an undulating membrane, and specially adapted for life in the blood of a vertebrate.'

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  • These instruments are only adapted for the measurement of continuous potential difference, that is to say, unidirectional potential difference, but not for alternating voltages.

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  • mylen, later myln, or miln, adapted from the late Lat.

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  • There are different styles of riding adapted to the different purposes for which horses are ridden - on the road, in the school, hunting, racing, steeple-chasing and in the cavalry service - just as there are different horses more suitable by conformation, breeding and training for each.

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  • A later view, adapted to the Christian one, represents the portions of light in the unsaved as actually becoming lost.

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  • The Manichaeans too, at least in the West, appear to have adapted themselves to the Church's system of festivals.

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  • The alphabet used is the one adapted by Mani himself from the Syriac estrangelo.

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  • Thus adapted from the first to individual requirements, this religion also showed itself able to appropriate from time to time foreign elements.

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  • It is peculiarly adapted for peaty soils, and is accordingly a favourite crop in the fen lands of England, and on recently reclaimed mosses and moors elsewhere.

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  • The oil is similar to that in the true colza seeds but the plants do not yield so much per acre as the latter: they are, however, hardier and more adapted for cultivation on poor sandy soils.

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  • It will be seen from the above account that the arrangement of a Cistercian monastery was in accordance with a clearly defined system, and admirably adapted to its purpose.

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  • long and as wide as or wider than France, with (over a large part of this area) a climate adapted to the production of foods of superior quality.

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  • Over large areas the Canadian soil and climate are admirably adapted for producing oats of heavy weight per bushel.

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  • The breeding of cattle, adapted for the production of prime beef and of dairy cows for the production of milk, butter and cheese, has received much attention.

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  • All parts of the Dominion are well adapted for sheep; but various causes, amongst which must be reckoned the prosperity of other branches of agriculture, including wheat-growing and dairying, have in several of the provinces contributed to prevent that attention to this branch which its importance deserves, though there are large areas of rolling, rugged yet nutritious pastures well suited to sheep-farming.

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  • After peace was concluded in 1763, Canada was governed under the authority of a royal proclamation, but sooner or later a constitution specially adapted to the needs of the country was inevitable.

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  • Gerin Lajoie'S Cry Of " Back To The Land " Was Successfully Adapted To Moderns Developments In Le Saguenay (1896) And L'Outaouais Su Perieur (1889) By Arthur Buies, Who Showed What Immense Inland Breadths Of Country Lay Open To Suitable " Jean Rivards " From The Older Settlements Along The St Lawrence.

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  • The legs are stout and spiny, and well adapted for clinging to the hair or feathers of the host animal.

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  • The winged insects resemble the May-flies in their short feelers and in the large number (50 to 60) of their Malpighian tubes, but differ most strikingly from those insects in their strong wellarmoured bodies, their powerful jaws adapted for a predaceous manner of life, and the close similarity of the hind-wings to the forewings.

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  • CALENDAR, so called from the Roman Calends or Kalends, a method of distributing time into certain periods adapted to the purposes of civil life, as hours, days, weeks, months, years, &c.

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  • It Is Therefore Infinitely More Commodious To Determine The Commencement Of The Year By A Fixed Rule Of Intercalation; And Of The Various Methods Which Might Be Employed, No One, Perhaps Is On The Whole More Easy Of Application, Or Better Adapted For The Purpose Of Computation, Than The Gregorian Now In Use.

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  • It Is Therefore So Obviously Ill Adapted To The Computation Of Time, That, Excepting The Modern Jews And Mahommedans, Almost All Nations Who Have Regulated Their Months By The Moon Have Employed Some Method Of Intercalation By Means Of Which The Beginning Of The Year Is Retained At Nearly The Same Fixed Place In The Seasons.

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  • On The Other Hand, As The Golden Numbers Were Only Adapted To The Julian Calendar, Every Omission Of The Centenary Intercalation Would Require Them To Be Placed One Line Lower, Opposite The 6Th, For Example, Instead Of The 5Th Of The Month; So That, Generally Speaking, The Places Of The Golden Numbers Would Have To Be Changed Every Century.

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  • P. 9); It May Be Exhibited Under A Variety Of Forms, But The Above Is Perhaps The Best Adapted For Calculation.

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  • The combination proved admirably adapted in Russia for the practical purpose of the overthrow of the previously existing order.

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  • It receives its name from its soil (weathered from the weak underlying limestone), which is black in colour, almost destitute of sand and loam, and rich in limestone and marl formations, especially adapted to the production of cotton; hence the region is also called the "Cotton Belt."

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  • By altering the quantity of shot in the small balls the instrument could be adapted for liquids other than water.

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  • The instrument thus adapted to the determination of densities exceeding that of water was called the hydrometer for salts.

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  • In Speer's hydrometer the stem has the form of an octagonal prism, and upon each of the eight faces a scale is engraved, indicating the percentage strength of the spirit corresponding to the several divisions of the scale, the eight scales being adapted respectively to the temperature 35°, 40°, 45 50°, 55, 60°, 65° and 70° F.

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  • Twaddell's hydrometer is adapted for densities greater than that of water.

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  • The lactometer constructed by Dicas of Liverpool is adapted for the determination of the quality of milk.

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  • So, although a certain amount of the narrative could date from the days of Moses, the Exodus story has been made the vehicle for the aims and ideals of subsequent ages, and has been adapted from time to time to the requirements of later stages of thought.

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  • The wood is the hardest and strongest of all the American conifers; it is durable and adapted for construction work or household furniture.

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  • subtaneus, adapted in O.

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  • RODENTIA, or Glires, an order of placental mammals characterized by the peculiar form and structure of their front or incisor teeth, which are reduced to a single functional chisellike pair in each jaw, specially adapted for gnawing, and growing throughout the entire life of their owners.

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  • All these "rodentmoles" are thoroughly adapted to a subterranean life, the eyes and ears being small and rudimentary, as is also the tail; while the bodily form is cylindrical, and the front claws are very large and powerful.

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  • All the Bathyergidae are African, and adapted to a burrowing life, having minute ears and eyes, a short tail and the thumb armed with a large claw.

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  • Flax, for which much of the soil is admirably adapted, is extensively cultivated, and forms an important article of export, chiefly, however, in the form of yarn.

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  • Wilham de Waddington produced at the end of the 13th century his Manuel des peches, which was adapted in England by Robert of Brunne in his Handlying Sinne (1303) [Hist.

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  • The cultivated varieties are extremely numerous, some kinds being adapted for marshy land, others for growth on the hill A, spikelet (enlarged) B, bearded variety sides.

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  • No special rotation is followed: indeed the soil best suited for rice is ill adapted for any other crop. In some cases little manure is employed, but in others abundance of manure is used.

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  • There is some reason to believe that this complicated and variable apparatus is used for stabbing the body of another animal and that beginning as a weapon for catching prey it has become modified for hypodermic impregnation and only gradually adapted for insertion into the bursa copulatrix.

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  • 28), adapted the works of Ps.

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  • The doctrine has adapted itself to the popular belief.

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  • Out of two old buildings adapted by him to Christian worship, Felix made the church of SS.

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  • He throws out the brilliant suggestion that the experience of the race is in a sense inherited by the individual; which is true in the sense that animal organisms become hereditarily better adapted to perform mental operations, though no proof that any elements of knowledge become a priori.

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  • While their principles were consistent with the neighbourhood of men, they were better adapted to a state of seclusion.

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  • In its most simple and attractive form - one at the same time invested with the authority of the reputed holy author - their account of the creation of the world and of man; the origin of sin and redemption, the history of the Cross, and the disputes between body and soul, right and wrong, heaven and hell, were embodied either in "Historiated Bibles" (Paleya 1) or in special dialogues held between Christ and his disciples, or between renowned Fathers of the Church who expounded these views in a simple manner adapted to the understanding of the people (Lucidaria).

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  • himself at the beginning of his pontificate yielded to the current, and, like his predecessors, adapted his external policy to the pretensions and interests of vlll.

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  • Unfortunately, on the 1st of May, an attack of apoplexy cut short the life of this pope, who seemed peculiarly adapted for the reformation of the Church.

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  • was repeated and adapted to later conditions.

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  • also made special regulations for it, by which its ancient usages are adapted to modern circumstances.

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  • These teeth, adapted to various requirements, vary according to the genus, being conical, hooked, spoon-shaped, molariform, &c.

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  • Although partly feeding on worms and other small forms of animal life, the carp is principally a vegetarian, and the great development of its pharyngeal apparatus renders it particularly adapted to a graminivorous regime.

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  • Hence slabs or beams of long span should not be built of plain concrete, though when reinforced with steel it is admirably adapted for these purposes.

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  • "Expanded metal" too is admirably adapted for the purpose (fig.

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  • Taken as a whole, the finches, concerning which no reasonable doubt can exist, are not only little birds with a hard bill, adapted in most cases for shelling and eating the various seeds that form the chief portion of their diet when adult, but they appear to be mainly forms which predominate in and are highly characteristic of the Palaearctic Region; moreover, though some are found elsewhere on the globe, the existence of but very few in the Notogaean hemisphere can as yet be regarded as certain.

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  • Regarded as a method of military organization, the feudal system of tenures was always far better adapted to the purposes of defensive than of offensive warfare.

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  • The badge is a striking example of Oriental design adapted to a European conventional form.

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  • However, it is practically certain, both from the etymology of the word Purim and from the resemblance of the festivals, that the feast, as represented in the Book of Esther, was borrowed from the Persians, who themselves appeared to have adapted it from the Babylonians.

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  • All means are adapted to increase the hilarity of the two days, which are filled with feasting, dancing, singing and making merry generally.

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  • It showed itself in a desire to throw off the governance of the missionaries, in a criticism of Protestant creeds as not adapted to Japanese needs, and in a slackened growth numerically and intensively.

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  • In wind-fertilized plants the flowers are comparatively inconspicuous and devoid of much attraction for insects; and their pollen is smoother and smaller, and better adapted for transport by the wind, than that of insectfertilized plants, the roughness of which adapts it for attachment to the bodies of insects.

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  • A hazel-coloured loam, moderately light in texture, is well adapted for most garden crops, whether of fruits or vegetables, especially a good warm deep loam resting upon chalk; and if such a soil occurs naturally in the selected site, but little will be required in the way of preparation.

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  • The clay marls are, like clay soils, too stiff for garden purposes until well worked and heavily manured; but loamy marls are fertile and well suited to fruit trees, and sandy marls are adapted for producing early crops.

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  • In the case of villas or picturesque residences, gardens of irregular form may be permitted; when adapted to the conditions of the locality, they associate better with surrounding objects, but in such gardens wall space is usually limited.

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  • Although the interior garden receives its form from the walls, the ring fence and plantations may be adapted to the shape and surface of the ground.

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  • These were, however, ill adapted for the growth of plants, as they consisted of little else than a huge chamber of masonry, having large windows in front, with the roof invariably opaque.

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  • Span and ridge-and-furrow roofs, the forms now mostly preferred, are exceedingly well adapted for the admission of light, especially when they are glazed to within a few inches 2.

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  • Great variety of design is admissible in the conservatory, but it ought always to be adapted to the style of the mansion of which it is a prominent appendage.

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  • A southern aspect, or one varying to south-east or south-west, is preferable; if these aspects cannot be secured, the plants selected must be adapted to the position.

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  • Houses of this form are excellent for general purposes, and they are well adapted both for muscats, which require a high temperature, and for late-keeping grapes.

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  • 7), the most elegant and ornamental form, is especially adapted for isolated positions; indeed, no other form affords so much roof space for the development of the vines.

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  • The amount of light admitted being very great, these houses answer well for general purposes and for the main crop. The large amount of glass or cooling surface, however, makes it more difficult to keep up a high and regular temperature in them, and from this cause they are not so well adapted for very early or very late crops.

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  • A low span, with dwarf side walls, and a lantern ventilator along the ridge, the height in the centre being 9 ft., would be very well adapted for the purpose.

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  • It is adapted for storing plants in winter, for nursing small plants in summer and for the culture of melons and other crops requiring glass shelter.

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  • It is no doubt the finest stimulant for the growth of plants, and that most adapted to restore the fertile elements which the plants have abstracted from exhausted soils.

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  • Horse dung is generally the principal ingredient in all hot bed manure; and, in its partially decomposed state, as afforded by exhausted hot beds, it is well adapted for garden use.

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  • The advantages of the operation may generally be gained by judicious root pruning, and it is not at all adapted for the various stone fruits.

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  • Horizontal training is best adapted to the apple and the pear; and for the more twiggy growing slender varieties, the forms shown in fig.

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  • ] it is best adapted.

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  • The half-fan form is well adapted for such fruits FIG.

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  • Climbers are trained from the bottom around or across trellises, of which the cylindrical or the balloon-shaped, or sometimes the flat oval or circular, are the best forms. The size should be adapted to the habit of the plant, which should cover the whole by the time flowers are produced.

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  • - Neat trailing plants adapted for rockwork, thriving in sandy soil.

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  • Pretty dwarf tufted plants, with needle-shaped leaves, adapted for rockwork.

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  • Dwarf close-growing evergreen cruciferous plants, adapted for rockwork and the front part of the flower border, and of the easiest culture.

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  • Well adapted for carpeting the border or rockery.

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  • - Showy marsh plants, adapted for the margins of lakes, streamlets or artificial bogs.

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  • Gigantic umbelliferous plants, with magnificent foliage, adapted for shrubbery borders or open spots on lawns.

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  • multiflorus, 4 ft., and its double-flowered varieties, bear showy golden yellow flower-heads in profusion, and are well adapted for shrubbery borders; H.

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  • Well adapted for rockwork or banks of sandy soil.

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  • rivularis, 4 in., from La Plata, has slender, creeping, rooting stems, bearing stalked ovate leaves, and large funnel-shaped white flowers, with a remarkably long slender tube; especially adapted for rockwork, requiring moist sandy loam.

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  • Elegant liliaceous plants, with rhizomatous stems. P. multiflorum (Solomon's Seal), 2 to 3 ft., with arching stems, and drooping white flowers from the leaf axils, is a handsome border plant, doing especially well in partial shade amongst shrubs, and also well adapted for pot culture for early forcing.

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  • P. Parthenium eximium, 2 ft., is a handsome double white form of ornamental character for the mixed border; P. uliginosum, 5 to 6 ft., has fine large, white, radiate flowers in October; P. Tchihatchewii, a close-growing, dense evergreen, creeping species, with long-stalked, white flower-heads, is adapted for covering slopes in lieu of turf, and for rockwork.

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  • Neat-growing, succulent plants, forming rosettes of fleshy leaves close to the ground, and rapidly increasing by runner-like offsets; they are well adapted for rockwork, and do best in sandy soil.

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  • Pretty caryophyllaceous plants, preferring sandy loam, and well adapted for rockwork.

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  • Many fish inhabited the Carboniferous seas and most of these were Elasmobranchs, sharks with crushing pavement teeth (Psammodus), adapted for grinding the shells of brachiopods, crustaceans, &c. Other sharks had piercing teeth (Cladoselache and Cladodus); some, the petalodonts, had peculiar cycloid cutting teeth.

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  • In the former case there is no later chance to remove sulphur, a minute quantity of which does great harm by leading to the formation of cementite instead of graphite and ferrite, and thus making the cast-iron castings too hard to be cut to exact shape with steel tools; in the latter case the converting or purifying processes, which are essentially oxidizing ones, though they remove the other impurities, carbon, silicon, phosphorus and manganese, are not well adapted to desulphurizing, which needs rather deoxidizing conditions, so as to cause the formation of calcium sulphide, than oxidizing ones.

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  • They were in German, not in Latin; they were expositions of his own experience, of his own views, of his own methods of curing, adapted to the diseases that afflicted the Germans in the year 1527, and they were not commentaries on the text of Galen or Avicenna.

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  • The long and mobile muzzle of the okapi appears to be adapted for feeding: on the low forest underwood and the swamp-vegetation.

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  • It is easy to understand that a form of monastic life thus emptied of distinctively Oriental features and adapted to the needs of the West.

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  • The internal structure of the lion, except in slight details, resembles that of other Felidae, the whole organization being that of an animal adapted for an active, predaceous existence.

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  • Though Eustathius of Sebaste was the first to introduce the monastic life within the confines of what may be called Greek Christianity in Asia Minor (c. 340), it was St Basil who adapted it to Greek and European ideas and needs.

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  • Hence the extended surface of the leaf exposing a large area to light and air is eminently adapted for the carrying out of the process of photo-synthesis and transpiration.

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  • for "blow," is a shortened form of colapus or colaphus, adapted from the Gr.

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  • Russian sobol, whence it has been adapted into various languages, cf.

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  • The plan is curious, and deviates much from the ordinary type; the internal arrangements are adapted for the performance of the peculiar rites of this deity.

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  • In a few instances only do we find them making use of a whitish limestone wrongly called travertine, which, though inferior to the similar material so largely employed at Rome, was better adapted than the ordinary tufa for purposes where great solidity was required.

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  • The water is there in abundance, the land is well adapted for irrigation, but as there is a considerable rainfall, it is doubtful whether the scheme would prove remunerative, and a large section of the landowners have hitherto opposed it, as likely to waterlog the country.

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  • A project was sanctioned ir 1905 for a canal, adapted for vessels up to 600 tons, from th Rhine to the Weser at Hanover, utilizing a portion of the Dort mund-Ems canal; for a channel accommodating vessels of simila:

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  • The white breeds are liable to sun-scald, and black pigs (like black men) are much better adapted than white to exposure in strong sunlight, conforming to the rule that animals in the tropics have black skins.

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  • Large Blacks are exceedingly docile, and the ears, hanging well forward over the eyes, contribute materially to a quietness of habit which renders them peculiarly adapted to field grazing.

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  • "In the Circuits, then, they adapted the whole to their own views, representing Peter falsely in many ways, as that he was daily baptized for the sake of purification, as these also do; and they say that he likewise abstained from animal food and meat, as they themselves also do."

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  • To such its romantic setting would be specially adapted, as falling in with the literary habits and tastes of the period; while its doctrinal peculiarities would least give offence in a work of the aim and character just described.

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  • Here he taught Greek and adapted Greek plays for a livelihood, and by his poetical compositions gained the friendship of the greatest men in Rome.

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  • The heroes and heroines of the Trojan cycle, such as Achilles, Ajax, Telamon, Cassandra, Andromache, were prominent figures in some of the dramas adapted from the Greek.

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  • It is, in the words of Lord Cromer, in many respects ill adapted to meet the special needs of the country (Egypt, No.

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  • The trend of the evolution of the plant kingdom has been in the direction of the establishment of a vegetation of fixed habit and adapted to the vicissitudes of a life on land, and the Angiosperms are the highest expression of this evolution and constitute the dominant vegetation of the earth's surface at the present epoch.

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  • In this connexion it is noteworthy that so many of the higher forms are adapted as bulbous geophytes, or as aerophytes to special xerophilous conditions.

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  • The most interesting of the seven tales is the fourth, the story of the Russian princess, in which we recognize at once the prototype of Gozzi's well-known Turandot, which was afterwards adapted by Schiller for the German stage.

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  • By this means the bulk of the statute law was immensely reduced, its obscurities and internal discrepancies in great measure removed, its provisions adapted, by the abrogation of what was obsolete, to the circumstances of Justinian's own time.

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  • The last four volumes of the second edition of his History of the Councils have been described as skilfully adapted to the new situation created by the Vatican decrees.

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  • The breeds include the Ayrshire, noted milkers and specially adapted for dairy farms (which prevail in the south-west), which in this respect have largely supplanted the Galloway in their native district; the polled Angus or Aberdeen, fair milkers, but valuable for their beef-making qualities, and on this account, as well as their hardihood, in great favour in the north-east, where cattlefeeding has been carried to perfection; and the West Highland or Kyloe breed, a picturesque breed with long horns, shaggy coats and decided colours-black, red, dun, cream and brindle-that thrives well on wild and healthy pasture.

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  • The largest administrative unit is that of the county, but the areas of counties may be adapted to meet various public or political requirements.

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  • It is even more important to notice that he did not suggest that every individual with a favourable variation must be selected, or that the selected or favoured animals were better or higher, but merely that they were more adapted to their surroundings.

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  • According to Strabo (p. 200) the Britons also bred dogs well adapted for hunting purposes.

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  • Between this drama and its successor, Die Brazil von Messina, Schiller translated and adapted to his classic ideals Shakespeare's Macbeth (1801) and Gozzi's Turandot (1802).

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  • Their structure is adapted to short voyages in a sea well studded with harbours, not exposed to the most violent storms or most dangerous tides.

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  • For joiners' work, however, it is well adapted, and glue adheres strongly to it, though nails do not hold well.

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  • pandecta, adapted from Gr.

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  • monachus, adapted from Gr.

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  • The word was adapted from an O.

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  • In addition to the above there is an extraordinary North American Miocene giraffe-necked camel (Alticamelus), a creature of the size of a giraffe, with similarly elongated neck and limbs, and evidently adapted for browsing on trees.

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  • The Jews were mainly country-folk from the time of their settlement in Canaan to their final expulsion from the land by Titus and Hadrian, and the soil of Israelitish Palestine was better adapted to the raising of sheep and oxen than to the production of grain.

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  • That it could fly is certain, and the feet show it to have been well adapted to arboreal life.

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  • Goethe, meanwhile, satisfied to continue the freer customs to which he had adapted himself in Rome, found a new mistress in Christiane Vulpius (1765-1816), the least interesting of all the women who attracted him.

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  • Goethe has here taken a simple story of village life, mirrored in it the most pregnant ideas of his time, and presented it with a skill which may well be called Homeric; but he has discriminated with the insight of genius between the Homeric method of reproducing the heroic life of primitive Greece and the same method as adapted to the commonplace happenings of 18th-century Germany.

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  • Thus, the Samaritans claim the traditions of the land; the Chronicler traces the connexion between " pre-exilic " and " post-exilic " Judaeans, ignoring and obscuring intervening events; the south Palestinian cycle of tradition is adapted to the history of a descent into and an exodus from Egypt; Zadokite priests are enrolled as Aaronites, and the hierarchical traditions ' A Samarian (or Ephraimite or N.

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  • The first of these, casting is chiefly adapted for bronze, or ' Analyses of the iron of prehistoric weapons have brought to light the interesting fact that many of these earliest specimens of iron manufacture contain a considerable percentage of nickel.

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  • The subdued colour and soft contours of pewter render it once more a favoured material, peculiarly adapted to the methods of the art revival, and perhaps destined to supersede electro-plate for household purposes.

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  • to 1830 it was used as a crown victualling office, but was subsequently purchased by the corporation and adapted as a town hall.

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  • In Great Britain Gay-Lussac's coke-towers, adapted by W.

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  • In A pis the workers differ structurally from the queen, who neither builds cells, gathers food, nor tends brood, and is therefore without the special organs adapted FIG.

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  • Such ruthless habits of the bee-commonwealth, no less than the altruistic labours of the workers, are adapted for the survival and dominance of the species.

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  • In England, after receiving such modifications - attributed to Burke - as adapted it to the purposes of the opposition, this pamphlet ran through many editions, and procured for its author, as he said, "the honour of having his name inserted in a long list of proscriptions enrolled in a bill of attainder commenced in one of the two houses of parliament, but suppressed in embryo by the hasty course of events."

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  • Taking India as a whole, the staple food grain is neither rice nor wheat, but millets, which are probably the most prolific grain in the world, and the best adapted to the vicissitudes of a tropical climate.

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  • The large and handsome oxen of Gujarat in Bombay and of Hariana in the Punjab are excellently adapted for drawing heavy loads in a sandy soil.

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  • Their three objects were conquest, commerce and conversion, and for all three their position on the Malabar coast strip was remarkably well adapted.

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  • For these reasons the coelostat is never likely to be largely employed in general astronomical work, but it is admirably adapted for spectroscopic and bolometric observations of the sun, and for use in eclipse expeditions.

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  • The rich soil of the lowlands of the province of Laguna is especially well adapted to the culture of the coco-nut palm, and since the American occupation considerable land in this province that had formerly been devoted to sugar has been planted with these trees.

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  • Callendar Has, However, Devised A Continuous Method Of Mixture, Which Appears To Be Peculiarly Adapted To The Purpose, And Promises To Give More Certain Results.

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  • It is natural that under the Sumerian revival, which characterized the united kingdom of Sumer and Akkad, the ancient ritual should have been revived and the Sumerian servicebooks adapted for the use of the reigning monarch.

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  • The ease with which the native populations of the conquered districts, exclusively or prevailingly Christian, adapted themselves to the new rule is very striking.

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  • The forward lines on Monte Armentera and Monte Salubio were poorly adapted for defence, but had been strongly fortified, while the line east of the Maso torrent, which Cadorna had indicated as the main line of defence, had undergone little preparation.

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  • This notion of the influence of the tenement is well adapted to feudal notions and makes itself felt again in the case of the pursuit of a fugitive villein.

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  • That other matters, the parva logicalia and Mnemonics adapted from Psellus and possibly of Stoic origin, entered too did not outweigh this advantage.

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  • " passed to the order of the day," while on the other Lotze hand he definitely raised the question, how an " object " could be brought into forms to which it was not in some sense adapted.

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  • Here, then, is a case specially adapted to the isotropy of the quaternion system; and Hamilton easily saw that the expression i d x +j - + k dz could be, like ix+jy+ kz, effectively expressed by a single letter.

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  • The leading thesis seems to have been that all the great religions of the world originated from the same supreme source, and that they were all to be regarded as so many divers expressions of one and the same fundamental truth, or "Wisdom Religion," in such form and dress as was best adapted to suit the times and the people for whose spiritual growth and development religious instruction was required.

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  • The characteristic costume of the Parsees (now frequently abandoned) is loose and flowing, very picturesque in appearance, and admirably adapted to the climate in which he lives.

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  • At first sight this singular structure appears so like a deformity that writers have not been wanting to account it such, 2 ignorant of its being a piece of mechanism most beautifully adapted to the habits of the bird, enabling it to extract with the greatest ease, from fir-cones or fleshy fruits, the seeds which form its usual and almost invariable food.

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  • It began as separate from the world and proscribed by it; next it adapted itself to the learning, the customs and the polity of the world.

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  • Collot d'Herbois wrote and adapted from the English and Spanish many plays, one of which, Le Paysan magistrat, kept the stage for several years.

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  • But the history of the alphabet shows that at no time has it represented any European language with much precision, because it was an importation adapted in a somewhat rough and ready fashion to represent sounds different from those which it represented outside Europe.

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  • That the alphabet was borrowed and adapted independently by different places not widely separated, and that the earliest Greek alphabets did not spread from one or a few centres in Greek lands, seem clear (a) from the different Greek sounds for which the Phoenician symbols were utilized; (b) from the different symbols which were employed to represent sounds which the Phoenicians did not possess, and for which, therefore, they had no symbols.

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  • Preparations had been made for a continuation of the offensive which had been broken off in Sept., and it was not possible, given the difficulty of communications and the risk of imminent attack, to take up those positions best adapted for defence.

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  • As a rule they have been constructed on islets or shallows in the lochs, which have been adapted for occupation, and fortified by single or double lines of stockaded defences drawn round the margin.

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  • In his Natural Theology Paley has adapted with consummate skill the argument which Ray (1691) and Derham (1711) and Nieuwentyt 1 (1730) had already made familiar to Englishmen.

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  • - Each indepgndent piece of the mechanism also is a structure, and its dimensions are to be adapted, according to the principles of the strength and stiffness of materials, to the most severe load to which it can he subjected during the action of the machine.

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  • Helical motion and screws adapted to it are said to be right- or left-handed according to the G appearance presented by the rotation to an observer looking towards the direction of the translation.

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  • (Adapted from Hatschek.) pc, Praechordal head-cavity of embryo; cc, collar-cavity (first somite); my, mesodermic somites (myocoelomic or archenteric pouches); ch, notochord with the neural tube (neurochord) lying upon it; np, anterior neuropore; ne, position of posterior neurenteric canal.

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  • That a wood-louse and a land-crab are alike Malacostracans, and that they have by different paths alike become adapted to terrestrial life, are facts which even a philosopher might condescend to notice.

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  • Probably the polar regions alone do not fall within the category of the potentially productive, as even sandy and alkaline desert is rendered habitable where irrigation can be introduced; and vast tracts of fertile soil adapted for immediate exploitation, especially in the temperate zones, both north and south, only remain unpeopled because they are not yet wanted for colonization.

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  • But most of these products of natural forces disappeared as suddenly as they arose; only in those rare cases where the several parts were found adapted to each other, and casual member fitted into casual member, did the complex structures thus formed last.

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  • But in the organs of sense these pores are specially adapted to receive the effluxes which are continually rising from bodies around us; and in this way perception is somewhat obscurely explained.

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  • Classical erudition had been adapted to the needs of modern thought.

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  • The church, which was built at a cost of £50,000, was specially adapted for congregational worship and was mentioned by an architectural journal as one of the hundred remarkable buildings of the century.

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  • The English word was adapted from the Old French portehors, and took a large number of forms, e.g.

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  • The native grasses are especially adapted for fodder.

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  • In the plains where drainage is poor, especially in the S., the soils contain too much alkali; but in the highlands most of this has been dissolved and carried away by the rains, and the soils are well adapted for grazing grounds.

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  • The soil of the township, unlike that of other parts of the county, is well adapted to agriculture, and the principal industry is the growing of vegetables and the supplying of milk and poultry for its several villages, nearly all of which are summer resorts.

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  • It is perhaps best adapted for the printing of newspapers or magazines having circulations that do not require rotary machines intended for long runs.

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