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abolitionists

abolitionists Sentence Examples

  • While affirming that he was "no friend of slavery" he held abolition and the abolitionists responsible for the hatred, strife, disruption and carnage that menaced the nation.

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  • Letter on Colonization (1834), Vindication of Abolitionists (1835), American Churches the Bulwark of American Slavery (1840, 3rd ed.

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  • Letter on Colonization (1834), Vindication of Abolitionists (1835), American Churches the Bulwark of American Slavery (1840, 3rd ed.

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  • After the separation of the Garrisonian and the political abolitionists in 1840 the new party was formed, and in 1840, and again in 1844, as the Liberty party, it made Birney its candidate for the presidency.

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  • Then followed several years during which efforts were made by the abolitionists in parliament with little success.

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  • Agents of the American Colonization Society in England having succeeded in deceiving leading Abolitionists there as to its character and tendency, Garrison was deputed by the New England Anti-Slavery Society to visit England for the purpose of counteracting their influence.

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  • I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.

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  • He favoured immediatism, but he differed sharply from the Garrisonian abolitionists, who abhorred the federal Constitution and favoured secession.

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  • Even in regard to slavery he had serious hesitations about the ways of the abolitionists, and for a long time refused to be identified with them.

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  • He was one of the earliest political opponents of slavery, as distinguished from the radical Abolitionists, or the followers of William Lloyd Garrison, who eschewed politics and devoted themselves to a moral agitation.

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  • The leaders of the ultra non-political abolitionists (who opposed the formation of the Liberty party) were mainly Massachusetts men, notably W.

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  • The Abolitionists of the United States were a united body until 1839-1840, when divisions sprang up among them.

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  • JAMES GILLESPIE BIRNEY (1792-1857), American reformer, leader of the conservative abolitionists in the United States from about 1835 to 1845, was born in Danville, Kentucky, of a family of wealth and influence, on the 4th of February 1792.

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  • In1832-1833the "Union" party of South Carolina was composed of those who rejected nullification, holding to secession as the only remedy; and from 1830 to 1860 certain radical abolitionists advocated a division of the Union.

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  • He was lukewarm toward recognizing the independence of Texas, lest it should aid the increase of slave territory, and generally favoured the freedom of speech and press as regards the question of slavery; yet his various concessions and compromises resulted, as he himself declared, in the abolitionists denouncing him as a slaveholder, and the slaveholders as an abolitionist.

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  • On this second visit he became acquainted with some of the leading Abolitionists, and founded later in Paris a Societe des Amis des Noirs, of which he was president during 1790 and 1791.

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  • For more than ten years preceding the Civil War the city was much disturbed by slavery dissension - the industrial interests were largely with the South, but abolitionists were numerous and active, and the city was an important station on the "Underground Railroad," of which Dr Norton S.

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  • It deserves mention here that Garrison was then in utter ignorance of the change previously wrought in the opinions of English abolitionists by Elizabeth Heyrick's pamphlet in favour of immediate, in distinction from gradual emancipation.

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  • On the all-absorbing question of slavery he took a middle ground between the pro-slavery or peace party, and abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips, believing, with such statesmen as W.

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  • The insurrection, which was attributed to the teachings of the abolitionists, led to the enactment of stricter slave codes.

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  • It deserves mention here that Garrison was then in utter ignorance of the change previously wrought in the opinions of English abolitionists by Elizabeth Heyrick's pamphlet in favour of immediate, in distinction from gradual emancipation.

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  • Lane Theological Seminary is situated in Walnut Hills, in the north-eastern part of the city; it was endowed by Ebenezer Lane and the Kemper family; was founded in 1829 for the training of Presbyterian ministers; had for its first president (1832-1852) Lyman Beecher; and in 1834 was the scene of a bitter contest between abolitionists in the faculty and among the students, led by Theodore Dwight Weld, and the board of trustees, who forbade the discussion of slavery in the seminary and so caused about four-fifths of the students to leave, most of them going to Oberlin College.

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  • He also received assurances of the cordial sympathy of British Abolitionists with him in his efforts to abolish American slavery.

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  • His death caused intense excitement throughout the country, and he was everywhere regarded by abolitionists as a martyr to their cause.

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  • He went in the spring of 1833, when he was but twenty-seven years of age, and was received with great cordiality by British Abolitionists, some of whom had heard of his bold assaults upon American slavery, and had seen a few numbers of the Liberator.

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  • One class of Abolitionists sought to evade the difficulty by strained interpretations of the clauses referred to, while others, admitting that they were immoral, felt themselves obliged, notwithstanding, to support the constitution in order to avoid what they thought would be still greater evils.

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  • The Northern Abolitionists, to whom no contract or agreement was sacred that involved the continuance of slavery, regarded the clauses in the Federal Constitution which maintained the property rights of the slave-owners as treaties with evil, binding on no one, and bitterly attacked the slave-holders and the South generally.

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  • In 1836 he was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives after a campaign in which he was vigorously opposed because he had attacked the doctrine of nullification, and because he had opposed all extra-legal steps against the abolitionists.

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  • Birney, associated himself after about 1836 with the anti-slavery movement, and became recognized as the leader of the political reformers as opposed to the Garrisonian abolitionists.

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  • She was well known here in Chester County and Philadelphia, and respected by all true abolitionists.

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  • Professor David Turley: British and American abolitionists; representations of Lincoln; African-American critiques of racism.

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  • other abolitionists told him his vote in the House was worth twenty.

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  • The black abolitionists had respect for Brown but thought the plan lunacy.

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  • With the support of Gerrit Smith and other prominent abolitionists, Brown moved to Virginia where he established a refuge for runaway slaves.

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  • Such works went beyond white abolitionists, arguing for race consciousness.

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  • The novel exposes the evils of racism both in the South and among white, northern abolitionists.

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  • An anonymous pamphlet of 1792 which plays on British fears of the popular uprisings in France to link slave trade abolitionists with French Jacobins.

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  • abolitionists of the 19th century and the Progressive movement of the early 20th century.

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  • The black abolitionists had respect for Brown but thought the plan lunacy.

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  • He was one of the earliest political opponents of slavery, as distinguished from the radical Abolitionists, or the followers of William Lloyd Garrison, who eschewed politics and devoted themselves to a moral agitation.

    0
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  • On this second visit he became acquainted with some of the leading Abolitionists, and founded later in Paris a Societe des Amis des Noirs, of which he was president during 1790 and 1791.

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  • In 1836 he was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives after a campaign in which he was vigorously opposed because he had attacked the doctrine of nullification, and because he had opposed all extra-legal steps against the abolitionists.

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  • Then followed several years during which efforts were made by the abolitionists in parliament with little success.

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  • The severity of this measure led to gross abuses and defeated its purpose; the number of abolitionists increased, the operations of the Underground Railroad became more efficient, and new Personal Liberty Laws were enacted in Vermont (1850), Connecticut (1854), Rhode Island (1854), Massachusetts (1855), Michigan (1855), Maine (1855 and 1857), Kansas (1858) and Wisconsin (1858).

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  • The leaders of the ultra non-political abolitionists (who opposed the formation of the Liberty party) were mainly Massachusetts men, notably W.

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  • Incidents in it were his vehement opposition to the Mexican War as a scheme for more slavery territory, the assault made upon him in Washington by Congressman Albert Rust of Arkansas in 1856, an indictment in Virginia in the same year for circulating incendiary documents, perpetual denunciation of him in Southern newspapers and speeches, and the hostility of the Abolitionists, who regarded his course as too conservative.

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  • Lane Theological Seminary is situated in Walnut Hills, in the north-eastern part of the city; it was endowed by Ebenezer Lane and the Kemper family; was founded in 1829 for the training of Presbyterian ministers; had for its first president (1832-1852) Lyman Beecher; and in 1834 was the scene of a bitter contest between abolitionists in the faculty and among the students, led by Theodore Dwight Weld, and the board of trustees, who forbade the discussion of slavery in the seminary and so caused about four-fifths of the students to leave, most of them going to Oberlin College.

    0
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  • For more than ten years preceding the Civil War the city was much disturbed by slavery dissension - the industrial interests were largely with the South, but abolitionists were numerous and active, and the city was an important station on the "Underground Railroad," of which Dr Norton S.

    0
    0
  • JAMES GILLESPIE BIRNEY (1792-1857), American reformer, leader of the conservative abolitionists in the United States from about 1835 to 1845, was born in Danville, Kentucky, of a family of wealth and influence, on the 4th of February 1792.

    0
    0
  • He favoured immediatism, but he differed sharply from the Garrisonian abolitionists, who abhorred the federal Constitution and favoured secession.

    0
    0
  • After the separation of the Garrisonian and the political abolitionists in 1840 the new party was formed, and in 1840, and again in 1844, as the Liberty party, it made Birney its candidate for the presidency.

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  • It was a combination of the political abolitionists - many of whom had formerly been identified with the more radical Liberty party - the anti-slavery Whigs, and the faction of the Democratic party in the state of New York, called "Barnburners," who favoured the prohibition of slavery, in accordance with the "Wilmot Proviso" (see Wilmot, David), in the territory acquired from Mexico.

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  • In1832-1833the "Union" party of South Carolina was composed of those who rejected nullification, holding to secession as the only remedy; and from 1830 to 1860 certain radical abolitionists advocated a division of the Union.

    0
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  • Birney, associated himself after about 1836 with the anti-slavery movement, and became recognized as the leader of the political reformers as opposed to the Garrisonian abolitionists.

    0
    0
  • Agents of the American Colonization Society in England having succeeded in deceiving leading Abolitionists there as to its character and tendency, Garrison was deputed by the New England Anti-Slavery Society to visit England for the purpose of counteracting their influence.

    0
    0
  • He went in the spring of 1833, when he was but twenty-seven years of age, and was received with great cordiality by British Abolitionists, some of whom had heard of his bold assaults upon American slavery, and had seen a few numbers of the Liberator.

    0
    0
  • He also received assurances of the cordial sympathy of British Abolitionists with him in his efforts to abolish American slavery.

    0
    0
  • The Abolitionists of the United States were a united body until 1839-1840, when divisions sprang up among them.

    0
    0
  • One class of Abolitionists sought to evade the difficulty by strained interpretations of the clauses referred to, while others, admitting that they were immoral, felt themselves obliged, notwithstanding, to support the constitution in order to avoid what they thought would be still greater evils.

    0
    0
  • The Northern Abolitionists, to whom no contract or agreement was sacred that involved the continuance of slavery, regarded the clauses in the Federal Constitution which maintained the property rights of the slave-owners as treaties with evil, binding on no one, and bitterly attacked the slave-holders and the South generally.

    0
    0
  • He was lukewarm toward recognizing the independence of Texas, lest it should aid the increase of slave territory, and generally favoured the freedom of speech and press as regards the question of slavery; yet his various concessions and compromises resulted, as he himself declared, in the abolitionists denouncing him as a slaveholder, and the slaveholders as an abolitionist.

    0
    0
  • While affirming that he was "no friend of slavery" he held abolition and the abolitionists responsible for the hatred, strife, disruption and carnage that menaced the nation.

    0
    0
  • Even in regard to slavery he had serious hesitations about the ways of the abolitionists, and for a long time refused to be identified with them.

    0
    0
  • On the all-absorbing question of slavery he took a middle ground between the pro-slavery or peace party, and abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips, believing, with such statesmen as W.

    0
    0
  • His death caused intense excitement throughout the country, and he was everywhere regarded by abolitionists as a martyr to their cause.

    0
    0
  • The insurrection, which was attributed to the teachings of the abolitionists, led to the enactment of stricter slave codes.

    0
    0
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