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accidents

accidents Sentence Examples

  • The number of servants killed in train accidents is the next in importance.

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  • Sometimes very terrible accidents happen, and many people are burned and drowned and injured.

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  • 50 19,041 (A) Accidents to trains: I.

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  • A majority of the states have railway commissions, but the investigation of railway accidents, with comparatively few exceptions, has not been done in such a way as to make the results useful in promoting improved practice.

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  • By other accidents I I 246 ..

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  • Is it actually that blue-eyed redheads have the same number of accidents as non-redheads, but brown-eyed redheads are even more clumsy, accident prone, and traffic hazards?

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  • P Y of risk, it has during recent years come to notice that the number of casualties among railway servants is still unduly great, and in 1899 a Royal Commission was appointed to investigate the causes of the numerous accidents, fatal and nonfatal, to railway men.

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  • Other accidents in or around trains, &c. 102 2,242 102 2,132 3.

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  • In this respect the lines of the United Kingdom are far ahead of those of any other country, and a diminution of accidents, particularly of collisions, has resulted therefrom.

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  • Item I shows no passengers killed in train accidents during the year.

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  • By other accidents not included in the preceding.

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  • Table Xii.-Detail'Causes Of Certain Accidents Passengers:- a.

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  • In train accidents 97 171 52 1202 1 49 1373 8.

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  • 5 86 3 5 265 836 4,018 5 2,899 94 7 686 I 5 1,981142,753 55 15,701 2 975 8 304 2 1,495 2 404 II I 1, 0 9 71 6 Table Xiii.-Nature Of Accidents To Trains, Vehicles And Permanent-Way 1908.1907.

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  • Table Xii.-Detail'Causes Of Certain Accidents Passengers:- a.

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  • 5 86 3 5 265 836 4,018 5 2,899 94 7 686 I 5 1,981142,753 55 15,701 2 975 8 304 2 1,495 2 404 II I 1, 0 9 71 6 Table Xiii.-Nature Of Accidents To Trains, Vehicles And Permanent-Way 1908.1907.

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  • If we keep cool and moist, and meet with no accidents, we often live for five years.

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  • Say, for instance, you believe redheads cause more traffic accidents than those with other colors of hair.

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  • The year 1885 saw the introduction and adoption of a measure embodying the principle of employers liability for accidents to workmen, a principle subsequently extended and more equitably defined in the spring of 1899.

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  • Other acts which are of importance in connexion with accidents are the Accidents Compensation Act of 1846, the Employers' Liability Act of 1880, and the Workmen's Compensation Act of 1897.

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  • Such statistics are studied mainly with the object of learning the lessons which they may afford as to preventive measures for the future; and from this point of view the most important element is the single item of passengers killed in train accidents (a 1).

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  • Then Dean added, "Just like investigating accidents."

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  • In connexion with the stability of portable cranes, it may be mentioned that accidents more often arise from FIG.

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  • On the 17th of April 1898 a species of Employers Liability Act compelled employers of more than five workmen in certain industries to insure their employees against accidents.

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  • D.*) Accident Statistics Statistics of railway accidents may be divided into three classes: casualties (a) to passengers, (b) to servants or employ& and (c) to other persons; and again into (t) train accidents, (2) accidents to persons doing work on or about trains and (3) other accidents.

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  • Being struck or run over by a train while standing or walking on the track is the largest single cause of " railway accidents."

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  • In train accidents.

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  • The average length Table Xii.-Detail Causes Of Certain Accidents -continued.

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  • In 1907 one passenger in 2,318,051 was killed, and one in 107,004 was injured, in train accidents.

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  • Passengers Servants Other accidents, due to railway operations Passengers and others Servants Other accidents, victim's own fault - Passengers and others.

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  • 576 1254 The most significant item in the table, 36 passengers killed in train accidents, is perhaps to be considered as abnormally large, the totals under this head for the preceding six years beginning with 1901 being 7, 35, 3, 18, 4, 14, or an average of 11.57 per year.

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  • The French secretary of Public Works, who has furnished these statistics, keeps also similar records of the local or light railways, on which the number of fatal accidents appears to be exceedingly small.

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  • The totals of passengers killed and injured in train accidents are not separated from those killed and injured from other causes, but ratios are given showing that for four years no passengers were killed in this class.

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  • Accidents due to simple climbing are, however, exceedingly rare, and are usually found associated with a faulty track, with " plunging " movements of the locomotive or vehicle, or with a " tight gauge " at curves or points.

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  • Occasionally on a double-track railway one platform placed between the tracks serves both of them; this " island " arrangement, as it is termed, has the advantage that more tracks can be readily added without disturbance of existing buildings, but when it is adopted the exit from the trains is at the opposite side to that which is usual, and accidents have happened through passengers alighting at the usual side without noticing the absence of a platform.

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  • 3 In other words, the evidence is rarely strictly experimental, and this not only gives facilities for fraud, but makes it necessary to allow a large margin for accidents, mistakes and mal-observation.

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  • The only veritable and real unity in the world of existences is the individual; to assert that the universal exists separately ex parte rei would be to reduce individuals to mere accidents of one indivisible form.

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  • The Chaff-cutting Machines (Accidents) Act 1897 is a measure very similar in its intention to the Threshing Machines Act 1878, and provides for the automatic prevention of accidents to persons in charge of chaff-cutting machines.

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  • In 1898, at Birmingham, a prize of £ioo was given for a self-moving vehicle for light loads, ioo and 50 for self-moving vehicles for heavy loads, and fio for safety feeder to chaff-cutter, in accordance with the Chaffcutting Machines (Accidents) Act 1897.

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  • These forms, when materialized, are called formae substantiales or formae nativae; they are the essences of things, and in themselves have no relation to the accidents of things.

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  • Liability for loss by " accidents " may be thrown on the lessee by express stipulation (Art.

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  • " Accidents " here mean ordinary accidents only, such as hail, lightning or frost, and the lessee will not be answerable for loss caused by extraordinary accidents such as war or floods, unless he has, been made liable for all accidents, foreseen or unforeseen (Art.

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  • The drilling of a well is commonly carried out under contract, the producer erecting the derrick and providing the engine and boiler while the drilling contractor finds the tools, and is Drill ing the responsible for accidents or failure to complete the well.

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  • Vedius Pollio, in the time of Augustus, was said to have thrown his slaves, condemned sometimes for trivial mistakes or even accidents, to the lampreys in his fishpond.

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  • One of the first of these attacks was made by Berengarius of Tours (999-1088) upon the doctrine of transubstantiation; he denied the possibility of a change of substance in the bread and wine without some corresponding change in the accidents.

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  • He taught, says Abelard, that the same thing or substance was present in its entirety and essence in each individual, and that individuals differed no whit in their essence but only in the variety of their accidents.

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  • The species is essentially one, but it takes on individual varieties or accidents.

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  • - Death-rate from various classes of accidents in and about all mines in the United Kingdom from 1873 to 1900.

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  • Accidents from the misuse and careless handling of explosives are unfortunately too frequent in mines.

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  • The conditions under Accidents which explosives may be stored, handled and used are from carefully formulated in the mining laws of most states, fro Explosives.

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  • The facts that the outlays averaged less than 47% of the gross income, and that accidents and irregularities are not numerous, prove that Japanese management in this kind of enterprise is efficient.

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  • His universal process of Evolution seems to give Spencer a criterion of" higher "and" lower " progression "and" degeneration,"independent of the accidents of actual history, and unattainable by strictly Darwinian methods.

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  • Accidents are rarely caused by them, because they are extremely shy and swim away on the least alarm; but, when surprised in the submarine cavities forming their natural retreats, they will, like any other poisonous terrestrial snake, dart at the disturbing object; and, when out of the water, they attempt to bite every object near them, even turning round to wound their own bodies.

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  • The initial day of the consulate was never fixed, at least before the 7th century of Rome, but varied with the different accidents which in times of political commotion so frequently occurred to accelerate or retard the elections.

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  • If there is no external world, the distinction between substance and accidents vanishes, and these become the sole essence of material objects, so that there is no room for any change whilst they remain as before.

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  • Underground fires are not uncommon accidents in coal-mines.

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  • To prevent accidents from the breaking of the rope while the cage is travelling in the shaft, or from over-winding when in consequence of the engine not being stopped in time the cage may be drawn up to the head-gear pulleys (both of which are unhappily not uncommon), various forms of safety catches and disconnecting hooks have been adopted.

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  • For the prevention of accidents from over-winding, detaching hooks are used.

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  • 547 „ other underground accidents.

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  • 328 accidents in shafts..

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  • 65 surface accidents.

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  • the volume of the gas, but in the United States and on the continent of Europe, where liquefied acetylene was made on the large scale, several fatal accidents occurred owing to its explosion under not easily explained conditions.

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  • As a result of these accidents M.

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  • The fact that several accidents had already happened accentuated the risk, and in Great Britain the storage and use of liquefied acetylene are prohibited.

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  • When acetylene was first introduced on a commercial scale grave fears were entertained as to its safety, it being represented that it had the power of combining with certain metals, more especially copper and silver, to form acetylides of a highly explosive character, and that even with coal gas, which contains less than i %, such copper compounds had been known to be formed in cases where the gas-distributing mains were composed of copper, and that accidents had happened from this cause.

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  • It was therefore predicted that the introduction of acetylene on a large scale would be followed by numerous accidents unless copper and its alloys were rigidly excluded from contact with the gas.

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  • The spirits which take possession of man or animal can equally take possession of a material substance, and even replace the substance, leaving the outward accidents of colour, shape and size unchanged.

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  • Many so-called accidents are predicable necessarily of any particular persons.

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  • The universal or infinite is one that realizes itself in finite particular minds and wills, not as accidents or imperfections of it, but as its essential form.

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  • He directed that the movements of the troops when they drew near the allied outposts should be covered as far as possible by accidents of ground, for there was no great natural screen to cover his strategical concentration.

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  • In 1898 also the municipal franchise, hitherto confined to ratepayers, was greatly widened; in 1900 the English system of compensation to workmen for accidents suffered in their trade was adopted with some changes, one of the chief being that contested claims are adjudicated upon cheaply and expeditiously by the same arbitration court that decides industrial disputes.

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  • The continued success of the government life insurance office led in 1899 to the setting up of an accidents insurance office, and, in 1903, of a state fire insurance office.

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  • Ingot metal or mild steel was sometimes treacherous when first introduced, and accidents occurred, the causes of which were obscure.

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  • The Railway Department was originally constituted in 1840, and performs multifarious duties under various railway acts, including the inspection of railways before they are open, inquiries into accidents, reports on proposed railways, approval of by-laws, appointment of arbitrators in disputes, as well as many duties under private railway.

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  • The colliery, which was opened in 1807, has frequently been the scene of dreadful accidents, notably on the 23rd of October 1821, when 52 lives were lost.

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  • Apart from these changes in the history of the text, it has, like all ancient texts, suffered from accidents of transmission, from the unintentional mistakes of copyists.

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  • The board is specially directed to prescribe the manner in which the railway corporations shall keep their accounts, to examine these accounts from time to time, to examine the railways at least once a year, to investigate the cause of all accidents and upon the petition of an interested party to fix rates for the transportation of persons and freight.

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  • It is not unfair to connect the apparent failings of Schelling's philosophizing with the very nature of the thinker and with the historical accidents of his career.

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  • In 830-850, Paschasius Radbert taught that after the priest has uttered the words of institution, nothing remains save the body and blood under the outward form of bread and wine; the substance is changed and the accidents alone remain.

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  • Perhaps we may illustrate his position by saying that the elements undergo a change analogous to what takes place in iron, when by being brought into an electric field it becomes magnetic. The substance of the elements remain as well as their accidents, but like baptismal water they gain by consecration a hidden virtue benefiting soul and body.

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  • Berengar in the i ith century assailed this view, which was really that of transubstantiation, alleging that there is no substance in matter apart from the accidents, and that therefore Christ cannot be corporally present in the sacrament; because, if so, he must be spatially present, and there will be two material bodies in one space; moreover his body will be in thousands of places at once.

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  • Enghien had designed his battle even more carefully than before, but as the result of a series of accidents the two French armies attacked prematurely and straight to their front, one brigade after another, and though at one moment Enghien, sword in hand, broke the line of defence with his last intact reserve, a brilliant counterstroke, led by Mercy's brother Kaspar (who was killed), drove out the assailants.

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  • sweet, red - and refer them as accidents to matter in space, which, though mental, is objective, because its production is grounded on a law of all reason.

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  • Moreover, he and his successors mixed up so many accidents with the essence of their realism that the whole system broke down under its own weight.

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  • The accidents of political life suddenly opened out to him a career which made him, next to Lord Salisbury, the most prominent, the most admired and the most attacked Conservative politician of the day.

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  • retaining walls b, b are built up to the ground level, and the spaces between the two are covered by thick boarding, which is to be shut down as shown at c in cold weather to exclude frost, and opened as shown at d in mild weather to promote The height of the pit of the plants; and, to from the havoc caused by accidents, and very short ones being objectionable as multiplying the chances of drip, and the exclusion of light by the numerous lappings; panes about 12 in.

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  • He saw all the mechanical difficulties that had to be overcome in mining; he learned the nature and succession of rocks, the physical properties of minerals, ores and metals; he got a notion of mineral waters; he was an eyewitness of the accidents which befel the miners, and studied the diseases which attacked them; he had proof that positive knowledge of nature was not to be got in schools and universities, but only by going to nature herself, and to those who were constantly engaged with her.

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  • Owing to the mutilation of the Hebrew by the accidents of time the Greek version retains its place as the chief authority for the text, and references by chapter and verse are usually made to it.

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  • If a dam be absolutely necessary, care must be taken so to build it as to secure the fields on both sides from possible inundation; and it should be constructed substantially, for the cost of repairing accidents to a weak dam is very serious.

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  • The greater number of these associations cover a very wide field, generally the whole empire; in such cases they are empowered to divide their spheres into sections, and to establish agents in different centres to inquire into cases of accident, and to see to the carrying out of the rule~ prescribed by the association for the avoidance of accidents.

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  • The funds for covering the compensation payable in respect of accidents are raised by payments based, in agriculture, on the taxable capital, and in other trades and industries on the earnings of the insured.

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  • The first proposal in March 1881 was for compulsory insurance against accidents.

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  • legisla- were no precautions against accidents.

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  • In 1887-1888 laws, modelled on the new German laws, introduced compulsory insurance against accidents and sickness.

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  • He made a great speech on the second reading of the Irish Church Bill, and wrote a letter on the House of Lords, in which he said, "In harmony with the nation they may go on for a long time, but throwing themselves athwart its course they may meet with accidents not pleasant for them to think of."

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  • But, judging from the frequent accidents which occur, they sometimes dispense with this precaution.

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  • Paradoxical insistence on the accidents of speech-forms and thought-forms leads in the end to perception of the essentials.

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  • The latter are only describable by their accidents.

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  • The recognition of the individual is a matter of his accidents, to which even sex belongs, and the gap from lowest universal to individual may still be conceived as unbridged.

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  • Then follows the chequered period of the prime of life and middle age, during which the liability of men to industrial accidents, war and other causes of special mortality, irrespective of their greater inclination to emigrate, is generally sufficient to outweigh the dangers of childbirth or premature decay among the women, who tend, accordingly, to predominate in number at this stage.

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  • - Average, in modern law, is the term used in maritime commerce to signify damages or expenses resulting from the accidents of navigation.

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  • During the five years1884-1889a committee was occupied with the question of workmen's insurance, and thrice the government made proposals for its settlement, on the last occasion adopting the principle of invalidity as a common basis for insurance against accidents, illness or old age.

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  • At last the Riksdag of 1901 accepted a Bill for insurance against accidents which also extended to agricultural labourers, in connexion with the establishment of a state institution for insurance.

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  • The bill for protection against accidents, as well as for the limitation of working hours for women and children, was passed, together with one for the appointment of special factory inspectors.

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  • These small particles or larger communities are subject to accidents, internal or external, which destroy them, immediately or slowly, and thus life ceases; or they may wear out, or become clogged by the products of their own activity.

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  • The Pellegrini is exclusively surgical; the Santa Maria di Loreto is especially for the inmates of the Reclusorio and for street accidents; the Ospedale Lina for children; and the Ospedale Cotugno for infectious diseases.

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  • Forster's pluck in speaking out like this was fully appreciated in England, but it was not till after the revelations connected with the Phoenix Park murders that the dangers he had confronted were properly realized, and it became known that several plans to murder him had only been frustrated by the merest accidents.

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  • Despite these precautions many accidents have occurred; some of the houses have sunk or stand at fantastic angles, and in 1892 a portion of the High Street, which had subsided below the level of the Weaver, had to be raised 6 ft.

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  • But many accidents have resulted from the arsenic being absorbed, and the patient thereby poisoned.

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  • He claims to have shown that the dogmas of the eternity of matter and the permanence of the world are false; that their description of the Deity as the demiurgos is unspiritual; that they fail to prove the existence, the unity, the simplicity, the incorporeality or the knowledge (both of species and accidents) of God; that their ascription of souls to the celestial spheres is unproved; that their theory of causation, which attributes effects to the very natures of the causes, is false, for that all actions and events are to be ascribed to the Deity; and, finally, that they cannot establish the spirituality of the soul, nor prove its mortality.

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  • The value of this wonderful provision of nature to the bee-keeper of to-day may be estimated from the fact that bees managed according to modern methods are necessarily subject to so much manipulating or handling, that fatal accidents are as likely to happen in bee-life as among human beings.

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  • Then Dean added, "Just like investigating accidents."

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  • Let's change this to enable prompt investigation and root cause analysis, and to facilitate avoidance of similar accidents.

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  • Vehicles at work These pages are here to help you prevent vehicle accidents at work.

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  • Way to work-related accidents both loan remains the it sound too.

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  • forensic accounting Quantifying losses arising from thefts, frauds and accidents.

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  • Most don't die of mystery ailments, or in tragic " accidents " .

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  • airmane were also accidents in which 70 allied airmen in total died.

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  • We should remember that increased automation can also help to avoid accidents.

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  • Norfolk County Council is trialing an ultra-bright belisha beacon designed to reduce accidents at crossings at two locations in the county.

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  • blameworthy accidents in the past three years, and together with them we are proud of their record.

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  • The human toll of road accidents caused by high speed blowouts is all too obvious.

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  • bread-and-butter work of road traffic cases and accidents at work cases is what mostly occupies trainees.

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  • Tissues can be obtained via ethically-sourced cadavers from animals that have died naturally or in accidents or been euthanased for medical reasons.

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  • Better yet, I wonder if vehicular accidents are any more frequent on streets that pass by popular coffeehouses.

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  • Personal Injury Bond Pearce LLP's personal injury team recovers compensation for people who have been injured in accidents.

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  • Great fun was had by all involved with making the confectionery with sundry accidents occurring.

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  • cost-effective method of reducing road accidents.

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  • A few tragic accidents have resulted from people not wearing crampons or using an ice ax.

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  • They are at much greater risk of being involved in accidents or assaults or caught up in other criminality, " he said.

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  • Accidents that cause ton crossbar transfer little changed for drivers in a rugged.

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  • dirt bike accidents?

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  • disaggregate those figures to find out which accidents were at private crossings.

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  • Firstly, the commonly employed markers of the risk society - nuclear accidents, genetic technology and environmental disequilibrium - are crudely amalgamated.

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  • A spokeswoman from Bristol Council said the decision to remove the doormats was about minimizing the risk of possible future accidents.

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  • emergencyalso take care of those everyday accidents and one-off emergencies in the home.

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  • Drug use is linked with risks such as accidents while someone is intoxicated, overdose, or infection from sharing injecting equipment.

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  • During the chase they are likely to be involved in road or rail accidents, or injure themselves in quarry or barbed wire fences.

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  • Pulling back from customersthe folks at the motor accidents quot to insurers.

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  • Project benefits The project is intended to provide guaranteed overtaking opportunities to reduce platoons, driver frustration and accidents.

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  • Two accidents involved transport; a tractor overturn on a rubbish tip and a pierced groin from the forks of a loader.

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  • Should any passenger be interested in insurance against accidents for a particular flight he/she can make arrangements for coverage at any insurance company.

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  • high frequencyled through its database of more than 230,000 claims over the last year to determine which names had the highest frequency of accidents.

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  • Scores of minor accidents as vehicles skid on black ice in the morning rush hour.

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  • hurt in road traffic accidents, 5% of them children.

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  • inappropriate speed is a factor in many road accidents.

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  • Accidents There is now incontrovertible evidence that men in fast cars, particularly young men, cause a disproportionate number of road traffic accidents.

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  • inside story of my personal and scholarly wanderings may be read in Providential Accidents: an Autobiography (1998 ).

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  • involved in serious accidents in pursuing stolen cars.

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  • killed in accidents fell 13.9% from 173 in 2000 to 149 last year.

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  • lane markings at the junction are aimed at reducing the number of accidents.

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  • The balance of his practice involves large personal injury and some clinical negligence litigation and fatal accidents.

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  • malaise symptoms and pedestrian road traffic accidents (RTAs ).

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  • markings at the junction are aimed at reducing the number of accidents.

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  • A little advice can prevent mishaps or accidents which could take the edge off your holiday.

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  • Non Fault Accidents involving an uninsured or untraced motorist.

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  • For a list of services that relate to the Accidents at Work look at the right-hand navigation.

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  • negligence litigation and fatal accidents.

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  • notorious for accidents.

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  • obtained according and work for avoidable accidents how.

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  • If anything, many drivers believe that speed as a factor in accidents is grossly overstated.

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  • Cycling accidents caused by potholes Many cycling accidents are caused by poorly kept roads.

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  • powertrain design, operation and construction affect the behavior of vehicles involved in accidents.

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  • prevent slipping accidents especially where showers are located over baths.

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  • psychoactive substances use on road accidents has been adopted the 27 November 2003.

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  • Collection of blood from satellite refrigerators is also a major root cause of transfusion accidents.

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  • requirements specifications can and do cause accidents.

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  • Scores of minor accidents as vehicles skid on black ice in the morning rush hour.

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  • scald accidents to children happen in the kitchen.

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  • scalds accidents.

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  • Time or anything there's marsh inc's active seaport of fremantle where such accidents.

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  • seaport of Fremantle where such accidents.

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  • siesta syndrome ' and a drop in concentration seem the most likely reason why accidents soar in the afternoon.

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  • The author, a former signalman, examines railroad accidents in Britain and looks at their historical perspective, causes and lessons learned.

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  • driver sleepiness was estimated to be a factor in up to 20,000 accidents on UK roads last year, according to Government figures.

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  • Including leaks, nasty spills, explosions and personnel accidents.

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  • station wagon models such innovation accidents there are.

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  • stepladder accidents are caused by human error, not by ladders failing.

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  • Death, illness, weird stuff, accidents, family strife, relationship ' stuff ' .

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  • General Public Introduction Accidents to the general public caused by building operations happen more frequently than is generally supposed.

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  • For example, there are derogations covering ' unforeseeable circumstances and accidents ' and ' foreseeable surges of activity ' .

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  • survivable accidents.

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  • Thus the percentage of road traffic accidents causing ocular trauma is 12.5% .

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  • Make sure there are enough litter trays around and your rabbit knows where they are to prevent toilet accidents.

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  • The stretch to Ripon is quite twisty, tho reasonably flat, and has caused many accidents in the past.

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  • Motorists are generally unaccustomed to driving on slick roads and traffic accidents increase.

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  • These include devices to prevent whiplash and lateral skidding, which have cut accidents in Japan by 15% .

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  • Accidents in the home, at work, during sport, or when driving (including whiplash) are also common causes.

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  • Types of accident claims There are many types of personal injury claims form whiplash claims to work accidents.

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  • workplace accidents.

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  • In connexion with the stability of portable cranes, it may be mentioned that accidents more often arise from FIG.

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  • Further, the preliminary survey over the proposed route, necessary for deciding the length and types of cable required, can afford merely an approximation to the depth in which the cable actually lies, since accidents of wind and weather, or lack of observations for determining the position, cause deviations, often of considerable importance, from the proposed route.

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  • On the 17th of April 1898 a species of Employers Liability Act compelled employers of more than five workmen in certain industries to insure their employees against accidents.

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  • The year 1885 saw the introduction and adoption of a measure embodying the principle of employers liability for accidents to workmen, a principle subsequently extended and more equitably defined in the spring of 1899.

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  • The former of these two islands belongs to the Indian Region, the latter to the Australian, and between them there is absolutely no true transition - that is, no species are common to both which cannot be easily accounted for by the various accidents and migrations that in the course of time must have tended to mingle the productions of islands so close to one another.

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  • Conquest is not usually bloodless, whether achieved at the van of a marching column or at the head of a hastily-built railway, and the process under which the American railway system took form left the way open for a distressing record of accidents to the traveller and the railway servant.

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  • In this respect the lines of the United Kingdom are far ahead of those of any other country, and a diminution of accidents, particularly of collisions, has resulted therefrom.

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  • The Notice of Accidents Act of 1884, which obliges employers of labour to report to the Board of Trade, when "there occurs in any employment " as defined by the schedule of the act, " any accident which causes to any person employed therein, either loss of life or such bodily injury as to prevent him on any one of the three working days next after the occurrence of the accident from being employed for five hours on his ordinary work," affects railways in course of construction, but not, as a rule, otherwise.

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  • P Y of risk, it has during recent years come to notice that the number of casualties among railway servants is still unduly great, and in 1899 a Royal Commission was appointed to investigate the causes of the numerous accidents, fatal and nonfatal, to railway men.

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  • As a consequence of the report of this Commission the Railway Employment (Prevention of Accidents) Act of 'goo was passed, putting upon the Board of Trade the duty of making " such rules as they think fit with respect to any of the subjects mentioned in the schedule to this act, with the object of reducing or removing the dangers and risks incidental to railway service."

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  • Other acts which are of importance in connexion with accidents are the Accidents Compensation Act of 1846, the Employers' Liability Act of 1880, and the Workmen's Compensation Act of 1897.

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  • D.*) Accident Statistics Statistics of railway accidents may be divided into three classes: casualties (a) to passengers, (b) to servants or employ& and (c) to other persons; and again into (t) train accidents, (2) accidents to persons doing work on or about trains and (3) other accidents.

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  • Such statistics are studied mainly with the object of learning the lessons which they may afford as to preventive measures for the future; and from this point of view the most important element is the single item of passengers killed in train accidents (a 1).

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  • Accidents to passengers other than those caused by collisions or derailments of trains are very largely due to causes which it is fair to class either as unavoidable or as due mainly to the fault or carelessness of the victim himself.

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  • That this is so is indicated by the fact that, although the railways - always made to suffer severely in pecuniary damages for injuries for which their officers or servants are held responsible by the courts - have for years taken almost every conceivable precaution, the number of accidents, in proportion to the number of persons travelling, diminishes but slowly - so slowly that, in view of the variety of conditions to be considered, it would hardly be safe to conclude that the diminution is due to any definite improvement in the safeguards provided.

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  • The number of servants killed in train accidents is the next in importance.

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  • Apart from collisions and derailments, a large proportion of all accidents is found to be due primarily to want of care on the part of the victims. Accidents to workmen in marshalling, shunting, distributing and running trains, engines and cars, may be taken as the most important class, after train accidents, because this work is necessary and important and yet involves considerable hazard.

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  • In the year ending June 30, 1909, exclusive of casualties due to collisions, derailments and other accidents to trains, the number killed was 811 and of injured 28,156 (Accident Bulletin, No.

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  • Being struck or run over by a train while standing or walking on the track is the largest single cause of " railway accidents."

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  • Railways have always been held by the legislatures and by the courts strictly accountable for their shortcomings, so far as accountability can be enforced by compelling the payment of damages to victims of accidents; but in spite of this, a want of enterprise and even some apparent neglect of passengers' and servants' plain rights, have often been apparent, and the Board of Trade, with its powers of supervision, inspection and investigation, must therefore be classed as one of the most beneficent factors in the promotion of safety on British railways.

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  • Its powers have been exercised with the greatest caution, yet with consistent firmness; and the publicity which has been given to the true and detailed causes of scores and scores of railway accidents by the admirable reports of the Board of Trade inspectors has been a powerful lever in improving the railway service.

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  • A majority of the states have railway commissions, but the investigation of railway accidents, with comparatively few exceptions, has not been done in such a way as to make the results useful in promoting improved practice.

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  • In train accidents.

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  • Other accidents in or around trains, &c. 102 2,242 102 2,132 3.

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  • aggregate 6 killed and 454 injured; the six deaths were due to collisions, while of the cases of injury 372 occurred by collisions, 47 by derailments, and 35 by other accidents to trains.

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  • Item I shows no passengers killed in train accidents during the year.

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  • This was the case once before, in 1901; and the total of fatal accidents to passengers and servants, taken together, has in several years been very low (1896, eight; 1901, eight; 1902, ten; 1904, thirteen), but never before was it down to six.

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  • are made up of the classes of accidents shown in Table XI.

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  • Table Xi.-Detail Causes Of Certain Accidents Year 1908.

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  • By other accidents not included in the preceding.

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  • 50 19,041 (A) Accidents to trains: I.

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  • Miscellaneous (B) Accidents to or failure of rolling stock and permanent-way: 12.

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  • In train accidents 97 171 52 1202 1 49 1373 8.

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  • The accidents to " other persons " cannot readily be compared with items 7-12 in the British record, except as to the totals and a few of the items.

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  • The average length Table Xii.-Detail Causes Of Certain Accidents -continued.

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  • By other accidents I I 246 ..

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  • In 1907 one passenger in 2,318,051 was killed, and one in 107,004 was injured, in train accidents.

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  • The number of passengers (36) killed in train accidents in 1907 was equal to o 0759 per million passengers carried and o o024 per million kilometres travelled by passengers, or 0.1503 per million kilometres travelled by trains.

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  • Passengers Servants Other accidents, due to railway operations Passengers and others Servants Other accidents, victim's own fault - Passengers and others.

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  • 576 1254 The most significant item in the table, 36 passengers killed in train accidents, is perhaps to be considered as abnormally large, the totals under this head for the preceding six years beginning with 1901 being 7, 35, 3, 18, 4, 14, or an average of 11.57 per year.

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  • The French secretary of Public Works, who has furnished these statistics, keeps also similar records of the local or light railways, on which the number of fatal accidents appears to be exceedingly small.

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  • The totals of passengers killed and injured in train accidents are not separated from those killed and injured from other causes, but ratios are given showing that for four years no passengers were killed in this class.

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  • Accidents due to simple climbing are, however, exceedingly rare, and are usually found associated with a faulty track, with " plunging " movements of the locomotive or vehicle, or with a " tight gauge " at curves or points.

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  • Occasionally on a double-track railway one platform placed between the tracks serves both of them; this " island " arrangement, as it is termed, has the advantage that more tracks can be readily added without disturbance of existing buildings, but when it is adopted the exit from the trains is at the opposite side to that which is usual, and accidents have happened through passengers alighting at the usual side without noticing the absence of a platform.

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  • 3 In other words, the evidence is rarely strictly experimental, and this not only gives facilities for fraud, but makes it necessary to allow a large margin for accidents, mistakes and mal-observation.

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  • The only veritable and real unity in the world of existences is the individual; to assert that the universal exists separately ex parte rei would be to reduce individuals to mere accidents of one indivisible form.

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  • The Chaff-cutting Machines (Accidents) Act 1897 is a measure very similar in its intention to the Threshing Machines Act 1878, and provides for the automatic prevention of accidents to persons in charge of chaff-cutting machines.

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  • In 1898, at Birmingham, a prize of £ioo was given for a self-moving vehicle for light loads, ioo and 50 for self-moving vehicles for heavy loads, and fio for safety feeder to chaff-cutter, in accordance with the Chaffcutting Machines (Accidents) Act 1897.

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  • These forms, when materialized, are called formae substantiales or formae nativae; they are the essences of things, and in themselves have no relation to the accidents of things.

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  • Liability for loss by " accidents " may be thrown on the lessee by express stipulation (Art.

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  • " Accidents " here mean ordinary accidents only, such as hail, lightning or frost, and the lessee will not be answerable for loss caused by extraordinary accidents such as war or floods, unless he has, been made liable for all accidents, foreseen or unforeseen (Art.

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  • The drilling of a well is commonly carried out under contract, the producer erecting the derrick and providing the engine and boiler while the drilling contractor finds the tools, and is Drill ing the responsible for accidents or failure to complete the well.

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  • Vedius Pollio, in the time of Augustus, was said to have thrown his slaves, condemned sometimes for trivial mistakes or even accidents, to the lampreys in his fishpond.

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  • One of the first of these attacks was made by Berengarius of Tours (999-1088) upon the doctrine of transubstantiation; he denied the possibility of a change of substance in the bread and wine without some corresponding change in the accidents.

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  • He taught, says Abelard, that the same thing or substance was present in its entirety and essence in each individual, and that individuals differed no whit in their essence but only in the variety of their accidents.

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  • The species is essentially one, but it takes on individual varieties or accidents.

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  • The intellect collects the universal, which exists but not as a substance (est sed non substat), from the particular things which not merely are (sunt) but also, as subjects of accidents, have substantial existence (substant), by considering only their substantial similarity or conformity.

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  • At one time it was transported all over America in a frozen condition without serious accidents, and according to Sir F.

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  • That the methods and the subject-matter of surgery and of medicine are substantially the same, and that the advance of one is the advance of the other, the division being purely artificial and founded merely on accidents of personal bent and skill, must be insisted upon at this time of our history.

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  • Poplar Hospital for Accidents (1854).

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