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acacia

acacia

acacia Sentence Examples

  • Two species of acacia are remarkable for the delicate and violet-like perfume of their wood - myall and yarran.

  • The majority of the species of Acacia are edible and serve as reserve fodder for sheep and cattle.

  • The iron tree (Parrotia persica), the silk acacia, Carpinus betulus, Quercus iberica, the box tree and the walnut flourish freely, as well as the sumach, the pomegranate, and the Gleditschia caspica.

  • The principal trees are the alder, aloe, palm, poplar, acacia, willow and eucalyptus.

  • The forest vegetation, largely confined to the "Isle of Isles" and the southern uplands, includes the Adansonia (baobab), which in the Fazogli district attains gigantic proportions, the tamarind, of which bread is made, the deleb palm, several valuable gum trees (whence the term Sennari often applied in Egypt to gumarabic), some dyewoods, ebony, ironwood and many varieties of acacia.

  • The arboreous forms which least require the humid and equable heat of the more truly tropical and equatorial climates, and are best able to resist the high temperatures and excessive drought of the northern Indian hot months from April to June, are certain Leguminosae, Bauhinia, Acacia, Butea and Dalbergia, Bombax, Shorea, Nauclea, Lagerstroemia, and Bignonia, a few bamboos and palms, with others which extend far beyond the tropic, and give a tropical aspect to the forest to the extreme northern border of the Indian plain.

  • Of other useful woods found in the plains may be named the babool, Acacia; toon, Cedrela; and sissoo, Dalbergia.

  • (X.) Ark of the Covenant, Ark of the Revelation, Ark of the Testimony, are the full names of the sacred chest of acacia wood overlaid with gold which the Israelites took with them on their journey into Palestine.

  • It was lined within and without with gold, and through four golden rings were placed staves of acacia wood, by means of which it was carried.

  • trees, and even new genera, such as the cork-tree (Phellodendron amurense, walnut (Juglans manchurica), acacia (Maackia amurensis), the graceful climber Maximowiczia amurensis, the Japanese Trochostigma and many others - all unknown to Siberia proper - are met with.

  • More important is the cultivation of the black wattle (Acacia mollissima), which began in 1886, the bark being exported for tanning purposes, the wood also commanding a ready sale.

  • A rare species is the acacia erioloba Rameel doom, akin to the acacia giraffae of Bechuanaland.

  • Feran there is little cultivable land, the greater part consisting of bare, rocky hills and sandy valleys, sparsely covered with tamarisk and acacia bushes.

  • The lowland strip or Tehama consists partly of a gravelly plain, the Khabt, covered sparsely with acacia and other desert shrubs and trees, and furnishing pasturage for large flocks of goats and camels; and partly of sterile wastes of sand like the Ramla, which extends on either side of Aden almost from the seashore to the foot of the hills.

  • The stony plains which cover so large a part of the country are often covered with acacia jungle, and in the dry water-courses a kind of wild palm, the dom, abounds, from the leaves of which baskets and mats are woven.

  • The British pharmacopoeia contains the mucilages of acacia and tragacanth.

  • Acacia >>

  • A large part of the country is covered with grass or shrub, chiefly acacia.

  • Thus the protoand per-salts of iron, as well as the protoand per-salts of tin, including also a large variety of tannin, sumac, divi-divi, chestnut, valonia, the acacias (Areca Catechu and Acacia Catechu from India), from which are obtained cutch and gambier, &c., are no longer used solely as mordants or tinctorial matters, but mainly to serve the object of converting the silk into a greatly-expanded fibre, consisting of a conglomeration of more or less of these substances."

  • The koa (Acacia koa), from the wood of which the natives used to make the bodies of their canoes, and the only tree of the islands that furnishes much valuable lumber (a hard cabinet wood marketed as " Hawaiian mahogany "), forms extensive forests on Hawaii and Maui between elevations of 2000 and 4000 ft.

  • In many districts between elevations of 2000 and 6000 ft., where there is only a moderate amount of moisture, occur mixed forests of koa, koaia (Acacia koaia), kopiko (Straussia oncocarpa and S.

  • Rose Acacia, &c. Cornus - Dogwood.

  • A structure called the cool orchid house is set apart for the accommodation of the many lovely mountain species from South America and India, such as odontoglossums, masdevallias, &c., and in this the more uniform the temperature can be kept the better, that in summer varying between Cyanophyllum (Miconia) Cycas Dieffenbachia Dipladenia* Dracaena Eranthemum Eucharist Euphorbia Ficus Franciscea Gardenia Gesnera Gloriosa* Gloxinia f Heliconia f Hoffmannia I pomaea * Ixora Jacobinia Jasminum* Luculia Maranta Medinilla Meyenia Musa Nelumbium f Nepenthes Nymphaea f Oxera * Pancratium f Pandanus Passiflora* Pavetta Petraea * Pleroma* Poinsettia Rondeletia Sanchezia Schubertia* Scutellaria Stephanotis Tabernaemontana Terminalia Thunbergia Torenia Thyrsacanthus Tydaea Vinca Abutilon Acacia Agapanthus Agathaea Agave Alonsoa Aloysia Amaryllis Ardisia Asparagus Aspidistra Asystasia (Mackaya) Azalea Bauera Begonia Blandfordia Bomarea * Boronia Bougainvillea * Bouvardia Brugmansia Calceolaria Camellia Campanula Canna Celosia Cestrum * Chorizema* Chrysanthemum Cineraria 60° and 65°, and in winter from 45° to 60°.

  • The chief constituent of the low scrub which covers the northern part of the country is the grey gum acacia (hashob).

  • On the same acacia there occur leaves with the petiole and lamina perfect; others having the petiole slightly expanded or winged, and the lamina imperfectly developed; and others in which there is no lamina, and the petiole becomes large and broad.

  • The leaves of barberry and of some species of Astragalus, and the stipules of the false acacia (Robinia) are spiny.

  • - Leaf of an Acacia (Acacia heterophylla), showing a flattened leaf-like petiole p, called a phyllode, with straight venation, and a bipinnate lamina.

  • Other trees, found chiefly on the plateaus, are the baobab, the shea-butter tree, the locust tree, gambier, palms, including the date and dum palm (Hyphaene), the tamarind, and, in the arid regions, the acacia and mimosa.

  • The sunt tree (Acacia nhlolica) grows everywhere, as well as the tamarisk and the sycamore.

  • The acacia abounded on the borders of the valley, but the groves were gradually cut down for the use of the carpenter and the charcoal-burner.

  • For boatbuilding papyrus stems and acacia wood were employed, and for the best work cedar-wood was imported from Lebanon.

  • t f., Yahweh ordered Moses to make an ark of acacia wood before he ascended the mountain.

  • Among the trees the acacia and the dum-palm are common.

  • The dom palm, tamarisk, acacia and wild senna are also found.

  • ACACIA, a genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the family Leguminosae and the sub-family Mimoseae.

  • There are about 450 species of acacia widely scattered over the warmer regions of the globe.

  • True gum-arabic is the product of Acacia Senegal, abundant in both east and west tropical Africa.

  • Acacia arabica is the gum-arabic tree of India, but yields a gum inferior to the true gum-arabic. An astringent medicine, called catechu or cutch, is procured from several species, but more especially from Acacia catechu, by boiling down the wood and evaporating the solution so as to get an extract.

  • The bark of Acacia arabica, under the name of babul or babool, is used in Scinde for tanning.

  • Such are Acacia pycnantha, golden wattle, A.

  • The pods of Acacia nilotica, under the name of neb-neb, and of other African species Acacia Senegal, flowering branch, natural size (after A.

  • The seeds of Acacia niopo are roasted and used as snuff in South America.

  • Some species afford valuable timber; such are Acacia melanoxylon, black wood of Australia, which attains a great size; its wood is used for furniture, and takes a high polish; and Acacia homalophylla (also Australian), myall wood, which yields a fragrant timber, used for ornamental purposes.

  • Acacia formosa supplies the valuable Cuba timber called sabicu.

  • Acacia seyal is supposed to be the shittah tree of the Bible, which supplied shittim-wood.

  • Acacia heterophylla, from Mauritius and Bourbon, and Acacia koa from the Sandwich Islands are also good timber trees.

  • Acacia armata is the kangaroo-thorn of Australia, A.

  • In the Central American Acacia sphaerocephala (bullthorn acacia) and A.

  • In common language the term Acacia is often applied to species of the genus Robinia which belongs also to the Leguminous family, but is placed in a different section.

  • Robinia Pseud-acacia, or false acacia, is cultivated in the milder parts of Britain, and forms a large tree, with beautiful pea-like blossoms. The tree is sometimes called the locust tree.

  • Chilensis), lingue (Persea lingue), laurel (Laurus aromatica), avellano (Guevina avellana), lama (Myrtus luma), espino (Acacia cavenia) and many others.

  • Of dye-yielding shrubs and plants camwood and indigo may be mentioned; of those whence gum is obtained the copal, acacia and African tragacanth (Sterculia tragacantha).

  • The commonest species of trees are such as grow in central Europe, namely, ash, fir, pine, beech, acacia, maple, birch, box, chestnut, laurel, holm-oak, poplar, elm, lime, yew, elder, willow, oak.

  • Gumand resin-yielding trees and plants (such as the acacia) are numerous.

  • deep, filled with a dense growth of prickly acacia, the usual defence of West African strongholds.

  • This altar was in the centre of the court of the tabernacle, of acacia wood, 3 cubits high and 5 square.

  • Ferri sulphas exsiccatus, which has two subpreparations: (a) Pilula ferri, " Blaud's pill " (exsiccated ferrous sulphate 150, exsiccated sodium carbonate 95, gum acacia 50, tragacanth 15, glycerin 10, syrup 150, water 20, each to contain about I grain of ferrous carbonate); (b) Pilula aloes et ferri (Barbadoes aloes 2, exsiccated ferrous sulphate I, compound powder of cinnamon 3, syrup of glucose 3).

  • the number of the spies, the number of souls that went down into Egypt with Jacob, and the ark being made of acacia wood.

  • Characteristic of the Sahara is the date-palm, which flourishes where other vegetation can scarcely maintain existence, while in the semi-desert regions the acacia (whence is obtained gum-arabic) is abundant.

  • The acacia tree is common, and from it gum-arabic of good quality is obtained.

  • Between the desert and the cultivated Nile lands is an open growth of samr, hashab (Acacia verek) and other acacia trees.

  • forest belts line the banks of the rivers and khors, in which the most noteworthy tree is the sant or sunt (Acacia arabica).

  • Farther from the rivers are open woods of heglig (Balanites aegyptiaca), hashab, &c., and dense thickets of laot (Acacia nubica) and kittr (Acacia mellifera).

  • On the eastern side the plains and rocky ridges, where not artificially cleared, are occupied by shaggy and often sombre forests mainly composed of the following genera: Eucalyptus (gum tree), Casuarina, Bursaria, Acacia, Leptospermum, Drimys, Melaleuca, Dodonaea, Notolea, Exocarpus, Hakea, Epacris, Xanthorrhoea, Frenela.

  • Among the noticeable Dicotyledons are the Myricaceae, Proteaceae, Laurineae, Bombax, the Judas-tree, Acacia, Ailanthus, while the most plentiful forms are the Araliaceae.

  • Among the Dicotyledons, the Leguminosae take the first place with 131 species, including Acacia, Caesalpinia and Cassia, each represented by several forms. The occurrence of 90 species of Amentaceae shows that, as the climate became less tropical, the relative proportion of this group to the total flora increased.

  • Gum senegal, a variety of gum arabic produced by Acacia Verek, occurs in pieces generally rounded, of the size of a pigeon's egg, and of a reddish or yellow colour, and specific gravity 1.436.

  • It is medicinally superior to gum acacia, as it does not undergo acetous fermentation.

  • World furniture collection which includes acacia, fruitwood and birch furniture.

  • Many low trees covered the land, mostly small thorny acacia and some cineraria, all trunk and no branches.

  • Indeed he could, and not one but two, surprisingly well concealed in a small acacia and viewable from just a few meters.

  • acacia scrub wasn't easy.

  • acacia honey matches your delicate emotions.

  • acacia yield gum.

  • acacia bush began - which was full of birds.

  • acacia woodland stained orange by dust.

  • acacia trees are ubiquitous on Taiwan's lower hills.

  • Pale catechu has properties and uses similar to those of black catechu derived from Acacia catechu Willd., fam.

  • A juvenile Gabar goshawk came hurtling past one of the vehicles to perch on top of an acacia.

  • gum Arabic is the product of Acacia Senegal, abundant in dry tropical west Africa from Senegal to northern Nigeria.

  • inlayid panels between the legs and the arcaded back with pointed crest are of acacia wood, inlaid with ivory.

  • Since splinters of Australian lancewood (Acacia shirleyi Maiden, fam.

  • lazes in acacia shade, flicking flies off its wild yellow body, pride won't eat dead meat.

  • We then move south to the more open, acacia savanna, with more grazing mammals and a greater chance of seeing predators.

  • There is extensive acacia woodland savanna in the center stretching east from Ikoma and some gallery forest along the rivers.

  • This consists largely of fairly open areas with stands of gingerbread plum and other small trees, acacia scrub and some Rhun palms.

  • We had excellent views of a Desert Wheatear perched on a small acacia bush and Julia found a male stonechat perched on stubble.

  • Species found in forest areas include tamarind, acacia, Baobab and African rosewood.

  • thorny acacia scrub wasn't easy.

  • Two species of acacia are remarkable for the delicate and violet-like perfume of their wood - myall and yarran.

  • The majority of the species of Acacia are edible and serve as reserve fodder for sheep and cattle.

  • The iron tree (Parrotia persica), the silk acacia, Carpinus betulus, Quercus iberica, the box tree and the walnut flourish freely, as well as the sumach, the pomegranate, and the Gleditschia caspica.

  • The principal trees are the alder, aloe, palm, poplar, acacia, willow and eucalyptus.

  • The forest vegetation, largely confined to the "Isle of Isles" and the southern uplands, includes the Adansonia (baobab), which in the Fazogli district attains gigantic proportions, the tamarind, of which bread is made, the deleb palm, several valuable gum trees (whence the term Sennari often applied in Egypt to gumarabic), some dyewoods, ebony, ironwood and many varieties of acacia.

  • The arboreous forms which least require the humid and equable heat of the more truly tropical and equatorial climates, and are best able to resist the high temperatures and excessive drought of the northern Indian hot months from April to June, are certain Leguminosae, Bauhinia, Acacia, Butea and Dalbergia, Bombax, Shorea, Nauclea, Lagerstroemia, and Bignonia, a few bamboos and palms, with others which extend far beyond the tropic, and give a tropical aspect to the forest to the extreme northern border of the Indian plain.

  • Of other useful woods found in the plains may be named the babool, Acacia; toon, Cedrela; and sissoo, Dalbergia.

  • (X.) Ark of the Covenant, Ark of the Revelation, Ark of the Testimony, are the full names of the sacred chest of acacia wood overlaid with gold which the Israelites took with them on their journey into Palestine.

  • It was lined within and without with gold, and through four golden rings were placed staves of acacia wood, by means of which it was carried.

  • trees, and even new genera, such as the cork-tree (Phellodendron amurense, walnut (Juglans manchurica), acacia (Maackia amurensis), the graceful climber Maximowiczia amurensis, the Japanese Trochostigma and many others - all unknown to Siberia proper - are met with.

  • More important is the cultivation of the black wattle (Acacia mollissima), which began in 1886, the bark being exported for tanning purposes, the wood also commanding a ready sale.

  • A rare species is the acacia erioloba Rameel doom, akin to the acacia giraffae of Bechuanaland.

  • Feran there is little cultivable land, the greater part consisting of bare, rocky hills and sandy valleys, sparsely covered with tamarisk and acacia bushes.

  • The lowland strip or Tehama consists partly of a gravelly plain, the Khabt, covered sparsely with acacia and other desert shrubs and trees, and furnishing pasturage for large flocks of goats and camels; and partly of sterile wastes of sand like the Ramla, which extends on either side of Aden almost from the seashore to the foot of the hills.

  • The stony plains which cover so large a part of the country are often covered with acacia jungle, and in the dry water-courses a kind of wild palm, the dom, abounds, from the leaves of which baskets and mats are woven.

  • The British pharmacopoeia contains the mucilages of acacia and tragacanth.

  • A large part of the country is covered with grass or shrub, chiefly acacia.

  • Thus the protoand per-salts of iron, as well as the protoand per-salts of tin, including also a large variety of tannin, sumac, divi-divi, chestnut, valonia, the acacias (Areca Catechu and Acacia Catechu from India), from which are obtained cutch and gambier, &c., are no longer used solely as mordants or tinctorial matters, but mainly to serve the object of converting the silk into a greatly-expanded fibre, consisting of a conglomeration of more or less of these substances."

  • The koa (Acacia koa), from the wood of which the natives used to make the bodies of their canoes, and the only tree of the islands that furnishes much valuable lumber (a hard cabinet wood marketed as " Hawaiian mahogany "), forms extensive forests on Hawaii and Maui between elevations of 2000 and 4000 ft.

  • In many districts between elevations of 2000 and 6000 ft., where there is only a moderate amount of moisture, occur mixed forests of koa, koaia (Acacia koaia), kopiko (Straussia oncocarpa and S.

  • Rose Acacia, &c. Cornus - Dogwood.

  • A structure called the cool orchid house is set apart for the accommodation of the many lovely mountain species from South America and India, such as odontoglossums, masdevallias, &c., and in this the more uniform the temperature can be kept the better, that in summer varying between Cyanophyllum (Miconia) Cycas Dieffenbachia Dipladenia* Dracaena Eranthemum Eucharist Euphorbia Ficus Franciscea Gardenia Gesnera Gloriosa* Gloxinia f Heliconia f Hoffmannia I pomaea * Ixora Jacobinia Jasminum* Luculia Maranta Medinilla Meyenia Musa Nelumbium f Nepenthes Nymphaea f Oxera * Pancratium f Pandanus Passiflora* Pavetta Petraea * Pleroma* Poinsettia Rondeletia Sanchezia Schubertia* Scutellaria Stephanotis Tabernaemontana Terminalia Thunbergia Torenia Thyrsacanthus Tydaea Vinca Abutilon Acacia Agapanthus Agathaea Agave Alonsoa Aloysia Amaryllis Ardisia Asparagus Aspidistra Asystasia (Mackaya) Azalea Bauera Begonia Blandfordia Bomarea * Boronia Bougainvillea * Bouvardia Brugmansia Calceolaria Camellia Campanula Canna Celosia Cestrum * Chorizema* Chrysanthemum Cineraria 60° and 65°, and in winter from 45° to 60°.

  • The chief constituent of the low scrub which covers the northern part of the country is the grey gum acacia (hashob).

  • On the same acacia there occur leaves with the petiole and lamina perfect; others having the petiole slightly expanded or winged, and the lamina imperfectly developed; and others in which there is no lamina, and the petiole becomes large and broad.

  • The leaves of barberry and of some species of Astragalus, and the stipules of the false acacia (Robinia) are spiny.

  • - Leaf of an Acacia (Acacia heterophylla), showing a flattened leaf-like petiole p, called a phyllode, with straight venation, and a bipinnate lamina.

  • Other trees, found chiefly on the plateaus, are the baobab, the shea-butter tree, the locust tree, gambier, palms, including the date and dum palm (Hyphaene), the tamarind, and, in the arid regions, the acacia and mimosa.

  • The sunt tree (Acacia nhlolica) grows everywhere, as well as the tamarisk and the sycamore.

  • The acacia abounded on the borders of the valley, but the groves were gradually cut down for the use of the carpenter and the charcoal-burner.

  • For boatbuilding papyrus stems and acacia wood were employed, and for the best work cedar-wood was imported from Lebanon.

  • t f., Yahweh ordered Moses to make an ark of acacia wood before he ascended the mountain.

  • Among the trees the acacia and the dum-palm are common.

  • The dom palm, tamarisk, acacia and wild senna are also found.

  • The low scattered jungle contains such characteristic species as Capparis aphylla, Acacia arabica (babul), Populus euphratica (the " willows " of Ps.

  • ACACIA, a genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the family Leguminosae and the sub-family Mimoseae.

  • There are about 450 species of acacia widely scattered over the warmer regions of the globe.

  • True gum-arabic is the product of Acacia Senegal, abundant in both east and west tropical Africa.

  • Acacia arabica is the gum-arabic tree of India, but yields a gum inferior to the true gum-arabic. An astringent medicine, called catechu or cutch, is procured from several species, but more especially from Acacia catechu, by boiling down the wood and evaporating the solution so as to get an extract.

  • The bark of Acacia arabica, under the name of babul or babool, is used in Scinde for tanning.

  • Such are Acacia pycnantha, golden wattle, A.

  • The pods of Acacia nilotica, under the name of neb-neb, and of other African species Acacia Senegal, flowering branch, natural size (after A.

  • The seeds of Acacia niopo are roasted and used as snuff in South America.

  • Some species afford valuable timber; such are Acacia melanoxylon, black wood of Australia, which attains a great size; its wood is used for furniture, and takes a high polish; and Acacia homalophylla (also Australian), myall wood, which yields a fragrant timber, used for ornamental purposes.

  • Acacia formosa supplies the valuable Cuba timber called sabicu.

  • Acacia seyal is supposed to be the shittah tree of the Bible, which supplied shittim-wood.

  • Acacia heterophylla, from Mauritius and Bourbon, and Acacia koa from the Sandwich Islands are also good timber trees.

  • Acacia armata is the kangaroo-thorn of Australia, A.

  • In the Central American Acacia sphaerocephala (bullthorn acacia) and A.

  • In common language the term Acacia is often applied to species of the genus Robinia which belongs also to the Leguminous family, but is placed in a different section.

  • Robinia Pseud-acacia, or false acacia, is cultivated in the milder parts of Britain, and forms a large tree, with beautiful pea-like blossoms. The tree is sometimes called the locust tree.

  • Chilensis), lingue (Persea lingue), laurel (Laurus aromatica), avellano (Guevina avellana), lama (Myrtus luma), espino (Acacia cavenia) and many others.

  • Of dye-yielding shrubs and plants camwood and indigo may be mentioned; of those whence gum is obtained the copal, acacia and African tragacanth (Sterculia tragacantha).

  • The commonest species of trees are such as grow in central Europe, namely, ash, fir, pine, beech, acacia, maple, birch, box, chestnut, laurel, holm-oak, poplar, elm, lime, yew, elder, willow, oak.

  • Gumand resin-yielding trees and plants (such as the acacia) are numerous.

  • deep, filled with a dense growth of prickly acacia, the usual defence of West African strongholds.

  • The principal timber trees in the forests are - teak; blackwood of two varieties (Dalbergia Sisu andDalbergia latifolia), Dalbergia ujainensis, Pterocarpus Marsupium, Terminalia glabra, Acacia arabica, Acacia Catechu, Nauclea cordifolia, Nauclea parvifolia, Bidelia spinosa, Hardwickia binata, Juga xylocarpa, Populus euphratica, and Tamarindus indica.

  • This altar was in the centre of the court of the tabernacle, of acacia wood, 3 cubits high and 5 square.

  • Ferri sulphas exsiccatus, which has two subpreparations: (a) Pilula ferri, " Blaud's pill " (exsiccated ferrous sulphate 150, exsiccated sodium carbonate 95, gum acacia 50, tragacanth 15, glycerin 10, syrup 150, water 20, each to contain about I grain of ferrous carbonate); (b) Pilula aloes et ferri (Barbadoes aloes 2, exsiccated ferrous sulphate I, compound powder of cinnamon 3, syrup of glucose 3).

  • the number of the spies, the number of souls that went down into Egypt with Jacob, and the ark being made of acacia wood.

  • Characteristic of the Sahara is the date-palm, which flourishes where other vegetation can scarcely maintain existence, while in the semi-desert regions the acacia (whence is obtained gum-arabic) is abundant.

  • The acacia tree is common, and from it gum-arabic of good quality is obtained.

  • Between the desert and the cultivated Nile lands is an open growth of samr, hashab (Acacia verek) and other acacia trees.

  • forest belts line the banks of the rivers and khors, in which the most noteworthy tree is the sant or sunt (Acacia arabica).

  • Farther from the rivers are open woods of heglig (Balanites aegyptiaca), hashab, &c., and dense thickets of laot (Acacia nubica) and kittr (Acacia mellifera).

  • On the eastern side the plains and rocky ridges, where not artificially cleared, are occupied by shaggy and often sombre forests mainly composed of the following genera: Eucalyptus (gum tree), Casuarina, Bursaria, Acacia, Leptospermum, Drimys, Melaleuca, Dodonaea, Notolea, Exocarpus, Hakea, Epacris, Xanthorrhoea, Frenela.

  • Among the noticeable Dicotyledons are the Myricaceae, Proteaceae, Laurineae, Bombax, the Judas-tree, Acacia, Ailanthus, while the most plentiful forms are the Araliaceae.

  • Among the Dicotyledons, the Leguminosae take the first place with 131 species, including Acacia, Caesalpinia and Cassia, each represented by several forms. The occurrence of 90 species of Amentaceae shows that, as the climate became less tropical, the relative proportion of this group to the total flora increased.

  • Gum senegal, a variety of gum arabic produced by Acacia Verek, occurs in pieces generally rounded, of the size of a pigeon's egg, and of a reddish or yellow colour, and specific gravity 1.436.

  • It is medicinally superior to gum acacia, as it does not undergo acetous fermentation.

  • We then move south to the more open, acacia savanna, with more grazing mammals and a greater chance of seeing predators.

  • There is extensive acacia woodland savanna in the center stretching east from Ikoma and some gallery forest along the rivers.

  • This consists largely of fairly open areas with stands of gingerbread plum and other small trees, acacia scrub and some Rhun palms.

  • We had excellent views of a Desert Wheatear perched on a small acacia bush and Julia found a male Stonechat perched on stubble.

  • Species found in forest areas include tamarind, acacia, Baobab and African rosewood.

  • They are aged in oak, acacia, mulberry, chestnut, or cherry barrels.

  • False Acacia (Robinia) - Beautiful flowering trees for lawn or shrubbery.

  • The common Acacia or Locust Tree (R. pseudoacacia) is of quick growth, hardy, and thrives almost anywhere.

  • Robinia Hispida - ose Acacia) is one of the finest of small trees, requiring little room and not fastidious as to soil.

  • Clammy Locust (Robinia Viscosa) - Smaller than the ordinary False Acacia, but is elegant in foliage and beautiful in flower.

  • The flowers resemble those of Decaisnes variety of the common Acacia, being of a pale pink color, but the clusters are shorter and denser.

  • Kelseys False Acacia (Robinia Kelseyi) - This is a new kind found by Mr Kelsey, of Boston, a very graceful shrub, pretty in flower and having its seed-pods covered with red bristles.

  • For some time this plant will doubtless be propagated by grafting on the common Acacia, but the sooner we get it from seed the better.

  • It grows on many trees, both evergreen and summer-leafing-orchard trees, Limes, Poplars, Elms, Willows, Hornbeam, Beech, Acacia, Horse-chestnut, Firs-rarely on the Oak in Britain.

  • H. Ewbank wrote of it in The Garden as follows:-"The foliage gives it very much the look of an Acacia at a little distance, and it is often mistaken for one of them.

  • But no Acacia that I have ever seen has such splendid blossoms.

  • Tassel Tree (Acacia) - Beautiful shrubs and trees, thriving in warmer countries, but a few grown out of doors do well in parts of England.

  • Chardonnays from Acacia Vineyards are no exception, remaining consistently good from vintage to vintage.

  • Try one of these wines from Acacia Vineyards.

  • Try the Acacia Chardonnay Carneros Sangiacomo Vineyard, 2008 or the Acacia Chardonnay Russian River Valley 2009.

  • Acacia Woodworks offers several wine presentation boxes, some of which include space for glasses.

  • Scent Acacia: A limited-run series in a large hibiscus print on a white background.

  • The products contain flax, acacia, oat bran and chia seeds to deliver a balance of soluble and insoluble fiber.

  • This natural product is made from the hardened sap of two species of the acacia tree.

  • Acacia Cemetery in Modesto: In this old cemetery, terrifying screams and mournful wails are reportedly heard at all hours, even in the daytime.

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