Acrid sentence example

acrid
  • The acrid smell of cigarette ashes burned her nose and brought tears to her eyes.
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  • It has a bitter, saline, but not acrid taste.
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  • The acrid smell of sulfur surfed a breeze and burned her nose.
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  • The odour is heavy and disagreeable, and the taste acrid and bitter.
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  • She followed the two through the acrid smoke into the command hub.
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  • The tree produces excellent timber, and is much used for furniture, its strong acrid taste driving away insects.
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  • She stared at the embroidered tablecloth, tormented by the scent of food she couldn't eat and the visions of death and betrayal that left an acrid taste in her mouth.
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  • Mole, supported by Louis Philippe, held his ground against the general hostility until the beginning of 1839, when, after acrid discussions on the address, the chamber was dissolved.
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  • The sale of his Netheravon estates in Wiltshire to the War Office in 1898 occasioned some acrid criticism concerning the valuation, for which, however, Sir Michael himself was not responsible.
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  • During the Polish insurrection Gorchakov rebuffed the suggestions of Great Britain, Austria and France for assuaging the severities employed in quelling it, and he was especially acrid in his replies to Earl Russell's despatches.
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  • The plants generally contain an acrid poisonous juice.
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  • The taste of the liquid is at first sweet, and then pungent and acrid.
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  • I only ever sweat badly under one arm (weird) and the smell has definitely changed to a very acrid smell.
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  • A great volume of dense smoke and acrid fumes was produced which filled the train and the tunnel.
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  • The acrid smell of burnt eagle feathers hung in the air.
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  • The class was known as ` smokey Joes ` since they were coal burning and emitted copious amounts of thick, acrid black smoke.
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  • The acrid stench of the remedy Hangs in the air; the night skies Are lit with it; the animals Burning.
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  • In the latter case they become green and have an acrid taste, which renders them unpalatable to human beings, and as poisonous qualities are produced similar to those of many Solanaceae they are unwholesome.
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  • The Guardian Nature notes The sweet, slightly acrid scent of privet pervades the streets from garden hedges.
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  • The class was known as ` Smokey Joes ` since they were coal burning and emitted copious amounts of thick, acrid black smoke.
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  • Sumach (Rhus) - Low trees, shrubs, or climbers, with an acrid juice, usually hardy, and remarkable for their elegant and picturesque growth, and often brilliantly colored leaves in autumn.
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  • Sammie kept having uneasy dreams of her house in flames and smelling something acrid and strong.
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  • The bark of the tree contains a thick, resinous, acrid sap which blackens on exposure to the air.
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  • "Walk," she managed, shuddering at the lingering visions that left an acrid taste in her mouth.
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  • "Well, madam," he began, stooping over the book close to his daughter and placing an arm on the back of the chair on which she sat, so that she felt herself surrounded on all sides by the acrid scent of old age and tobacco, which she had known so long.
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  • The odour of cubebs is agreeable and aromatic; the taste, pungent, acrid, slightly bitter and persistent.
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  • Newly pressed rape oil has a dark sherry colour with, at first, scarcely any perceptible smell; but after resting a short time the oil deposits an abundant mucilaginous slime, and by taking up oxygen it acquires a peculiar disagreeable odour and an acrid taste.
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  • Robespierre was an acrid fanatic, and unlike Danton, who only cared to secure the practical results of the Revolution, he had a moral and religious ideal which he intended to force on the nation.
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  • The non-drying oils, the type of which is olive oil, do not become oxidized readily on exposure to the air, although gradually a change takes place, the oils thickening slightly and acquiring that peculiar disagreeable smell and acrid taste, which are defined by the term "rancid."
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  • The bright red ovoid berries are cathartic, the whole plant is acrid and poisonous, and the bark is used medicinally.
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  • It possesses a somewhat pleasant vinous odour and a burning aromatic taste; it is a highly acrid poison.
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  • Soaps give an alkaline reaction and have a decided acrid taste; in a pure condition - a state never reached in practice - they have neither smell nor colour.
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  • But now Mary Tudor succeeded her brother, and Knox in March 1554 escaped into five years' exile abroad, leaving Mrs. Bowes a fine treatise on "Affliction," and sending back to England two editions of a more acrid "Faithful Admonition" on the crisis there.
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  • The integument of tailed and tailless batrachians is remarkable for the great abundance of follicular glands, of which there may be two kinds, each having a special secretion, which is always more or less acrid and irritating, and affords a means of defence against the attacks of many carnivorous animals.
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  • He has, indeed, described in graphic terms the greatest of the more superficial changes he underwent; how he had " carried into logical and ethical problems the maxims and postulates of physical knowledge," and had moved within the narrow lines drawn by the philosophical instructions of the class-room " interpreting human phenomena by the analogy of external nature "; how he served in willing captivity " the ` empirical ' and ` necessarian ' mode of thought," even though " shocked " by the dogmatism and acrid humours " of certain distinguished representatives "; 1 and how in a period of " second education " at Berlin, " mainly under the admirable guidance of Professor Trendelenburg," he experienced " a new intellectual birth" which " was essentially the gift of fresh conceptions, the unsealing of hidden openings of self-consciousness, with unmeasured corridors and sacred halls behind; and, once gained, was more or less available throughout the history of philosophy, and lifted the darkness from the pages of Kant and even Hegel."
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