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accent

accent

accent Sentence Examples

  • Maybe it was the soft accent that held her attention.

  • It was nice to hear English spoken without a Spanish accent.

  • In that moment of obvious joy, Alondra barely had an accent.

  • Was it possible that their accent was in large, contrived?

  • Her accent was still there, but the clumsy speech pattern was gone.

  • "There are three'" answered a clerk with an accent from a country I couldn't fine on a map and a name tag that said Pual.

  • "I'll take you to the mall," he said in his tight accent but as I started to move toward his old car, Detective Dick, my phone in his hand, yelled.

  • The accent says otherwise, but I was born in New York.

  • "Ikira, I'm honored," the dark-haired man said with a bow and a thick Spanish accent.

  • "That would be a description of his ego and nothing else," the brooding blond said with a light French accent.

  • His cultured accent made even bad news sound pleasant.

  • His French accent rolled off his deep voice in a way that made her smile.

  • "I should hope to smile," he said with a contrived southern accent.

  • His order was calm, the slight accent in his voice foreign.

  • "Ully, you're not supposed to be down here!" she called without turning in a distinct British accent.

  • Katie smiled in return, deciding she liked the Amazon with the British accent and wild tribal tattoos.

  • She froze at the cultured voice with its rich accent, knowing the woman at the nearest table spoke about her.

  • "Hello, kitten," he said in his thick accent.

  • She sometimes thought his accent sounded Russian, sometimes Irish.

  • Jerome doesn't have a southern accent.

  • The voice rang deep and sultry with a southern accent.

  • The three stood looking at each other, speechless, until Jackson broke the silence in his best Hispanic accent, "Lucy… you got some splainin' to do."

  • His accent appeared when he was too stressed to be concerned about emulating the flat, cultured accent of the political elite.

  • "This ain't right," he said, his Southern accent plain even to his ears.

  • "It is so," he said, mocking his father's accent.

  • "By gosh, I think I've got it," she spoke in a poor imitation of British accent.

  • The familiar lilt of her accent was still present.

  • As there is no accent in Indian words, the natural pronunciation of this name would be Man-i-CO-ba.

  • Phil., 1904), "Studies in Latin Accent and Metric" (in Trans.

  • Its charm lies in its exquisite accent and its infinite tenderness.

  • The accent plays much less part in lengthening and altering the vowels in Syriac than in Hebrew, but there are well-marked cases of lengthening from this cause.

  • An original medial p preceding the chief accent of the word also appears as b in English and the other members of the same group. It is not certain that any English word is descended from an original word beginning with b, though it has been suggested that peg is of the same origin as the Latin baculum and the Greek (6 KTpov.

  • Malay is essentially, with few exceptions, a dissyllabic language, and the syllabic accent rests on the penultimate unless that syllable is open and short; e.g.

  • One accent only is to be used, the acute, to denote the syllable on which stress is laid.

  • The Welsh form of the name, Caerdydd (pronounced Caerdeeth, with the accent on the second syllable) suggests that the name means "the fort of (Aulus ?) Didius," rather than Caer Daf ("the fortress on the Taff"), which is nowhere found (except in Leland), though Caer Dyv once existed as a variant.

  • Gaston Paris maintained that French versification was a natural development of popular Latin methods which depended on accent rather than quantity, and were as widely different from classical rules as the Low Latin was from the classical idiom.

  • Dealing next with accent, punctuation marks, sounds and syllables, it goes on to the different parts of speech (eight in number) and their inflections.

  • He looked at poetry as a kind of " proteus among the people, which changes its form according to language, manners, habits, according to temperament and climate, nay, even according to the accent of different nations."

  • The next octave above has two accents, and each succeeding octave another accent.

  • The octave below bass C is written C D E F GA B c. The next octave below is C] D i E 1 F] G] A] B 1 C, and each preceding octave has another accent as suffix.

  • Accent >>

  • In The Table Here Given, This Distinction Is Made By Means Of An Accent Placed Over The Last Figure.

  • The Epact 19' (Also Distinguished By An Accent Or Different Character) Is Placed Table Iii.

  • For This Reason The Epacts Twenty Five And Twenty Four Are Placed Together, So As To Belong Only To One Day In The Months Of February, April, June, August, September And November, And In The Same Months .Another 25', Distinguished By An Accent, Or By Being Printed In A :Different Character, Is Placed Beside 26, And Belongs To The Same, Day.

  • In the British army an officer is said to be "seconded" (with the accent on the second syllable) when he is employed on special service outside his regiment, his name being retained on the regimental list, but his place being filled by promotion of other officers.

  • What remain of these effusions have no special quality except good sense, refined feeling, accuracy of phrase, and a curious correctness of accent and rhythm.

  • To shake off his native accent and to acquire the graces of oratorical action, he engaged the services of Thomas Sheridan and Charles Macklin.

  • Castilian, which is the literary language of Spain, and with certain differences, of Spanish America, is spoken in Old and New Castile, Aragon, Estremadura, and the greater part of Leon; in Andalusia it is subject to various modifications of accent and pronunciation.

  • Doubtless he knew Latin before Greek; it is alleged that he always spoke Greek with a barbarian accent.

  • It is now generally assumed that the word is the causative form (hiph`il) and should be pronounced Yahveh or Yahweh (accent on second syllable).

  • Most words take the accent on the penult.

  • The accentuation of Rumanian, though complex, is governed by certain broad principles, except in the case of neologisms, many of which have been borrowed from French and Italian without change of accent.

  • the name Ion or loan (John), has the diminutives lonicei, Ionita, Ionascii, Ianache, Ienachel, &c. In verbs - apart from a few exceptional tenses - the accent falls on the first syllable of the inflectional suffix, e.g.

  • Although they are professedly written in hexameters, the rules of quantity are sacrificed to accent.

  • He spoke English well and idiomatically, but with a strong Icelandic accent.

  • It is almost incredible that the superb imaginative amplification of the description of Hyder Ali's descent upon the Carnatic should be from the same pen as the grave, simple, unadorned Address to the King (1777), where each sentence falls on the ear with the accent of some golden-tongued oracle of the wise gods.

  • It takes no account of the quantity of syllables; the scansion depends on accent, and there is always an accent on the last syllable but one.

  • This undertaking led to the introduction of a large number of Flemish workmen, who settled in the district, and, in spite of the violent measures adopted by the English peasantry to expel them, retained their ground in sufficient numbers to affect the physical appearance and the accent of the inhabitants to this day.

  • It was at this time that he acquired the slight German accent which he never lost.

  • (1) To take first its treatment of the final vowelsCatalan, like French and Provenal, having only oxytones and paroxytones, does not admit more than one syllable after the tonic accent: thus anima gives arma, cdmera gives cambra.

  • As regards the tonic, accent and the treatment of the vowels which come after it, Castilian may be said to be essentially a paroxytonic language, though it does not altogether refuse proparoxytonic accentuation and it would be a mistake to regard vocables like 1dm para, lagrima, rdpido, &c., as learned words.

  • Another special feature of CastilianPortuguese is the complete absence of the form of conjugation known as inchoative (intercalation, in the present tense, of the syllable isc or esc between the radical and the inflexion), although in all the other tenses, except the present, Spanish shows a tendency to lay the accent upon the same syllable in all the six persons, which was the object aimed at by the inchoative form.

  • Castilian displaces the accent on the 1st and 2nd pers.

  • eureni, firent), may be regarded as truly etymological, or rather as a result of the assimilation of these perfects to the perfects known as weak (amiron), for there are dialectic forms having the accent on the radical, such as dixon, hizon.

  • When she spoke, she welcomed them with a soft melodic voice made all the more attractive with a Spanish accent.

  • Maybe it was the soft accent that held her attention.

  • It was nice to hear English spoken without a Spanish accent.

  • Dulce was the oldest of the girls, yet her accent was the most prominent.

  • In that moment of obvious joy, Alondra barely had an accent.

  • Was it possible that their accent was in large, contrived?

  • The thick accent and clumsy wording suddenly annoyed Carmen.

  • Her accent was still there, but the clumsy speech pattern was gone.

  • "There are three'" answered a clerk with an accent from a country I couldn't fine on a map and a name tag that said Pual.

  • "I'll take you to the mall," he said in his tight accent but as I started to move toward his old car, Detective Dick, my phone in his hand, yelled.

  • The accent says otherwise, but I was born in New York.

  • "Ikira, I'm honored," the dark-haired man said with a bow and a thick Spanish accent.

  • "That would be a description of his ego and nothing else," the brooding blond said with a light French accent.

  • Her accent was exotic and complemented her sexy, sultry voice.

  • His cultured accent made even bad news sound pleasant.

  • His French accent rolled off his deep voice in a way that made her smile.

  • "I should hope to smile," he said with a contrived southern accent.

  • His French accent rolled off his deep voice.

  • His order was calm, the slight accent in his voice foreign.

  • "Ully, you're not supposed to be down here!" she called without turning in a distinct British accent.

  • Katie smiled in return, deciding she liked the Amazon with the British accent and wild tribal tattoos.

  • She froze at the cultured voice with its rich accent, knowing the woman at the nearest table spoke about her.

  • "Hello, kitten," he said in his thick accent.

  • She sometimes thought his accent sounded Russian, sometimes Irish.

  • Jerome doesn't have a southern accent.

  • The voice rang deep and sultry with a southern accent.

  • The three stood looking at each other, speechless, until Jackson broke the silence in his best Hispanic accent, "Lucy… you got some splainin' to do."

  • His accent appeared when he was too stressed to be concerned about emulating the flat, cultured accent of the political elite.

  • "This ain't right," he said, his Southern accent plain even to his ears.

  • After the tuxedoed maitre d' had seated them, Fred had made a pronouncement in his best French accent, There are no prob­lems, no worries at Café Richard.

  • "It is so," he said, mocking his father's accent.

  • "By gosh, I think I've got it," she spoke in a poor imitation of British accent.

  • The familiar lilt of her accent was still present.

  • An aggressive accent by US protectionism on pushing US trading interests overseas would be severely detrimental to the economies of the south.

  • They hired a dialect coach to develop an accent to make their characters more realistic.

  • i was surprised that she had names that were foreign to her and gave them to me slightly mispronounced in her strong jordanian accent.

  • If actors are going to adopt a scouse accent, please stick to it throughout the play.

  • The accuracy of distinguishing American accent and British accent is 83% .

  • The cockney accent had disappeared; Winston suddenly realized whose voice it was that he had heard a few moments ago on the telescreen.

  • A smile, a nod, a polite little " OK " in a Glaswegian accent.

  • Yet from his beer belly to his scouse accent, Kilfoyle is almost a caricature of an old Labor MP.

  • Parents, start practicing your best Jamaican accent now!

  • The man has a strong Irish accent, believed by the witness to be Southern Irish.

  • accent lighting, starfields, landscape or pool lighting.

  • accent correction function, and specialized terms database will help you communicate with utmost efficiency.

  • His cut-glass accent was too strong, often making it difficult to understand what he was saying.

  • pitch and stress: Japanese is only minimally semantically tonal, tho the majority of dialects have a word pitch accent.

  • NB Frederic has an acute accent on each ' e ' Reviews 'Powerful...the combination of banality and panic is quietly devastating.

  • albino monk with the silly accent.

  • bare-knuckle fighter with a very strange accent, to help with Howard's training.

  • In particular one of the boys has a strong Irish brogue, and another has an equally strong west Hampshire accent.

  • Ugly, pubescent, often lower class and furnished with a regional accent the dummy is a crude technical caricature of the human body.

  • circumflex accent will show the stress: Cwmbrân.

  • Thereâs something of the pantomime clown about him with his fake Italian accent (does anyone know why he does this?

  • cockney accent, good for you!

  • The Yanks seem to get the English accent mixed up with our Antipodean cousins, just not cricket!

  • You sing with an almost defiant Northern accent - why?

  • There is the utterly deplorable Accent, which you absolutely mustnât buy.

  • Maybe it was the fact that he had to cope with an American drawl, rather than his usual Northern accent.

  • I'm not certain about it tho, but she did have an accent that sounded vaguely eastern European.

  • estuary accent what is that all about?

  • Callers reporting faults to NTL were greeted with a recorded message, in a Geordie accent, that was strewn with four-letter expletives.

  • Is it too fanciful to imagine him speaking with a bread country accent, possibly from the Devon area?

  • fanciful to imagine him speaking with a bread country accent, possibly from the Devon area?

  • framboise Gommendy reports... [read it with a French Accent, Ed] JAMES WILLSTROP: A FLICK TOO FAR!

  • I think your best course of action is to avoid English words that sound funny in a French accent.

  • Oliver, raised in the Midlands, has a slight Birmingham accent, tho his natural gentility is indicated by his manners.

  • Had me in fit of girlish giggles every time they said " thankyou " in a Geordie accent, much to Cherb's amusement.

  • girlish giggles every time they said " thankyou " in a Geordie accent, much to Cherb's amusement.

  • OOTB housemate: Maxwell, cheeky southeast England accent.

  • imitate opened it and he's standing there (imitating breathless Japanese accent) ' Tom Verlaine!

  • No-one can hate a Brummie as the accent renders contempt impossible.

  • indecipherable accent, lol.

  • infelicitychildren up on their accent or pronunciation or on perceived grammatical infelicities - the oral equivalent of the red pen treatment!

  • lilting tones of your Black Country accent on the National News.

  • lingua franca spoken with a foreign accent and some dubious prepositions.

  • Hewitt, in a terrible haircut, does well when she keeps the English accent low-key, although it occasionally wanders around the country.

  • The onboard metronome allows control over tempo and meter, with an accent on each downbeat.

  • mixed-up accent the kids in London have?

  • I have this waking nightmare of hundreds of little Russians speaking English in a heavy Welsh farmer accent.

  • Just adopt the accent and an ability to eat oatcakes without choking and you'll have the time of your life.

  • offspring of a single mother with a thick yokel accent.

  • But it nearly wasn't so: Myers originally voiced the luminous green ogre using his native Canadian accent.

  • Again, could he but do the accent, Brad Pitt might not do too badly... oy!

  • pantomime clown about him with his fake Italian accent (does anyone know why he does this?

  • pertinacious manner and upper-middle-class accent and invariably had good sales.

  • She would offer them to people with her politely pertinacious manner and upper-middle-class accent and invariably had good sales.

  • Further reading [It's impossible to say much about accent without using phonetics.

  • pitch and stress: Japanese is only minimally semantically tonal, tho the majority of dialects have a word pitch accent.

  • plummy English accent, like Hollywood wants you to believe.

  • pronounced accent, sometimes searching for the right words.

  • We're told it's going to replace fuddy-duddy old received pronunciation as the standard accent.

  • put-on accent.

  • received pronunciation as the standard accent.

  • It comes replete with coffee making facilities, the primary accent colors and light wood furniture adding to the effect.

  • scouse accent.

  • Still at least one of you has retained a semblance of your regional accent.

  • A MIDI file can be easily exported so that groove, accent, and feel can be manipulated in any host sequencer.

  • All of these accent colors work well against neutral base shades of creams or shades of brown for your main walls and furniture.

  • Once you get used to the rather shrill deep south accent of Maggie, the play becomes easier to follow.

  • She said he was good looking, had wavy hair and long sideburns and spoke with a Liverpool accent.

  • speaks with a thick French accent, a legacy of growing up on a farm in Rougemont, Canada, outside Montreal.

  • speakas served by a woman who spoke English with a very thick accent.

  • timbre change was handled particularly well, including a strong accent.

  • trace of an accent which lent it charm.

  • Fairly light flowers with a small injection of an accent color, perhaps pink, turquoise or pale yellow.

  • Ulster scots is basically English written as if you were speaking with an ulster scots is basically English written as if you were speaking with an Ulster accent.

  • Speaker independent voice recognition means you can control your phone by speaking (regardless of your accent!

  • wakehave this waking nightmare of hundreds of little Russians speaking English in a heavy Welsh farmer accent.

  • welsh accent.

  • yokel accent.

  • As there is no accent in Indian words, the natural pronunciation of this name would be Man-i-CO-ba.

  • - The most important treatises (apart from those mentioned under "Editions") are Muller, Plautinische Prosodie (1869); Spengel, Reformvorschlage zur Metrik der lyrischen Versarten( 1882); Klotz, Grundziige altromischer Metrik (1890); Skutsch, Forschungen zur lateinischen Grammatik and Metrik (1892), Iambenkiirzung and Synizese (Satura Viadrina) (1896), continued by the author in a work called 'Was (1903); Leo, Die plautinischen Cantica and die hellenistische Lyrik (1897); Maurenbrecher, Hiatus and Verschleifung int alien Latein (1899); Ahlberg, De proceleusmaticis (1900), De correptione iambica plautina (1901); Jacobsohn, Quaestiones plautinae (1904); Radford, on the "Recession of the Latin Accent" (in Amer.

  • Phil., 1904), "Studies in Latin Accent and Metric" (in Trans.

  • Its charm lies in its exquisite accent and its infinite tenderness.

  • The accent plays much less part in lengthening and altering the vowels in Syriac than in Hebrew, but there are well-marked cases of lengthening from this cause.

  • An original medial p preceding the chief accent of the word also appears as b in English and the other members of the same group. It is not certain that any English word is descended from an original word beginning with b, though it has been suggested that peg is of the same origin as the Latin baculum and the Greek (6 KTpov.

  • Malay is essentially, with few exceptions, a dissyllabic language, and the syllabic accent rests on the penultimate unless that syllable is open and short; e.g.

  • One accent only is to be used, the acute, to denote the syllable on which stress is laid.

  • The Welsh form of the name, Caerdydd (pronounced Caerdeeth, with the accent on the second syllable) suggests that the name means "the fort of (Aulus ?) Didius," rather than Caer Daf ("the fortress on the Taff"), which is nowhere found (except in Leland), though Caer Dyv once existed as a variant.

  • Gaston Paris maintained that French versification was a natural development of popular Latin methods which depended on accent rather than quantity, and were as widely different from classical rules as the Low Latin was from the classical idiom.

  • Dealing next with accent, punctuation marks, sounds and syllables, it goes on to the different parts of speech (eight in number) and their inflections.

  • He looked at poetry as a kind of " proteus among the people, which changes its form according to language, manners, habits, according to temperament and climate, nay, even according to the accent of different nations."

  • The next octave above has two accents, and each succeeding octave another accent.

  • The octave below bass C is written C D E F GA B c. The next octave below is C] D i E 1 F] G] A] B 1 C, and each preceding octave has another accent as suffix.

  • In The Table Here Given, This Distinction Is Made By Means Of An Accent Placed Over The Last Figure.

  • The Epact 19' (Also Distinguished By An Accent Or Different Character) Is Placed Table Iii.

  • For This Reason The Epacts Twenty Five And Twenty Four Are Placed Together, So As To Belong Only To One Day In The Months Of February, April, June, August, September And November, And In The Same Months .Another 25', Distinguished By An Accent, Or By Being Printed In A :Different Character, Is Placed Beside 26, And Belongs To The Same, Day.

  • In the British army an officer is said to be "seconded" (with the accent on the second syllable) when he is employed on special service outside his regiment, his name being retained on the regimental list, but his place being filled by promotion of other officers.

  • What remain of these effusions have no special quality except good sense, refined feeling, accuracy of phrase, and a curious correctness of accent and rhythm.

  • To shake off his native accent and to acquire the graces of oratorical action, he engaged the services of Thomas Sheridan and Charles Macklin.

  • Castilian, which is the literary language of Spain, and with certain differences, of Spanish America, is spoken in Old and New Castile, Aragon, Estremadura, and the greater part of Leon; in Andalusia it is subject to various modifications of accent and pronunciation.

  • Doubtless he knew Latin before Greek; it is alleged that he always spoke Greek with a barbarian accent.

  • It is now generally assumed that the word is the causative form (hiph`il) and should be pronounced Yahveh or Yahweh (accent on second syllable).

  • Most words take the accent on the penult.

  • The accentuation of Rumanian, though complex, is governed by certain broad principles, except in the case of neologisms, many of which have been borrowed from French and Italian without change of accent.

  • Nouns retain the accent of the nominative singular in all cases and in both numbers (e.g.

  • copila, girl, vocative plur, copilelor), except when a diminutive or augmentative suffix is added; the accent then shifts to the suffix.

  • the name Ion or loan (John), has the diminutives lonicei, Ionita, Ionascii, Ianache, Ienachel, &c. In verbs - apart from a few exceptional tenses - the accent falls on the first syllable of the inflectional suffix, e.g.

  • Although they are professedly written in hexameters, the rules of quantity are sacrificed to accent.

  • He spoke English well and idiomatically, but with a strong Icelandic accent.

  • It is almost incredible that the superb imaginative amplification of the description of Hyder Ali's descent upon the Carnatic should be from the same pen as the grave, simple, unadorned Address to the King (1777), where each sentence falls on the ear with the accent of some golden-tongued oracle of the wise gods.

  • It takes no account of the quantity of syllables; the scansion depends on accent, and there is always an accent on the last syllable but one.

  • This undertaking led to the introduction of a large number of Flemish workmen, who settled in the district, and, in spite of the violent measures adopted by the English peasantry to expel them, retained their ground in sufficient numbers to affect the physical appearance and the accent of the inhabitants to this day.

  • It was at this time that he acquired the slight German accent which he never lost.

  • (1) To take first its treatment of the final vowelsCatalan, like French and Provenal, having only oxytones and paroxytones, does not admit more than one syllable after the tonic accent: thus anima gives arma, cdmera gives cambra.

  • As regards the tonic, accent and the treatment of the vowels which come after it, Castilian may be said to be essentially a paroxytonic language, though it does not altogether refuse proparoxytonic accentuation and it would be a mistake to regard vocables like 1dm para, lagrima, rdpido, &c., as learned words.

  • Another special feature of CastilianPortuguese is the complete absence of the form of conjugation known as inchoative (intercalation, in the present tense, of the syllable isc or esc between the radical and the inflexion), although in all the other tenses, except the present, Spanish shows a tendency to lay the accent upon the same syllable in all the six persons, which was the object aimed at by the inchoative form.

  • Castilian displaces the accent on the 1st and 2nd pers.

  • eureni, firent), may be regarded as truly etymological, or rather as a result of the assimilation of these perfects to the perfects known as weak (amiron), for there are dialectic forms having the accent on the radical, such as dixon, hizon.

  • Voweis.Lat., 0 with the accent have not been diphthongized into ie, uo, ue: pi (pede m), dez (decem), born (bomfu s), pode (p 0 t e t).

  • "What do you want?" demanded a third voice, in a stern, gruff accent.

  • There was a regretful accent in the creature's voice, and at the words all the other dragonettes sighed dismally.

  • The principal thing that is lacking is sentence accent and variety in the inflection of phrases.

  • The wavering is caused by the absence of accent on FUL, for she pronounces FULL correctly.

  • I sometimes found the name of his native parish handsomely written in the snow by the highway, with the proper French accent, and knew that he had passed.

  • "Prince, humanum est errare, * but..." replied the doctor, swallowing his r's, and pronouncing the Latin words with a French accent.

  • "Commander in Chief Kutuzov?" said the newly arrived general speaking quickly with a harsh German accent, looking to both sides and advancing straight toward the inner door.

  • *(2) Only a hobbledehoy could amuse himself in this way, he added in Russian--but pronouncing the word with a French accent--having noticed that Zherkov could still hear him.

  • The French dragoon was a young Alsatian who spoke French with a German accent.

  • "Well, Prince, may God give you great luck!" said Matrena in her gypsy accent.

  • "You are a colonel?" shouted the chief of staff with a German accent, in a voice familiar to Prince Andrew.

  • The porter, listening in perplexity to the unfamiliar Polish accent and not realizing that the interpreter was speaking Russian, did not understand what was being said to him and slipped behind the others.

  • A third officer, who by his accent was a Pole, disputed with the commissariat officer, arguing that he was mistaken in his identification of the different wards of Moscow.

  • Question :.. It 's just a put-on accent.

  • A major interpretational feature of this piece is to achieve the subjective accent on the first of each pair of quaver chords occurring throughout.

  • It comes replete with coffee making facilities, the primary accent colors and light wood furniture adding to the effect.

  • Some even claim to have detected traces of a scouse accent.

  • Still at least one of you has retained a semblance of your regional accent.

  • A MIDI file can be easily exported so that groove, accent, and feel can be manipulated in any host sequencer.

  • All of these accent colors work well against neutral base shades of creams or shades of brown for your main walls and furniture.

  • Once you get used to the rather shrill deep south accent of Maggie, the play becomes easier to follow.

  • She said he was good looking, had wavy hair and long sideburns and spoke with a Liverpool accent.

  • I was served by a woman who spoke English with a very thick accent.

  • He speaks with a thick French accent, a legacy of growing up on a farm in Rougemont, Canada, outside Montreal.

  • The introduction of the silks with the timbre change was handled particularly well, including a strong accent.

  • She spoke excellent French, with a trace of an accent which lent it charm.

  • Fairly light flowers with a small injection of an accent color, perhaps pink, turquoise or pale yellow.

  • Ulster Scots is basically English written as if you were speaking with an Ulster accent.

  • Speaker independent voice recognition means you can control your phone by speaking (regardless of your accent !

  • Posted by Stuart at 06:21 PM Comments I did, I said it to myself, under my breath, in a welsh accent.

  • Although he was from New Jersey, he liked to affect a Southern accent sometimes. He thought it made him sound sexier.

  • Don't abase your cousin by making fun of his accent.

  • Hailey searched for months to find the perfect accoutrement to accent her wedding outfit.

  • Red has become increasingly popular in babies' rooms, and you can accent that red with other colors and accessories once the baby is here.

  • You may find the perfect items to accent the nursery for a few dollars!

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