This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

adaptations

adaptations Sentence Examples

  • Except for its aquatic adaptations, however, the ephemerid °larva is wonderfully thysanuran in character, and possesses conspicuous and distinct maxillulae.

    8
    4
  • Although the brain is relatively larger, the bones of the limbs, especially the short, five-toed feet, approximate to those of the Amblypoda and Proboscidea; but in the articulation of the astragalus with both the navicular and cuboid Arsinoitherium is nearer the former than the latter group. It is probable, however, that these resemblances are mainly due to parallelism in development, and are in all three cases adaptations necessary to support the enormous weight of the body.

    7
    5
  • It was the application of Fritz Miller's law of recapitulation which gave the chief stimulus to embryological investigations between 1865 and 1890; and, though it is now recognized that " recapitulation " is vastly and bewilderingly modified by special adaptations in every case, yet the principle has served, and still serves, as a guide of great value.

    5
    6
  • Such adaptations are well seen in the leaf of the holly (Ilex aquifolium).

    4
    4
  • For later versions and adaptations of the saga see O.

    4
    4
  • Such adaptations are well seen in the leaf of the holly (Ilex aquifolium).

    4
    4
  • From this point of view it is not sufficient, in attempting to map out the earths surface into regions of vegetation, to have regard alone to adaptations to physical conditions.

    4
    5
  • Such adaptations are the transparency and colourlessness of the tissues, and the modifications of the foot, which still shows in Atlanta the form common in Pectin:branchia (compare fig.

    3
    3
  • The aquatic habit of many larvae is associated with endless beautiful adaptations for respiration.

    3
    3
  • Empedocles tries to explain the genesis of organic beings, and, according to Lange, anticipates the idea of Darwin that adaptations abound, because it is their nature to perpetuate themselves.

    3
    4
  • All these are adaptations of a stem from which also Erin is descended.

    3
    5
  • The Psaumes of Clement Marot (1538) were curious adaptations of Hebrew ideas to French forms of the epigram and the madrigal.

    3
    21
  • They are true Pectinibranchia which have taken to a pelagic life, and the peculiarities of structure which they exhibit are strictly adaptations consequent upon their changed mode of life.

    2
    2
  • The Corinthian Li LJi and (also at Corcyra) and the of Byzantine coins are other adaptations of the same symbol.

    2
    2
  • On the other hand, he advances too easily from the maxim that function is prior to, and makes, structure to the conclusion that the results of use and disuse are therefore immediately incarnated in structural adaptations capable of hereditary transmission.

    2
    2
  • He especially pointed out the laws of the " extinction of the specialized " and " survival of the non-specialized " forms of life, and challenged Darwin's principle of selection as an explanation of the origin of adaptations by saying that the " survival of the fittest " does not explain the " origin of the fittest."

    2
    2
  • They are true Pectinibranchia which have taken to a pelagic life, and the peculiarities of structure which they exhibit are strictly adaptations consequent upon their changed mode of life.

    2
    2
  • Although many different rotations of crops are practised, they may for the most part be considered as little more than local adaptations of the system of alternating root-crops and leguminous crops with cereal crops, as exemplified in the old four-course rotation - roots, barley, clover, wheat.

    2
    3
  • But the reprints and editions of Crusoe have been innumerable; it has been often translated; and the eulogy pronounced on it by Rousseau gave it special currency in France, where imitations (or rather adaptations) have also been common.

    2
    3
  • His most important original works are: Les Vies des poetes Grecs (1665); Methode pour commencer les humanites Grecques et Latines (2nd ed., 1731), of which several English adaptations have appeared; Epistolae Criticae (1659).

    2
    3
  • But the reprints and editions of Crusoe have been innumerable; it has been often translated; and the eulogy pronounced on it by Rousseau gave it special currency in France, where imitations (or rather adaptations) have also been common.

    2
    3
  • In external habit these exhibit adaptations to every kind of climatic or physical condition:

    2
    9
  • The adherence to type, the favourite conception of the transcendental morphologist, was seen to be nothing more than the expression of one of the laws of thremmatology, the persistence of hereditary transmission of ancestral characters, even when they have ceased to be significant or valuable in the struggle for existence, whilst the so-called evidences of design which was supposed to modify the limitations of types assigned to Himself by the Creator were seen to be adaptations due to the selection and intensification by selective breeding of fortuitous congenital variations, which happened to prove more useful than the many thousand other variations which did not survive in the struggle for existence.

    1
    1
  • - The lore of the farmer, gardener, sportsman, fancier and field-naturalist, including thremmatology, or the science of breeding, and the allied teleology, or science of organic adaptations: exemplified by the patriarch Jacob, the poet Virgil, Sprengel, Kirby.

    1
    1
  • The law in Scotland is on the same lines, and extends to all nonparliamentary elections, and, as has been stated, the English statutes have been applied with adaptations to all municipal and local government elections in Ireland.

    1
    1
  • For in the first place there seems to be no good reason for thinking that the Tupaias feed to any considerable extent upon prey of that kind, and in the second place the resemblance is due to characters which may be merely adaptations to a similar mode of life.

    1
    1
  • Till the appearance of Ennius, Roman literature, although it had produced the epic poem of Naevius and some adaptations of Greek tragedy, had been most successful in comedy.

    1
    1
  • The law in Scotland is on the same lines, and extends to all nonparliamentary elections, and, as has been stated, the English statutes have been applied with adaptations to all municipal and local government elections in Ireland.

    1
    1
  • The results are as interesting from a morphological point of view (showing the subtle and gradual modifications of these organs in their various adaptations), as they are sparse in taxonomic value, far less satisfactory than are those of the hind-limb.

    1
    2
  • It is perhaps on account of this intermediate flavour that the literature of Persia - for instance the adaptations of Omar Khayyam - is more appreciated in Europe than that of other Oriental nations.

    1
    2
  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.

    1
    2
  • How far such adaptations are produced afresh in each generation, whether or no their effects are transmitted to descendants and so directly modify the stock, to what extent adaptations characteristic of a species or variety have come about by selection of individuals capable, in each generation, of responding favourably, or how far by the selection of individuals fortuitously suitable to the environment, or, how far, possibly by the inheritance of the responses to the environment, are problems of biology not yet definitely solved.

    1
    2
  • The grandest application of analogy is that observed in the adaptations of groups of animals evolving on different continents, by which their various divisions tend to mimic those on other continents.

    1
    2
  • The consequences of this principle when applied to the adaptations of animals bring us to the very antithesis of Cuvier's supposed "law of correlation," for we find that, while the end results of adaptation are such that all parts of an animal conspire to make the whole adaptive, there is no fixed correlation either in the form or rate of development of parts, and that it is therefore impossible for the palaeontologist to predict the anatomy of an unknown animal from one of its parts only, unless the animal happens to belong to a type generally familiar.

    1
    2
  • Their adaptations to parasitic life in vertebrate animals appear to have involved such modifications of structure and development that their affinities are quite problematical.

    1
    2
  • How far such adaptations are produced afresh in each generation, whether or no their effects are transmitted to descendants and so directly modify the stock, to what extent adaptations characteristic of a species or variety have come about by selection of individuals capable, in each generation, of responding favourably, or how far by the selection of individuals fortuitously suitable to the environment, or, how far, possibly by the inheritance of the responses to the environment, are problems of biology not yet definitely solved.

    1
    2
  • The grandest application of analogy is that observed in the adaptations of groups of animals evolving on different continents, by which their various divisions tend to mimic those on other continents.

    1
    2
  • Their adaptations to parasitic life in vertebrate animals appear to have involved such modifications of structure and development that their affinities are quite problematical.

    1
    2
  • All organs performing the same function and showing similar adaptations are said to be analogous or homoplastic, whatever their morphological nature may be; hence organs are sometimes both homologous and analogous, sometimes only analogous.

    1
    4
  • The rude symmetry of the feudal system had been long ago destroyed by partial and unskilful adaptations to modern commercial life, effected at various dates and in accordance with various theories.

    1
    4
  • Many adaptations for the Italian stage were produced between the years 1486 and 1550, the earliest (the Menaechmi) under the direction of Ercole I., duke of Ferrara.

    1
    5
  • The rotations extending to five, six, seven or more years are, in most cases, only adaptations of the principle to variations of soil, altitude, aspect, climate, markets and other local conditions.

    1
    5
  • the descendants, and constitute the so-called adaptations in which the external factors acting on the plants are reflected.

    1
    6
  • Translations And Adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Halo phytes, or plants which live in saline soils, have xerophytic adaptations.

    0
    0
  • A geographical botany based on such resemblances is only in reality a study of adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Bionomically, metamorphosis may be defined as the sum of adaptations that have gradually fitted the larva (caterpillar or maggot) for one kind of life, the fly for another.

    0
    0
  • The skull is I There are no native names either in Teutonic or Celtic languages; such words as German Kaninchen or English cony are from the Latin cuniculus, while the Irish, Welsh and Gaelic are adaptations from English.

    0
    0
  • This process is known as " direct adaptation "; and there is no doubt that such structural adaptations are acquired by an animal in the course of its life, though such changes are strictly limited in degree and rare rather than frequent and obvious.

    0
    0
  • And though Spencer's general position - that it is absurd to suppose that organisms after being modified by their life should give birth to offspring showing no traces of such modifications - seems the more philosophic, yet it does not dispose of the facts which go to show that most of the evidence for the direct transmission of adaptations is illusory, and that beings are organised to minimize the effects of life on the reproductive tissues, so that the transmission of the effects of use and disuse, if it occurs, must be both difficult and rare - far more so than is convenient for Spencer's psychology.

    0
    0
  • It is true that a great variety of evidence is afforded by the composition of the rocks, that glaciers have left their traces in glacial scratchings and transported boulders, also that proofs of arid or semiarid conditions are found in the reddish colour of rocks in certain portions of the Palaeozoic, Trias and Eocene; but fossils afford the most precise and conclusive evidence as to the past history of climate, because of the fact that adaptations to temperature have remained constant for millions of years.

    0
    0
  • - Diagram demonstrating that there are an indefinite number of combinations of various adaptive types of limbs and feet with various adaptive types of teeth, and that there is no fixed law of correlation between the two series of adaptations.

    0
    0
  • The traces of alternations of adaptations corresponding to these alternations of habitat are recorded both in palaeontology and anatomy, although often after the obscure analogy of the earlier and later writings of a palimpsest.

    0
    0
  • These tragedies were for the most part adaptations and, in some cases, translations from Euripides.

    0
    0
  • They exhibit striking adaptations in these circumstances to the floating habit.

    0
    0
  • Among land plants, as is well known, similarity of environment has of ten called forth similar adaptations among plants of widely separated families.

    0
    0
  • How is it possible, it was said, that fortuitous variations can furnish the material for the precise and balanced adaptations that all nature reveals?

    0
    0
  • Variation provides the material for selection, and although opinions may differ as to the nature of that material, the modes by which it comes into existence and their relative values and permanences, there is an increasingly wide consensus of opinion that all such material has to pass through the sieve of natural selection and that the sifted products form new varieties and species, and new adaptations.

    0
    0
  • With regard to adaptations, it is becoming more and more apparent, as experimental knowledge advances, that it is a fundamental property of every living organism in every stage of its existence to display adaptive response to its environment.

    0
    0
  • The most interesting of all these adaptations is the setting of the words: "Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum et vitam venturi saeculi.

    0
    0
  • Though the demand for good domestic wrought-iron work has enormously increased, adaptations from the beautiful work of the 17th and 18th centuries have been found so suited to their architectural surroundings, that new departures have been relatively uncommon.

    0
    0
  • The Gospels, in fact, are adaptations or redactions of an older Gospel, such as the Gospel of the Hebrews, of Peter, of the Egyptians, or of the Ebionites.

    0
    0
  • Modern Adaptations of Christianity.

    0
    0
  • At the present time, in spite of the political troubles, books in almost every branch of research are found in the language, mainly translations or adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Laos and F ra (Davus, Geta) were common as names of slaves in Attic comedy and in the adaptations of Plautus and Terence.

    0
    0
  • Adaptations for aerial respiration are found in some of the landcrabs, where the lining membrane of the gill-chamber is beset with vascular papillae and acts as a lung.

    0
    0
  • Most of the larval forms swim freely at the surface of the sea, and many show special adaptations to this habit of life.

    0
    0
  • The election takes place subject to rules made by the Local Government Board, these rules being largely founded upon adaptations of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882.

    0
    0
  • But he was stronger as a preacher and an agitator than as a writer, the pamphlets which he now issued from the press of his colleague the ex-priest Hans Vingaard, who settled down at Viborg as a printer, being little more than adaptations of Luther's opuscula.

    0
    0
  • Alecsandri is less successful in his dramas, most of which are adaptations from French originals; the only merit of his novels is that amidst the phonetic and philological turmoil he kept to the purer language of the people.

    0
    0
  • These books are of course anonymous, most of them being translations and adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Special adaptations for climbing are exhibited by both pairs of limbs in opossums, and for hanging to boughs in sloths.

    0
    0
  • In habit and mode of life of the prothallus these present striking differences, which may be correlated with the situations inhabited by the sporophyte, and are perhaps to be regarded as adaptations which have enabled the species to survive.

    0
    0
  • (X 8.) The adaptations in the vegetative organs of the sporophyte are similar to those Flowering Plants.

    0
    0
  • No doubt careful microscopic scrutiny of the minute anatomy of the leaves of plants grown under various conditions would reveal further adaptations of structure to external conditions of climate.

    0
    0
  • Sopater, the commentator on Hermogenes, wrote on M€Ta130Xai Kai merairocicr as Twv z j,uoaOivovs Xwpiwv, " adaptations or transcripts of passages in Demosthenes."

    0
    0
  • The large size of the ears and the narrow stripes are in some degree at any rate adaptations to a life on scrub-clad plains.

    0
    0
  • We now know that such adaptations are of comparatively small importance, and cannot be utilized for establishing groups higher than genera in a natural or phylogenetic classification.

    0
    0
  • The latter shows marked xerophytic adaptations; the single vascular bundle was surrounded by a sheath of short tracheides, and the stomata were sheltered in two deep furrows of the lower surface.

    0
    0
  • adaptations of novels, to musicals, from comedy to drama.

    0
    0
  • adaptations of organisms, Food webs, Energy flow, Coastal management.

    0
    0
  • adaptations of classics, having written the spectacular dinosaur drama, The Lost World.

    0
    0
  • The development of science requires mental skills, many of which are evolved adaptations.

    0
    0
  • physiological adaptations to high intensity training interventions in team sports.

    0
    0
  • Training in equipment and minor adaptations had been provided to assistant care managers, but care managers were excluded.

    0
    0
  • There are key themes which recur throughout this book, Polish history, literary adaptations and Freudian interpretations.

    0
    0
  • The ' special ' biochemical adaptations used by bacteria that oxidize ammonia or nitrite.

    0
    0
  • Like other salt marsh plants sea aster has several adaptations typical of plants found in dry places.

    0
    0
  • cursorial adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Pterosaurs and non-avian dinosaurs had no obvious adaptations for burrowing or swimming and became extinct.

    0
    0
  • Items such as small grab rails, additional banister rails and flashing light doorbells fall into this category and are called minor adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Directed by Barry Levinson Running time 133 mins Certificate 12 What an amazing week for adaptations of works by literary heavyweights.

    0
    0
  • This suggests that most Mode 1 assemblages are a result of environmental adaptations by Pleistocene hominids in the region.

    0
    0
  • Other statutory duties include the provision of grant funding for disabled facilities adaptations where the occupants meet a financial means test.

    0
    0
  • I'm the wrong person to ask about this, being rather obsessive fan of the bard and filmic adaptations of his work.

    0
    0
  • The painterly adaptations of her sources impede our ability to read the image as transparent; their surfaces are literally rendered opaque.

    0
    0
  • physiological adaptations take place.

    0
    0
  • Pleistocene adaptations.

    0
    0
  • salt marsh plants sea aster has several adaptations typical of plants found in dry places.

    0
    0
  • Similar adaptations have been made by organisms carrying saxitoxin, ciguatera and others.

    0
    0
  • Sketches, fragments and fair copies of compositions and adaptations by Henry Aldrich; autograph scores; English, late 17th century.

    0
    0
  • Adaptations Adaptations refer to large or small changes to homes that are recommended by the occupational therapist.

    0
    0
  • He thus threw in his lot with the Scottish philosophy, and his first dissertations are, in their leading position, adaptations from Reid's Inquiry.

    0
    0
  • Translations And Adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Many adaptations for the Italian stage were produced between the years 1486 and 1550, the earliest (the Menaechmi) under the direction of Ercole I., duke of Ferrara.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the various details of the Judgment Critique (as to beauty; and as to the " internal " or as Hegel subsequently phrased it " immanent " adaptations seen in living organisms) Kant regards as extremely precarious all these hints of a higher view of nature.

    0
    0
  • Empedocles tries to explain the genesis of organic beings, and, according to Lange, anticipates the idea of Darwin that adaptations abound, because it is their nature to perpetuate themselves.

    0
    0
  • Our world is but one of an infinite number of others, and all the harmonies and adaptations of the universe are regarded as a special case of the infinite possibilities of mechanical events.

    0
    0
  • Especially in the case of manifest adaptations, organs possessed by creatures far apart genealogically may be moulded into conditions that are extremely alike.

    0
    0
  • Ecological Adapt ations.It is now possible to consider the ecological adaptations which the members of plant cornmunties show in a given geographical district such as western Europe, of which England of course forms a part.

    0
    0
  • Xerophytes.These plants have devices (a) for procuring water, (b) or for storing water, (c) or for limiting transpiration; and these adaptations are obviously related to the physically or physiologically dry habitats in which the plants live.

    0
    0
  • These adaptations tend to lessen the amount of transpiration by protecting the stomata from the movements of the air.

    0
    0
  • Halo phytes, or plants which live in saline soils, have xerophytic adaptations.

    0
    0
  • All organs performing the same function and showing similar adaptations are said to be analogous or homoplastic, whatever their morphological nature may be; hence organs are sometimes both homologous and analogous, sometimes only analogous.

    0
    0
  • The leaf of the higher plants will be taken as the illustrative case because it is the most plastic of the members, the one, that is, which presents the greatest variety of adaptations, and because it has been most thoroughly studied.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, adaptations, especially those evoked by climatic or edaphic conditions, may only, be shown by the seedling if grown under the appropriate external conditions; here what is hereditary is not the actual adaptation, but the capacity for responding in a particular way to a certain set of external conditions.

    0
    0
  • In external habit these exhibit adaptations to every kind of climatic or physical condition:

    0
    0
  • From this point of view it is not sufficient, in attempting to map out the earths surface into regions of vegetation, to have regard alone to adaptations to physical conditions.

    0
    0
  • the descendants, and constitute the so-called adaptations in which the external factors acting on the plants are reflected.

    0
    0
  • The study of the nature of these adaptations, which are often extremely subtle and by no means merely superficial, is termed Ecology (see above).

    0
    0
  • A geographical botany based on such resemblances is only in reality a study of adaptations.

    0
    0
  • The Psaumes of Clement Marot (1538) were curious adaptations of Hebrew ideas to French forms of the epigram and the madrigal.

    0
    0
  • The results are as interesting from a morphological point of view (showing the subtle and gradual modifications of these organs in their various adaptations), as they are sparse in taxonomic value, far less satisfactory than are those of the hind-limb.

    0
    0
  • For later versions and adaptations of the saga see O.

    0
    0
  • It is perhaps on account of this intermediate flavour that the literature of Persia - for instance the adaptations of Omar Khayyam - is more appreciated in Europe than that of other Oriental nations.

    0
    0
  • The rude symmetry of the feudal system had been long ago destroyed by partial and unskilful adaptations to modern commercial life, effected at various dates and in accordance with various theories.

    0
    0
  • Although many different rotations of crops are practised, they may for the most part be considered as little more than local adaptations of the system of alternating root-crops and leguminous crops with cereal crops, as exemplified in the old four-course rotation - roots, barley, clover, wheat.

    0
    0
  • The rotations extending to five, six, seven or more years are, in most cases, only adaptations of the principle to variations of soil, altitude, aspect, climate, markets and other local conditions.

    0
    0
  • Treated at first as a doctrine peculiarly applicable to land, with a certain controverted relevance to other natural agents, it has been so extended that there is scarcely any subject of economic study in which we may not expect to find adaptations or analogies, so that Ricardo seemed to have discovered the key of economic knowledge.

    0
    0
  • Such adaptations are the transparency and colourlessness of the tissues, and the modifications of the foot, which still shows in Atlanta the form common in Pectin:branchia (compare fig.

    0
    0
  • The aquatic habit of many larvae is associated with endless beautiful adaptations for respiration.

    0
    0
  • Bionomically, metamorphosis may be defined as the sum of adaptations that have gradually fitted the larva (caterpillar or maggot) for one kind of life, the fly for another.

    0
    0
  • The Corinthian Li LJi and (also at Corcyra) and the of Byzantine coins are other adaptations of the same symbol.

    0
    0
  • The skull is I There are no native names either in Teutonic or Celtic languages; such words as German Kaninchen or English cony are from the Latin cuniculus, while the Irish, Welsh and Gaelic are adaptations from English.

    0
    0
  • The adherence to type, the favourite conception of the transcendental morphologist, was seen to be nothing more than the expression of one of the laws of thremmatology, the persistence of hereditary transmission of ancestral characters, even when they have ceased to be significant or valuable in the struggle for existence, whilst the so-called evidences of design which was supposed to modify the limitations of types assigned to Himself by the Creator were seen to be adaptations due to the selection and intensification by selective breeding of fortuitous congenital variations, which happened to prove more useful than the many thousand other variations which did not survive in the struggle for existence.

    0
    0
  • - The lore of the farmer, gardener, sportsman, fancier and field-naturalist, including thremmatology, or the science of breeding, and the allied teleology, or science of organic adaptations: exemplified by the patriarch Jacob, the poet Virgil, Sprengel, Kirby.

    0
    0
  • It was the application of Fritz Miller's law of recapitulation which gave the chief stimulus to embryological investigations between 1865 and 1890; and, though it is now recognized that " recapitulation " is vastly and bewilderingly modified by special adaptations in every case, yet the principle has served, and still serves, as a guide of great value.

    0
    0
  • This process is known as " direct adaptation "; and there is no doubt that such structural adaptations are acquired by an animal in the course of its life, though such changes are strictly limited in degree and rare rather than frequent and obvious.

    0
    0
  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.

    0
    0
  • He himself wrote several plays, including adaptations of Shakespeare.

    0
    0
  • Pfeffer) are designated certain of the regulative adaptations by which such ends are attained.

    0
    0
  • The extraordinary variety of form and complication of structure exhibited by the appendages of the scolex are adaptations to fix FIG.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, he advances too easily from the maxim that function is prior to, and makes, structure to the conclusion that the results of use and disuse are therefore immediately incarnated in structural adaptations capable of hereditary transmission.

    0
    0
  • And though Spencer's general position - that it is absurd to suppose that organisms after being modified by their life should give birth to offspring showing no traces of such modifications - seems the more philosophic, yet it does not dispose of the facts which go to show that most of the evidence for the direct transmission of adaptations is illusory, and that beings are organised to minimize the effects of life on the reproductive tissues, so that the transmission of the effects of use and disuse, if it occurs, must be both difficult and rare - far more so than is convenient for Spencer's psychology.

    0
    0
  • His most important original works are: Les Vies des poetes Grecs (1665); Methode pour commencer les humanites Grecques et Latines (2nd ed., 1731), of which several English adaptations have appeared; Epistolae Criticae (1659).

    0
    0
  • Among his published adaptations are an opera, The Fairies (from Midsummer Night's Dream) (1755); an opera The Tempest (1756); Catherine and Petruchio (1758); Florizel and Perdita (1762).

    0
    0
  • His dramatic pieces, The Lying Valet, adapted from Motteux's Novelty Lethe (1740), The Guardian, Linco's Travels (1767), Miss in her Teens (1747), Irish Widow, &c., and his alterations and adaptations of old plays, which together fill four volumes, evinced his knowledge of stage effect and his appreciation of lively dialogue and action; but he cannot be said to have added one new or original character to the drama.

    0
    0
  • He was followed by Christian Konrad Sprengel, whose work Das entdeckte Geheimniss der Natur im Bau and in der Befruchtung der Blumen (Berlin, 1793), contains a description of floral adaptations to.

    0
    0
  • Hermann Muller's work on The Fertilization of Flowers by Insects and their Reciprocal Adaptations (1873), followed by subsequent works on the same lines, brought together a great number of observations on floral mechanisms and their relation to insect-visits.

    0
    0
  • He especially pointed out the laws of the " extinction of the specialized " and " survival of the non-specialized " forms of life, and challenged Darwin's principle of selection as an explanation of the origin of adaptations by saying that the " survival of the fittest " does not explain the " origin of the fittest."

    0
    0
  • It is true that a great variety of evidence is afforded by the composition of the rocks, that glaciers have left their traces in glacial scratchings and transported boulders, also that proofs of arid or semiarid conditions are found in the reddish colour of rocks in certain portions of the Palaeozoic, Trias and Eocene; but fossils afford the most precise and conclusive evidence as to the past history of climate, because of the fact that adaptations to temperature have remained constant for millions of years.

    0
    0
  • The consequences of this principle when applied to the adaptations of animals bring us to the very antithesis of Cuvier's supposed "law of correlation," for we find that, while the end results of adaptation are such that all parts of an animal conspire to make the whole adaptive, there is no fixed correlation either in the form or rate of development of parts, and that it is therefore impossible for the palaeontologist to predict the anatomy of an unknown animal from one of its parts only, unless the animal happens to belong to a type generally familiar.

    0
    0
  • - Diagram demonstrating that there are an indefinite number of combinations of various adaptive types of limbs and feet with various adaptive types of teeth, and that there is no fixed law of correlation between the two series of adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Adaptations to Alternations of Habitat.

    0
    0
  • The traces of alternations of adaptations corresponding to these alternations of habitat are recorded both in palaeontology and anatomy, although often after the obscure analogy of the earlier and later writings of a palimpsest.

    0
    0
  • Each of these alternate life phases may leave some profound modification, which is partially obscured but seldom wholly lost; thus the tracing of the evidences of former adaptations is of great importance in phylogenetic study.

    0
    0
  • Except for its aquatic adaptations, however, the ephemerid °larva is wonderfully thysanuran in character, and possesses conspicuous and distinct maxillulae.

    0
    0
  • All these are adaptations of a stem from which also Erin is descended.

    0
    0
  • Although the brain is relatively larger, the bones of the limbs, especially the short, five-toed feet, approximate to those of the Amblypoda and Proboscidea; but in the articulation of the astragalus with both the navicular and cuboid Arsinoitherium is nearer the former than the latter group. It is probable, however, that these resemblances are mainly due to parallelism in development, and are in all three cases adaptations necessary to support the enormous weight of the body.

    0
    0
  • one extremity, and the absence of any morphologically distinct anterior extremity, are adaptations to the wholly parasitic life of this class.

    0
    0
  • For in the first place there seems to be no good reason for thinking that the Tupaias feed to any considerable extent upon prey of that kind, and in the second place the resemblance is due to characters which may be merely adaptations to a similar mode of life.

    0
    0
  • The reciprocal adaptations of insects and flowers demand attentive observation on the part of the gardener concerned with the growing of grapes, cucumbers, melons and strawberries, or with the raising of new and improved varieties of plants.

    0
    0
  • In addition to these accidental modes of dispersal, however, there is a series of interesting adaptations on the part of the fungus itself.

    0
    0
  • Till the appearance of Ennius, Roman literature, although it had produced the epic poem of Naevius and some adaptations of Greek tragedy, had been most successful in comedy.

    0
    0
  • He was the first to impart to the Roman adaptations of Greek tragedy the masculine dignity, pathos and oratorical fervour which continued to animate them in the hands of Pacuvius and Accius, and, when set off by the acting of Aesopus, called forth vehement applause in the age of Cicero.

    0
    0
  • These tragedies were for the most part adaptations and, in some cases, translations from Euripides.

    0
    0
  • They exhibit striking adaptations in these circumstances to the floating habit.

    0
    0
  • Among land plants, as is well known, similarity of environment has of ten called forth similar adaptations among plants of widely separated families.

    0
    0
  • But it is now generally held that these two genealogies are variant adaptations of the Babylonian list of primitive kings (see Enoch).

    0
    0
  • How is it possible, it was said, that fortuitous variations can furnish the material for the precise and balanced adaptations that all nature reveals?

    0
    0
  • Variation provides the material for selection, and although opinions may differ as to the nature of that material, the modes by which it comes into existence and their relative values and permanences, there is an increasingly wide consensus of opinion that all such material has to pass through the sieve of natural selection and that the sifted products form new varieties and species, and new adaptations.

    0
    0
  • With regard to adaptations, it is becoming more and more apparent, as experimental knowledge advances, that it is a fundamental property of every living organism in every stage of its existence to display adaptive response to its environment.

    0
    0
  • It thus has obviously nothing to do with the Roman liturgy; but as an independent setting of the text it is one of the most sublime and profoundly religious works in all art; and its singular perfection as a design is nowhere more evident than in its numerous adaptations of earlier works.

    0
    0
  • The most interesting of all these adaptations is the setting of the words: "Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum et vitam venturi saeculi.

    0
    0
  • Though the demand for good domestic wrought-iron work has enormously increased, adaptations from the beautiful work of the 17th and 18th centuries have been found so suited to their architectural surroundings, that new departures have been relatively uncommon.

    0
    0
  • The Gospels, in fact, are adaptations or redactions of an older Gospel, such as the Gospel of the Hebrews, of Peter, of the Egyptians, or of the Ebionites.

    0
    0
  • Modern Adaptations of Christianity.

    0
    0
  • At the present time, in spite of the political troubles, books in almost every branch of research are found in the language, mainly translations or adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Laos and F ra (Davus, Geta) were common as names of slaves in Attic comedy and in the adaptations of Plautus and Terence.

    0
    0
  • Adaptations for aerial respiration are found in some of the landcrabs, where the lining membrane of the gill-chamber is beset with vascular papillae and acts as a lung.

    0
    0
  • Most of the larval forms swim freely at the surface of the sea, and many show special adaptations to this habit of life.

    0
    0
  • The election takes place subject to rules made by the Local Government Board, these rules being largely founded upon adaptations of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882.

    0
    0
  • But he was stronger as a preacher and an agitator than as a writer, the pamphlets which he now issued from the press of his colleague the ex-priest Hans Vingaard, who settled down at Viborg as a printer, being little more than adaptations of Luther's opuscula.

    0
    0
  • Alecsandri is less successful in his dramas, most of which are adaptations from French originals; the only merit of his novels is that amidst the phonetic and philological turmoil he kept to the purer language of the people.

    0
    0
  • These books are of course anonymous, most of them being translations and adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Special adaptations for climbing are exhibited by both pairs of limbs in opossums, and for hanging to boughs in sloths.

    0
    0
  • In habit and mode of life of the prothallus these present striking differences, which may be correlated with the situations inhabited by the sporophyte, and are perhaps to be regarded as adaptations which have enabled the species to survive.

    0
    0
  • (X 8.) The adaptations in the vegetative organs of the sporophyte are similar to those Flowering Plants.

    0
    0
  • No doubt careful microscopic scrutiny of the minute anatomy of the leaves of plants grown under various conditions would reveal further adaptations of structure to external conditions of climate.

    0
    0
  • Sopater, the commentator on Hermogenes, wrote on M€Ta130Xai Kai merairocicr as Twv z j,uoaOivovs Xwpiwv, " adaptations or transcripts of passages in Demosthenes."

    0
    0
  • The large size of the ears and the narrow stripes are in some degree at any rate adaptations to a life on scrub-clad plains.

    0
    0
  • We now know that such adaptations are of comparatively small importance, and cannot be utilized for establishing groups higher than genera in a natural or phylogenetic classification.

    0
    0
  • The latter shows marked xerophytic adaptations; the single vascular bundle was surrounded by a sheath of short tracheides, and the stomata were sheltered in two deep furrows of the lower surface.

    0
    0
  • Similar adaptations have been made by organisms carrying saxitoxin, ciguatera and others.

    0
    0
  • Sketches, fragments and fair copies of compositions and adaptations by Henry Aldrich; autograph scores; English, late 17th century.

    0
    0
  • Adaptations Adaptations refer to large or small changes to homes that are recommended by the occupational therapist.

    0
    0
  • Its appearance today is the result of many of those adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Are you savvy to all these changes and adaptations?

    0
    0
  • Teen anime series are often created as adaptations of manga and vice versa.

    0
    0
  • Make adaptations to any diagram you choose.

    0
    0
  • But we gamers are an anal bunch when it comes to console-to-screen adaptations, right?

    0
    0
  • Vision impairment is a loss of vision that makes it hard or impossible to perform daily tasks without specialized adaptations.

    0
    0
  • The major priorities include centering on the individual, understanding autism, adopting appropriate adaptations, and a broadly based intervention strategy building on existing skills and interests.

    0
    0
  • Using culturally sensitive adaptations of the Stanford Shyness Inventory, researchers in eight countries administered the inventory to groups of 18 to 21 year olds.

    0
    0
  • Exercise and sport activities should be encouraged, with adaptations made as necessary.

    0
    0
  • From adaptations of traditional hairdos to modern edgy styles, there are nearly limitless options for teens today.

    0
    0
  • This collective frenzy for Meyer's novels and subsequent big screen adaptations paved the way for a slew of Twilight-inspired paraphernalia, including t-shirts, jewelry, dolls and board games.

    0
    0
  • The fact is that Disney animated feature films have come from several sources, such as adaptations of books, stories, fairytales, folk tales, and legends.

    0
    0
  • All of the film adaptations from the Twilight series of books are extremely highly anticipated.

    0
    0
  • Sensory integration toy adaptations: Many outdoor toys are produced with varied textures to suit the tactile needs of children with autism, while others include sounds and lights for visual and auditory stimulation.

    0
    0
  • Gastrointestinal issues are more prevalent in children with autism than in the general population, making diet adaptations necessary.

    0
    0
  • For a student who has a disability and is gifted, the SDI also includes adaptations, accommodations or modifications to the general education curriculum, as appropriate for a student with a disability.

    0
    0
  • As in Dr. Atkins' New Diet Cookbook, there are both adaptations of old favorites and new recipes sure to become favorites.

    0
    0
  • Other adaptations complement the functioning of the heart.

    0
    0
  • Specifically, weight control works like other adaptations to exercise.

    0
    0
  • The interval training sessions created metabolic adaptations in the skeletal muscles, which enabled subjects to increase their aerobic endurance from 26 to 51 minutes, while elevating the intensity of their entire workout.

    0
    0
  • The adaptations of the body surround this phenomenon, which actually makes exercise easier the more you work out.

    0
    0
  • However, it is best known by its various stage and screen adaptations.

    0
    0
  • It has been the basis for innumerable stage and screen adaptations, and the 'mythology' (much of it invented for the novel) lives on today in cult television shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

    0
    0
  • Many feel this version is the closest to the Stoker story of any of the film adaptations.

    0
    0
  • Fairies also play prominent roles in children's tales such as Peter Pan, which has lasted through the 20th century and been revisited in modern adaptations.

    0
    0
  • He thus threw in his lot with the Scottish philosophy, and his first dissertations are, in their leading position, adaptations from Reid's Inquiry.

    0
    1
  • Our world is but one of an infinite number of others, and all the harmonies and adaptations of the universe are regarded as a special case of the infinite possibilities of mechanical events.

    0
    1
  • Especially in the case of manifest adaptations, organs possessed by creatures far apart genealogically may be moulded into conditions that are extremely alike.

    0
    1
  • These adaptations tend to lessen the amount of transpiration by protecting the stomata from the movements of the air.

    0
    1
  • The leaf of the higher plants will be taken as the illustrative case because it is the most plastic of the members, the one, that is, which presents the greatest variety of adaptations, and because it has been most thoroughly studied.

    0
    1
  • He himself wrote several plays, including adaptations of Shakespeare.

    0
    1
  • Pfeffer) are designated certain of the regulative adaptations by which such ends are attained.

    0
    1
  • The extraordinary variety of form and complication of structure exhibited by the appendages of the scolex are adaptations to fix FIG.

    0
    1
  • Among his published adaptations are an opera, The Fairies (from Midsummer Night's Dream) (1755); an opera The Tempest (1756); Catherine and Petruchio (1758); Florizel and Perdita (1762).

    0
    1
  • one extremity, and the absence of any morphologically distinct anterior extremity, are adaptations to the wholly parasitic life of this class.

    0
    1
  • The reciprocal adaptations of insects and flowers demand attentive observation on the part of the gardener concerned with the growing of grapes, cucumbers, melons and strawberries, or with the raising of new and improved varieties of plants.

    0
    1
  • Each of these alternate life phases may leave some profound modification, which is partially obscured but seldom wholly lost; thus the tracing of the evidences of former adaptations is of great importance in phylogenetic study.

    0
    2
  • He was followed by Christian Konrad Sprengel, whose work Das entdeckte Geheimniss der Natur im Bau and in der Befruchtung der Blumen (Berlin, 1793), contains a description of floral adaptations to.

    0
    6
  • In addition to these accidental modes of dispersal, however, there is a series of interesting adaptations on the part of the fungus itself.

    0
    10
Browse other sentences examples →