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abyssinians

abyssinians Sentence Examples

  • After the defeat of the Abyssinians at Debra Sin in August 1887 Gondar was looted and fired by the dervishes under Abu Anga.

  • The Portuguese were expelled by Fasilidas, but his castle was built, by Indian workmen, under the superintendence of Abyssinians who had learned something of architecture from the Portuguese adventurers, helped possibly by Portuguese still in the country.

  • Measures, apparently successful, were taken to reassure the negus, but shortly afterwards protection inopportunely accorded by Italy to enemies of Ras Alula, induced the Abyssinians to enter upon hostilities.

  • On the following day, however, the Abyssinians succeeded in surprising, near the village of Dogali, an Italian force of 524 officers and men under Colonel De Cristoforis, who were convoying provisions to the garrison of Saati.

  • The Abyssinians, 20,000 strong, speedily overwhelmed the small Italian force, which, after exhausting its ammunition, was destroyed where it stood.

  • The Italian commander attempted to treat with Menelek, but his negotiations merely enabled the Italian envoy, Major Salsa, to ascertain that the Abyssinians were nearly Ioo,ooo strong mostly armed with rides and well supplied with artillery.

  • Marching rapidly, however, Albertone outdistanced the other columns, but, in consequence of allowing his men an hours rest, arrived upon the scene of action when the Abyssinians, whom it had been hoped to surprise at dawn, were ready to receive the attack.

  • The Abyssinians lost more than.

  • Far superior to these maps is Fra Mauro's map (1457), for the author has availed himself not only of the information collected by Marco Polo and earlier travellers, but *was able, by personal intercourse, to gather additional information from Nicolo de' Conti, who had returned from the east in 1440, and more especially from Abyssinians who lived in Italy at that time.

  • There are a number of Arabs, Abyssinians, Indians, and about 2000 Europeans and Levantines.

  • The exports are chiefly coffee, hides, ivory (all from Abyssinia), gum, mother-of-pearl and a little gold; the imports cotton and other European stuffs, cereals, beverages, tobacco and arms and ammunition for the Abyssinians.

  • Abdullah established himself under Italian surveillance, and by an agreement dated the 5th of March 1905, peace was declared between the mullah, the Italians, British and Abyssinians, and all other Somali tribes.

  • GALLABAT, or Galabat, called by the Abyssinians Matemma (Metemma), a town of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, in 13° N.

  • Being on the frontier line, the possession of the town was for long a matter of dispute between the Sudanese, and later the Egyptians, on the one hand and the Abyssinians on the other.

  • The Abyssinians then held the fort, but as the result of frontier arrangement the town was definitely included in the Sudan, though Abyssinia takes half the customs revenue.

  • During the latter part of this time the Abyssinians, who had earlier migrated from Arabia to the opposite coast of Africa, began to flow back to the south of Arabia, where they seem to have settled gradually and increased in importance until about A.D.

  • The struggle between them and the Abyssinians now became one of Judaism against Christianity.

  • There is little or no physical difference between them and the typical Abyssinians, except perhaps that their eyes are a little more oblique; and they may certainly be regarded as Hamitic. It is uncertain when they became Jews: one account suggests in Solomon's time; another, at the Babylonian captivity; a third, during the 1st century of the Christian era.

  • They do not mix with the Abyssinians, and never marry women of alien religions.

  • At the same time they established a new era, which is still followed by the Abyssinians and Copts.

  • We do not know whether the leech Philip ever reached his destination, or whether a reply ever came back to the Lateran.(fn 6) Baronius, who takes the view for which we have been arguing, supposes it possible that the church in Rome possessed in his own time by the Abyssinians (St Stephen's in the Vatican) might have been granted on this occasion.

  • In the Pilgerfahrt des Ritters Arnold von Harff (1496-1499: Cologne, 1860, p. 175), we find it stated that the Abyssinians had their chapel, &c., to the left of the Holy Sepulchre, between two pillars of the Temple, whilst the Armenian chapel was over theirs, reached by a stone staircase alongside of the Indians (or Abyssinians).

  • A reference to Jerusalem, which we procured through the kindness of Mr Walter Besant, shows that the Abyssinians no longer have a chapel or privileges in the Church of the Sepulchre.

  • The chief traders are Abyssinians, Armenians and Greeks.

  • Besides the native population there are in Harrar colonies of Abyssinians, Somalis and Gallas.

  • That Abyssinia was peopled from South Arabia is proved by its language and writing; but the difference between the two languages is such as to imply that the settlement was very early and that there were many centuries of separation, during which the Abyssinians were exposed to foreign influences.

  • Reinaud thought of the Seleucid era, which is not impossible; but Halevy observes that the fortress of Mawiyyat (now Hisn Ghorab) bears the date 640, and is said to have been erected " when the Abyssinians overran the country and destroyed the king of Himyar and his princes."

  • But the Abyssinians rejected the council of Chalcedon, and still remain monophysites.

  • Generally the Abyssinians agree with the Copts in ritual and practice.

  • The European civil population numbers over boo; the rest of the inhabitants are chiefly Abyssinians.

  • By the Abyssinians the Hamasen plateau was known as the plain of the thousand villages.

  • From the close of the 5th century the Armenians have remained monophysite, like the Copts and Abyssinians, and have only broken the record with occasional short interludes of orthodoxy, as when in 633 the emperor Heraclius forced reunion on them, under a catholicus named Esdras, at a council held in Erzerum.

  • James Bruce identified this bird with the Abu-Hannes or "Father John" of the Abyssinians, and in 1790 it received from Latham (Index ornithologicus, p. 706) the name of Tantalus aethiopicus.

  • Rasselas and Imlac, Nekayah and Pekuah, are evidently meant to be Abyssinians of the 18th century; for the Europe which Imlac describes is the Europe of the 18th century, and the inmates of the Happy Valley talk familiarly of that law of gravitation which Newton discovered and which was not fully received even at Cambridge till the 18th century.

  • Sprenger arrives at this explanation by a very artificial method; and besides, Mahomet was not so simple as the Moslem traditionalists, who imagined that the Abyssinians could read a piece of the Arabic Koran.

  • At this time the power and prestige of the khalifa were at their height: the rebellions in Darfur and Kordofan had been stamped out, the anti-mahdi was dead, and even the dervish defeat by the Abyssinians had been converted by the death of King John and the capture of his body into a success.

  • Gera, Amadib, Senhit and Gallabat were, in consequence, duly succoured, and their garrisons and Egyptian populations brought away to the coast by the Abyssinians in 1885.

  • The Abyssinians lost 40 officers and 1500 men killed, besides many more wounded.

  • The Abyssinian Frontier.On the Abyssinian frontier Ras Adal was in command of a considerable force of Abyssinians early in 1886, and in June of that year he invaded Gallabat and defeated the dervishes on the plain of Madana; the dervish amir Mahommed Wad Ardal was killed and his camp captured.

  • Abu Angar entered Abyssinia and, in August 1887, attacked Ras Adal in the plain of Debra Sin and, after a prolonged battle, defeated the Abyssinians, captured their camp, and marched on Gondar, the ancient capital of Abyssinia, which he sacked, and then returned into Gallabat.

  • King John, the negus of Abyssinia, burning to avenge this defeat, marched, in February 1889, with an enormous army to Gallabat, where the amir Zeki Tumal commanded the khalifas forces, some 60,000 strong, and had strongly fortified the town and the camp. On the 9th of March 1889 the Abyssinians made a terrific onslaught, stormed and burnt the town, and took thousands of prisoners.

  • The Abyssinians decided to retire, fighting ceased, and they moved off with their prisoners and the wounded negus.

  • From this time, however, the dervishes ceased to trouble the Abyssinians.

  • Such being the condition of public and official sentiment, the crushing defeat of the Italians by the Abyssinians at the battle of Adowa on the 1st of March 1896, and the critical state of Kassalaheld by Italy at British suggestion, and now closely invested by the dervishesmade it not only desirable but necessary to take immediate action.

  • The inhabitants of the plateau are Abyssinians.

  • The Abyssinians are more warlike, but they have settled down under Italian rule.

  • The coast regions had meantime passed from the control of the Abyssinians.

  • In the 16th century the Turks made themselves masters of Zula, Massawa, &c., and these places were never recovered by the Abyssinians.

  • In 1875 and 1876 the Egyptians, who sought to increase their conquests, were defeated by the Abyssinians at Gundet and Gura.

  • At first the government of the colony was purely military, but after the defeat of the Italians by the Abyssinians at Adowa, the administration was placed upon a civil basis (1898-1900).

  • Ibn Zobair employed against him Abyssinians armed with Greek-fire-tubes, who, however, quitted him soon under the pressure of famine.

  • Semitic. Till the 19th century the earliest form known of this alphabet was the Ethiopian or Geez, in which Christian documents have been preserved from the early centuries of our era, and which is still used by the Abyssinians for liturgical purposes.

  • Linseed formed an article of food among the Greeks and Romans, and it is said that the Abyssinians at the present day eat it roasted.

  • the Greeks in Italy (Italograeci), the scattered Bulgarian Uniats, the Abyssinians, some of the Armenians and the " Christians of St Thomas "; (2)(2) those having their own bishops and sometimes their own metropolitans, as in Austria-Hungary; (3) the Eastern patriarchates.

  • Mandera-Mariam ("Mary's Rest"), for some time a royal residence, and an important market and great place of pilgrimage, a few miles south-west of DebraTabor; its two churches of the "Mother" and the "Son" are held in great veneration by all Abyssinians; it has a permanent.

  • Agriculture is extensively followed, chiefly by the Gallas, the indolence of the Abyssinians preventing them from being good farmers.

  • The Abyssinians keep a large number of domestic animals.

  • The inhabitants consist mainly of the Abyssinians, the Galla and the Somali (the two last-named peoples are separately noticed).

  • The hybridism of the Abyssinians is reflected in their political and social institutions, and especially in their religious beliefs and practices.

  • The Abyssinians are vain and selfish, irritable but easily appeased; and are an intelligent bright people, fond of gaiety.

  • The Abyssinians are heavy eaters and drinkers, and any occasion is seized as an excuse for a carouse.

  • (Samuel Gobat's Journal of a Three Years' Residence in Abyssinia, 1834.) The dress of the Abyssinians is much like that of the Arabs.

  • The Christian Abyssinians usually go barehead and barefoot, in contrast to the Mahommedans, who wear turbans and leather sandals.

  • The Christian Abyssinians, men and women, wear a blue silk cord round the neck, to which is often attached a crucifix.

  • The Abyssinians are great hunters and are also clever at taming wild beasts.

  • Although reinforced by Walad Michael, who had now quarrelled with John, the Egyptians were a second time (25th March 1876) heavily beaten by the Abyssinians, and retired, losing an enormous quantity of both men and rifles.

  • This latter act was greatly resented by the Abyssinians, for by a treaty concluded with a British and Egyptian mission under Admiral Hewett and Mason Pasha 2 in the previous year, free transit of goods was to be allowed through this port.

  • Fighting between the dervishes and the Abyssinians continued, and in August 1887 the dervishes entered and sacked Gondar.

  • But a stray bullet struck the king, and the Abyssinians decided to retire.

  • The Italians lost over 4500 white and 2000 native troops killed and wounded, and over 2500 prisoners, of which 1600 were white, whilst the Abyssinians owned to a loss of over 3000.

  • General Baldissera advanced with a large body of reinforcements to avenge this defeat, but the Abyssinians, desperately short of supplies, had already retired, and beyond the peaceful relief of Adrigat no further operations took place.

  • Another expedition of Abyssinians, under Dejaj Tasamma and accompanied by three Europeans - Faivre (French), Potter (Swiss) and Artomonov (Russian) - started early in 1898, and reached the Nile at the Sobat mouth in June, a few days only before Major Marchand and his gallant companions arrived on the scene.

  • This effected, the Abyssinians almost came into contact with the Egyptian troops sent up the Blue Nile (after the occupation of Khartum) to Famaka and towards Gallabat; but as both sides were anxious to avoid a collision over this latter town, no hostile results ensued.

  • Two British officers accompanied this force, which was to co-operate with British troops advancing from Somaliland; but little was achieved by the Abyssinians, and after undergoing considerable privations and losses, and harassing the country generally, including that of some friendly tribes, it returned to Harrar.

  • This time the Abyssinians were more successful, and beat the rebels in a pitched fight; but the difficulties of the country again precluded effective co-operation.

  • During General Egerton's campaign (1903-4) yet another force of 5000 Abyssinians was despatched towards Somaliland.

  • In any case, however, it is significant that the Abyssinians have repeatedly been willing to co-operate with the British away from their own country.

  • There has also been a slight immigration of Abyssinians, Egyptians, Syrians and Europeans - the last named chiefly Greeks.

  • In the early part of the 18th century there was war between the Sennari and the Abyssinians, in which the last named were defeated with great slaughter.

  • He led expeditions up the White Nile against the Dinkas as far as Fashoda; defeated the Abyssinians on the Sennar frontier, and taught the natives of Khartum to build houses of brick.

  • The garrisons of some other towns were rescued by the Abyssinians.

  • The force was routed by the Abyssinians at Gura, but Prince Hassan and his staff got back to Massawa.

  • Course of the Battle Soldier from the 4th Foot As thousands of Abyssinians rushed down the mountain, the British had to quickly redeploy.

  • After the defeat of the Abyssinians at Debra Sin in August 1887 Gondar was looted and fired by the dervishes under Abu Anga.

  • The Portuguese were expelled by Fasilidas, but his castle was built, by Indian workmen, under the superintendence of Abyssinians who had learned something of architecture from the Portuguese adventurers, helped possibly by Portuguese still in the country.

  • Measures, apparently successful, were taken to reassure the negus, but shortly afterwards protection inopportunely accorded by Italy to enemies of Ras Alula, induced the Abyssinians to enter upon hostilities.

  • On the following day, however, the Abyssinians succeeded in surprising, near the village of Dogali, an Italian force of 524 officers and men under Colonel De Cristoforis, who were convoying provisions to the garrison of Saati.

  • The Abyssinians, 20,000 strong, speedily overwhelmed the small Italian force, which, after exhausting its ammunition, was destroyed where it stood.

  • Fearing a new attack, General Gene withdrew his forces from Saati, Wa and Arafali; but the losses of the Abyssinians at Saati and Dogali had been so heavy as to dissuade Alula from further hostilities.

  • The Italian commander attempted to treat with Menelek, but his negotiations merely enabled the Italian envoy, Major Salsa, to ascertain that the Abyssinians were nearly Ioo,ooo strong mostly armed with rides and well supplied with artillery.

  • Marching rapidly, however, Albertone outdistanced the other columns, but, in consequence of allowing his men an hours rest, arrived upon the scene of action when the Abyssinians, whom it had been hoped to surprise at dawn, were ready to receive the attack.

  • Between 3000 and 4000 prisoners were taken by the Abyssinians, including General Albertone, while Generals Arimondi and Dabormida were killed and General Ellena wounded.

  • The Abyssinians lost more than.

  • Far superior to these maps is Fra Mauro's map (1457), for the author has availed himself not only of the information collected by Marco Polo and earlier travellers, but *was able, by personal intercourse, to gather additional information from Nicolo de' Conti, who had returned from the east in 1440, and more especially from Abyssinians who lived in Italy at that time.

  • They are not pure Hamites, and their physical characteristics vary considerably, showing signs of interbreeding with Galla, Afar, Arabs, Abyssinians, Bantus and Negroes.

  • There are a number of Arabs, Abyssinians, Indians, and about 2000 Europeans and Levantines.

  • The exports are chiefly coffee, hides, ivory (all from Abyssinia), gum, mother-of-pearl and a little gold; the imports cotton and other European stuffs, cereals, beverages, tobacco and arms and ammunition for the Abyssinians.

  • Abdullah established himself under Italian surveillance, and by an agreement dated the 5th of March 1905, peace was declared between the mullah, the Italians, British and Abyssinians, and all other Somali tribes.

  • GALLABAT, or Galabat, called by the Abyssinians Matemma (Metemma), a town of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, in 13° N.

  • Being on the frontier line, the possession of the town was for long a matter of dispute between the Sudanese, and later the Egyptians, on the one hand and the Abyssinians on the other.

  • The dervishes suffered very severely, but King John being killed by a stray bullet, the Abyssinians retired (see Egypt: Military Operations, 1885-1896).

  • The Abyssinians then held the fort, but as the result of frontier arrangement the town was definitely included in the Sudan, though Abyssinia takes half the customs revenue.

  • the state of Meroe was ravaged by the Nubas (?) and the Abyssinians, and in the 6th century its place was taken by the Christian state of Nubia (see Dongola).

  • During the latter part of this time the Abyssinians, who had earlier migrated from Arabia to the opposite coast of Africa, began to flow back to the south of Arabia, where they seem to have settled gradually and increased in importance until about A.D.

  • The struggle between them and the Abyssinians now became one of Judaism against Christianity.

  • There is little or no physical difference between them and the typical Abyssinians, except perhaps that their eyes are a little more oblique; and they may certainly be regarded as Hamitic. It is uncertain when they became Jews: one account suggests in Solomon's time; another, at the Babylonian captivity; a third, during the 1st century of the Christian era.

  • They do not mix with the Abyssinians, and never marry women of alien religions.

  • At the same time they established a new era, which is still followed by the Abyssinians and Copts.

  • We do not know whether the leech Philip ever reached his destination, or whether a reply ever came back to the Lateran.(fn 6) Baronius, who takes the view for which we have been arguing, supposes it possible that the church in Rome possessed in his own time by the Abyssinians (St Stephen's in the Vatican) might have been granted on this occasion.

  • In the Pilgerfahrt des Ritters Arnold von Harff (1496-1499: Cologne, 1860, p. 175), we find it stated that the Abyssinians had their chapel, &c., to the left of the Holy Sepulchre, between two pillars of the Temple, whilst the Armenian chapel was over theirs, reached by a stone staircase alongside of the Indians (or Abyssinians).

  • A reference to Jerusalem, which we procured through the kindness of Mr Walter Besant, shows that the Abyssinians no longer have a chapel or privileges in the Church of the Sepulchre.

  • The chief traders are Abyssinians, Armenians and Greeks.

  • Besides the native population there are in Harrar colonies of Abyssinians, Somalis and Gallas.

  • That Abyssinia was peopled from South Arabia is proved by its language and writing; but the difference between the two languages is such as to imply that the settlement was very early and that there were many centuries of separation, during which the Abyssinians were exposed to foreign influences.

  • Reinaud thought of the Seleucid era, which is not impossible; but Halevy observes that the fortress of Mawiyyat (now Hisn Ghorab) bears the date 640, and is said to have been erected " when the Abyssinians overran the country and destroyed the king of Himyar and his princes."

  • But the Abyssinians rejected the council of Chalcedon, and still remain monophysites.

  • Generally the Abyssinians agree with the Copts in ritual and practice.

  • The European civil population numbers over boo; the rest of the inhabitants are chiefly Abyssinians.

  • By the Abyssinians the Hamasen plateau was known as the plain of the thousand villages.

  • From the close of the 5th century the Armenians have remained monophysite, like the Copts and Abyssinians, and have only broken the record with occasional short interludes of orthodoxy, as when in 633 the emperor Heraclius forced reunion on them, under a catholicus named Esdras, at a council held in Erzerum.

  • On the 1st of March 1896, in the hills north of the town, was fought the battle of Adowa, in which the Abyssinians inflicted a crushing defeat on the Italian forces (see ITALY, History, and ABYSSINIA, History).

  • James Bruce identified this bird with the Abu-Hannes or "Father John" of the Abyssinians, and in 1790 it received from Latham (Index ornithologicus, p. 706) the name of Tantalus aethiopicus.

  • Rasselas and Imlac, Nekayah and Pekuah, are evidently meant to be Abyssinians of the 18th century; for the Europe which Imlac describes is the Europe of the 18th century, and the inmates of the Happy Valley talk familiarly of that law of gravitation which Newton discovered and which was not fully received even at Cambridge till the 18th century.

  • Sprenger arrives at this explanation by a very artificial method; and besides, Mahomet was not so simple as the Moslem traditionalists, who imagined that the Abyssinians could read a piece of the Arabic Koran.

  • At this time the power and prestige of the khalifa were at their height: the rebellions in Darfur and Kordofan had been stamped out, the anti-mahdi was dead, and even the dervish defeat by the Abyssinians had been converted by the death of King John and the capture of his body into a success.

  • Gera, Amadib, Senhit and Gallabat were, in consequence, duly succoured, and their garrisons and Egyptian populations brought away to the coast by the Abyssinians in 1885.

  • The Abyssinians lost 40 officers and 1500 men killed, besides many more wounded.

  • The Abyssinian Frontier.On the Abyssinian frontier Ras Adal was in command of a considerable force of Abyssinians early in 1886, and in June of that year he invaded Gallabat and defeated the dervishes on the plain of Madana; the dervish amir Mahommed Wad Ardal was killed and his camp captured.

  • Abu Angar entered Abyssinia and, in August 1887, attacked Ras Adal in the plain of Debra Sin and, after a prolonged battle, defeated the Abyssinians, captured their camp, and marched on Gondar, the ancient capital of Abyssinia, which he sacked, and then returned into Gallabat.

  • King John, the negus of Abyssinia, burning to avenge this defeat, marched, in February 1889, with an enormous army to Gallabat, where the amir Zeki Tumal commanded the khalifas forces, some 60,000 strong, and had strongly fortified the town and the camp. On the 9th of March 1889 the Abyssinians made a terrific onslaught, stormed and burnt the town, and took thousands of prisoners.

  • The Abyssinians decided to retire, fighting ceased, and they moved off with their prisoners and the wounded negus.

  • From this time, however, the dervishes ceased to trouble the Abyssinians.

  • Such being the condition of public and official sentiment, the crushing defeat of the Italians by the Abyssinians at the battle of Adowa on the 1st of March 1896, and the critical state of Kassalaheld by Italy at British suggestion, and now closely invested by the dervishesmade it not only desirable but necessary to take immediate action.

  • The inhabitants of the plateau are Abyssinians.

  • The Abyssinians are more warlike, but they have settled down under Italian rule.

  • The chief town in the interior is Asmara, the capital of the colony and under the Abyssinians capital of the province of Hamasen, and favourite headquarters of Ras Alula (see below and also Abyssinia).

  • The coast regions had meantime passed from the control of the Abyssinians.

  • In the 16th century the Turks made themselves masters of Zula, Massawa, &c., and these places were never recovered by the Abyssinians.

  • In 1875 and 1876 the Egyptians, who sought to increase their conquests, were defeated by the Abyssinians at Gundet and Gura.

  • At first the government of the colony was purely military, but after the defeat of the Italians by the Abyssinians at Adowa, the administration was placed upon a civil basis (1898-1900).

  • Ibn Zobair employed against him Abyssinians armed with Greek-fire-tubes, who, however, quitted him soon under the pressure of famine.

  • Semitic. Till the 19th century the earliest form known of this alphabet was the Ethiopian or Geez, in which Christian documents have been preserved from the early centuries of our era, and which is still used by the Abyssinians for liturgical purposes.

  • Linseed formed an article of food among the Greeks and Romans, and it is said that the Abyssinians at the present day eat it roasted.

  • the Greeks in Italy (Italograeci), the scattered Bulgarian Uniats, the Abyssinians, some of the Armenians and the " Christians of St Thomas "; (2)(2) those having their own bishops and sometimes their own metropolitans, as in Austria-Hungary; (3) the Eastern patriarchates.

  • Mandera-Mariam ("Mary's Rest"), for some time a royal residence, and an important market and great place of pilgrimage, a few miles south-west of DebraTabor; its two churches of the "Mother" and the "Son" are held in great veneration by all Abyssinians; it has a permanent.

  • Agriculture is extensively followed, chiefly by the Gallas, the indolence of the Abyssinians preventing them from being good farmers.

  • The Abyssinians keep a large number of domestic animals.

  • The inhabitants consist mainly of the Abyssinians, the Galla and the Somali (the two last-named peoples are separately noticed).

  • The negroid element in the population is due chiefly to the number of negro women who have been imported into the harems of the Abyssinians.

  • The hybridism of the Abyssinians is reflected in their political and social institutions, and especially in their religious beliefs and practices.

  • The Abyssinians are vain and selfish, irritable but easily appeased; and are an intelligent bright people, fond of gaiety.

  • The Abyssinians are heavy eaters and drinkers, and any occasion is seized as an excuse for a carouse.

  • (Samuel Gobat's Journal of a Three Years' Residence in Abyssinia, 1834.) The dress of the Abyssinians is much like that of the Arabs.

  • The Christian Abyssinians usually go barehead and barefoot, in contrast to the Mahommedans, who wear turbans and leather sandals.

  • The Christian Abyssinians, men and women, wear a blue silk cord round the neck, to which is often attached a crucifix.

  • The Abyssinians are great hunters and are also clever at taming wild beasts.

  • Although reinforced by Walad Michael, who had now quarrelled with John, the Egyptians were a second time (25th March 1876) heavily beaten by the Abyssinians, and retired, losing an enormous quantity of both men and rifles.

  • This latter act was greatly resented by the Abyssinians, for by a treaty concluded with a British and Egyptian mission under Admiral Hewett and Mason Pasha 2 in the previous year, free transit of goods was to be allowed through this port.

  • Matters came to a head in January 1887, when the Abyssinians, in consequence of a refusal from General Gene to withdraw his troops, surrounded and attacked a detachment of soo Italian troops at Dogali, killing more than 400 of them.

  • Fighting between the dervishes and the Abyssinians continued, and in August 1887 the dervishes entered and sacked Gondar.

  • But a stray bullet struck the king, and the Abyssinians decided to retire.

  • The Italians lost over 4500 white and 2000 native troops killed and wounded, and over 2500 prisoners, of which 1600 were white, whilst the Abyssinians owned to a loss of over 3000.

  • General Baldissera advanced with a large body of reinforcements to avenge this defeat, but the Abyssinians, desperately short of supplies, had already retired, and beyond the peaceful relief of Adrigat no further operations took place.

  • Another expedition of Abyssinians, under Dejaj Tasamma and accompanied by three Europeans - Faivre (French), Potter (Swiss) and Artomonov (Russian) - started early in 1898, and reached the Nile at the Sobat mouth in June, a few days only before Major Marchand and his gallant companions arrived on the scene.

  • This effected, the Abyssinians almost came into contact with the Egyptian troops sent up the Blue Nile (after the occupation of Khartum) to Famaka and towards Gallabat; but as both sides were anxious to avoid a collision over this latter town, no hostile results ensued.

  • Two British officers accompanied this force, which was to co-operate with British troops advancing from Somaliland; but little was achieved by the Abyssinians, and after undergoing considerable privations and losses, and harassing the country generally, including that of some friendly tribes, it returned to Harrar.

  • This time the Abyssinians were more successful, and beat the rebels in a pitched fight; but the difficulties of the country again precluded effective co-operation.

  • During General Egerton's campaign (1903-4) yet another force of 5000 Abyssinians was despatched towards Somaliland.

  • In any case, however, it is significant that the Abyssinians have repeatedly been willing to co-operate with the British away from their own country.

  • There has also been a slight immigration of Abyssinians, Egyptians, Syrians and Europeans - the last named chiefly Greeks.

  • In the early part of the 18th century there was war between the Sennari and the Abyssinians, in which the last named were defeated with great slaughter.

  • The victory over the " infidel " Abyssinians became celebrated throughout the Mahommedan world, and Sennar was visited by many learned and celebrated men from Egypt, Arabia and India.

  • He led expeditions up the White Nile against the Dinkas as far as Fashoda; defeated the Abyssinians on the Sennar frontier, and taught the natives of Khartum to build houses of brick.

  • He was also almost constantly in conflict either with the Shilluks, Nuers and other negro tribes of the south; with the peoples of Darfur, where at one time an anti-Mandi gained a great following; with the Abyssinians; with the Kabbabish and other Arab tribes who 5 Sennar town held out until the 19th of August, while the Red Sea ports of Suakin and Massawa never fell into the hands of the Mandists.

  • The garrisons of some other towns were rescued by the Abyssinians.

  • The force was routed by the Abyssinians at Gura, but Prince Hassan and his staff got back to Massawa.

  • Course of the Battle Soldier from the 4th Foot As thousands of Abyssinians rushed down the mountain, the British had to quickly redeploy.

  • When testing was carried out against a limited number of other breeds, including Abyssinians and the average Tabby, the Siberian did indeed show lower levels of the protein in fur and skin samples.

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