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aborigines

aborigines Sentence Examples

  • Indian corn, quinoa, mandioca, possibly the potato, cotton and various fruits, including the strawberry, were already known to the aborigines, but with the conqueror came wheat, barley, oats, flax, many kinds of vegetables, apples, peaches, apricots, pears, grapes, figs, oranges and lemons, together with alfalfa and new grasses for the plains.

  • The Galapagos archipelago possesses a rare advantage from its isolated situation, and from the fact that its history has never been interfered with by any aborigines of the human race.

  • Bidwillii, or the bunyabunya, afforded food in its nut-like seeds to the aborigines.

  • The " nardoo " seed, on which the aborigines sometimes contrived to exist, is a creeping plant, growing plentifully in swamps and shallow pools, and belongs to the natural order of Marsileaceae.

  • At the census of 1901, 48,248 aborigines were enumerated, of whom 7434 were in New South Wales, 652 in Victoria, 27,123 in South Australia, and 6212 in Western Australia.

  • The assertion by the Queensland authorities that there are 50,000 aborigines in that state is a crude estimate, and may be far wide of the truth.

  • The census of Western Australia included only those aborigines in the employment of the colonists; and as a large part of this, the greatest of the Australian states, is as yet unexplored, it may be presumed that the aborigines enumerated were very far short of the whole number of persons of that race in the state.

  • At the close of 1906 the population of Australia was approximately 4,120,000, exclusive of aborigines.

  • He urges that the similarities of some of the primitive races of India and Africa to the aborigines of Australia are indications that they were peopled from one common stock.

  • Ling Roth, Queensland Aborigines (Brisbane, 1897); Carl Lumholtz, Among Cannibals (1889); Walter E.

  • Roth, Ethnological Studies among the North-west-central Queensland Aborigines (London, 1897); Mrs K.

  • Gillen, Notes on Manners and Customs of the Aborigines of the Macdonnell Ranges belonging to the Arunta Tribe; J.

  • Frazer, " The Beginnings of Religion and Totemism among the Australian Aborigines," Fortnightly Review, July 1905; N.

  • The great navigator and his crew, unacquainted with the character of the Australian aborigines, were not a little astonished that these natives took no notice of them or their proceedings.

  • " Aborigines."

  • That they were not indigenous, but had displaced an earlier Melanesian or Papuan race, the true aborigines, is certain.

  • Despite its superior weapons and mode of warfare, the German east Baltic colony was constantly in danger of being overborne by the endless assaults of the dogged aborigines, whose hatred of the religion of the Cross as preached by the knights is very intelligible; and in 1218 Bishop Albert of Riga was driven to appeal for assistance to King Valdemar.

  • 172) believed the Caunians to have been aborigines, the Carians having been originally called Leleges, who had been driven from the Aegean islands by the invading Greeks.

  • The abiding tradition of the Cretan aborigines, as preserved by Herodotus (vii.

  • In northern Asia are found other aborigines, such as the Ainus of Japan and the so-called hyperborean races (Chukchis, &c.), but no materials are at present forthcoming for their history.

  • There is some record of the migrations of the later races superimposed on these aborigines.

  • The population of India comprises at least three strata: firstly, uncivilized aborigines, such as the Kols and Santhals, and secondly, the Dravidians (Tamils, Kanarese, &c.), who perhaps represent the earliest northern invaders, and appear to have attained some degree of culture on their own account.

  • They probably are aborigines fundamentally, with a mixture of what are now called the Scythian tribes, which at a very early time overran India.

  • The aborigines, who seemed to have reached a stage of civilization somewhat similar to that of the Aztecs, were conquered and exterminated or absorbed by Creeks about the middle of the 18th century.

  • For any aboriginal race inhabiting these countries, such important articles of diet as the duri-an, &c., could not fail to be among the first natural objects to receive a name, and thus we find primary terms in use among the Sakai and Semang, the aborigines of the Peninsula, to describe these fruits.

  • The rivers and neighbouring seas seem to be well stocked with fish, and especial mention must be made of the turtles, flying-fish, and brilliant I coral-fish which swarm in the waters warmed by the Kurosiwo current, the gulf-stream of the Pacific. Shell-fish form an important article of diet to both the Chinese and the aborigines along the coast - a species of Cyrena, a species of Tapes, Cytheraea petechiana and Modiola teres being most abundant.

  • The population of Formosa, according to a census in 1904, is estimated at 3,022,687, made up as follows: aborigines 104,334, Chinese 2,860,574 and Japanese 51,770.

  • The semi-civilized aborigines, who adopted the Chinese language, dress and customs, were called Pe-pa-hwan (Anglice Pepo-hoans), while their wilder brethren bear the name of Chin-hwan or" green savages," otherwise Sheng-fan or " wild savages."

  • From the close of the 17th century a long era of conflict ensued between the Chinese and the aborigines.

  • The aborigines, Sheng fan, or " wild savages," deserved the appellation in some respects, for they lived by the chase and had little knowledge even of husbandry; while the Chinese themselves, uneducated labourers, acknowledged no right except that of might.

  • In the early part of the 19th century the island was chiefly known to Europeans on account of the wrecks which took place on its coasts, and the dangers that the crews had to run from the cannibal propensities of the aborigines, and the almost equally cruel tendencies of the Chinese.

  • By many of these Chinese settlers the Japanese conquerors, when they came to occupy the island, were regarded in precisely the same light as the Chinese themselves had been regarded from time immemorial by the aborigines.

  • Even in the 19th century reports were spread of communities in which Indian blood was supposedly still plainly dominant; but the conclusion of the competent scientists who have investigated such rumours has been that at least absolutely nothing of the language and traditions of the aborigines has survived.

  • Tobacco and cascarilla bark also flourish; and cotton is indigenous and was woven into cloth by the aborigines.

  • It is said that the aborigines had a breed of dogs which did not bark, and a small coney is also mentioned.

  • The race is probably the result of a fusion of the Malay aborigines of Indo-China with the Aryan and Mongolian invaders of the country.

  • The true Thracians were part of that dark-complexioned, long-skulled race, which had been in the Balkan peninsula from the Stone Age, closely akin to the Pelasgians, the aborigines of Greece, to the Ligurians, the aborigines of Italy, and to the Iberians.

  • Pedro de Goes obtained a grant of the captaincy of Parahyba between those of Sao Vicente and Espirito Santo; but his means were too feeble to enable him to make head against the aborigines, and the colony was broken up after a painful struggle of seven years.

  • Among the aborigines the number of females to males was 114 to Ioo.

  • Tubino, Los Aborigines ibericos o los Berberos en la peninsula (Madrid, 1876); A.

  • These peoplethe Ainuare usually spoken of as the aborigines of Japan.

  • Salomon Reinach, guided by the analogy of similar practices among the aborigines of Australia, and noticing that these primitive pictures represent none but animals that formed the staple food of the age and place, and that they are usually found in the deepest and darkest recesses of the caves where they could only be drawn and seen by torchlight, has argued that they were not intended for artistic gratification (a late motive in human art), but were magical representations destined to influence and perhaps attract the hunter's quarry.

  • LATINUS, in Roman legend, king of the aborigines in Latium, and eponymous hero of the Latin race.

  • A summary account is here given of the American aborigines, who are discussed in more detail under North American Indians.

  • aborigines.

  • Following Notes and Queries on Anthropology, published by the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the study of the American aborigines divides itself into two parts: that relating to their biology, and that relating to their culture.

  • Ethnol., 1906, and Handbook.) Metals were treated as malleable stones by the American aborigines.

  • The aesthetic arts of the American aborigines cannot be studied apart from their languages, industries, social organizations, lore Fine art.

  • In larger or smaller numbers of cognate kindred, for shorter or longer periods of time, near or far from home, the aborigines developed their legislatures, courts, armies, secret societies and priesthoods.

  • The thought life of the American aborigines is expressed in their practical knowledge and their lore.

  • The religion of the American aborigines, so far as it can be made a subject of investigation, consisted (1) in what the tribes believed.

  • The affirmation that American aborigines believed in an all-pervading, omnipotent Spirit is entirely inconsistent with the very nature of the case.

  • These mythological ideas and symbols of the American aborigines were woven in their textiles, painted on their robes and furniture, burned into their pottery, drawn in sand mosaics on deserts, and perpetuated in the only sculptures.

  • The following represent a select list of works on the American aborigines: - H.

  • Only by way of the Hudson and Mohawk valleys, and round about the southern termination of the system were there easy routes to the interior of the country, and these were long closed by hostile aborigines and jealous French or Spanish colonists.

  • Keane, is that the Negritos, still found in the Philippines, are the true aborigines of Indo-China and western Malaysia, while the Melanesians, probably their kinsmen, were the earliest occupants of eastern Malaysia and western Polynesia.

  • The Melanesians then, must be regarded as the aborigines of Oceania.

  • Since the absorption of the aborigines in Israel Canaanite ideas had exercised great influence over the sanctuaries - so much so that the reforming prophets of the 8th century regarded the national religion as having become wholly heathenish; and this influence the ordinary prophets, whom a man like Micah regards as mere diviners, had certainly not escaped.

  • Thus, animism is in some directions little developed, so far as we can see, among the Australian aborigines; but from those who know them best we learn that they believe in innumerable spirits and bush bogies, which wander, especially at night, and can be held at bay by means of fire; with this belief may be compared the ascription in European folk belief of prophylactic properties to iron.

  • The aborigines of Australia furnish an example.

  • Some scholars suppose them to have been of Achaean race, but they were more probably the aborigines of Laconia who had been enslaved by the Achaeans before the Dorian conquest.

  • - Not much is known about the aborigines.

  • This should be supplemented by C. C. Jones's, Antiquities of the Southern Indians, particularly of the Georgia Tribes (New York, 1873), for the aborigines; W.

  • The aborigines are Papuans, but much mixed with Malayan and perhaps Polynesian elements.

  • with the religious and political institutions of the aborigines.

  • The Anglican Church in Canada has its Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, working in the North-West and in Japan; and in Australia it has a Board of Missions, working amongst the Australian aborigines and in New Guinea.

  • - The earliest attempt to evangelize the aborigines of Australia by a separate mission was that of the Church Missionary Society in 1825.

  • Nomadic aborigines have hardly been touched.

  • In Tasmania the aborigines are extinct, the last pure-blooded native dying in 1876.

  • Polish millet is P. sanguinale; P. frumentaceum, shamalo, a Deccan grass, is probably a native of tropical Africa; P. decompositum is the Australian millet, its grains being made into cakes by the aborigines.

  • It is said to be possible to make out the remains of the cave-dwellings of the Ottadeni, the aborigines of the district.

  • ABORIGINES, a mythical people of central Italy, connected in legendary history with Aeneas, Latinus and Evander.

  • Historical and ethnographical discussions have led to no result; the most that can be said is that, if not a general term, "aborigines" may be the name of an Italian stock, about whom the ancients knew no more than ourselves.

  • In modern times the term "Aborigines" has been extended in signification, and is used to indicate the inhabitants found in a country at its first discovery, in contradistinction to colonies or new races, the time of whose introduction into the country is known.

  • The Aborigines' Protection Society was founded in 1838 in England as the result of a royal commission appointed at the instance of Sir T.

  • In the northern peninsula are found people of Papuan type, probably representing the aborigines, and a tribe around Galela, who are Polynesian in physique, possibly remnants, much mixed by subsequent crossings with the Papuan indigenes, of the Caucasian hordes emigrating in prehistoric times across the Pacific. M.

  • The Sasaks must be considered the aborigines, as no trace of an earlier race is found.

  • The aborigines of the Canary Islands, the Guanches, would seem almost certainly, from the remains of their language, to have been Berbers.

  • Our earliest glimpses of India disclose two races struggling for the soil, the Dravidians, a dark-skinned race of aborigines, and the Aryans, a fair-skinned people, descending from Legends.

  • They show us the Aryans on the banks of the Indus, divided into various tribes, sometimes at war with each other, sometimes united against the " black-skinned " aborigines.

  • Aborigines >>

  • Of the black race 23,511, or 97.8%, were Negritos, who are believed to be the aborigines of the Philippines.

  • This region bears the reputation of being the most unhealthy in all India, and in many parts only the acclimatized aborigines can withstand its deadly malaria.

  • All other inhabitants of French Guinea are regarded as comparatively late arrivals from the interior who have displaced the aborigines.'

  • The first Spanish adventurers came, not to colonize, but to satisfy as rapidly as possible and by the labour of the enslaved aborigines, their thirst for silver and gold.

  • He is the patron-deity of the invading Aryan race in India, the god of battle to whose help they look in their struggles with the dark aborigines.

  • The aborigines of South Africa are represented by the Bushmen and Hottentots, now found in any racial purity only in the Kalahari and in the southern part of German South-West Africa.

  • Kicherer and Edwards, who in the early years of the 19th century devoted themselves to ameliorating the lot of these aborigines.

  • The interior is occupied by the aborigines, a people of Papuan stock.

  • The Celts represented Indo-European q by p, whilst the Greeks, Illyrians, Thracians, Ligurians, and aborigines of France, Britain and Ireland represented it by k, c or qu.

  • Contrary to venerable traditions there is no evidence that mining was practised beyond the most inconsiderable extent by aborigines, Spanish conquistadores, or Jesuits.

  • The southern part of the peninsula is occupied by Kamchadales, who exhibit many attributes of the Mongolian race, but are more similar to the aborigines of N.E.

  • A few of Harrison's public addresses survive, the most notable being A Discourse on the Aborigines of the Ohio.

  • The surviving aborigines remained there until 1802, when they joined the Mohegans in New York and migrated to Wisconsin and later to Indian Territory, now part of the state of Oklahoma.

  • The total includes 105,000 Chinese and 7500 aborigines and half-castes.

  • (For the labour legislation of the state, see AUSTRALIA.) A census taken on the 5th of April 1891 showed that the population was 1,134,207, of whom the aborigines numbered 7705 and the Chinese 12,781.

  • The aborigines are represented by a few rude hill-tribes, who resemble in physique the Battas of Sumatra.

  • Among modern tribes of mankind the forehead of the Australian aborigines makes the nearest approach to this type, as was pointed out by Huxley.

  • The climate in the eastern and southern regions is not so rigorous as was believed, there are no barren lands, the soil is fertile and can support fruitful industries, and the aborigines are far from being so dangerous as they were once considered to be.

  • The aborigines are decreasing rapidly in the whole archipelago, and although the Rev. Thomas Bridges, who, as missionary first and then as farmer, resided thirty years there, calculated the population to be 10,000 when he arrived, towards the close of the 19th century it was estimated to be little more than woo.

  • On the eastern plains are to be found the "miriti" (Mauritia flexuosa) and the "pirijao" or peach palm (Guilielma speciosa), called the "pupunha" on the Amazon, whose fruit, fibre, leaf, sap, pith and wood meet so large a part of the primary needs of the aborigines.

  • Geologische Studien in der Republik Colombia (Berlin, 1893); Ernesto Restrepo, Ensayo etnografico y arqueologico de la provincia de los Quimbayas (Bogota, 1892), and Estudios sobre los aborigines de Colombia (Bogota, 1892); Vicente Restrepo, Estudio sobre las minas de oro y plata de Colombia (Bogota, 1888, translated by C. W.

  • Hainan forms a fu or department of the province of Kwangtung, though strictly it is only a portion of the island that is under Chinese administration, the remainder being still occupied by unsubjugated aborigines.

  • The inhabitants of Hainan may be divided into three classes, the Chinese immigrants, the civilized aborigines or Shu-li and the wild aborigines or Sheng-li.

  • VEDDAHS, or Weddahs (from Sanskrit veddha, " hunter"), a primitive people of Ceylon, probably representing the Yakkos or "demons" of Sanskrit writers, the true aborigines of the island.

  • The Aryan Tajik, the aborigines of the fertile parts of Turkestan, were subdued by the Turko-Mongol invaders and partly compelled to emigrate to the mountains, where they are now known as Galchas.

  • As to how the Papuans, who are the aborigines of New Guinea, may have peopled other and much more distant islands, information is lacking.

  • The Aborigines Society protested to the colonial office, and the imperial government refused to sanction the proposal.

  • What the language was that was spoken by the neolithic aborigines is a question which will probably never be settled.

  • Kur-bo-roo is the sage counsellor of the aborigines in all their difficulties.

  • Brough Smyth, Aborigines of Victoria, i.

  • The aborigines of the northern parts of Victoria (Australia) believe that the earth was made by Pund-jel, the bird-creator, who sliced the valleys with a knife.

  • Such are the Mandingo, the Songhai, the Fula, Hausa, Kanuri, Bagirmi, Kanembu, and the peoples of Wadai and Darfur; the few aborigines who persist, on the southern fringe of the Chad basin, are imperfectly known.

  • The race was probably a mixed one, consisting of aborigines and Aryan immigrants.

  • She relieved the distressed in far-off lands as well as at home, her helping hand being stretched out to the Dyaks of Borneo and the aborigines of Australia.

  • Butler, The Aborigines of Tasmania (2nd ed.

  • 46, 2).6 In considering the whole question, one must beware of the 1 For these see Brough Smith with Howitt, Native Tribes of Southeast Australia, Aborigines of Victoria; Kuhn, on bird fire-bringer in Isle of Man, Die Herabkunft des Feuers, p. 109; Van Gennep, Mythes et legendes d'Australie.

  • aboriginal tourism in Canada benefits the aborigines.

  • It is their aim to ensure that aboriginal tourism in Canada benefits the aborigines.

  • He finally became superintendent of Sydney Botanic Garden, replacing his brother who was killed by aborigines in 1835.

  • Unfortunately she did not know very much about the indigenous aborigines.

  • Some of the native aborigines of Australia still live a similar existence to their ancestors.

  • Four members each shall be elected from among the lowland and highland aborigines in the free area.

  • aborigines in Australia.

  • hidee Cuban newspaper Granma has also covered in depth the oppression of Aborigines hidden behind the glamorous facade of the Sydney Games.

  • The Aborigines were divided into clans; each clan had a totem to identify itself by.

  • Indian corn, quinoa, mandioca, possibly the potato, cotton and various fruits, including the strawberry, were already known to the aborigines, but with the conqueror came wheat, barley, oats, flax, many kinds of vegetables, apples, peaches, apricots, pears, grapes, figs, oranges and lemons, together with alfalfa and new grasses for the plains.

  • The Galapagos archipelago possesses a rare advantage from its isolated situation, and from the fact that its history has never been interfered with by any aborigines of the human race.

  • Bidwillii, or the bunyabunya, afforded food in its nut-like seeds to the aborigines.

  • The " nardoo " seed, on which the aborigines sometimes contrived to exist, is a creeping plant, growing plentifully in swamps and shallow pools, and belongs to the natural order of Marsileaceae.

  • It is certain that the aborigines (see the section on Aborigines below) are very much less numerous than when the country was first colonized, but their present numbers can be given for only a few of the states.

  • At the census of 1901, 48,248 aborigines were enumerated, of whom 7434 were in New South Wales, 652 in Victoria, 27,123 in South Australia, and 6212 in Western Australia.

  • The assertion by the Queensland authorities that there are 50,000 aborigines in that state is a crude estimate, and may be far wide of the truth.

  • The census of Western Australia included only those aborigines in the employment of the colonists; and as a large part of this, the greatest of the Australian states, is as yet unexplored, it may be presumed that the aborigines enumerated were very far short of the whole number of persons of that race in the state.

  • At the close of 1906 the population of Australia was approximately 4,120,000, exclusive of aborigines.

  • He urges that the similarities of some of the primitive races of India and Africa to the aborigines of Australia are indications that they were peopled from one common stock.

  • Ling Roth, Queensland Aborigines (Brisbane, 1897); Carl Lumholtz, Among Cannibals (1889); Walter E.

  • Roth, Ethnological Studies among the North-west-central Queensland Aborigines (London, 1897); Mrs K.

  • Gillen, Notes on Manners and Customs of the Aborigines of the Macdonnell Ranges belonging to the Arunta Tribe; J.

  • Frazer, " The Beginnings of Religion and Totemism among the Australian Aborigines," Fortnightly Review, July 1905; N.

  • The great navigator and his crew, unacquainted with the character of the Australian aborigines, were not a little astonished that these natives took no notice of them or their proceedings.

  • That they were not indigenous, but had displaced an earlier Melanesian or Papuan race, the true aborigines, is certain.

  • Despite its superior weapons and mode of warfare, the German east Baltic colony was constantly in danger of being overborne by the endless assaults of the dogged aborigines, whose hatred of the religion of the Cross as preached by the knights is very intelligible; and in 1218 Bishop Albert of Riga was driven to appeal for assistance to King Valdemar.

  • 172) believed the Caunians to have been aborigines, the Carians having been originally called Leleges, who had been driven from the Aegean islands by the invading Greeks.

  • The abiding tradition of the Cretan aborigines, as preserved by Herodotus (vii.

  • In northern Asia are found other aborigines, such as the Ainus of Japan and the so-called hyperborean races (Chukchis, &c.), but no materials are at present forthcoming for their history.

  • There is some record of the migrations of the later races superimposed on these aborigines.

  • The population of India comprises at least three strata: firstly, uncivilized aborigines, such as the Kols and Santhals, and secondly, the Dravidians (Tamils, Kanarese, &c.), who perhaps represent the earliest northern invaders, and appear to have attained some degree of culture on their own account.

  • They probably are aborigines fundamentally, with a mixture of what are now called the Scythian tribes, which at a very early time overran India.

  • The aborigines, who seemed to have reached a stage of civilization somewhat similar to that of the Aztecs, were conquered and exterminated or absorbed by Creeks about the middle of the 18th century.

  • For any aboriginal race inhabiting these countries, such important articles of diet as the duri-an, &c., could not fail to be among the first natural objects to receive a name, and thus we find primary terms in use among the Sakai and Semang, the aborigines of the Peninsula, to describe these fruits.

  • The rivers and neighbouring seas seem to be well stocked with fish, and especial mention must be made of the turtles, flying-fish, and brilliant I coral-fish which swarm in the waters warmed by the Kurosiwo current, the gulf-stream of the Pacific. Shell-fish form an important article of diet to both the Chinese and the aborigines along the coast - a species of Cyrena, a species of Tapes, Cytheraea petechiana and Modiola teres being most abundant.

  • The population of Formosa, according to a census in 1904, is estimated at 3,022,687, made up as follows: aborigines 104,334, Chinese 2,860,574 and Japanese 51,770.

  • The inhabitants of Formosa may be divided into four classes: the Japanese, who are comparatively few, as there has not been much tendency to immigration; the Chinese, many of whom immigrated from the neighbourhood of Amoy and speak the dialect of that district, while others were Hakkas from the vicinity of Swatow; the subjugated aborigines, who largely intermingled with the Chinese; and the uncivilized aborigines of the eastern region who refuse to recognize authority and carry on raids as opportunity occurs.

  • The semi-civilized aborigines, who adopted the Chinese language, dress and customs, were called Pe-pa-hwan (Anglice Pepo-hoans), while their wilder brethren bear the name of Chin-hwan or" green savages," otherwise Sheng-fan or " wild savages."

  • From the close of the 17th century a long era of conflict ensued between the Chinese and the aborigines.

  • The aborigines, Sheng fan, or " wild savages," deserved the appellation in some respects, for they lived by the chase and had little knowledge even of husbandry; while the Chinese themselves, uneducated labourers, acknowledged no right except that of might.

  • In the early part of the 19th century the island was chiefly known to Europeans on account of the wrecks which took place on its coasts, and the dangers that the crews had to run from the cannibal propensities of the aborigines, and the almost equally cruel tendencies of the Chinese.

  • By many of these Chinese settlers the Japanese conquerors, when they came to occupy the island, were regarded in precisely the same light as the Chinese themselves had been regarded from time immemorial by the aborigines.

  • Even in the 19th century reports were spread of communities in which Indian blood was supposedly still plainly dominant; but the conclusion of the competent scientists who have investigated such rumours has been that at least absolutely nothing of the language and traditions of the aborigines has survived.

  • Tobacco and cascarilla bark also flourish; and cotton is indigenous and was woven into cloth by the aborigines.

  • It is said that the aborigines had a breed of dogs which did not bark, and a small coney is also mentioned.

  • It is said that reverence and love for their departed relatives was a marked feature in the character of the aborigines, and that the Spaniards made use of this as a bait to trap the unhappy natives.

  • The race is probably the result of a fusion of the Malay aborigines of Indo-China with the Aryan and Mongolian invaders of the country.

  • The true Thracians were part of that dark-complexioned, long-skulled race, which had been in the Balkan peninsula from the Stone Age, closely akin to the Pelasgians, the aborigines of Greece, to the Ligurians, the aborigines of Italy, and to the Iberians.

  • Pedro de Goes obtained a grant of the captaincy of Parahyba between those of Sao Vicente and Espirito Santo; but his means were too feeble to enable him to make head against the aborigines, and the colony was broken up after a painful struggle of seven years.

  • Among the aborigines the number of females to males was 114 to Ioo.

  • Tubino, Los Aborigines ibericos o los Berberos en la peninsula (Madrid, 1876); A.

  • These peoplethe Ainuare usually spoken of as the aborigines of Japan.

  • Salomon Reinach, guided by the analogy of similar practices among the aborigines of Australia, and noticing that these primitive pictures represent none but animals that formed the staple food of the age and place, and that they are usually found in the deepest and darkest recesses of the caves where they could only be drawn and seen by torchlight, has argued that they were not intended for artistic gratification (a late motive in human art), but were magical representations destined to influence and perhaps attract the hunter's quarry.

  • LATINUS, in Roman legend, king of the aborigines in Latium, and eponymous hero of the Latin race.

  • A summary account is here given of the American aborigines, who are discussed in more detail under North American Indians.

  • Boyd Dawkins and Brinton, that the French cave man came hither by way of Iceland; or with Keane, that two subvarieties, the long-headed Eskimo-Botocudo type and the Mexican roundheaded type, prior to all cultural developments, reached the New World, one by Iceland, the other by Bering Sea; or that Malayoid wanderers were stranded on the coast of South America; or that no breach of continuity has occurred since first the march of tribes began this way - ethnologists agree that the aborigines of the western came from the eastern hemisphere,and there is lacking any biological evidence of Caucasoid or Negroid blood flowing in the veins of Americans before the invasions of historic times.

  • Following Notes and Queries on Anthropology, published by the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the study of the American aborigines divides itself into two parts: that relating to their biology, and that relating to their culture.

  • Ethnol., 1906, and Handbook.) Metals were treated as malleable stones by the American aborigines.

  • The aesthetic arts of the American aborigines cannot be studied apart from their languages, industries, social organizations, lore Fine art.

  • In larger or smaller numbers of cognate kindred, for shorter or longer periods of time, near or far from home, the aborigines developed their legislatures, courts, armies, secret societies and priesthoods.

  • The thought life of the American aborigines is expressed in their practical knowledge and their lore.

  • The religion of the American aborigines, so far as it can be made a subject of investigation, consisted (1) in what the tribes believed.

  • The affirmation that American aborigines believed in an all-pervading, omnipotent Spirit is entirely inconsistent with the very nature of the case.

  • These mythological ideas and symbols of the American aborigines were woven in their textiles, painted on their robes and furniture, burned into their pottery, drawn in sand mosaics on deserts, and perpetuated in the only sculptures.

  • The following represent a select list of works on the American aborigines: - H.

  • Only by way of the Hudson and Mohawk valleys, and round about the southern termination of the system were there easy routes to the interior of the country, and these were long closed by hostile aborigines and jealous French or Spanish colonists.

  • Keane, is that the Negritos, still found in the Philippines, are the true aborigines of Indo-China and western Malaysia, while the Melanesians, probably their kinsmen, were the earliest occupants of eastern Malaysia and western Polynesia.

  • The Melanesians then, must be regarded as the aborigines of Oceania.

  • Since the absorption of the aborigines in Israel Canaanite ideas had exercised great influence over the sanctuaries - so much so that the reforming prophets of the 8th century regarded the national religion as having become wholly heathenish; and this influence the ordinary prophets, whom a man like Micah regards as mere diviners, had certainly not escaped.

  • Modern archaeologists approach the question from a different standpoint, but the origin of the American aborigines and of Mexican civilization remains extremely obscure (see America, where the primitive Mexican cultures are fully illustrated, and CENTRAL America).

  • Thus, animism is in some directions little developed, so far as we can see, among the Australian aborigines; but from those who know them best we learn that they believe in innumerable spirits and bush bogies, which wander, especially at night, and can be held at bay by means of fire; with this belief may be compared the ascription in European folk belief of prophylactic properties to iron.

  • The aborigines of Australia furnish an example.

  • Some scholars suppose them to have been of Achaean race, but they were more probably the aborigines of Laconia who had been enslaved by the Achaeans before the Dorian conquest.

  • - Not much is known about the aborigines.

  • This should be supplemented by C. C. Jones's, Antiquities of the Southern Indians, particularly of the Georgia Tribes (New York, 1873), for the aborigines; W.

  • The aborigines are Papuans, but much mixed with Malayan and perhaps Polynesian elements.

  • with the religious and political institutions of the aborigines.

  • The Anglican Church in Canada has its Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, working in the North-West and in Japan; and in Australia it has a Board of Missions, working amongst the Australian aborigines and in New Guinea.

  • - The earliest attempt to evangelize the aborigines of Australia by a separate mission was that of the Church Missionary Society in 1825.

  • Nomadic aborigines have hardly been touched.

  • In Tasmania the aborigines are extinct, the last pure-blooded native dying in 1876.

  • The legends represent the Latins of the historical period as a fusion of different races, Ligures, Veneti and Siculi among them; the story of the alliance of the Trojan settler Aeneas with the daughter of Latinus, king of the aborigines, and the consequent enmity of the Rutulian prince Turnus, well known to readers of Virgil, is thoroughly typical of the reflection of these distant ethnical phenomena in the surviving traditions.

  • Polish millet is P. sanguinale; P. frumentaceum, shamalo, a Deccan grass, is probably a native of tropical Africa; P. decompositum is the Australian millet, its grains being made into cakes by the aborigines.

  • It is said to be possible to make out the remains of the cave-dwellings of the Ottadeni, the aborigines of the district.

  • ABORIGINES, a mythical people of central Italy, connected in legendary history with Aeneas, Latinus and Evander.

  • Historical and ethnographical discussions have led to no result; the most that can be said is that, if not a general term, "aborigines" may be the name of an Italian stock, about whom the ancients knew no more than ourselves.

  • In modern times the term "Aborigines" has been extended in signification, and is used to indicate the inhabitants found in a country at its first discovery, in contradistinction to colonies or new races, the time of whose introduction into the country is known.

  • The Aborigines' Protection Society was founded in 1838 in England as the result of a royal commission appointed at the instance of Sir T.

  • In the northern peninsula are found people of Papuan type, probably representing the aborigines, and a tribe around Galela, who are Polynesian in physique, possibly remnants, much mixed by subsequent crossings with the Papuan indigenes, of the Caucasian hordes emigrating in prehistoric times across the Pacific. M.

  • The Sasaks must be considered the aborigines, as no trace of an earlier race is found.

  • The aborigines of the Canary Islands, the Guanches, would seem almost certainly, from the remains of their language, to have been Berbers.

  • Our earliest glimpses of India disclose two races struggling for the soil, the Dravidians, a dark-skinned race of aborigines, and the Aryans, a fair-skinned people, descending from Legends.

  • They show us the Aryans on the banks of the Indus, divided into various tribes, sometimes at war with each other, sometimes united against the " black-skinned " aborigines.

  • A minister of justice and religion (Dharma Mahamatra) directed its operations; and, one of its first duties being to proselytize, he was specially charged with the welfare of the aborigines among whom its missionaries were sent.

  • Of the black race 23,511, or 97.8%, were Negritos, who are believed to be the aborigines of the Philippines.

  • This region bears the reputation of being the most unhealthy in all India, and in many parts only the acclimatized aborigines can withstand its deadly malaria.

  • All other inhabitants of French Guinea are regarded as comparatively late arrivals from the interior who have displaced the aborigines.'

  • In the north-west part of Futa Jallon are found remnants of the aborigines, such as the Tiapi, Koniagui and the Bassari, all typical Negro tribes.

  • The first Spanish adventurers came, not to colonize, but to satisfy as rapidly as possible and by the labour of the enslaved aborigines, their thirst for silver and gold.

  • Though doubtless divided into different tribes scattered over an extensive tract of land, the subjected aborigines were slumped together under the designation of Sudras, whose duty it was to serve the upper classes in all the various departments of manual labour, save those of a downright sordid and degrading character which it was left to vratyas or outcasts to perform.

  • He is the patron-deity of the invading Aryan race in India, the god of battle to whose help they look in their struggles with the dark aborigines.

  • The aborigines of South Africa are represented by the Bushmen and Hottentots, now found in any racial purity only in the Kalahari and in the southern part of German South-West Africa.

  • Kicherer and Edwards, who in the early years of the 19th century devoted themselves to ameliorating the lot of these aborigines.

  • The interior is occupied by the aborigines, a people of Papuan stock.

  • The Celts represented Indo-European q by p, whilst the Greeks, Illyrians, Thracians, Ligurians, and aborigines of France, Britain and Ireland represented it by k, c or qu.

  • Contrary to venerable traditions there is no evidence that mining was practised beyond the most inconsiderable extent by aborigines, Spanish conquistadores, or Jesuits.

  • The southern part of the peninsula is occupied by Kamchadales, who exhibit many attributes of the Mongolian race, but are more similar to the aborigines of N.E.

  • A few of Harrison's public addresses survive, the most notable being A Discourse on the Aborigines of the Ohio.

  • The surviving aborigines remained there until 1802, when they joined the Mohegans in New York and migrated to Wisconsin and later to Indian Territory, now part of the state of Oklahoma.

  • The total includes 105,000 Chinese and 7500 aborigines and half-castes.

  • (For the labour legislation of the state, see AUSTRALIA.) A census taken on the 5th of April 1891 showed that the population was 1,134,207, of whom the aborigines numbered 7705 and the Chinese 12,781.

  • The aborigines are represented by a few rude hill-tribes, who resemble in physique the Battas of Sumatra.

  • Among modern tribes of mankind the forehead of the Australian aborigines makes the nearest approach to this type, as was pointed out by Huxley.

  • Brough Smyth, Aborigines of Victoria (1878), vol.

  • The climate in the eastern and southern regions is not so rigorous as was believed, there are no barren lands, the soil is fertile and can support fruitful industries, and the aborigines are far from being so dangerous as they were once considered to be.

  • The aborigines are decreasing rapidly in the whole archipelago, and although the Rev. Thomas Bridges, who, as missionary first and then as farmer, resided thirty years there, calculated the population to be 10,000 when he arrived, towards the close of the 19th century it was estimated to be little more than woo.

  • On the eastern plains are to be found the "miriti" (Mauritia flexuosa) and the "pirijao" or peach palm (Guilielma speciosa), called the "pupunha" on the Amazon, whose fruit, fibre, leaf, sap, pith and wood meet so large a part of the primary needs of the aborigines.

  • Geologische Studien in der Republik Colombia (Berlin, 1893); Ernesto Restrepo, Ensayo etnografico y arqueologico de la provincia de los Quimbayas (Bogota, 1892), and Estudios sobre los aborigines de Colombia (Bogota, 1892); Vicente Restrepo, Estudio sobre las minas de oro y plata de Colombia (Bogota, 1888, translated by C. W.

  • Hainan forms a fu or department of the province of Kwangtung, though strictly it is only a portion of the island that is under Chinese administration, the remainder being still occupied by unsubjugated aborigines.

  • The inhabitants of Hainan may be divided into three classes, the Chinese immigrants, the civilized aborigines or Shu-li and the wild aborigines or Sheng-li.

  • VEDDAHS, or Weddahs (from Sanskrit veddha, " hunter"), a primitive people of Ceylon, probably representing the Yakkos or "demons" of Sanskrit writers, the true aborigines of the island.

  • The Aryan Tajik, the aborigines of the fertile parts of Turkestan, were subdued by the Turko-Mongol invaders and partly compelled to emigrate to the mountains, where they are now known as Galchas.

  • As to how the Papuans, who are the aborigines of New Guinea, may have peopled other and much more distant islands, information is lacking.

  • The Aborigines Society protested to the colonial office, and the imperial government refused to sanction the proposal.

  • What the language was that was spoken by the neolithic aborigines is a question which will probably never be settled.

  • Kur-bo-roo is the sage counsellor of the aborigines in all their difficulties.

  • Brough Smyth, Aborigines of Victoria, i.

  • The aborigines of the northern parts of Victoria (Australia) believe that the earth was made by Pund-jel, the bird-creator, who sliced the valleys with a knife.

  • Such are the Mandingo, the Songhai, the Fula, Hausa, Kanuri, Bagirmi, Kanembu, and the peoples of Wadai and Darfur; the few aborigines who persist, on the southern fringe of the Chad basin, are imperfectly known.

  • The race was probably a mixed one, consisting of aborigines and Aryan immigrants.

  • She relieved the distressed in far-off lands as well as at home, her helping hand being stretched out to the Dyaks of Borneo and the aborigines of Australia.

  • Butler, The Aborigines of Tasmania (2nd ed.

  • 46, 2).6 In considering the whole question, one must beware of the 1 For these see Brough Smith with Howitt, Native Tribes of Southeast Australia, Aborigines of Victoria; Kuhn, on bird fire-bringer in Isle of Man, Die Herabkunft des Feuers, p. 109; Van Gennep, Mythes et legendes d'Australie.

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